19.4 thermal expansion of Solids and Liquids 
575
temperature changes to T
i
1 DT, its volume changes to V
i
1 DV, where each dimen-
sion changes according to Equation 19.4. Therefore,
V
i
1 DV 5 (, 1 D,)(w 1 Dw)(h 1 Dh)
5 (, 1 a, DT)(w 1 aDT)(h 1 aDT)
5 ,wh(1 1 a DT)3
V
i
[1 1 3a DT 1 3(a DT)2 1 (a DT)3]
Dividing both sides by V
i
and isolating the term DV/V
i
, we obtain the fractional 
change in volume:
DV
V
i
53a DT13
1
a DT
22
1
1
a
DT
23
Because a DT ,, 1 for typical values of DT (, , 1008C), we can neglect the terms 
3(a DT)2 and (a DT)3. Upon making this approximation, we see that
DV
V
i
53a DT   S   DV5
1
3a
2
V
i
DT
Comparing this expression to Equation 19.6 shows that
b 5 3a
In a similar way, you can show that the change in area of a rectangular plate is given 
by DA 5 2aA
i
DT (see Problem 61).
A simple mechanism called a bimetallic strip, found in practical devices such as 
mechanical thermostats, uses the difference in coefficients of expansion for differ-
ent materials. It consists of two thin strips of dissimilar metals bonded together. As 
the temperature of the strip increases, the two metals expand by different amounts 
and the strip bends as shown in Figure 19.9.
uick Quiz 19.3  If you are asked to make a very sensitive glass thermometer, 
which of the following working liquids would you choose? (a) mercury (b)alco-
hol (c) gasoline (d) glycerin
uick Quiz 19.4  Two spheres are made of the same metal and have the same 
radius, but one is hollow and the other is solid. The spheres are taken through 
the same temperature increase. Which sphere expands more? (a)The solid 
sphere expands more. (b) The hollow sphere expands more. (c)They expand by 
the same amount. (d) There is not enough information to say.
Table 19.1
Average Expansion Coefficients  
for Some Materials Near Room Temperature
Average Linear 
Average Volume
Expansion 
Expansion
Material 
Coefficient 
Material 
Coefficient
(Solids) 
(a)(°C)21 
(Liquids and Gases) 
(b)(°C)21
Aluminum 
24 3 1026 
Acetone 
1.5 3 1024
Brass and bronze 
19 3 1026 
Alcohol, ethyl 
1.12 3 1024
Concrete 
12 3 1026 
Benzene 
1.24 3 1024
Copper 
17 3 1026 
Gasoline 
9.6 3 1024
Glass (ordinary) 
9 3 1026 
Glycerin 
4.85 3 1024
Glass (Pyrex) 
3.2 3 1026 
Mercury 
1.82 3 1024
Invar (Ni–Fe alloy) 
0.9 3 1026 
Turpentine 
9.0 3 1024
Lead 
29 3 1026 
Aira at 08C 
3.67 3 1023
Steel 
11 3 1026 
Heliuma 
3.665 3 1023
aGases do not have a specific value for the volume expansion coefficient because the amount of expansion depends 
on the type of process through which the gas is taken. The values given here assume the gas undergoes an expansion 
at constant pressure.
Steel
Brass
Room
temperature
Higher
temperature
Bimetallic
strip
Off
30°C
On
25°C
a
b
Figure 19.9 
(a) A bimetallic 
strip bends as the temperature 
changes because the two metals 
have different expansion coeffi-
cients. (b) A bimetallic strip used 
in a thermostat to break or make 
electrical contact.
Figure 19.8 
Thermal expansion 
of a homogeneous metal washer. 
(The expansion is exaggerated in 
this figure.)
a
b
b + ∆b 
a + ∆a
T
i
+ ∆T
T
i
Convert pdf link to html - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
how to convert pdf into html code; convert pdf to html5
Convert pdf link to html - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
convert pdf to url online; how to convert pdf to html code
576
chapter 19 temperature
Example 19.2   Expansion of a Railroad Track
A segment of steel railroad track has a length of 30.000 m when the temperature is 0.08C.
(A)  What is its length when the temperature is 40.08C?
Conceptualize  Because the rail is relatively long, we expect to obtain a measurable increase in length for a 408C tem-
perature increase.
Categorize  We will evaluate a length increase using the discussion of this section, so this part of the example is a sub-
stitution problem.
SolutIon
Use Equation 19.4 and the value of the coeffi-
cient of linear expansion from Table 19.1:
DL 5 aL
i
DT 5 [11 3 1026 (8C)21](30.000 m)(40.08C) 5 0.013 m
Find the new length of the track:
L
f
5 30.000 m 1 0.013 m 5   30.013 m
Find the tensile stress from Equation 12.6 using 
Young’s modulus for steel from Table 12.1:
Tensile stress5
F
A
5Y 
DL
L
i
F
A
5
1
2031010 N/m2
2
a
0.013 m
30.000 m
b5 8.7 3 107 N/m2
(B)  Suppose the ends of the rail are rigidly clamped at 0.08C so that expansion is prevented. What is the thermal 
stress set up in the rail if its temperature is raised to 40.08C?
Categorize  This part of the example is an analysis problem because we need to use concepts from another chapter.
Analyze The thermal stress is the same as the tensile stress in the situation in which the rail expands freely and is then 
compressed with a mechanical force F back to its original length.
SolutIon
Finalize  The expansion in part (A) is 1.3 cm. This expansion is indeed measurable as predicted in the Conceptualize 
step. The thermal stress in part (B) can be avoided by leaving small expansion gaps between the rails.
What if the temperature drops to 240.08C? What is the length of the unclamped segment?
Answer  The expression for the change in length in Equation 19.4 is the same whether the temperature increases or 
decreases. Therefore, if there is an increase in length of 0.013 m when the temperature increases by 408C, there is a 
decrease in length of 0.013 m when the temperature decreases by 408C. (We assume a is constant over the entire range 
of temperatures.) The new length at the colder temperature is 30.000 m 2 0.013 m 5 29.987 m.
WHAt IF?
Example 19.3   The Thermal Electrical Short
A poorly designed electronic device has two bolts 
attached to different parts of the device that almost 
touch each other in its interior as in Figure 19.10. The 
steel and brass bolts are at different electric potentials, 
and if they touch, a short circuit will develop, damag-
ing the device. (We will study electric potential in Chap-
ter 25.) The initial gap between the ends of the bolts is  
d 5 5.0mm at 278C. At what temperature will the bolts 
touch? Assume the distance between the walls of the 
device is not affected by the temperature change.
Conceptualize  Imagine the ends of both bolts expanding into the gap between them as the temperature rises.
SolutIon
0.010 m
0.030 m 
5.0 mm 
Steel
Brass
Figure 19.10 
(Example 19.3) Two bolts attached to different 
parts of an electrical device are almost touching when the temper-
ature is 278C. As the temperature increases, the ends of the bolts 
move toward each other.
C# PDF url edit Library: insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.
Empower to create clickable and active html links in .NET WinForms. Able to insert and delete PDF links. Able to embed link to specific PDF pages.
convert pdf to web pages; convert pdf to website
VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net
Empower to create and insert clickable and active html links to PDF document. Able to embed link to specific PDF pages in VB.NET program.
converting pdfs to html; embed pdf into webpage
19.4 thermal expansion of Solids and Liquids 
577
Finalize  This temperature is possible if the air conditioning in the building housing the device fails for a long period 
on a very hot summer day.
Analyze  Set the sum of the length 
changes equal to the width of the gap:
DL
br
1 DL
st
5 a
br
L
i,br
DT 1 a
st
L
i,st
DT 5 d
Solve for DT:
Substitute numerical values:
DT5
d
a
br
L
i,br
1a
st
L
i,st
DT 5
5.031026 m
3
1931026 
1
8C
22141
0.030 m
2
1
3
1131026 
1
8C
22141
0.010 m
2
57.48C
Find the temperature at which the 
bolts touch:
T 5 278C 1 7.48C 5   348C
1.00
0.99
0.98
0.97
0.96
0.95
0
20
40
60
80
100
Temperature (°C)
0.999 9
0
1.000 0
0.999 8
0.999 7
0.999 6
0.999 5
2
4 6
8
10
12
Temperature (°C)
(g/cm3)
r
(g/cm
3
)
r
This blown-up portion of the 
graph shows that the maximum 
density of water occurs at 4°C.
Figure 19.11 
The variation in 
the density of water at atmospheric 
pressure with temperature.
▸ 19.3 
continued
Categorize  We categorize this example as a thermal expansion problem in which the sum of the changes in length of 
the two bolts must equal the length of the initial gap between the ends.
The Unusual Behavior of Water
Liquids generally increase in volume with increasing temperature and have aver-
age coefficients of volume expansion about ten times greater than those of solids.  
Cold water is an exception to this rule as you can see from its density-versus- 
temperature curve shown in Figure 19.11. As the temperature increases from 08C to 
48C, water contracts and its density therefore increases. Above 48C, water expands 
with increasing temperature and so its density decreases. Therefore, the density of 
water reaches a maximum value of 1.000 g/cm3 at 48C.
We can use this unusual thermal-expansion behavior of water to explain why a 
pond begins freezing at the surface rather than at the bottom. When the air tem-
perature drops from, for example, 78C to 68C, the surface water also cools and con-
sequently decreases in volume. The surface water is denser than the water below it, 
which has not cooled and decreased in volume. As a result, the surface water sinks, 
and warmer water from below moves to the surface. When the air temperature is 
between 48C and 08C, however, the surface water expands as it cools, becoming less 
dense than the water below it. The mixing process stops, and eventually the surface 
water freezes. As the water freezes, the ice remains on the surface because ice is less 
dense than water. The ice continues to build up at the surface, while water near the 
RasterEdge .NET Document Imaging Trial Package Download Link.
Demo▶: Convert PDF to Word; Convert PDF to Tiff; Convert PDF to HTML; Convert PDF to Image; Tiff; Online Convert PDF to Html. SUPPORT:
convert pdf to html format; convert pdf to html form
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
PDF Viewer provides C# users abilities to view, annotate, convert and create editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark.
convert pdf link to html; add pdf to website html
578
chapter 19 temperature
bottom remains at 48C. If that were not the case, fish and other forms of marine life 
would not survive.
19.5 Macroscopic Description of an Ideal Gas
The volume expansion equation DV 5 bV
i
DT is based on the assumption that the 
material has an initial volume V
i
before the temperature change occurs. Such is the 
case for solids and liquids because they have a fixed volume at a given temperature.
The case for gases is completely different. The interatomic forces within gases are 
very weak, and, in many cases, we can imagine these forces to be nonexistent and 
still make very good approximations. Therefore, there is no equilibrium separation for 
the atoms and no “standard” volume at a given temperature; the volume depends 
on the size of the container. As a result, we cannot express changes in volume DV in 
a process on a gas with Equation 19.6 because we have no defined volume V
i
at the 
beginning of the process. Equations involving gases contain the volume V, rather 
than a change in the volume from an initial value, as a variable.
For a gas, it is useful to know how the quantities volume V, pressure P, and tem-
perature T are related for a sample of gas of mass m. In general, the equation that 
interrelates these quantities, called the equation of state, is very complicated. If the gas 
is maintained at a very low pressure (or low density), however, the equation of state is 
quite simple and can be determined from experimental results. Such a low-density 
gas is commonly referred to as an ideal gas.5 We can use the ideal gas model to make 
predictions that are adequate to describe the behavior of real gases at low pressures.
It is convenient to express the amount of gas in a given volume in terms of the 
number of moles n. One mole of any substance is that amount of the substance that 
contains Avogadro’s number N
A
5 6.022 3 1023 of constituent particles (atoms or 
molecules). The number of moles n of a substance is related to its mass m through 
the expression
n5
m
M
(19.7)
where M is the molar mass of the substance. The molar mass of each chemical 
element is the atomic mass (from the periodic table; see Appendix C) expressed 
in grams per mole. For example, the mass of one He atom is 4.00 u (atomic mass 
units), so the molar mass of He is 4.00 g/mol.
Now suppose an ideal gas is confined to a cylindrical container whose volume 
can be varied by means of a movable piston as in Figure 19.12. If we assume the cyl-
inder does not leak, the mass (or the number of moles) of the gas remains constant. 
For such a system, experiments provide the following information:
• When the gas is kept at a constant temperature, its pressure is inversely propor-
tional to the volume. (This behavior is described historically as Boyle’s law.)
• When the pressure of the gas is kept constant, the volume is directly propor-
tional to the temperature. (This behavior is described historically as Charles’s 
law.)
• When the volume of the gas is kept constant, the pressure is directly propor-
tional to the temperature. (This behavior is described historically as Gay– 
Lussac’s law.)
These observations are summarized by the equation of state for an ideal gas:
PV 5 nRT 
(19.8)
Equation of state for  
an ideal gas
5To be more specific, the assumptions here are that the temperature of the gas must not be too low (the gas must not 
condense into a liquid) or too high and that the pressure must be low. The concept of an ideal gas implies that the 
gas molecules do not interact except upon collision and that the molecular volume is negligible compared with the 
volume of the container. In reality, an ideal gas does not exist. The concept of an ideal gas is nonetheless very useful 
because real gases at low pressures are well-modeled as ideal gases.
Figure 19.12 
An ideal gas con-
fined to a cylinder whose volume 
can be varied by means of a mov-
able piston.
Gas
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
PDF to Text. Convert PDF to JPEG. Convert PDF to Png to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete
attach pdf to html; convert pdf table to html
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
C# programmers can convert Word, Excel, PowerPoint Tiff, Jpeg, Bmp of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark
best website to convert pdf to word; convert pdf to html online for
19.5 Macroscopic Description of an Ideal Gas 
579
In this expression, also known as the ideal gas law, n is the number of moles of gas 
in the sample and R is a constant. Experiments on numerous gases show that as the 
pressure approaches zero, the quantity PV/nT approaches the same value R for all 
gases. For this reason, R is called the universal gas constant. In SI units, in which 
pressure is expressed in pascals (1 Pa 5 1 N/m2) and volume in cubic meters, the 
product PV has units of newton  ?  meters, or joules, and R has the value
R 5 8.314 J/mol ? K 
(19.9)
If the pressure is expressed in atmospheres and the volume in liters (1 L 5 
103cm35 1023 m3), then R has the value
R 5 0.082 06 L ? atm/mol ? K 
Using this value of R and Equation 19.8 shows that the volume occupied by 1 mol of 
any gas at atmospheric pressure and at 08C (273 K) is 22.4 L.
The ideal gas law states that if the volume and temperature of a fixed amount of 
gas do not change, the pressure also remains constant. Consider a bottle of cham-
pagne that is shaken and then spews liquid when opened as shown in Figure 19.13. 
A common misconception is that the pressure inside the bottle is increased when 
the bottle is shaken. On the contrary, because the temperature of the bottle and 
its contents remains constant as long as the bottle is sealed, so does the pressure, 
as can be shown by replacing the cork with a pressure gauge. The correct expla-
nation is as follows. Carbon dioxide gas resides in the volume between the liquid 
surface and the cork. The pressure of the gas in this volume is set higher than 
atmospheric pressure in the bottling process. Shaking the bottle displaces some of 
the carbon dioxide gas into the liquid, where it forms bubbles, and these bubbles 
become attached to the inside of the bottle. (No new gas is generated by shaking.) 
When the bottle is opened, the pressure is reduced to atmospheric pressure, which 
causes the volume of the bubbles to increase suddenly. If the bubbles are attached 
to the bottle (beneath the liquid surface), their rapid expansion expels liquid from 
the bottle. If the sides and bottom of the bottle are first tapped until no bubbles 
remain beneath the surface, however, the drop in pressure does not force liquid 
from the bottle when the champagne is opened.
The ideal gas law is often expressed in terms of the total number of molecules N
Because the number of moles n equals the ratio of the total number of molecules 
and Avogadro’s number N
A
, we can write Equation 19.8 as
PV5nRT5
N
N
A
RT 
PV 5 Nk
B
T 
(19.10)
where k
B
is Boltzmann’s constant, which has the value
k
B
5
R
N
A
51.38310223 J/K 
(19.11)
It is common to call quantities such as P, V, and T the thermodynamic variables of 
an ideal gas. If the equation of state is known, one of the variables can always be 
expressed as some function of the other two.
uick Quiz 19.5  A common material for cushioning objects in packages is made 
by trapping bubbles of air between sheets of plastic. Is this material more effec-
tive at keeping the contents of the package from moving around inside the 
package on (a) a hot day, (b) a cold day, or (c) either hot or cold days?
uick Quiz 19.6  On a winter day, you turn on your furnace and the tempera-
ture of the air inside your home increases. Assume your home has the normal 
amount of leakage between inside air and outside air. Is the number of moles of 
air in your room at the higher temperature (a) larger than before, (b) smaller 
than before, or (c) the same as before?
WWBoltzmann’s constant
Figure 19.13 
A bottle of cham-
pagne is shaken and opened. 
Liquid spews out of the opening. 
A common misconception is that 
the pressure inside the bottle is 
increased by the shaking.
I
m
a
g
e
c
o
p
y
r
i
g
h
t
d
i
g
i
t
a
l
i
f
e
,
2
0
0
9
.
U
s
e
d
u
n
d
e
r
l
i
c
e
n
s
e
f
r
o
m
S
h
u
t
t
e
r
s
t
o
c
k
.
c
o
m
Pitfall Prevention 19.3
So Many 
k
There are a variety of 
physical quantities for which the 
letter k is used. Two we have seen 
previously are the force constant 
for a spring (Chapter 15) and the 
wave number for a mechanical 
wave (Chapter 16). Boltzmann’s 
constant is another k, and we will 
see k used for thermal conductiv-
ity in Chapter 20 and for an elec-
trical constant in Chapter 23. To 
make some sense of this confusing 
state of affairs, we use a subscript 
B for Boltzmann’s constant to help 
us recognize it. In this book, you 
will see Boltzmann’s constant as 
k
B
, but you may see Boltzmann’s 
constant in other resources as 
simply k.
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF to MS Office Word in VB.NET. VB.NET Tutorial for How to Convert PDF to Word (.docx) Document in VB.NET. Best
convert pdf to html code for email; convert pdf to website html
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
C# PDF - Convert PDF to JPEG in C#.NET. C#.NET PDF to JPEG Converting & Conversion Control. Convert PDF to JPEG Using C#.NET. Add necessary references:
how to convert pdf to html email; convert pdf into html code
580
chapter 19 temperature
Example 19.4   Heating a Spray Can
A spray can containing a propellant gas at twice atmospheric pressure (202 kPa) and having a volume of 125.00 cm3 is 
at 228C. It is then tossed into an open fire. (Warning: Do not do this experiment; it is very dangerous.) When the tem-
perature of the gas in the can reaches 1958C, what is the pressure inside the can? Assume any change in the volume of 
the can is negligible.
Conceptualize  Intuitively, you should expect that the pressure of the gas in the container increases because of the 
increasing temperature.
Categorize  We model the gas in the can as ideal and use the ideal gas law to calculate the new pressure.
SolutIon
Analyze  Rearrange Equation 19.8:
(1)   
PV
T
5nR
No air escapes during the compression, so n, and there-
fore nR, remains constant. Hence, set the initial value of 
the left side of Equation (1) equal to the final value:
(2)   
P
i
V
i
T
i
5
P
f
V
f
T
f
Because the initial and final volumes of the gas are 
assumed to be equal, cancel the volumes:
(3)   
P
i
T
i
5
P
f
T
f
Solve for P
f
:
P
f
5
a
T
f
T
i
b
P
i
5
a
468 K
295 K
b
1
202 kPa
2
5 320 kPa
Find the change in the volume of the can using Equa-
tion 19.6 and the value for a for steel from Table 19.1:
DV 5 bV
i
DT 5 3aV
i
DT
5 3[11 3 1026 (8C)21](125.00 cm3)(1738C) 5 0.71 cm3
Start from Equation (2) again and find an equation for 
the final pressure:
P
f
5
a
T
f
T
i
ba
V
i
V
f
b
P
i
This result differs from Equation (3) only in the factor 
V
i
/V
f
. Evaluate this factor:
V
i
V
f
5
125.00 cm
3
1
125.00 cm10.71 cm3
2
50.994599.4%
Finalize  The higher the temperature, the higher the pressure exerted by the trapped gas as expected. If the pressure 
increases sufficiently, the can may explode. Because of this possibility, you should never dispose of spray cans in a fire.
Suppose we include a volume change due to thermal expansion of the steel can as the temperature 
increases. Does that alter our answer for the final pressure significantly?
Answer  Because the thermal expansion coefficient of steel is very small, we do not expect much of an effect on our 
final answer.
WHAt IF?
Therefore, the final pressure will differ by only 0.6% from the value calculated without considering the thermal expan-
sion of the can. Taking 99.4% of the previous final pressure, the final pressure including thermal expansion is 318 kPa.
Summary
Two objects are in thermal equilibrium with each other if they do not exchange energy when in thermal contact.
Definitions
Objective Questions 
581
Temperature is the property that determines whether an object is in thermal equilibrium with other objects. Two 
objects in thermal equilibrium with each other are at the same temperature. The SI unit of absolute temperature is 
the kelvin, which is defined to be 1/273.16 of the difference between absolute zero and the temperature of the triple 
point of water.
An ideal gas is one for which PV/nT is constant. An ideal gas is described by the equation of state,
PV 5 nRT 
(19.8)
where n equals the number of moles of the gas, P is its pressure, V is its volume, R is the universal gas constant  
(8.314 J/mol ? K), and T is the absolute temperature of the gas. A real gas behaves approximately as an ideal gas if  
it has a low density.
The zeroth law of thermody-
namics states that if objects A and 
B are separately in thermal equi-
librium with a third object C, then 
objects A and B are in thermal 
equilibrium with each other.
When the temperature of an object is changed by an amount DT, its length 
changes by an amount DL that is proportional to DT and to its initial length L
i
:
DL 5 aL
i
DT 
(19.4)
where the constant a is the average coefficient of linear expansion. The aver-
age coefficient of volume expansion b for a solid is approximately equal to 3a.
Concepts and Principles
stant, what new volume does the gas occupy? (a) 1.0 m3 
(b) 1.5 m3 (c) 2.0 m3 (d) 0.12 m3 (e) 2.5 m3
7. What would happen if the glass of a thermometer 
expanded more on warming than did the liquid in the 
tube? (a) The thermometer would break. (b) It could 
be used only for temperatures below room tempera-
ture. (c) You would have to hold it with the bulb on top. 
(d) The scale on the thermometer is reversed so that 
higher temperature values would be found closer to 
the bulb. (e) The numbers would not be evenly spaced.
8. A cylinder with a piston contains a sample of a thin gas. 
The kind of gas and the sample size can be changed. 
The cylinder can be placed in different constant- 
temperature baths, and the piston can be held in dif-
ferent positions. Rank the following cases according 
to the pressure of the gas from the highest to the low-
est, displaying any cases of equality. (a) A 0.002-mol 
sample of oxygen is held at 300 K in a 100-cm3 con-
tainer. (b) A 0.002-mol sample of oxygen is held at 
600 K in a 200-cm3 container. (c) A 0.002-mol sample 
of oxygen is held at 600 K in a 300-cm3 container.  
(d) A 0.004-mol sample of helium is held at 300 K in a  
200-cm3 container. (e) A 0.004-mol sample of helium is 
held at 250 K in a 200-cm3 container.
9. Two cylinders A and B at the same temperature con-
tain the same quantity of the same kind of gas. Cylin-
der A has three times the volume of cylinder B. What 
can you conclude about the pressures the gases exert? 
(a) We can conclude nothing about the pressures.  
1. Markings to indicate length are placed on a steel tape 
in a room that is at a temperature of 228C. Measure-
ments are then made with the same tape on a day when 
the temperature is 278C. Assume the objects you are 
measuring have a smaller coefficient of linear expan-
sion than steel. Are the measurements (a) too long,  
(b) too short, or (c) accurate?
2. When a certain gas under a pressure of 5.00 3 106 Pa 
at 25.08C is allowed to expand to 3.00 times its origi-
nal volume, its final pressure is 1.07 3 106 Pa. What 
is its final temperature? (a) 450 K (b) 233 K (c) 212 K  
(d) 191 K (e)115K
3. If the volume of an ideal gas is doubled while its tem-
perature is quadrupled, does the pressure (a) remain 
the same, (b) decrease by a factor of 2, (c) decrease by a 
factor of 4, (d) increase by a factor of 2, or (e) increase 
by a factor of 4
4. The pendulum of a certain pendulum clock is made 
of brass. When the temperature increases, what hap-
pens to the period of the clock? (a) It increases. (b) It 
decreases. (c)It remains the same.
5. A temperature of 1628F is equivalent to what tempera-
ture in kelvins? (a) 373 K (b) 288 K (c) 345 K (d) 201 K 
(e)308K
6. A cylinder with a piston holds 0.50 m3 of oxygen at 
an absolute pressure of 4.0 atm. The piston is pulled 
outward, increasing the volume of the gas until the 
pressure drops to 1.0 atm. If the temperature stays con-
Objective Questions
1. 
denotes answer available in Student Solutions Manual/Study Guide
582
chapter 19 temperature
12. Suppose you empty a tray of ice cubes into a bowl 
partly full of water and cover the bowl. After one-half 
hour, the contents of the bowl come to thermal equi-
librium, with more liquid water and less ice than you 
started with. Which of the following is true? (a) The 
temperature of the liquid water is higher than the 
temperature of the remaining ice. (b) The tempera-
ture of the liquid water is the same as that of the ice. 
(c) The temperature of the liquid water is less than 
that of the ice. (d) The comparative temperatures 
of the liquid water and ice depend on the amounts 
present.
13. A hole is drilled in a metal plate. When the metal is 
raised to a higher temperature, what happens to the 
diameter of the hole? (a) It decreases. (b) It increases. 
(c) It remains the same. (d) The answer depends on 
the initial temperature of the metal. (e) None of those 
answers is correct.
14. On a very cold day in upstate New York, the tempera-
ture is 2258C, which is equivalent to what Fahrenheit 
temperature? (a) 2468F (b) 2778F (c) 188F (d) 2258F 
(e) 2138F
7. An automobile radiator is filled to the brim with water 
when the engine is cool. (a) What happens to the water 
when the engine is running and the water has been 
raised to a high temperature? (b) What do modern 
automobiles have in their cooling systems to prevent 
the loss of coolants?
8. When the metal ring and metal sphere in Figure 
CQ19.8 are both at room temperature, the sphere can 
barely be passed through the ring. (a) After the sphere 
is warmed in a flame, it cannot be passed through the 
ring. Explain. (b)What If? What if the ring is warmed 
and the sphere is left at room temperature? Does the 
sphere pass through the ring?
Figure CQ19.8
©
C
e
n
g
a
g
e
L
e
a
r
n
i
n
g
/
C
h
a
r
l
e
s
D
.
W
i
n
t
e
r
s
9. Is it possible for two objects to be in thermal equi-
librium if they are not in contact with each other? 
Explain.
10. Use a periodic table of the elements (see Appendix 
C) to determine the number of grams in one mole of  
(a) hydrogen, which has diatomic molecules; (b) helium;  
and (c)carbon monoxide.
(b) The pressure in A is three times the pressure in B. 
(c) The pressures must be equal. (d) The pressure in A 
must be one-third the pressure in B.
10. A rubber balloon is filled with 1 L of air at 1 atm and 
300K and is then put into a cryogenic refrigerator at 
100 K. The rubber remains flexible as it cools. (i) What 
happens to the volume of the balloon? (a) It decreases 
to 
1
3  
L. (b)It decreases to 1/!3
L. (c) It is constant.  
(d) It increases to !3
L. (e) It increases to 3 L. (ii) What 
happens to the pressure of the air in the balloon? (a) It 
decreases to 
1
3
atm. (b)It decreases to 1/!3
atm. (c) It 
is constant. (d) It increases to !3
atm. (e) It increases 
to 3 atm.
11. The average coefficient of linear expansion of cop-
per is 17 3 1026(8C)21. The Statue of Liberty is 93 m 
tall on a summer morning when the temperature is 
258C. Assume the copper plates covering the statue are 
mounted edge to edge without expansion joints and do 
not buckle or bind on the framework supporting them 
as the day grows hot. What is the order of magnitude 
of the statue’s increase in height? (a) 0.1 mm (b) 1 mm 
(c) 1 cm (d) 10 cm (e) 1 m
1. Common thermometers are made of a mercury col-
umn in a glass tube. Based on the operation of these 
thermometers, which has the larger coefficient of lin-
ear expansion, glass or mercury? (Don’t answer the 
question by looking in a table.)
2. A piece of copper is dropped into a beaker of water. 
(a)If the water’s temperature rises, what happens 
to the temperature of the copper? (b) Under what 
conditions are the water and copper in thermal 
equilibrium?
3. (a) What does the ideal gas law predict about the vol-
ume of a sample of gas at absolute zero? (b) Why is this 
prediction incorrect?
4. Some picnickers stop at a convenience store to buy 
some food, including bags of potato chips. They 
then drive up into the mountains to their picnic site. 
When they unload the food, they notice that the bags 
of chips are puffed up like balloons. Why did that 
happen?
5. In describing his upcoming trip to the Moon, and as 
portrayed in the movie Apollo 13 (Universal, 1995), 
astronaut Jim Lovell said, “I’ll be walking in a place 
where there’s a 400-degree difference between sun-
light and shadow.” Suppose an astronaut standing on 
the Moon holds a thermometer in his gloved hand.  
(a) Is the thermometer reading the temperature of the 
vacuum at the Moon’s surface? (b) Does it read any 
temperature? If so, what object or substance has that 
temperature?
6. Metal lids on glass jars can often be loosened by run-
ning hot water over them. Why does that work?
Conceptual Questions
1. 
denotes answer available in Student Solutions Manual/Study Guide
problems 
583
should the engineer leave between the sections to elim-
inate buckling if the concrete is to reach a temperature 
of 50.08C?
9. The active element of a certain laser 
is made of a glass rod 30.0 cm long 
and 1.50 cm in diameter. Assume 
the average coefficient of linear 
expansion of the glass is equal to 
9.003 1026(8C)21. If the tempera-
ture of the rod increases by 65.08C, 
what is the increase in (a)its length, 
(b) its diameter, and (c) its volume?
10. Review. Inside the wall of a house, an 
L-shaped section of hot-water pipe 
consists of three parts: a straight, 
horizontal piece h 5 28.0 cm long; an 
elbow; and a straight, vertical piece 
, 5 134cm long (Fig. P19.10). A stud and a second- 
story floorboard hold the ends of this section of cop-
per pipe stationary. Find the magnitude and direction 
of the displacement of the pipe elbow when the water 
flow is turned on, raising the temperature of the pipe 
from 18.08C to 46.58C.
11. A copper telephone wire has essentially no sag between 
poles 35.0 m apart on a winter day when the tempera-
ture is 220.08C. How much longer is the wire on a sum-
mer day when the temperature is 35.08C?
12. A pair of eyeglass frames is made of epoxy plastic. At 
room temperature (20.0°C), the frames have circular 
lens holes 2.20 cm in radius. To what temperature must 
the frames be heated if lenses 2.21 cm in radius are to 
be inserted in them? The average coefficient of linear 
expansion for epoxy is 1.30 3 10–4 (°C)–1.
13. The Trans-Alaska pipeline is 1 300 km long, reaching 
from Prudhoe Bay to the port of Valdez. It experiences 
temperatures from 273°C to 135°C. How much does 
the steel pipeline expand because of the difference in 
temperature? How can this expansion be compensated 
for?
14. Each year thousands of children are badly burned by 
hot tap water. Figure P19.14 (page 584) shows a cross-
sectional view of an antiscalding faucet attachment 
designed to prevent such accidents. Within the device, a 
spring made of material with a high coefficient of ther-
mal expansion controls a movable plunger. When the 
M
M
BIO
BIO
Section 19.2  thermometers and the Celsius temperature Scale
Section 19.3  the Constant-Volume Gas thermometer  
and the Absolute temperature Scale
1. A nurse measures the temperature of a patient to be  
41.58C. (a) What is this temperature on the Fahren-
heit scale? (b) Do you think the patient is seriously ill? 
Explain.
2. The temperature difference between the inside and 
the outside of a home on a cold winter day is 57.08F. 
Express this difference on (a) the Celsius scale and  
(b) the Kelvin scale.
3. Convert the following temperatures to their values on 
the Fahrenheit and Kelvin scales: (a) the sublimation 
point of dry ice, 278.58C; (b) human body tempera-
ture, 37.08C.
4. The boiling point of liquid hydrogen is 20.3 K at atmo-
spheric pressure. What is this temperature on (a) the 
Celsius scale and (b) the Fahrenheit scale?
5. Liquid nitrogen has a boiling point of 2195.818C at 
atmospheric pressure. Express this temperature (a) in 
degrees Fahrenheit and (b) in kelvins.
6. Death Valley holds the record for the highest recorded 
temperature in the United States. On July 10, 1913, at a 
place called Furnace Creek Ranch, the temperature rose 
to 134°F. The lowest U.S. temperature ever recorded 
occurred at Prospect Creek Camp in Alaska on January 
23, 1971, when the temperature plummeted to 279.8° F.  
(a) Convert these temperatures to the Celsius scale.  
(b) Convert the Celsius temperatures to Kelvin.
7. In a student experiment, a constant-volume gas ther-
mometer is calibrated in dry ice (278.58C) and in boil-
ing ethyl alcohol (78.08C). The separate pressures are 
0.900atm and 1.635 atm. (a) What value of absolute 
zero in degrees Celsius does the calibration yield? 
What pressures would be found at (b) the freezing and 
(c) the boiling points of water? Hint: Use the linear 
relationship P 5 A1 BT, where A and B are constants.
Section 19.4 thermal Expansion of Solids and liquids
Note: Table 19.1 is available for use in solving problems 
in this section.
8. The concrete sections of a certain superhighway are 
designed to have a length of 25.0 m. The sections are 
poured and cured at 10.08C. What minimum spacing 
Q/C
BIO
M
W
h
,
Figure P19.10
Problems
the problems found in this  
chapter may be assigned 
online in Enhanced WebAssign
1.
 straightforward; 
2. 
intermediate;  
3. 
challenging
1.
full solution available in the Student 
Solutions Manual/Study Guide
AMT
Analysis Model tutorial available in 
Enhanced WebAssign
GP
Guided Problem
M
Master It tutorial available in Enhanced 
WebAssign
W
Watch It video solution available in 
Enhanced WebAssign
BIO
Q/C
S
584
chapter 19 temperature
21. A hollow aluminum cylinder 20.0 cm deep has an inter-
nal capacity of 2.000 L at 20.08C. It is completely filled 
with turpentine at 20.08C. The turpentine and the alu-
minum cylinder are then slowly warmed together to 
80.08C. (a)How much turpentine overflows? (b) What 
is the volume of turpentine remaining in the cylinder 
at 80.08C? (c) If the combination with this amount 
of turpentine is then cooled back to 20.08C, how far 
below the cylinder’s rim does the turpentine’s surface 
recede?
22. Review. The Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco 
has a main span of length 1.28 km, one of the lon-
gest in the world. Imagine that a steel wire with this 
length and a cross-sectional area of 4.00 3 1026 m2  
is laid in a straight line on the bridge deck with its 
ends attached to the towers of the bridge. On a 
summer day the temperature of the wire is 35.08C.  
(a) When winter arrives, the towers stay the same dis-
tance apart and the bridge deck keeps the same shape 
as its expansion joints open. When the temperature 
drops to 210.08C, what is the tension in the wire? Take 
Young’s modulus for steel to be 20.0 3 1010 N/m2.  
(b) Permanent deformation occurs if the stress in 
the steel exceeds its elastic limit of 3.00 3 108 N/m2. 
At what temperature would the wire reach its elastic 
limit? (c) What If? Explain how your answers to parts 
(a) and (b) would change if the Golden Gate Bridge 
were twice as long.
23. A sample of lead has a mass of 20.0 kg and a density of 
11.3 3 103 kg/m3 at 08C. (a) What is the density of lead 
at 90.08C? (b) What is the mass of the sample of lead at 
90.08C?
24. A sample of a solid substance has a mass m and a den-
sity r
0
at a temperature T
0
. (a) Find the density of the 
substance if its temperature is increased by an amount 
DT in terms of the coefficient of volume expansion b. 
(b) What is the mass of the sample if the temperature 
is raised by an amount DT?
25. An underground gasoline tank can hold 1.00 3 103 gal- 
lons of gasoline at 52.0°F. Suppose the tank is being 
filled on a day when the outdoor temperature (and 
the temperature of the gasoline in a tanker truck) is 
95.0°F. When the underground tank registers that it is 
full, how many gallons have been transferred from the 
truck, according to a non-temperature-compensated 
gauge on the truck? Assume the temperature of the 
gasoline quickly cools from 95.0°F to 52.0°F upon enter-
ing the tank.
Section 19.5  Macroscopic Description of an Ideal Gas
26. A rigid tank contains 1.50 moles of an ideal gas. Deter-
mine the number of moles of gas that must be with-
drawn from the tank to lower the pressure of the gas 
from 25.0 atm to 5.00 atm. Assume the volume of the 
tank and the temperature of the gas remain constant 
during this operation.
27. Gas is confined in a tank at a pressure of 11.0 atm 
and a temperature of 25.08C. If two-thirds of the gas 
Q/C
S
M
water temperature rises above a 
preset safe value, the expansion 
of the spring causes the plunger 
to shut off the water flow. Assum-
ing that the initial length L of 
the unstressed spring is 2.40 cm  
and its coefficient of linear 
expansion is 22.0 3 10–6 (°C)–1, 
determine the increase in length 
of the spring when the water 
temperature rises by 30.0°C. 
(You will find the increase in 
length to be small. Therefore, 
to provide a greater variation in 
valve opening for the tempera-
ture change anticipated, actual 
devices have a more complicated mechanical design.)
15. A square hole 8.00 cm along each side is cut in a sheet 
of copper. (a) Calculate the change in the area of this 
hole resulting when the temperature of the sheet is 
increased by 50.0 K. (b) Does this change represent an 
increase or a decrease in the area enclosed by the hole?
16. The average coefficient of volume expansion for car-
bon tetrachloride is 5.81 3 10–4 (°C)–1. If a 50.0-gal 
steel container is filled completely with carbon tetra-
chloride when the temperature is 10.0°C, how much 
will spill over when the temperature rises to 30.0°C?
17. At 20.08C, an aluminum ring has an inner diameter of 
5.000 0 cm and a brass rod has a diameter of 5.050 0 cm. 
(a) If only the ring is warmed, what temperature must it 
reach so that it will just slip over the rod? (b) What If?  
If both the ring and the rod are warmed together, what 
temperature must they both reach so that the ring 
barely slips over the rod? (c) Would this latter process 
work? Explain. Hint: Consult Table 20.2 in the next 
chapter.
18. Why is the following situation impossible? A thin brass 
ring has an inner diameter 10.00 cm at 20.08C. A solid 
aluminum cylinder has diameter 10.02 cm at 20.08C. 
Assume the average coefficients of linear expansion 
of the two metals are constant. Both metals are cooled 
together to a temperature at which the ring can be 
slipped over the end of the cylinder.
19. A volumetric flask made of Pyrex is calibrated at 20.08C. 
It is filled to the 100-mL mark with 35.08C acetone. 
After the flask is filled, the acetone cools and the flask 
warms so that the combination of acetone and flask 
reaches a uniform temperature of 32.08C. The combi-
nation is then cooled back to 20.08C. (a) What is the 
volume of the acetone when it cools to 20.08C? (b) At 
the temperature of 32.08C, does the level of acetone lie 
above or below the 100-mL mark on the flask? Explain.
20. Review. On a day that the temperature is 20.08C, a 
concrete walk is poured in such a way that the ends of 
the walk are unable to move. Take Young’s modulus for 
concrete to be 7.00 3 109 N/m2 and the compressive 
strength to be 2.00 3 109 N/m2. (a) What is the stress 
in the cement on a hot day of 50.08C? (b) Does the con-
crete fracture?
W
Q/C
W
Q/C
L
Figure P19.14
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested