20.2 Specific heat and calorimetry 
595
For example, the specific heat of water varies by only about 1% from 0°C to 100°C at 
atmospheric pressure. Unless stated otherwise, we shall neglect such variations.
uick Quiz 20.1  Imagine you have 1 kg each of iron, glass, and water, and all 
three samples are at 10°C. (a) Rank the samples from highest to lowest tempera-
ture after 100 J of energy is added to each sample. (b) Rank the samples from 
greatest to least amount of energy transferred by heat if each sample increases 
in temperature by 20°C.
Isolated system boundary
Hot sample
Q
cold
m
w
c
w
T
w
m
x
c
x
T
x
Q
hot
Cold water
Figure 20.2 
In a calorimetry 
experiment, a hot sample whose 
specific heat is unknown is placed 
in cold water in a container that 
isolates the system from the 
environment.
Notice from Table 20.1 that water has the highest specific heat of common mate-
rials. This high specific heat is in part responsible for the moderate climates found 
near large bodies of water. As the temperature of a body of water decreases during 
the winter, energy is transferred from the cooling water to the air by heat, increas-
ing the internal energy of the air. Because of the high specific heat of water, a rela-
tively large amount of energy is transferred to the air for even modest temperature 
changes of the water. The prevailing winds on the West Coast of the United States 
are toward the land (eastward). Hence, the energy liberated by the Pacific Ocean as 
it cools keeps coastal areas much warmer than they would otherwise be. As a result, 
West Coast states generally have more favorable winter weather than East Coast 
states, where the prevailing winds do not tend to carry the energy toward land.
Calorimetry
One technique for measuring specific heat involves heating a sample to some 
known temperature T
x
, placing it in a vessel containing water of known mass and 
temperature T
w
T
x
, and measuring the temperature of the water after equilibrium 
has been reached. This technique is called calorimetry, and devices in which this 
energy transfer occurs are called calorimeters. Figure 20.2 shows the hot sample in 
the cold water and the resulting energy transfer by heat from the high-temperature 
part of the system to the low-temperature part. If the system of the sample and the 
water is isolated, the principle of conservation of energy requires that the amount 
of energy Q
hot
that leaves the sample (of unknown specific heat) equal the amount 
of energy Q
cold
that enters the water.3 Conservation of energy allows us to write the 
mathematical representation of this energy statement as
Q
cold
5 2Q
hot
(20.5)
Suppose m
x
is the mass of a sample of some substance whose specific heat we 
wish to determine. Let’s call its specific heat c
x
and its initial temperature T
x
as 
shown in Figure 20.2. Likewise, let m
w
c
w
, and T
w
represent corresponding values 
for the water. If T
f
is the final temperature after the system comes to equilibrium, 
Equation 20.4 shows that the energy transfer for the water is m
w
c
w
(T
f
T
w
), which 
is positive because T
f
T
w
, and that the energy transfer for the sample of unknown 
specific heat is m
x
c
x
(T
f
T
x
), which is negative. Substituting these expressions into 
Equation 20.5 gives
m
w
c
w
(T
f
T
w
) 5 2m
x
c
x
(T
f
T
x
) 
This equation can be solved for the unknown specific heat c
x
.
Example 20.2   Cooling a Hot Ingot
A 0.050 0-kg ingot of metal is heated to 200.0°C and then dropped into a calorimeter containing 0.400 kg of water ini-
tially at 20.0°C. The final equilibrium temperature of the mixed system is 22.4°C. Find the specific heat of the metal.
Pitfall Prevention 20.5
Remember the negative Sign It is 
critical to include the negative sign 
in Equation 20.5. The negative 
sign in the equation is necessary 
for consistency with our sign con-
vention for energy transfer. The 
energy transfer Q
hot
has a negative 
value because energy is leaving 
the hot substance. The negative 
sign in the equation ensures that 
the right side is a positive number, 
consistent with the left side, which 
is positive because energy is enter-
ing the cold water.
continued
3For precise measurements, the water container should be included in our calculations because it also exchanges 
energy with the sample. Doing so would require that we know the container’s mass and composition, however. If the 
mass of the water is much greater than that of the container, we can neglect the effects of the container.
Change pdf to html format - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
how to change pdf to html format; convert pdf to html open source
Change pdf to html format - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
convert pdf to web page online; convert pdf to html code online
596
chapter 20 the First Law of thermodynamics
Conceptualize  Imagine the process occurring in the isolated system of Figure 20.2. Energy leaves the hot ingot and 
goes into the cold water, so the ingot cools off and the water warms up. Once both are at the same temperature, the 
energy transfer stops.
Categorize  We use an equation developed in this section, so we categorize this example as a substitution problem.
SolUTIon
Use Equation 20.4 to evaluate each side of 
Equation20.5:
m
w
c
w
(T
f
T
w
) 5 2m
x
c
x
(T
f
T
x
)
Solve for c
x
:
c
x
5
m
w
c
w
1T
f
2T
w
2
m
x
1T
x
2T
f
2
Substitute numerical values:
c
x
5
1
0.400 kg
21
4 186 J/kg
#
8C
21
22.48C220.08C
2
1
0.050 0 kg
21
200.08C222.48C
2
453 J/kg
#
8C
The ingot is most likely iron as you can see by comparing this result with the data given in Table 20.1. The temperature 
of the ingot is initially above the steam point. Therefore, some of the water may vaporize when the ingot is dropped 
into the water. We assume the system is sealed and this steam cannot escape. Because the final equilibrium tempera-
ture is lower than the steam point, any steam that does result recondenses back into water.
Suppose you are performing an experiment in the laboratory that uses this technique to determine the 
specific heat of a sample and you wish to decrease the overall uncertainty in your final result for c
x
. Of the data given 
in this example, changing which value would be most effective in decreasing the uncertainty?
Answer  The largest experimental uncertainty is associated with the small difference in temperature of 2.4°C for the 
water. For example, using the rules for propagation of uncertainty in Appendix Section B.8, an uncertainty of 0.1°C in 
each of T
f
and T
w
leads to an 8% uncertainty in their difference. For this temperature difference to be larger experi-
mentally, the most effective change is to decrease the amount of water.
WHAT IF?
▸ 20.2 
continued
Example 20.3   Fun Time for a Cowboy 
A cowboy fires a silver bullet with a muzzle speed of 200 m/s into the pine wall of a saloon. Assume all the internal 
energy generated by the impact remains with the bullet. What is the temperature change of the bullet?
Conceptualize  Imagine similar experiences you may have had in which mechanical energy is transformed to internal 
energy when a moving object is stopped. For example, as mentioned in Section 20.1, a nail becomes warm after it is hit 
a few times with a hammer.
Categorize  The bullet is modeled as an isolated system. No work is done on the system because the force from the wall 
moves through no displacement. This example is similar to the skateboarder pushing off a wall in Section 9.7. There, no 
work is done on the skateboarder by the wall, and potential energy stored in the body from previous meals is transformed 
to kinetic energy. Here, no work is done by the wall on the bullet, and kinetic energy is transformed to internal energy.
AM
SolUTIon
Analyze  Reduce the conservation of energy equation, 
Equation 8.2, to the appropriate expression for the sys-
tem of the bullet:
(1)    DK 1 DE
int
5 0
The change in the bullet’s internal energy is related to 
its change in temperature:
(2)    DE
int
mc DT
Substitute Equation (2) into Equation (1):
1
021
2
mv2
2
1mc DT50
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
An attempt to load a program with an incorrect format", please check your configure as follows: You can also directly change PDF to Gif image file in C# program
pdf to html converters; convert pdf to html
VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
NET control to batch convert PDF documents to Tiff format in Visual Basic. Qualified Tiff files are exported with high resolution in VB.NET.
converting pdf to html code; convert pdf to html5 open source
20.3 Latent heat 
597
Solve for DT, using 234 J/kg ? °C as the specific heat of 
silver (see Table 20.1):
(3)   DT5
1
2
mv2
mc
5
v2
2c
5
1
200 m/s
22
2
1
234 J/kg
#
8C
2
5
85.58C
Finalize  Notice that the result does not depend on the mass of the bullet.
Suppose the cowboy runs out of silver bullets and fires a lead bullet at the same speed into the wall. Will 
the temperature change of the bullet be larger or smaller?
Answer  Table 20.1 shows that the specific heat of lead is 128 J/kg ? °C, which is smaller than that for silver. Therefore, 
a given amount of energy input or transformation raises lead to a higher temperature than silver and the final tem-
perature of the lead bullet will be larger. In Equation (3), let’s substitute the new value for the specific heat:
DT5
v2
2c
5
1
200 m/s
22
2
1
128 J/kg
#
8C
2
51568C
There is no requirement that the silver and lead bullets have the same mass to determine this change in temperature. 
The only requirement is that they have the same speed.
WHAT IF?
▸ 20.3 
continued
20.3 Latent Heat
As we have seen in the preceding section, a substance can undergo a change in tem-
perature when energy is transferred between it and its surroundings. In some situ-
ations, however, the transfer of energy does not result in a change in temperature. 
That is the case whenever the physical characteristics of the substance change from 
one form to another; such a change is commonly referred to as a phase change. 
Two common phase changes are from solid to liquid (melting) and from liquid to 
gas (boiling); another is a change in the crystalline structure of a solid. All such 
phase changes involve a change in the system’s internal energy but no change in 
its temperature. The increase in internal energy in boiling, for example, is repre-
sented by the breaking of bonds between molecules in the liquid state; this bond 
breaking allows the molecules to move farther apart in the gaseous state, with a 
corresponding increase in intermolecular potential energy.
As you might expect, different substances respond differently to the addition or 
removal of energy as they change phase because their internal molecular arrange-
ments vary. Also, the amount of energy transferred during a phase change depends on 
the amount of substance involved. (It takes less energy to melt an ice cube than it does 
to thaw a frozen lake.) When discussing two phases of a material, we will use the term 
higher-phase material to mean the material existing at the higher temperature. So, for 
example, if we discuss water and ice, water is the higher-phase material, whereas steam 
is the higher-phase material in a discussion of steam and water. Consider a system 
containing a substance in two phases in equilibrium such as water and ice. The initial 
amount of the higher-phase material, water, in the system is m
i
. Now imagine that 
energy Q enters the system. As a result, the final amount of water is m
f
due to the melt-
ing of some of the ice. Therefore, the amount of ice that melted, equal to the amount 
of new water, is Dm 5 m
f
m
i
. We define the latent heat for this phase change as
L;
Q
Dm
(20.6)
This parameter is called latent heat (literally, the “hidden” heat) because this 
added or removed energy does not result in a temperature change. The value of L 
for a substance depends on the nature of the phase change as well as on the proper-
ties of the substance. If the entire amount of the lower-phase material undergoes a 
phase change, the change in mass Dm of the higher-phase material is equal to the 
initial mass of the lower-phase material. For example, if an ice cube of mass m on a 
How to C#: File Format Support
PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. HTML Document Viewer for Azure, C# HTML Document Viewer VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET
pdf to html; convert pdf to html with images
How to C#: File Format Support
Convert Jpeg to PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. PDF in C#, C# convert PDF to HTML, C# convert
pdf to html converter online; convert pdf into web page
598
chapter 20 the First Law of thermodynamics
plate melts completely, the change in mass of the water is m
f
2 0 5 m, which is the 
mass of new water and is also equal to the initial mass of the ice cube.
From the definition of latent heat, and again choosing heat as our energy trans-
fer mechanism, the energy required to change the phase of a pure substance is
Q 5 L Dm 
(20.7)
where Dm is the change in mass of the higher-phase material.
Latent heat of fusion L
f
is the term used when the phase change is from solid to 
liquid (to fuse means “to combine by melting”), and latent heat of vaporization L
v
is 
the term used when the phase change is from liquid to gas (the liquid “vaporizes”).4 
The latent heats of various substances vary considerably as data in Table 20.2 show. 
When energy enters a system, causing melting or vaporization, the amount of the 
higher-phase material increases, so Dm is positive and Q is positive, consistent with 
our sign convention. When energy is extracted from a system, causing freezing or 
condensation, the amount of the higher-phase material decreases, so Dm is nega-
tive and Q is negative, again consistent with our sign convention. Keep in mind that 
Dm in Equation 20.7 always refers to the higher-phase material.
To understand the role of latent heat in phase changes, consider the energy 
required to convert a system consisting of a 1.00-g cube of ice at 230.0°C to steam 
at 120.0°C. Figure 20.3 indicates the experimental results obtained when energy is 
gradually added to the ice. The results are presented as a graph of temperature of 
the system versus energy added to the system. Let’s examine each portion of the 
red-brown curve, which is divided into parts A through E.
Part A. On this portion of the curve, the temperature of the system changes from 
230.0°C to 0.0°C. Equation 20.4 indicates that the temperature varies linearly 
with the energy added, so the experimental result is a straight line on the graph. 
Because the specific heat of ice is 2 090 J/kg ? °C, we can calculate the amount of 
energy added by using Equation 20.4:
Q 5 m
i
c
i
DT 5 (1.00 3 1023 kg)(2 090 J/kg ? °C)(30.0°C) 5 62.7 J 
Part B. When the temperature of the system reaches 0.0°C, the ice–water mixture 
remains at this temperature—even though energy is being added—until all the ice 
melts. The energy required to melt 1.00 g of ice at 0.0°C is, from Equation 20.7,
Q 5 L
f
Dm
w
L
f
m
i
5 (3.33 3 105 J/kg)(1.00 3 1023 kg) 5 333 J 
Energy transferred to 
a substance during 
a phase change
4When a gas cools, it eventually condenses; that is, it returns to the liquid phase. The energy given up per unit mass 
is called the latent heat of condensation and is numerically equal to the latent heat of vaporization. Likewise, when a 
liquid cools, it eventually solidifies, and the latent heat of solidification is numerically equal to the latent heat of fusion.
Table 20.2
Latent Heats of Fusion and Vaporization
Latent Heat
Melting 
of Fusion 
Boiling 
Latent Heat
Substance 
Point (°C) 
(J/kg) 
Point (°C) 
of Vaporization (J/kg)
Heliuma 
2272.2 
5.23 3 103 
2268.93 
2.09 3 104
Oxygen 
2218.79 
1.38 3 104 
2182.97 
2.13 3 105
Nitrogen 
2209.97 
2.55 3 104 
2195.81 
2.01 3 105
Ethyl alcohol 
2114 
1.04 3 105 
78 
8.54 3 105
Water 
0.00 
3.33 3 105 
100.00 
2.26 3 106
Sulfur 
119 
3.81 3 104 
444.60 
3.26 3 105
Lead 
327.3 
2.45 3 104 
1 750 
8.70 3 105
Aluminum 
660 
3.97 3 105 
2 450 
1.14 3 107
Silver 
960.80 
8.82 3 104 
2 193 
2.33 3 106
Gold 
1 063.00 
6.44 3 104 
2 660 
1.58 3 106
Copper 
1 083 
1.34 3 105 
1 187 
5.06 3 106
aHelium does not solidify at atmospheric pressure. The melting point given here corresponds to a pressure of 2.5 MPa.
Pitfall Prevention 20.6
Signs Are Critical Sign errors 
occur very often when students 
apply calorimetry equations. For 
phase changes, remember that 
Dm in Equation 20.7 is always the 
change in mass of the higher-
phase material. In Equation 20.4, 
be sure your DT is always the final 
temperature minus the initial tem-
perature. In addition, you must 
always include the negative sign on 
the right side of Equation 20.5.
C#: How to Determine the Display Format for Web Doucment Viewing
and _pptViewer are corresponding to setting PDF, Word, Excel the default setting of our XDoc.HTML Viewer, which on C#.NET web viewer, please change value to 0
convert pdf to web link; convert pdf to webpage
C# PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in C#.net, ASP
pdf = new PDFDocument(@"C:\input.pdf"); pdf.ConvertToVectorImages(ContextType.SVG Description: Convert to html/svg files and targetType, The target image format.
convert pdf to web; convert pdf to url online
20.3 Latent heat 
599
At this point, we have moved to the 396 J (5 62.7 J 1 333 J) mark on the energy axis 
in Figure 20.3.
Part C. Between 0.0°C and 100.0°C, nothing surprising happens. No phase change 
occurs, and so all energy added to the system, which is now water, is used to increase 
its temperature. The amount of energy necessary to increase the temperature from 
0.0°C to 100.0°C is
Q 5 m
w
c
w
DT 5 (1.00 3 1023 kg)(4.19 3 103 J/kg ? °C)(100.0°C) 5 419 J 
where m
w
is the mass of the water in the system, which is the same as the mass m
i
of 
the original ice.
Part D. At 100.0°C, another phase change occurs as the system changes from water 
at 100.0°C to steam at 100.0°C. Similar to the ice–water mixture in part B, the 
water–steam mixture remains at 100.0°C—even though energy is being added—
until all the liquid has been converted to steam. The energy required to convert 
1.00 g of water to steam at 100.0°C is
Q 5 L
v
Dm
s
L
v
m
w
5 (2.26 3 106 J/kg)(1.00 3 1023 kg) 5 2.26 3 103 J 
Part E. On this portion of the curve, as in parts A and C, no phase change occurs; 
therefore, all energy added is used to increase the temperature of the system, which 
is now steam. The energy that must be added to raise the temperature of the steam 
from 100.0°C to 120.0°C is
Q 5 m
s
c
s
DT 5 (1.00 3 1023 kg)(2.01 3 103 J/kg ? °C)(20.0°C) 5 40.2 J 
The total amount of energy that must be added to the system to change 1 g of ice 
at 230.0°C to steam at 120.0°C is the sum of the results from all five parts of the 
curve, which is 3.11 3 103 J. Conversely, to cool 1 g of steam at 120.0°C to ice at 
230.0°C, we must remove 3.11 3 103 J of energy.
Notice in Figure 20.3 the relatively large amount of energy that is transferred 
into the water to vaporize it to steam. Imagine reversing this process, with a large 
amount of energy transferred out of steam to condense it into water. That is why a 
burn to your skin from steam at 100°C is much more damaging than exposure of 
your skin to water at 100°C. A very large amount of energy enters your skin from 
the steam, and the steam remains at 100°C for a long time while it condenses. Con-
versely, when your skin makes contact with water at 100°C, the water immediately 
begins to drop in temperature as energy transfers from the water to your skin.
If liquid water is held perfectly still in a very clean container, it is possible for the 
water to drop below 0°C without freezing into ice. This phenomenon, called super-
cooling, arises because the water requires a disturbance of some sort for the mol-
ecules to move apart and start forming the large, open ice structure that makes the 
120
90
60
30
0
T
(
°
C
)
B
Ice +
water
Water
0
500
1000
1500
2000
2500
3000
3 110
3 070
815
396
62.7
Ice
Water + steam
E
Steam
A
D
–30
C
Energy added (J)
Figure 20.3 
A plot of tempera-
ture versus energy added when a 
system initially consisting of 1.00 g  
of ice at 230.0°C is converted to 
steam at 120.0°C.
VB.NET Image: Tutorial for Converting Image and Document in VB.NET
you integrate these functions into your VB.NET project, you are able to convert image to byte array or stream and convert Word or PDF document to image format.
convert pdf form to html; add pdf to website html
C# PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.
Description: Convert the PDF page to bitmap with specified format and save it on the disk. Parameters: Name, Description, Valid Value.
convert pdf into html online; convert pdf to html code
600
chapter 20 the First Law of thermodynamics
density of ice lower than that of water as discussed in Section 19.4. If supercooled 
water is disturbed, it suddenly freezes. The system drops into the lower-energy con-
figuration of bound molecules of the ice structure, and the energy released raises 
the temperature back to 0°C.
Commercial hand warmers consist of liquid sodium acetate in a sealed plastic 
pouch. The solution in the pouch is in a stable supercooled state. When a disk in the 
pouch is clicked by your fingers, the liquid solidifies and the temperature increases, 
just like the supercooled water just mentioned. In this case, however, the freezing 
point of the liquid is higher than body temperature, so the pouch feels warm to the 
touch. To reuse the hand warmer, the pouch must be boiled until the solid lique-
fies. Then, as it cools, it passes below its freezing point into the supercooled state.
It is also possible to create superheating. For example, clean water in a very clean 
cup placed in a microwave oven can sometimes rise in temperature beyond 100°C 
without boiling because the formation of a bubble of steam in the water requires 
scratches in the cup or some type of impurity in the water to serve as a nucleation 
site. When the cup is removed from the microwave oven, the superheated water can 
become explosive as bubbles form immediately and the hot water is forced upward 
out of the cup.
uick Quiz 20.2  Suppose the same process of adding energy to the ice cube is 
performed as discussed above, but instead we graph the internal energy of the 
system as a function of energy input. What would this graph look like?
Analyze  Write Equation 20.5 to describe the calo-
rimetry process:
(1)   Q
cold
5 2Q
hot
The steam undergoes three processes: first a decrease 
in temperature to 100°C, then condensation into 
liquid water, and finally a decrease in temperature of 
the water to 50.0°C. Find the energy transfer in the 
first process using the unknown mass m
s
of the steam:
Q
1
m
s
c
s
DT
s
Find the energy transfer in the second process:
Q
2
L
v
Dm
s
L
v
(0 2 m
s
) 5 2m
s
L
v
Find the energy transfer in the third process:
Q
3
m
s
c
w
DT
hot water
Add the energy transfers in these three stages:
(2)   Q
hot
Q
1
Q
2
Q
3
m
s
(c
s
DT
s
L
v
c
w
DT
hot water
)
Example 20.4   Cooling the Steam 
What mass of steam initially at 130°C is needed to warm 200 g of water in a 100-g glass container from 20.0°C to 50.0°C?
Conceptualize  Imagine placing water and steam together in a closed insulated container. The system eventually 
reaches a uniform state of water with a final temperature of 50.0°C.
Categorize  Based on our conceptualization of this situation, we categorize this example as one involving calorimetry 
in which a phase change occurs. The calorimeter is an isolated system for energy: energy transfers between the compo-
nents of the system but does not cross the boundary between the system and the environment.
AM
SolUTIon
The 20.0°C water and the glass undergo only one 
process, an increase in temperature to 50.0°C. Find 
the energy transfer in this process:
(3)   Q
cold
m
w
c
w
DT
cold water
m
g
c
g
DT
glass
Substitute Equations (2) and (3) into Equation (1):
m
w
c
w
DT
cold water
m
g
c
g
DT
glass
5 2m
s
(c
s
DT
s
L
v
c
w
DT
hot water
)
Solve for m
s
:
m
s
52
m
w
c
w
DT
cold water
1m
g
c
g
DT
glass
c
s
DT
s
2L
v
1c
w
DT
hot water
20.4 Work and heat in thermodynamic processes 
601
dy
P
A
V
a
b
Figure 20.4 
Work is done on 
a gas contained in a cylinder at a 
pressure P as the piston is  
pushed downward so that the gas 
is compressed.
What if the final state of the system is water at 100°C? Would we need more steam or less steam? How 
would the analysis above change?
Answer  More steam would be needed to raise the temperature of the water and glass to 100°C instead of 50.0°C. 
There would be two major changes in the analysis. First, we would not have a term Q
3
for the steam because the water 
that condenses from the steam does not cool below 100°C. Second, in Q
cold
, the temperature change would be 80.0°C 
instead of 30.0°C. For practice, show that the result is a required mass of steam of 31.8 g.
WHAT IF?
Substitute 
numerical 
values:
m
s
52
1
0.200 kg
21
4 186 J/kg
#
8C
21
50.08C220.08C
2
1
1
0.100 kg
21
837 J/kg
#
8C
21
50.08C220.08C
2
1
2 010 J/kg
#
8C
21
1008C21308C
2
2
1
2.263106 J/kg
2
1
1
4 186 J/kg
#
8C
21
50.08C21008C
2
5 1.09 3 1022 kg 5   10.9 g
▸ 20.4 
continued
20.4 Work and Heat in Thermodynamic Processes
In thermodynamics, we describe the state of a system using such variables as pres-
sure, volume, temperature, and internal energy. As a result, these quantities belong 
to a category called state variables. For any given configuration of the system, we 
can identify values of the state variables. (For mechanical systems, the state vari-
ables include kinetic energy K and potential energy U.) A state of a system can be 
specified only if the system is in thermal equilibrium internally. In the case of a gas 
in a container, internal thermal equilibrium requires that every part of the gas be 
at the same pressure and temperature.
A second category of variables in situations involving energy is transfer vari-
ables. These variables are those that appear on the right side of the conservation 
of energy equation, Equation 8.2. Such a variable has a nonzero value if a process 
occurs in which energy is transferred across the system’s boundary. The transfer 
variable is positive or negative, depending on whether energy is entering or leaving 
the system. Because a transfer of energy across the boundary represents a change 
in the system, transfer variables are not associated with a given state of the system, 
but rather with a change in the state of the system.
In the previous sections, we discussed heat as a transfer variable. In this section, 
we study another important transfer variable for thermodynamic systems, work. Work 
performed on particles was studied extensively in Chapter 7, and here we investigate 
the work done on a deformable system, a gas. Consider a gas contained in a cylinder 
fitted with a movable piston (Fig. 20.4). At equilibrium, the gas occupies a volume V 
and exerts a uniform pressure P on the cylinder’s walls and on the piston. If the pis-
ton has a cross-sectional area A, the magnitude of the force exerted by the gas on the 
piston is F 5 PA. By Newton’s third law, the magnitude of the force exerted by the pis-
ton on the gas is also PA. Now let’s assume we push the piston inward and compress 
the gas quasi-statically, that is, slowly enough to allow the system to remain essen-
tially in internal thermal equilibrium at all times. The point of application of the 
force on the gas is the bottom face of the piston. As the piston is pushed downward 
by an external force F
S
52F j
^
through a displacement of dr
S
5dy j
^
(Fig. 20.4b), the 
work done on the gas is, according to our definition of work in Chapter 7,
dWF
S
?dr
S
52F j
^
?dy j
^
52F dy52PA dy 
The mass of the piston is assumed to be negligible in this discussion. Because  dy 
is the change in volume of the gas dV, we can express the work done on the gas as
dW 5 2P dV 
(20.8)
If the gas is compressed, dV is negative and the work done on the gas is positive. 
If the gas expands, dV is positive and the work done on the gas is negative. If the 
602
chapter 20 the First Law of thermodynamics
volume remains constant, the work done on the gas is zero. The total work done on 
the gas as its volume changes from V
i
to V
f
is given by the integral of Equation20.8:
W5 2
3
V
f
V
i
P dV 
(20.9)
To evaluate this integral, you must know how the pressure varies with volume dur-
ing the process.
In general, the pressure is not constant during a process followed by a gas, but 
depends on the volume and temperature. If the pressure and volume are known 
at each step of the process, the state of the gas at each step can be plotted on an 
important graphical representation called a PV diagram as in Figure 20.5. This type 
of diagram allows us to visualize a process through which a gas is progressing. The 
curve on a PV diagram is called the path taken between the initial and final states.
Notice that the integral in Equation 20.9 is equal to the area under a curve on a 
PV diagram. Therefore, we can identify an important use for PV diagrams:
The work done on a gas in a quasi-static process that takes the gas from an 
initial state to a final state is the negative of the area under the curve on a PV 
diagram, evaluated between the initial and final states.
For the process of compressing a gas in a cylinder, the work done depends on the 
particular path taken between the initial and final states as Figure 20.5 suggests. To 
illustrate this important point, consider several different paths connecting i and f 
(Fig. 20.6). In the process depicted in Figure 20.6a, the volume of the gas is first 
reduced from V
i
to V
f
at constant pressure P
i
and the pressure of the gas then 
increases from P
i
to P
f
by heating at constant volume V
f
. The work done on the gas 
along this path is 2P
i
(V
f
V
i
). In Figure 20.6b, the pressure of the gas is increased 
from P
i
to P
f
at constant volume V
i
and then the volume of the gas is reduced from 
V
i
to V
f
at constant pressure P
f
. The work done on the gas is 2P
f
(V
f
V
i
). This value 
is greater than that for the process described in Figure 20.6a because the piston is 
moved through the same displacement by a larger force. Finally, for the process 
described in Figure 20.6c, where both P and V change continuously, the work done 
on the gas has some value between the values obtained in the first two processes. 
To evaluate the work in this case, the function P(V) must be known so that we can 
evaluate the integral in Equation 20.9.
The energy transfer Q into or out of a system by heat also depends on the pro-
cess. Consider the situations depicted in Figure 20.7. In each case, the gas has the 
same initial volume, temperature, and pressure, and is assumed to be ideal. In Figure 
20.7a, the gas is thermally insulated from its surroundings except at the bottom of 
the gas-filled region, where it is in thermal contact with an energy reservoir. An energy 
reservoir is a source of energy that is considered to be so great that a finite transfer of 
energy to or from the reservoir does not change its temperature. The piston is held 
Work done on a gas 
f
P
f
P
i
V
V
i
V
f
P
i
f
P
f
P
i
V
V
i
V
f
P
i
f
P
f
P
i
V
V
i
V
f
P
i
A constant-pressure 
compression followed by a 
constant-volume process
A constant-volume process 
followed by a constant-
pressure compression
An arbitrary 
compression
a
b
c
Figure 20.6 
The work done on 
a gas as it is taken from an initial 
state to a final state depends on 
the path between these states.
Figure 20.5 
A gas is compressed 
quasi-statically (slowly) from state 
i to state f. An outside agent must 
do positive work on the gas to 
compress it.
f
P
f
P
i
V
V
i
V
f
P
i
The work done on a gas 
equals the negative of the area 
under the PV curve. The area 
is negative here because the 
volume is decreasing, resulting 
in positive work.
20.5 the First Law of thermodynamics 
603
Figure 20.7 
Gas in a cylinder. (a) The gas is in contact with an energy reservoir. The walls of the cylinder are perfectly insulating, but the 
base in contact with the reservoir is conducting. (b) The gas expands slowly to a larger volume. (c) The gas is contained by a membrane in 
half of a volume, with vacuum in the other half. The entire cylinder is perfectly insulating. (d) The gas expands freely into the larger volume.
The hand 
reduces its 
downward force,  
allowing the 
piston to move 
up slowly. The 
energy reservoir 
keeps the gas at 
temperature T
i 
The gas is 
initially at 
temperature T
i
a
b
Energy reservoir at T
i
Energy reservoir at T
i
c
d
The gas is 
initially at 
temperature
T
and 
contained
by a thin 
membrane, 
with vacuum 
above. 
The membrane
is broken, and 
the gas expands 
freely into the 
evacuated 
region.
at its initial position by an external agent such as a hand. When the force holding the 
piston is reduced slightly, the piston rises very slowly to its final position shown in Fig-
ure 20.7b. Because the piston is moving upward, the gas is doing work on the piston. 
During this expansion to the final volume V
f
, just enough energy is transferred by 
heat from the reservoir to the gas to maintain a constant temperature T
i
.
Now consider the completely thermally insulated system shown in Figure 20.7c. 
When the membrane is broken, the gas expands rapidly into the vacuum until it 
occupies a volume V
f
and is at a pressure P
f
. The final state of the gas is shown in 
Figure 20.7d. In this case, the gas does no work because it does not apply a force; no 
force is required to expand into a vacuum. Furthermore, no energy is transferred 
by heat through the insulating wall.
As we discuss in Section 20.5, experiments show that the temperature of the ideal 
gas does not change in the process indicated in Figures 20.7c and 20.7d. Therefore, 
the initial and final states of the ideal gas in Figures 20.7a and 20.7b are identical  
to the initial and final states in Figures 20.7c and 20.7d, but the paths are different. 
In the first case, the gas does work on the piston and energy is transferred slowly to 
the gas by heat. In the second case, no energy is transferred by heat and the value of 
the work done is zero. Therefore, energy transfer by heat, like work done, depends on 
the particular process occurring in the system. In other words, because heat and work 
both depend on the path followed on a PV diagram between the initial and final states, 
neither quantity is determined solely by the endpoints of a thermodynamic process.
20.5 The First Law of Thermodynamics
When we introduced the law of conservation of energy in Chapter 8, we stated that 
the change in the energy of a system is equal to the sum of all transfers of energy 
across the system’s boundary (Eq. 8.2). The first law of thermodynamics is a spe-
cial case of the law of conservation of energy that describes processes in which only 
the internal energy5 changes and the only energy transfers are by heat and work:
DE
int
1 W 
(20.10)
WWFirst law of thermodynamics
5It is an unfortunate accident of history that the traditional symbol for internal energy is U, which is also the tra-
ditional symbol for potential energy as introduced in Chapter 7. To avoid confusion between potential energy and 
internal energy, we use the symbol E
int
for internal energy in this book. If you take an advanced course in thermody-
namics, however, be prepared to see U used as the symbol for internal energy in the first law.
604
chapter 20 the First Law of thermodynamics
Look back at Equation 8.2 to see that the first law of thermodynamics is contained 
within that more general equation.
Let us investigate some special cases in which the first law can be applied. First, 
consider an isolated system, that is, one that does not interact with its surroundings, 
as we have seen before. In this case, no energy transfer by heat takes place and the 
work done on the system is zero; hence, the internal energy remains constant. That 
is, because Q 5 W 5 0, it follows that DE
int
5 0; therefore, E
int,i
E
int,f
. We con-
clude that the internal energy E
int
of an isolated system remains constant.
Next, consider the case of a system that can exchange energy with its surround-
ings and is taken through a cyclic process, that is, a process that starts and ends at 
the same state. In this case, the change in the internal energy must again be zero 
because E
int
is a state variable; therefore, the energy Q added to the system must 
equal the negative of the work W done on the system during the cycle. That is, in a 
cyclic process,
DE
int
5 0    and    Q 5 2W (cyclic process) 
On a PV diagram for a gas, a cyclic process appears as a closed curve. (The pro-
cesses described in Figure 20.6 are represented by open curves because the initial 
and final states differ.) It can be shown that in a cyclic process for a gas, the net 
work done on the system per cycle equals the area enclosed by the path represent-
ing the process on a PV diagram.
20.6  Some Applications of the First Law  
of Thermodynamics
In this section, we consider additional applications of the first law to processes 
through which a gas is taken. As a model, let’s consider the sample of gas contained 
in the piston–cylinder apparatus in Figure 20.8. This figure shows work being done 
on the gas and energy transferring in by heat, so the internal energy of the gas is 
rising. In the following discussion of various processes, refer back to this figure 
and mentally alter the directions of the transfer of energy to reflect what is hap-
pening in the process.
Before we apply the first law of thermodynamics to specific systems, it is useful 
to first define some idealized thermodynamic processes. An adiabatic process is 
one during which no energy enters or leaves the system by heat; that is, Q 5 0. An 
adiabatic process can be achieved either by thermally insulating the walls of the 
system or by performing the process rapidly so that there is negligible time for 
energy to transfer by heat. Applying the first law of thermodynamics to an adia-
batic process gives
DE
int
W  (adiabatic process) 
(20.11)
This result shows that if a gas is compressed adiabatically such that W is positive, 
then DE
int
is positive and the temperature of the gas increases. Conversely, the tem-
perature of a gas decreases when the gas expands adiabatically.
Adiabatic processes are very important in engineering practice. Some common 
examples are the expansion of hot gases in an internal combustion engine, the 
liquefaction of gases in a cooling system, and the compression stroke in a diesel 
engine.
The process described in Figures 20.7c and 20.7d, called an adiabatic free 
expansion, is unique. The process is adiabatic because it takes place in an insulated 
container. Because the gas expands into a vacuum, it does not apply a force on a 
piston as does the gas in Figures 20.7a and 20.7b, so no work is done on or by the 
gas. Therefore, in this adiabatic process, both Q 5 0 and W 5 0. As a result, DE
int
 
0 for this process as can be seen from the first law. That is, the initial and final 
internal energies of a gas are equal in an adiabatic free expansion. As we shall see 
Pitfall Prevention 20.7
Dual Sign Conventions Some phys-
ics and engineering books present 
the first law as DE
int
Q 2 W, with 
a minus sign between the heat 
and work. The reason is that work 
is defined in these treatments as 
the work done by the gas rather 
than on the gas, as in our treat-
ment. The equivalent equation to 
Equation 20.9 in these treatments 
defines work as W5
e
V
f
V
i
P dV. 
Therefore, if positive work is done 
by the gas, energy is leaving the 
system, leading to the negative 
sign in the first law.
 In your studies in other chem-
istry or engineering courses, or 
in your reading of other physics 
books, be sure to note which sign 
convention is being used for the 
first law.
Pitfall Prevention 20.8
The First law With our approach 
to energy in this book, the first law 
of thermodynamics is a special case 
of Equation 8.2. Some physicists 
argue that the first law is the gen-
eral equation for energy conserva-
tion, equivalent to Equation 8.2. 
In this approach, the first law is 
applied to a closed system (so that 
there is no matter transfer), heat 
is interpreted so as to include elec-
tromagnetic radiation, and work is 
interpreted so as to include electri-
cal transmission (“electrical work”) 
and mechanical waves (“molecular 
work”). Keep that in mind if you 
run across the first law in your 
reading of other physics books.
Q
W
Q
E
int
Figure 20.8 
The first law of ther-
modynamics equates the change in 
internal energy E
int
in a system to 
the net energy transfer to the sys-
tem by heat Q and work W. In the 
situation shown here, the internal 
energy of the gas increases.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested