problems 
585
air, Avogadro’s number of molecules has mass 28.9 g. 
Calculate the mass of one cubic meter of air. (c) State 
how this result compares with the tabulated density of 
air at 20.08C.
34. Use the definition of Avogadro’s number to find the 
mass of a helium atom.
35. A popular brand of cola contains 6.50 g of carbon diox-
ide dissolved in 1.00 L of soft drink. If the evaporating 
carbon dioxide is trapped in a cylinder at 1.00 atm and 
20.0°C, what volume does the gas occupy?
36. In state-of-the-art vacuum systems, pressures as low as 
1.003 1029 Pa are being attained. Calculate the num-
ber of molecules in a 1.00-m3 vessel at this pressure 
and a temperature of 27.08C.
37. An automobile tire is inflated with air originally at 
10.08C and normal atmospheric pressure. During the 
process, the air is compressed to 28.0% of its original 
volume and the temperature is increased to 40.08C.  
(a) What is the tire pressure? (b) After the car is driven 
at high speed, the tire’s air temperature rises to 85.08C 
and the tire’s interior volume increases by 2.00%. What 
is the new tire pressure (absolute)?
38. Review. To measure how far below the ocean surface a 
bird dives to catch a fish, a scientist uses a method origi-
nated by Lord Kelvin. He dusts the interiors of plastic 
tubes with powdered sugar and then seals one end of 
each tube. He captures the bird at nighttime in its nest 
and attaches a tube to its back. He then catches the same 
bird the next night and removes the tube. In one trial, 
using a tube 6.50cm long, water washes away the sugar 
over a distance of 2.70 cm from the open end of the tube. 
Find the greatest depth to which the bird dived, assum-
ing the air in the tube stayed at constant temperature.
39. Review. The mass of a hot-air balloon and its cargo 
(not including the air inside) is 200 kg. The air outside 
is at 10.08C and 101 kPa. The volume of the balloon is 
400m3. To what temperature must the air in the bal-
loon be warmed before the balloon will lift off? (Air 
density at 10.08C is 1.244 kg/m3.)
40. A room of volume V contains air having equivalent 
molar mass M (in g/mol). If the temperature of the 
room is raised from T
1
to T
2
, what mass of air will leave 
the room? Assume that the air pressure in the room is 
maintained at P
0
.
41. Review. At 25.0 m below the surface of the sea, where 
the temperature is 5.008C, a diver exhales an air bub-
ble having a volume of 1.00 cm3. If the surface tem-
perature of the sea is 20.08C, what is the volume of the 
bubble just before it breaks the surface?
42. Estimate the mass of the air in your bedroom. State 
the quantities you take as data and the value you mea-
sure or estimate for each.
43. A cook puts 9.00 g of water in a 2.00-L pressure cooker 
that is then warmed to 5008C. What is the pressure 
inside the container?
44. The pressure gauge on a cylinder of gas registers the 
gauge pressure, which is the difference between the 
W
M
BIO
M
AMT
S
W
S
is withdrawn and the temperature is raised to 75.08C, 
what is the pressure of the gas remaining in the tank?
28. Your father and your younger brother are confronted 
with the same puzzle. Your father’s garden sprayer and 
your brother’s water cannon both have tanks with a 
capacity of 5.00 L (Fig. P19.28). Your father puts a neg-
ligible amount of concentrated fertilizer into his tank. 
They both pour in 4.00 L of water and seal up their 
tanks, so the tanks also contain air at atmospheric 
pressure. Next, each uses a hand-operated pump to 
inject more air until the absolute pressure in the tank 
reaches 2.40 atm. Now each uses his device to spray 
out water—not air—until the stream becomes feeble, 
which it does when the pressure in the tank reaches 
1.20 atm. To accomplish spraying out all the water, 
each finds he must pump up the tank three times. 
Here is the puzzle: most of the water sprays out after 
the second pumping. The first and the third pumping-
up processes seem just as difficult as the second but 
result in a much smaller amount of water coming out. 
Account for this phenomenon.
Figure P19.28
29. Gas is contained in an 8.00-L vessel at a temperature of 
20.08C and a pressure of 9.00 atm. (a) Determine the 
number of moles of gas in the vessel. (b) How many 
molecules are in the vessel?
30. A container in the shape of a cube 10.0 cm on each edge 
contains air (with equivalent molar mass 28.9 g/mol)  
at atmospheric pressure and temperature 300 K. Find 
(a)the mass of the gas, (b) the gravitational force 
exerted on it, and (c) the force it exerts on each face of 
the cube. (d) Why does such a small sample exert such 
a great force?
31. An auditorium has dimensions 10.0 m 3 20.0 m 3 
30.0m. How many molecules of air fill the auditorium 
at 20.08C and a pressure of 101 kPa (1.00 atm)?
32. The pressure gauge on a tank registers the gauge pres-
sure, which is the difference between the interior pres-
sure and exterior pressure. When the tank is full of 
oxygen (O
2
), it contains 12.0 kg of the gas at a gauge 
pressure of 40.0atm. Determine the mass of oxygen 
that has been withdrawn from the tank when the pres-
sure reading is 25.0 atm. Assume the temperature of 
the tank remains constant.
33. (a) Find the number of moles in one cubic meter of an 
ideal gas at 20.08C and atmospheric pressure. (b) For 
Q/C
W
Q/C
M
M
Q/C
Convert pdf to html open source - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
convert pdf to web; convert pdf to html online
Convert pdf to html open source - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
convert pdf to html email; convert pdf to html with
586
chapter 19 temperature
important that the pressure of the gas never fall below 
0.850 atm so that the piston will support a delicate 
and very expensive part of the apparatus. Without 
such support, the delicate apparatus can be severely 
damaged and rendered useless. When the design is 
turned into a working prototype, it operates perfectly.
51. A mercury thermometer 
is constructed as shown in 
Figure P19.51. The Pyrex 
glass capillary tube has a 
diameter of 0.004 00 cm, 
and the bulb has a diam-
eter of 0.250 cm. Find 
the change in height of 
the mercury column that 
occurs with a temperature 
change of 30.08C.
52. A liquid with a coefficient 
of volume expansion b 
just fills a spherical shell of volume V (Fig. P19.51). The 
shell and the open capillary of area A projecting from 
the top of the sphere are made of a material with an 
average coefficient of linear expansion a. The liquid 
is free to expand into the capillary. Assuming the tem-
perature increases by DT, find the distance Dh the liq-
uid rises in the capillary.
53. Review. An aluminum pipe is open at both ends and 
used as a flute. The pipe is cooled to 5.008C, at which 
its length is 0.655 m. As soon as you start to play it, the 
pipe fills with air at 20.08C. After that, by how much 
does its fundamental frequency change as the metal 
rises in temperature to 20.08C?
54. Two metal bars are made 
of invar and a third bar 
is made of aluminum. At 
08C, each of the three bars 
is drilled with two holes 
40.0 cm apart. Pins are put 
through the holes to assem-
ble the bars into an equi-
lateral triangle as in Figure 
P19.54. (a) First ignore the 
expansion of the invar. Find 
the angle between the invar bars as a function of Celsius 
temperature. (b) Is your answer accurate for negative as 
well as positive temperatures? (c) Is it accurate for 08C? 
(d) Solve the problem again, including the expansion 
of the invar. Aluminum melts at 6608C and invar at  
1 4278C. Assume the tabulated expansion coefficients 
are constant. What are (e) the greatest and (f) the 
smallest attainable angles between the invar bars?
55. A student measures the length of a brass rod with a 
steel tape at 20.08C. The reading is 95.00 cm. What will 
the tape indicate for the length of the rod when the 
rod and the tape are at (a) 215.08C and (b) 55.08C?
56. The density of gasoline is 730 kg/m3 at 08C. Its average 
coefficient of volume expansion is 9.60 3 1024 (8C)21. 
Assume 1.00 gal of gasoline occupies 0.003 80 m3.  
T
i
+ ∆T
h
A
T
i
Figure P19.51 
Problems 51 and 52.
M
S
AMT
Invar
40.0 cm
Aluminum
Figure P19.54
Q/C
interior pressure and the exterior pressure P
0
. Let’s 
call the gauge pressure P
g
. When the cylinder is full, 
the mass of the gas in it is m
i
at a gauge pressure of 
P
gi
. Assuming the temperature of the cylinder remains 
constant, show that the mass of the gas remaining in the 
cylinder when the pressure reading is P
gf
is given by
m
f
5m
i
a
P
gf
1P
0
P
gi
1P
0
b
Additional Problems
45. Long-term space missions require reclamation of the 
oxygen in the carbon dioxide exhaled by the crew. In 
one method of reclamation, 1.00 mol of carbon diox-
ide produces 1.00 mol of oxygen and 1.00 mol of meth-
ane as a byproduct. The methane is stored in a tank 
under pressure and is available to control the attitude 
of the spacecraft by controlled venting. A single astro-
naut exhales 1.09 kg of carbon dioxide each day. If 
the methane generated in the respiration recycling of 
three astronauts during one week of flight is stored in 
an originally empty 150-L tank at 245.0°C, what is the 
final pressure in the tank?
46. A steel beam being used in the construction of a sky-
scraper has a length of 35.000 m when delivered on 
a cold day at a temperature of 15.0008F. What is the 
length of the beam when it is being installed later on a 
warm day when the temperature is 90.0008F?
47. A spherical steel ball bearing has a diameter of 2.540 
cm at 25.008C. (a) What is its diameter when its tem-
perature is raised to 100.08C? (b) What temperature 
change is required to increase its volume by 1.000%?
48. A bicycle tire is inflated to a gauge pressure of 2.50 
atm when the temperature is 15.08C. While a man 
rides the bicycle, the temperature of the tire rises 
to 45.08C. Assuming the volume of the tire does not 
change, find the gauge pressure in the tire at the 
higher temperature.
49. In a chemical processing plant, a reaction chamber of 
fixed volume V
0
is connected to a reservoir chamber of 
fixed volume 4V
0
by a passage containing a thermally 
insulating porous plug. The plug permits the cham-
bers to be at different temperatures. The plug allows 
gas to pass from either chamber to the other, ensuring 
that the pressure is the same in both. At one point in 
the processing, both chambers contain gas at a pres-
sure of 1.00 atm and a temperature of 27.0°C. Intake 
and exhaust valves to the pair of chambers are closed. 
The reservoir is maintained at 27.0°C while the reac-
tion chamber is heated to 400°C. What is the pressure 
in both chambers after that is done?
50. Why is the following situation impossible? An apparatus is 
designed so that steam initially at T 5 1508C, P 5  
1.00 atm, and V 5 0.500 m3 in a piston–cylinder appa-
ratus undergoes a process in which (1) the volume 
remains constant and the pressure drops to 0.870 atm,  
followed by (2) an expansion in which the pressure 
remains constant and the volume increases to 1.00 m3
followed by (3) a return to the initial conditions. It is 
BIO
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
it is feasible for users to extract text content from source PDF document file the following C# example code for text extraction from PDF page Open a document
adding pdf to html page; conversion pdf to html
VB.NET PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in
Decode source PDF document file into an in-memory object, namely 2.pdf" Dim outputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" Annot_8.pdf" ' open a PDF file
convert pdf into html file; convert pdf form to html
problems 
587
each dimension increases according to Equation 19.4, 
where a is the average coefficient of linear expansion. 
(a)Show that the increase in area is DA 5 2aA
i
DT 
(b) What approximation does this expression assume?
62. The measurement of the average coefficient of volume 
expansion b for a liquid is complicated because the con-
tainer also changes size with temperature. Figure P19.62  
shows a simple means for measuring b despite the 
expansion of the container. With this apparatus, one 
arm of a U-tube is maintained at 08C in a water–ice 
bath, and the other arm is maintained at a different 
temperature T
C
in a constant-temperature bath. The 
connecting tube is hori-
zontal. A difference in 
the length or diameter 
of the tube between 
the two arms of the 
U-tube has no effect on 
the pressure balance 
at the bottom of the 
tube because the pres-
sure depends only on 
the depth of the liquid. 
Derive an expression for 
b for the liquid in terms 
of h
0
h
t
, and T
C
.
63. A copper rod and a steel rod are different in length by 
5.00 cm at 08C. The rods are warmed and cooled 
together. (a) Is it possible that the length difference 
remains constant at all temperatures? Explain. (b) If 
so, describe the lengths at 08C as precisely as you can. 
Can you tell which rod is longer? Can you tell the 
lengths of the rods?
64. A vertical cylinder of cross-
sectional area A is fitted with a 
tight-fitting, frictionless piston 
of mass m (Fig.P19.64). The 
piston is not restricted in its 
motion in any way and is sup-
ported by the gas at pressure P 
below it. Atmospheric pressure 
is P
0
. We wish to find the height 
h in Figure P19.64.  (a) What 
analysis model is appropriate to 
describe the piston? (b) Write 
an appropriate force equation 
for the piston from this analy-
sis model in terms of PP
0
m, 
A, and g. (c) Suppose n moles of 
an ideal gas are in the cylinder at a temperature of T. 
Substitute for P in your answer to part (b) to find the 
height h of the piston above the bottom of the cylinder.
65. Review. Consider an object with any one of the 
shapes displayed in Table 10.2. What is the percentage 
increase in the moment of inertia of the object when 
it is warmed from 08C to 1008C if it is composed of  
(a) copper or (b) aluminum? Assume the average lin-
ear expansion coefficients shown in Table 19.1 do not 
vary between 08C and 1008C. (c)Why are the answers 
for parts (a) and (b) the same for all the shapes?
h
t
h
0
Constant-
temperature
bath at T
C
Water–ice
bath at 0°C
Figure P19.62
S
Q/C
h
A
m
Gas
Figure P19.64
AMT
GP
S
Q/C
How many extra kilograms of gasoline would you 
receive if you bought 10.0gal of gasoline at 08C rather 
than at 20.08C from a pump that is not temperature 
compensated?
57. A liquid has a density r. (a) Show that the fractional 
change in density for a change in temperature DT is 
Dr/r5 2b DT. (b) What does the negative sign signify?  
(c) Fresh water has a maximum density of 1.000 0 g/cm3  
at 4.08C. At 10.08C, its density is 0.999 7 g/cm3. What is 
b for water over this temperature interval? (d) At 08C, 
the density of water is 0.999 9 g/cm3. What is the value 
for b over the temperature range 08C to 4.008C?
58. (a) Take the definition of the coefficient of volume 
expansion to be
b5
1
V
dV
dT
`
P5constant
5
1
V
'V
'T
Use the equation of state for an ideal gas to show that 
the coefficient of volume expansion for an ideal gas at 
constant pressure is given by b 5 1/T, where T is the 
absolute temperature. (b) What value does this expres-
sion predict for b at 08C? State how this result com-
pares with the experimental values for (c) helium and 
(d) air in Table 19.1. Note: These values are much larger 
than the coefficients of volume expansion for most liq-
uids and solids.
59. Review. A clock with a brass pendulum has a period of 
1.000 s at 20.08C. If the temperature increases to 30.08C, 
(a) by how much does the period change and (b) how 
much time does the clock gain or lose in one week?
60. A bimetallic strip of length L is made 
of two ribbons of different metals 
bonded together. (a) First assume 
the strip is originally straight. As the 
strip is warmed, the metal with the 
greater average coefficient of expan-
sion expands more than the other, 
forcing the strip into an arc with 
the outer radius having a greater 
circumference (Fig.P19.60). Derive 
an expression for the angle of bending u as a function 
of the initial length of the strips, their average coeffi-
cients of linear expansion, the change in temperature, 
and the separation of the centers of the strips (Dr 5  
r
2
r
1
). (b) Show that the angle of bending decreases 
to zero when DT decreases to zero and also when the 
two average coefficients of expansion become equal. 
(c) What If? What happens if the strip is cooled?
61. The rectangular plate shown in Figure P19.61 has an 
area A
i
equal to ,w. If the temperature increases by DT
Q/C
Q/C
r
2
r
1
u
Figure P19.60
S
Q/C
Q/C
 + ∆
T
i
TT
i
+ ∆T
w + ∆w
w
Figure P19.61
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
Description: Combine the source PDF streams into one PDF file and save it to a new PDF file on the disk. Parameters: Name, Description, Valid Value.
how to convert pdf into html; how to change pdf to html
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Online C# source code for extracting, copying and pasting PDF The portable document format, known as PDF document, is of file that allows users to open & read
convert pdf into html online; best pdf to html converter online
588
chapter 19 temperature
copper to be 11.0 3 1010 N/m2. At this lower tempera-
ture, find (a) the tension in the wire and (b) the x coor-
dinate of the junction between the wires.
73. Review. A steel guitar string with a diameter of 1.00 mm  
is stretched between supports 80.0 cm apart. The tem-
perature is 0.08C. (a) Find the mass per unit length of 
this string. (Use the value 7.86 3 103 kg/m3 for the den-
sity.) (b)The fundamental frequency of transverse 
oscillations of the string is 200 Hz. What is the tension 
in the string? Next, the temperature is raised to 30.08C. 
Find the resulting values of (c) the tension and (d) the 
fundamental frequency. Assume both the Young’s mod-
ulus of 20.0 3 1010N/m2 and the average coefficient of 
expansion a 5 11.0 3 1026 (8C)21 have constant values 
between 0.08C and 30.08C.
74. A cylinder is closed by 
a piston connected to 
a spring of constant 
2.003 103 N/m (see 
Fig. P19.74). With the 
spring relaxed, the 
cylinder is filled with 
5.00 L of gas at a pres-
sure of 1.00 atm and a 
temperature of 20.08C. 
(a)If the piston has a 
cross- sectional area of 
0.010 0m2 and negli-
gible mass, how high 
will it rise when the 
temperature is raised 
to 2508C? (b) What is 
the pressure of the gas at 2508C?
75. Helium gas is sold in steel tanks that will rupture if sub-
jected to tensile stress greater than its yield strength of 
5 3 108 N/m2. If the helium is used to inflate a balloon, 
could the balloon lift the spherical tank the helium 
came in? Justify your answer. Suggestion: You may con-
sider a spherical steel shell of radius r and thickness t 
having the density of iron and on the verge of breaking 
apart into two hemispheres because it contains helium 
at high pressure.
76. A cylinder that has a 40.0-cm radius and is 50.0 cm 
deep is filled with air at 20.08C and 1.00 atm (Fig. 
P19.76a). A 20.0-kg piston is now lowered into the cyl-
inder, compressing the air trapped inside as it takes 
equilibrium height h
i
(Fig. P19.76b). Finally, a 25.0-kg 
dog stands on the piston, further compressing the air, 
which remains at 208C (Fig.P19.76c). (a) How far down 
k
h
= 20.0°C
= 250°C
Figure P19.74
W
Q/C
66. (a) Show that the density of an ideal gas occupying a 
volume V is given by r 5 PM/RT, where M is the molar 
mass. (b) Determine the density of oxygen gas at atmo-
spheric pressure and 20.08C.
67. Two concrete spans of 
a 250-m-long bridge 
are placed end to 
end so that no room 
is allowed for expan-
sion (Fig.P19.67a). If a 
temperature increase 
of 20.08C occurs, 
what is the height y 
to which the spans 
rise when they buckle 
(Fig. P19.67b)?
68. Two concrete spans 
that form a bridge 
of length L are placed end to end so that no room is 
allowed for expansion (Fig.P19.67a). If a temperature 
increase of DT occurs, what is the height y to which the 
spans rise when they buckle (Fig. P19.67b)?
69. Review. (a) Derive an expression for the buoyant force 
on a spherical balloon, submerged in water, as a func-
tion of the depth h below the surface, the volume V
i
of 
the balloon at the surface, the pressure P
0
at the sur-
face, and the density r
w
of the water. Assume the water 
temperature does not change with depth. (b) Does the 
buoyant force increase or decrease as the balloon is sub-
merged? (c) At what depth is the buoyant force one-
half the surface value?
70. Review. Following a collision in outer space, a copper 
disk at 8508C is rotating about its axis with an angular 
speed of 25.0 rad/s. As the disk radiates infrared light, 
its temperature falls to 20.08C. No external torque acts 
on the disk. (a) Does the angular speed change as the 
disk cools? Explain how it changes or why it does not. 
(b) What is its angular speed at the lower temperature?
71. Starting with Equation 19.10, show that the total pres-
sure P in a container filled with a mixture of several 
ideal gases is P 5 P
1
P
2
P
3
1  
. . .
, where P
1
P
2
. . .
are the pressures that each gas would exert if it alone 
filled the container. (These individual pressures are 
called the partial pressures of the respective gases.) This 
result is known as Dalton’s law of partial pressures.
Challenge Problems
72. Review. A steel wire and a copper wire, each of diameter 
2.000 mm, are joined end to end. At 40.08C, each has 
an unstretched length of 2.000 m. The wires are con-
nected between two fixed supports 4.000 m apart on 
a tabletop. The steel wire extends from x 5 22.000 m  
to x 5 0, the copper wire extends from x 5 0 to x 5 
2.000 m, and the tension is negligible. The temperature 
is then lowered to 20.08C. Assume the average coeffi-
cient of linear expansion of steel is 11.0 3 1026 (8C)21  
and that of copper is 17.0 3 1026 (8C)21. Take Young’s 
modulus for steel to be 20.0 3 1010 N/m2 and that for 
T
250 m
T + 20°C
y
a
b
Figure P19.67 
Problems 67 and 68.
S
S
AMT
Q/C
50.0 cm
h
i
h
a
b
c
Figure P19.76
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
Convert OpenOffice Text Document to PDF with embedded fonts. to change ODT, ODS, ODP forms to fillable PDF formats in Visual Online source code for C#.NET class.
adding pdf to html; pdf to web converter
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
addition, texts, pictures and font formatting of source PDF file are accurately retained in converted Word document file. Why do we need to convert PDF to Word
convert pdf to url; add pdf to website
problems 
589
of the plate below the stationary line are moving down 
relative to the roof and feel a force of kinetic friction 
acting up the roof. Elements of area above the station-
ary line are sliding up the roof, and on them kinetic 
friction acts downward parallel to the roof. The sta-
tionary line occupies no area, so we assume no force of 
static friction acts on the plate while the temperature 
is changing. The plate as a whole is very nearly in equi-
librium, so the net friction force on it must be equal to 
the component of its weight acting down the incline. 
(a)Prove that the stationary line is at a distance of
L
2
a12
tan u
m
k
b
below the top edge of the plate. (b) Analyze the forces 
that act on the plate when the temperature is falling 
and prove that the stationary line is at that same dis-
tance above the bottom edge of the plate. (c) Show that 
the plate steps down the roof like an inchworm, mov-
ing each day by the distance
L
m
k
1a
2
2a
1
21T
h
2T
c
2 tan u
(d) Evaluate the distance an aluminum plate moves 
each day if its length is 1.20 m, the temperature 
cycles between 4.008C and 36.08C, and if the roof has 
slope 18.5°, coefficient of linear expansion 1.50 3  
1025 (8C)21, and coefficient of friction 0.420 with the 
plate. (e) What If? What if the expansion coefficient 
of the plate is less than that of the roof? Will the plate 
creep up the roof?
79. A 1.00-km steel railroad rail is fastened securely at 
both ends when the temperature is 20.08C. As the tem-
perature increases, the rail buckles, taking the shape 
of an arc of a vertical circle. Find the height h of the 
center of the rail when the temperature is 25.08C. (You 
will need to solve a transcendental equation.)
(Dh) does the piston move when the dog steps onto it? 
(b) To what temperature should the gas be warmed to 
raise the piston and dog back to h
i
?
77. The relationship L 5 L
i
1 aL
i
DT is a valid approxi-
mation when a DT is small. If a DT is large, one must 
integrate the relationship dL 5 aL dT to determine 
the final length. (a)Assuming the coefficient of linear 
expansion of a material is constant as L varies, deter-
mine a general expression for the final length of a rod 
made of the material. Given a rod of length 1.00 m  
and a temperature change of 100.08C, determine 
the error caused by the approximation when (b)a 5  
2.00 3 1025 (8C)21 (a typical value for a metal) and  
(c) when a 5 0.020 0 (8C)21 (an unrealistically large 
value for comparison). (d) Using the equation from 
part (a), solve Problem 21 again to find more accurate 
results.
78. Review. A house roof is a perfectly flat plane that 
makes an angle u with the horizontal. When its temper-
ature changes, between T
c
before dawn each day and 
T
h
in the middle of each afternoon, the roof expands 
and contracts uniformly with a coefficient of thermal 
expansion a
1
. Resting on the roof is a flat, rectangular 
metal plate with expansion coefficient a
2
, greater than 
a
1
. The length of the plate is L, measured along the 
slope of the roof. The component of the plate’s weight 
perpendicular to the roof is supported by a normal 
force uniformly distributed over the area of the plate. 
The coefficient of kinetic friction between the plate 
and the roof is m
k
. The plate is always at the same tem-
perature as the roof, so we assume its temperature is 
continuously changing. Because of the difference in 
expansion coefficients, each bit of the plate is moving 
relative to the roof below it, except for points along a 
certain horizontal line running across the plate called 
the stationary line. If the temperature is rising, parts 
Q/C
C# Word - MailMerge Processing in C#.NET
da.Fill(data); //Open the document DOCXDocument document0 = DOCXDocument.Open( docFilePath ); int counter = 1; // Loop though all records in the data source.
convert pdf to web page; embed pdf into website
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Separate source PDF document file by defined page range in VB.NET class application. Divide PDF file into multiple files by outputting PDF file size.
convert pdf fillable form to html; convert pdf into webpage
c h a p p t t e r 
20
the First Law of 
thermodynamics
590 
In this photograph of the Mt. Baker 
area near Bellingham, Washington, 
we see evidence of water in all 
three phases. In the lake is liquid 
water, and solid water in the form 
of snow appears on the ground. The 
clouds in the sky consist of liquid 
water droplets that have condensed 
from the gaseous water vapor in the 
air. Changes of a substance from 
one phase to another are a result of 
energy transfer. 
(
©
iStockphoto.com/
KingWu)
Until about 1850, the fields of thermodynamics and mechanics were considered to be 
two distinct branches of science. The principle of conservation of energy seemed to describe 
only certain kinds of mechanical systems. Mid-19th-century experiments performed by  
Englishman James Joule and others, however, showed a strong connection between the 
transfer of energy by heat in thermal processes and the transfer of energy by work in 
mechanical processes. Today we know that mechanical energy can be transformed to inter-
nal energy, which is formally defined in this chapter. Once the concept of energy was gener-
alized from mechanics to include internal energy, the principle of conservation of energy as 
discussed in Chapter 8 emerged as a universal law of nature.
This chapter focuses on the concept of internal energy, the first law of thermodynamics, 
and some important applications of the first law. The first law of thermodynamics describes 
systems in which the only energy change is that of internal energy and the transfers of energy 
are by heat and work. A major difference in our discussion of work in this chapter from that in 
most of the chapters on mechanics is that we will consider work done on deformable systems.
20.1 Heat and Internal Energy
At the outset, it is important to make a major distinction between internal energy 
and heat, terms that are often incorrectly used interchangeably in popular 
language.
20.1 Heat and Internal Energy
20.2 Specific Heat  
and Calorimetry
20.3 Latent Heat
20.4 Work and Heat in 
Thermodynamic Processes
20.5 The First Law of 
Thermodynamics
20.6 Some Applications of  
the First Law of 
Thermodynamics
20.7 Energy Transfer Mechanisms 
in Thermal Processes
20.1 heat and Internal energy 
591
Internal energy is all the energy of a system that is associated with its micro-
scopic components—atoms and molecules—when viewed from a reference 
frame at rest with respect to the center of mass of the system.
The last part of this sentence ensures that any bulk kinetic energy of the system 
due to its motion through space is not included in internal energy. Internal energy 
includes kinetic energy of random translational, rotational, and vibrational motion 
of molecules; vibrational potential energy associated with forces between atoms in 
molecules; and electric potential energy associated with forces between molecules. 
It is useful to relate internal energy to the temperature of an object, but this rela-
tionship is limited. We show in Section 20.3 that internal energy changes can also 
occur in the absence of temperature changes. In that discussion, we will investi-
gate the internal energy of the system when there is a physical change, most often 
related to a phase change, such as melting or boiling. We assign energy associated 
with chemical changes, related to chemical reactions, to the potential energy term 
in Equation 8.2, not to internal energy. Therefore, we discuss the chemical potential 
energy in, for example, a human body (due to previous meals), the gas tank of a car 
(due to an earlier transfer of fuel), and a battery of an electric circuit (placed in the 
battery during its construction in the manufacturing process).
Heat is defined as a process of transferring energy across the boundary of a 
system because of a temperature difference between the system and its sur-
roundings. It is also the amount of energy Q transferred by this process.
When you heat a substance, you are transferring energy into it by placing it in con-
tact with surroundings that have a higher temperature. Such is the case, for exam-
ple, when you place a pan of cold water on a stove burner. The burner is at a higher 
temperature than the water, and so the water gains energy by heat. 
Read this definition of heat (Q in Eq. 8.2) very carefully. In particular, notice 
what heat is not in the following common quotes. (1) Heat is not energy in a hot sub-
stance. For example, “The boiling water has a lot of heat” is incorrect; the boiling 
water has internal energy E
int
. (2) Heat is not radiation. For example, “It was so hot 
because the sidewalk was radiating heat” is incorrect; energy is leaving the sidewalk 
by electromagnetic radiation, T
ER
in Equation 8.2. (3) Heat is not warmth of an envi-
ronment. For example, “The heat in the air was so oppressive” is incorrect; on a hot 
day, the air has a high temperature T.
As an analogy to the distinction between heat and internal energy, consider the 
distinction between work and mechanical energy discussed in Chapter 7. The work 
done on a system is a measure of the amount of energy transferred to the system 
from its surroundings, whereas the mechanical energy (kinetic energy plus poten-
tial energy) of a system is a consequence of the motion and configuration of the 
system. Therefore, when a person does work on a system, energy is transferred from 
the person to the system. It makes no sense to talk about the work of a system; one 
can refer only to the work done on or by a system when some process has occurred 
in which energy has been transferred to or from the system. Likewise, it makes no 
sense to talk about the heat of a system; one can refer to heat only when energy has 
been transferred as a result of a temperature difference. Both heat and work are 
ways of transferring energy between a system and its surroundings.
Units of Heat
Early studies of heat focused on the resultant increase in temperature of a sub-
stance, which was often water. Initial notions of heat were based on a fluid called 
caloric that flowed from one substance to another and caused changes in tempera-
ture. From the name of this mythical fluid came an energy unit related to ther-
mal processes, the calorie (cal), which is defined as the amount of energy transfer 
Pitfall Prevention 20.1
Internal Energy, Thermal Energy,  
and Bond Energy When reading 
other physics books, you may see 
terms such as thermal energy and 
bond energy. Thermal energy can 
be interpreted as that part of the 
internal energy associated with 
random motion of molecules and 
therefore related to temperature. 
Bond energy is the intermolecular 
potential energy. Therefore,
Internal energy 5  
thermal energy 1 bond energy
Although this breakdown is pre-
sented here for clarification with 
regard to other books, we will not 
use these terms because there is 
no need for them.
Pitfall Prevention 20.2
Heat, Temperature, and Internal 
Energy Are Different As you read 
the newspaper or explore the 
Internet, be alert for incorrectly 
used phrases including the word 
heat and think about the proper 
word to be used in place of heat. 
Incorrect examples include “As 
the truck braked to a stop, a large 
amount of heat was generated by 
friction” and “The heat of a hot 
summer day . . . .”
592
chapter 20 the First Law of thermodynamics
necessary to raise the temperature of 1 g of water from 14.5°C to 15.5°C.1 (The 
“Calorie,” written with a capital “C” and used in describing the energy content of 
foods, is actually a kilocalorie.) The unit of energy in the U.S. customary system is 
the British thermal unit (Btu), which is defined as the amount of energy transfer 
required to raise the temperature of 1 lb of water from 63°F to 64°F.
Once the relationship between energy in thermal and mechanical processes 
became clear, there was no need for a separate unit related to thermal processes. 
The joule has already been defined as an energy unit based on mechanical pro-
cesses. Scientists are increasingly turning away from the calorie and the Btu and 
are using the joule when describing thermal processes. In this textbook, heat, work, 
and internal energy are usually measured in joules.
The Mechanical Equivalent of Heat
In Chapters 7 and 8, we found that whenever friction is present in a mechanical 
system, the mechanical energy in the system decreases; in other words, mechani-
cal energy is not conserved in the presence of nonconservative forces. Various 
experiments show that this mechanical energy does not simply disappear but is 
transformed into internal energy. You can perform such an experiment at home 
by hammering a nail into a scrap piece of wood. What happens to all the kinetic 
energy of the hammer once you have finished? Some of it is now in the nail as 
internal energy, as demonstrated by the nail being measurably warmer. Notice that 
there is no transfer of energy by heat in this process. For the nail and board as a 
nonisolated system, Equation 8.2 becomes DE
int
W 1 T
MW
, where W is the work 
done by the hammer on the nail and T
MW
is the energy leaving the system by sound 
waves when the nail is struck. Although this connection between mechanical and 
internal energy was first suggested by Benjamin Thompson, it was James Prescott 
Joule who established the equivalence of the decrease in mechanical energy and 
the increase in internal energy.
A schematic diagram of Joule’s most famous experiment is shown in Figure 20.1. 
The system of interest is the Earth, the two blocks, and the water in a thermally 
insulated container. Work is done within the system on the water by a rotating pad-
dle wheel, which is driven by heavy blocks falling at a constant speed. If the energy 
transformed in the bearings and the energy passing through the walls by heat are 
neglected, the decrease in potential energy of the system as the blocks fall equals 
the work done by the paddle wheel on the water and, in turn, the increase in inter-
nal energy of the water. If the two blocks fall through a distance h, the decrease 
in potential energy of the system is 2mgh, where m is the mass of one block; this 
energy causes the temperature of the water to increase. By varying the conditions 
of the experiment, Joule found that the decrease in mechanical energy is propor-
tional to the product of the mass of the water and the increase in water tempera-
ture. The proportionality constant was found to be approximately 4.18 J/g ? °C. 
Hence, 4.18 J of mechanical energy raises the temperature of 1 g of water by 1°C. 
More precise measurements taken later demonstrated the proportionality to be  
4.186 J/g ? °C when the temperature of the water was raised from 14.5°C to 15.5°C. 
We adopt this “15-degree calorie” value:
1 cal 5 4.186 J 
(20.1)
This equality is known, for purely historical reasons, as the mechanical equivalent 
of heat. A more proper name would be equivalence between mechanical energy and 
internal energy, but the historical name is well entrenched in our language, despite 
the incorrect use of the word heat.
1Originally, the calorie was defined as the energy transfer necessary to raise the temperature of 1 g of water by 1°C. 
Careful measurements, however, showed that the amount of energy required to produce a 1°C change depends 
somewhat on the initial temperature; hence, a more precise definition evolved.
Thermal
insulator
The falling blocks rotate the 
paddles, causing the temperature 
of the water to increase.
m
Figure 20.1 
Joule’s experiment 
for determining the mechanical 
equivalent of heat.
James Prescott Joule
British physicist (1818–1889)
Joule received some formal education 
in mathematics, philosophy, and chem-
istry from John Dalton but was in large 
part self-educated. Joule’s research led 
to the establishment of the principle 
of conservation of energy. His study 
of the quantitative relationship among 
electrical, mechanical, and chemi-
cal effects of heat culminated in his 
announcement in 1843 of the amount 
of work required to produce a unit of 
energy, called the mechanical equiva-
lent of heat.
©
T
h
e
A
r
t
G
a
l
l
e
r
y
C
o
l
l
e
c
t
i
o
n
/
A
l
a
m
y
20.2 Specific heat and calorimetry 
593
Example 20.1   Losing Weight the Hard Way 
A student eats a dinner rated at 2 000 Calories. He wishes to do an equivalent amount of work in the gymnasium by 
lifting a 50.0-kg barbell. How many times must he raise the barbell to expend this much energy? Assume he raises the 
barbell 2.00 m each time he lifts it and he regains no energy when he lowers the barbell.
Conceptualize  Imagine the student raising the barbell. He is doing work on the system of the barbell and the Earth, so 
energy is leaving his body. The total amount of work that the student must do is 2 000 Calories.
Categorize  We model the system of the barbell and the Earth as a nonisolated system for energy.
AM
SolUTIon
Analyze  Reduce the conservation of energy equa-
tion, Equation 8.2, to the appropriate expression 
for the system of the barbell and the Earth:
(1)   DU
total
W
total
Express the change in gravitational potential energy 
of the system after the barbell is raised once:
DU 5 mgh
Express the total amount of energy that must be 
transferred into the system by work for lifting the 
barbell n times, assuming energy is not regained 
when the barbell is lowered:
(2)   DU
total
nmgh
Substitute Equation (2) into Equation (1):
nmgh 5 W
total
Solve for n:
Substitute numerical values:
n5
W
total
mgh
n5
1
2 000 Cal
2
1
50.0 kg
21
9.80 m/s
221
2.00 m
2
a
1.003103 cal
Calorie
ba
4.186 J
1 cal
b
  8.54 3 103 times
Finalize  If the student is in good shape and lifts the barbell once every 5 s, it will take him about 12 h to perform this 
feat. Clearly, it is much easier for this student to lose weight by dieting.
In reality, the human body is not 100% efficient. Therefore, not all the energy transformed within the body from 
the dinner transfers out of the body by work done on the barbell. Some of this energy is used to pump blood and 
perform other functions within the body. Therefore, the 2 000 Calories can be worked off in less time than 12 h when 
these other energy processes are included.
20.2 Specific Heat and Calorimetry
When energy is added to a system and there is no change in the kinetic or potential 
energy of the system, the temperature of the system usually rises. (An exception to 
this statement is the case in which a system undergoes a change of state—also called 
phase transition—as discussed in the next section.) If the system consists of a sam-
ple of a substance, we find that the quantity of energy required to raise the tempera-
ture of a given mass of the substance by some amount varies from one substance 
to another. For example, the quantity of energy required to raise the temperature 
of 1kg of water by 1°C is 4 186 J, but the quantity of energy required to raise the 
temperature of 1 kg of copper by 1°C is only 387 J. In the discussion that follows, we 
shall use heat as our example of energy transfer, but keep in mind that the tempera-
ture of the system could be changed by means of any method of energy transfer.
The heat capacity C of a particular sample is defined as the amount of energy 
needed to raise the temperature of that sample by 1°C. From this definition, we see 
that if energy Q produces a change DT in the temperature of a sample, then
Q 5 C DT 
(20.2)
594
chapter 20 the First Law of thermodynamics
The specific heat c of a substance is the heat capacity per unit mass. Therefore, 
if energy Q transfers to a sample of a substance with mass m and the temperature of 
the sample changes by DT, the specific heat of the substance is
c;
Q
m DT
(20.3)
Specific heat is essentially a measure of how thermally insensitive a substance is to 
the addition of energy. The greater a material’s specific heat, the more energy must 
be added to a given mass of the material to cause a particular temperature change. 
Table 20.1 lists representative specific heats.
From this definition, we can relate the energy Q transferred between a sample of 
mass m of a material and its surroundings to a temperature change DT as
Q 5 mc DT 
(20.4)
For example, the energy required to raise the temperature of 0.500 kg of water by 
3.00°C is Q 5 (0.500 kg)(4 186 J/kg ? °C)(3.00°C) 5 6.28 3 103 J. Notice that when 
the temperature increases, Q and DT are taken to be positive and energy trans-
fers into the system. When the temperature decreases, Q and DT are negative and 
energy transfers out of the system.
We can identify mc DT as the change in internal energy of the system if we ignore 
any thermal expansion or contraction of the system. (Thermal expansion or con-
traction would result in a very small amount of work being done on the system 
by the surrounding air.) Then, Equation 20.4 is a reduced form of Equation 8.2: 
DE
int
5 Q. The internal energy of the system can be changed by transferring energy 
into the system by any mechanism. For example, if the system is a baked potato in 
a microwave oven, Equation 8.2 reduces to the following analog to Equation 20.4: 
DE
int
T
ER
mc DT, where T
ER
is the energy transferred to the potato from the 
microwave oven by electromagnetic radiation. If the system is the air in a bicycle 
pump, which becomes hot when the pump is operated, Equation 8.2 reduces to the 
following analog to Equation 20.4: DE
int
W 5 mc DT, where W is the work done on 
the pump by the operator. By identifying mc DT as DE
int
, we have taken a step toward 
a better understanding of temperature: temperature is related to the energy of the 
molecules of a system. We will learn more details of this relationship in Chapter 21.
Specific heat varies with temperature. If, however, temperature intervals are not too 
great, the temperature variation can be ignored and c can be treated as a constant.2  
Specific heat 
Table 20.1
Specific Heats of Some Substances at 25°C  
and Atmospheric Pressure
Specific Heat 
Specific Heat
Substance 
(J/kg ? °C) 
Substance 
(J/kg ? °C)
Elemental solids 
Other solids
Aluminum 
900 
Brass 
380
Beryllium 
1 830 
Glass 
837
Cadmium 
230 
Ice (25°C) 
2 090
Copper 
387 
Marble 
860
Germanium 
322 
Wood 
1 700
Gold 
129 
Liquids
Iron 
448 
Alcohol (ethyl) 
2 400
Lead 
128 
Mercury 
140
Silicon 
703 
Water (15°C) 
4 186
Silver 
234 
Gas
Steam (100°C) 
2 010
Note: To convert values to units of cal/g ? °C, divide by 4 186.
2The definition given by Equation 20.4 assumes the specific heat does not vary with temperature over the interval  
DT 5 T
f
T
i
. In general, if c varies with temperature over the interval, the correct expression for Q is Q5m
e
T
f
T
i
c dT.
Pitfall Prevention 20.3
An Unfortunate Choice  
of Terminology The name specific 
heat is an unfortunate holdover 
from the days when thermody-
namics and mechanics developed 
separately. A better name would 
be specific energy transfer, but the 
existing term is too entrenched to 
be replaced.
Pitfall Prevention 20.4
Energy Can Be Transferred  
by Any Method The symbol Q 
represents the amount of energy 
transferred, but keep in mind that 
the energy transfer in Equation 
20.4 could be by any of the meth-
ods introduced in Chapter 8; it 
does not have to be heat. For exam-
ple, repeatedly bending a wire coat 
hanger raises the temperature at 
the bending point by work.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested