Objective Questions 
615
The energy Q required to change the temperature of a 
mass m of a substance by an amount DT is
Q 5 mc DT 
(20.4)
where c is the specific heat of the substance.
The energy required to change the phase of a pure sub-
stance is
Q 5 L Dm 
(20.7)
where L is the latent heat of the substance, which depends 
on the nature of the phase change and the substance, and 
Dm is the change in mass of the higher-phase material.
Conduction can be viewed as an exchange of kinetic energy between 
colliding molecules or electrons. The rate of energy transfer by conduction 
through a slab of area A is
P5kA`
dT
dx
(20.15)
where k is the thermal conductivity of the material from which the slab is 
made and |dT/dx| is the temperature gradient.
The work done on a gas as its volume changes 
from some initial value V
i
to some final value V
f
is
W52
3
V
f
V
i
P dV 
(20.9)
where P is the pressure of the gas, which may vary 
during the process. To evaluate W, the process 
must be fully specified; that is, P and V must be 
known during each step. The work done depends 
on the path taken between the initial and final 
states.
In convection, a warm sub-
stance transfers energy from one 
location to another.
All objects emit thermal 
radiation in the form of electro-
magnetic waves at the rate
P 5 sAeT4 
(20.19)
Concepts and Principles
The first law of thermodynamics is a specific reduction of the conservation of energy equation (Eq. 8.2) and states 
that when a system undergoes a change from one state to another, the change in its internal energy is
DE
int
Q 1 W 
(20.10)
where Q is the energy transferred into the system by heat and W is the work done on the system. Although Q and W 
both depend on the path taken from the initial state to the final state, the quantity DE
int
does not depend on the path.
In a cyclic process (one that originates and termi-
nates at the same state), DE
int
5 0 and therefore Q 5 
2W. That is, the energy transferred into the system by 
heat equals the negative of the work done on the sys-
tem during the process.
In an adiabatic process, no energy is transferred 
by heat between the system and its surroundings (Q5 
0). In this case, the first law gives DE
int
W. In the 
adiabatic free expansion of a gas, Q 5 0 and W 5 0, so 
DE
int
5 0. That is, the internal energy of the gas does 
not change in such a process.
An isobaric process is one that occurs at constant 
pressure. The work done on a gas in such a process is  
W 5 2P(V
f
V
i
).
An isovolumetric process is one that occurs at con-
stant volume. No work is done in such a process, so  
DE
int
Q.
An isothermal process is one that occurs at constant 
temperature. The work done on an ideal gas during an 
isothermal process is
W5nRT ln a
V
i
V
f
(20.14)
2. A poker is a stiff, nonflammable rod used to push burn-
ing logs around in a fireplace. For safety and comfort 
of use, should the poker be made from a material with 
(a)high specific heat and high thermal conductivity, 
(b) low specific heat and low thermal conductivity,  
1. An ideal gas is compressed to half its initial volume by 
means of several possible processes. Which of the fol-
lowing processes results in the most work done on the 
gas? (a) isothermal (b) adiabatic (c) isobaric (d) The 
work done is independent of the process.
Objective Questions
1. 
denotes answer available in Student Solutions Manual/Study Guide
Convert pdf form to html form - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
best pdf to html converter; convert pdf to html5 open source
Convert pdf form to html form - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
pdf to html converters; convert pdf to web page online
616
chapter 20 the First Law of thermodynamics
largest to the smallest. In your ranking, note any cases 
of equality. (a)raising the temperature of 1 kg of H
2
from 20°C to 26°C (b) raising the temperature of 2 kg 
of H
2
O from 20°C to 23°C (c)raising the temperature 
of 2 kg of H
2
O from 1°C to 4°C (d)raising the tempera-
ture of 2 kg of beryllium from 21°C to 2°C (e) raising 
the temperature of 2 kg of H
2
O from 21°C to 2°C
9. A person shakes a sealed insulated bottle containing 
hot coffee for a few minutes. (i) What is the change 
in the temperature of the coffee? (a) a large decrease  
(b) a slight decrease (c) no change (d) a slight increase 
(e) a large increase (ii) What is the change in the 
internal energy of the coffee? Choose from the same 
possibilities.
10. A 100-g piece of copper, initially at 95.0°C, is dropped 
into 200 g of water contained in a 280-g aluminum 
can; the water and can are initially at 15.0°C. What is 
the final temperature of the system? (Specific heats of 
copper and aluminum are 0.092 and 0.215 cal/g ? °C,  
respectively.) (a)16°C (b) 18°C (c) 24°C (d) 26°C  
(e) none of those answers
11. Star A has twice the radius and twice the absolute sur-
face temperature of star B. The emissivity of both stars 
can be assumed to be 1. What is the ratio of the power 
output of star A to that of star B? (a) 4 (b) 8 (c) 16  
(d) 32 (e) 64
12. If a gas is compressed isothermally, which of the fol-
lowing statements is true? (a) Energy is transferred 
into the gas by heat. (b) No work is done on the gas.  
(c) The temperature of the gas increases. (d) The 
internal energy of the gas remains constant. (e) None 
of those statements is true.
13. When a gas undergoes an adiabatic expansion, which 
of the following statements is true? (a) The tempera-
ture of the gas does not change. (b) No work is done by 
the gas. (c)No energy is transferred to the gas by heat. 
(d) The internal energy of the gas does not change.  
(e) The pressure increases.
14. If a gas undergoes an isobaric process, which of the fol-
lowing statements is true? (a) The temperature of the 
gas doesn’t change. (b) Work is done on or by the gas. 
(c) No energy is transferred by heat to or from the gas. 
(d) The volume of the gas remains the same. (e) The 
pressure of the gas decreases uniformly.
15. How long would it take a 1 000 W heater to melt  
1.00 kg of ice at 220.0°C, assuming all the energy from 
the heater is absorbed by the ice? (a) 4.18 s (b) 41.8 s 
(c) 5.55 min (d)6.25 min (e) 38.4 min
(c) low specific heat and high thermal conductivity, or 
(d) high specific heat and low thermal conductivity?
3. Assume you are measuring the specific heat of a sam-
ple of originally hot metal by using a calorimeter con-
taining water. Because your calorimeter is not perfectly 
insulating, energy can transfer by heat between the 
contents of the calorimeter and the room. To obtain 
the most accurate result for the specific heat of the 
metal, you should use water with which initial tem-
perature? (a) slightly lower than room temperature  
(b) the same as room temperature (c) slightly higher 
than room temperature (d) whatever you like because 
the initial temperature makes no difference
4. An amount of energy is added to ice, raising its temper-
ature from 210°C to 25°C. A larger amount of energy 
is added to the same mass of water, raising its tempera-
ture from 15°C to 20°C. From these results, what would 
you conclude? (a) Overcoming the latent heat of fusion 
of ice requires an input of energy. (b) The latent heat 
of fusion of ice delivers some energy to the system.  
(c) The specific heat of ice is less than that of water.  
(d) The specific heat of ice is greater than that of water. 
(e) More information is needed to draw any conclusion.
5. How much energy is required to raise the tempera-
ture of 5.00 kg of lead from 20.0°C to its melting point 
of 327°C? The specific heat of lead is 128 J/kg ? °C.  
(a) 4.04 3 105 J (b) 1.07 3 105 J (c) 8.15 3 104 J  
(d) 2.13 3 104 J (e) 1.96 3 105 J
6. Ethyl alcohol has about one-half the specific heat 
of water. Assume equal amounts of energy are trans-
ferred by heat into equal-mass liquid samples of alco-
hol and water in separate insulated containers. The 
water rises in temperature by 25°C. How much will the 
alcohol rise in temperature? (a) It will rise by 12°C. 
(b) It will rise by 25°C. (c) It will rise by 50°C. (d) It 
depends on the rate of energy transfer. (e) It will not 
rise in temperature.
7. The specific heat of substance A is greater than that 
of substance B. Both A and B are at the same initial 
temperature when equal amounts of energy are added 
to them. Assuming no melting or vaporization occurs, 
which of the following can be concluded about the 
final temperature T
A
of substance A and the final tem-
perature T
B
of substance B? (a) T
A
T
B
(b) T
A
T
B
(c) T
A
T
B
(d) More information is needed.
8. Beryllium has roughly one-half the specific heat of 
water (H
2
O). Rank the quantities of energy input 
required to produce the following changes from the 
Conceptual Questions
1. 
denotes answer available in Student Solutions Manual/Study Guide
1. Rub the palm of your hand on a metal surface for 
about 30 seconds. Place the palm of your other hand 
on an unrubbed portion of the surface and then on the 
rubbed portion. The rubbed portion will feel warmer. 
Now repeat this process on a wood surface. Why does 
the temperature difference between the rubbed and 
unrubbed portions of the wood surface seem larger 
than for the metal surface?
2. You need to pick up a very hot cooking pot in your 
kitchen. You have a pair of cotton oven mitts. To pick 
up the pot most comfortably, should you soak them in 
cold water or keep them dry?
3. What is wrong with the following statement: “Given 
any two bodies, the one with the higher temperature 
contains more heat.”
VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in
RasterEdge .NET PDF SDK is such one provide various of form field edit functions. Demo Code to Retrieve All Form Fields from a PDF File in VB.NET.
convert pdf to web pages; how to convert pdf file to html
C# PDF Form Data Read Library: extract form data from PDF in C#.
A best PDF document SDK library enable users abilities to read and extract PDF form data in Visual C#.NET WinForm and ASP.NET WebForm applications.
pdf to web converter; convert pdf to html online
problems 
617
wrap a wool blanket around the chest. Does doing so 
help to keep the beverages cool, or should you expect 
the wool blanket to warm them up? Explain your 
answer. (b) Your younger sister suggests you wrap her 
up in another wool blanket to keep her cool on the hot 
day like the ice chest. Explain your response to her.
8. In usually warm climates that experience a hard freeze, 
fruit growers will spray the fruit trees with water, hop-
ing that a layer of ice will form on the fruit. Why would 
such a layer be advantageous?
9. Suppose you pour hot coffee for your guests, and one 
of them wants it with cream. He wants the coffee to 
be as warm as possible several minutes later when he 
drinks it. To have the warmest coffee, should the per-
son add the cream just after the coffee is poured or just 
before drinking? Explain.
10. When camping in a canyon on a still night, a camper 
notices that as soon as the sun strikes the surrounding 
peaks, a breeze begins to stir. What causes the breeze?
11. Pioneers stored fruits and vegetables in underground 
cellars. In winter, why did the pioneers place an open 
barrel of water alongside their produce?
12. Is it possible to convert internal energy to mechanical 
energy? Explain with examples.
4. Why is a person able to remove a piece of dry alumi-
num foil from a hot oven with bare fingers, whereas a 
burn results if there is moisture on the foil?
5. Using the first law of thermodynamics, explain why the 
total energy of an isolated system is always constant.
6. In 1801, Humphry Davy rubbed together pieces of ice 
inside an icehouse. He made sure that nothing in the 
environment was at a higher temperature than the 
rubbed pieces. He observed the production of drops 
of liquid water. Make a table listing this and other 
experiments or processes to illustrate each of the 
following situations. (a) A system can absorb energy 
by heat, increase in internal energy, and increase in 
temperature. (b) A system can absorb energy by heat 
and increase in internal energy without an increase 
in temperature. (c) A system can absorb energy by 
heat without increasing in temperature or in inter-
nal energy. (d) A system can increase in internal 
energy and in temperature without absorbing energy 
by heat. (e) A system can increase in internal energy 
without absorbing energy by heat or increasing in 
temperature.
7. It is the morning of a day that will become hot. You just 
purchased drinks for a picnic and are loading them, 
with ice, into a chest in the back of your car. (a) You 
3. A combination of 0.250 kg of water at 20.0°C, 0.400 kg  
of aluminum at 26.0°C, and 0.100 kg of copper at 
100°C is mixed in an insulated container and allowed 
to come to thermal equilibrium. Ignore any energy 
transfer to or from the container. What is the final 
temperature of the mixture?
4. The highest waterfall in the world is the Salto Angel 
in Venezuela. Its longest single falls has a height of 
807 m. If water at the top of the falls is at 15.0°C, what 
is the maximum temperature of the water at the bot-
tom of the falls? Assume all the kinetic energy of the 
water as it reaches the bottom goes into raising its 
temperature.
5. What mass of water at 25.0°C must be allowed to come 
to thermal equilibrium with a 1.85-kg cube of alumi-
num initially at 150°C to lower the temperature of 
the aluminum to 65.0°C? Assume any water turned to 
steam subsequently condenses.
6. The temperature of a silver bar rises by 10.0°C when it 
absorbs 1.23 kJ of energy by heat. The mass of the bar is 
M
Section 20.1  Heat and Internal Energy
1. A 55.0-kg woman eats a 540 Calorie (540 kcal) jelly 
doughnut for breakfast. (a) How many joules of 
energy are the equivalent of one jelly doughnut?  
(b) How many steps must the woman climb on a 
very tall stairway to change the gravitational poten-
tial energy of the woman–Earth system by a value 
equivalent to the food energy in one jelly doughnut? 
Assume the height of a single stair is 15.0 cm. (c) If 
the human body is only 25.0% efficient in convert-
ing chemical potential energy to mechanical energy, 
how many steps must the woman climb to work off 
her breakfast?
Section 20.2  Specific Heat and Calorimetry
2. Consider Joule’s apparatus described in Figure 20.1. 
The mass of each of the two blocks is 1.50 kg, and the 
insulated tank is filled with 200 g of water. What is the 
increase in the water’s temperature after the blocks fall 
through a distance of 3.00 m?
BIO
AMT
W
Problems
The problems found in this  
chapter may be assigned 
online in Enhanced WebAssign
1.
 straightforward; 
2. 
intermediate;  
3. 
challenging
1.
full solution available in the Student 
Solutions Manual/Study Guide
AMT
Analysis Model tutorial available in 
Enhanced WebAssign
GP
Guided Problem
M
Master It tutorial available in Enhanced 
WebAssign
W
Watch It video solution available in 
Enhanced WebAssign
BIO
Q/C
S
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data
C#: Convert PDF to HTML; C#: Convert PDF to Jpeg; C# File: Compress PDF; C# File: Merge PDF; C# Protect: Add Password to PDF; C# Form: extract value from fields;
convert pdf to website; convert pdf to website html
VB.NET Image: Professional Form Processing and Recognition SDK in
Please make sure you have checked your forms before using form printing add are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
convert pdf to html code for email; embed pdf into webpage
618
chapter 20 the First Law of thermodynamics
of steel in this case. (c) What pieces of data, if any, are 
unnecessary for the solution? Explain.
m
M
Figure P20.12
13. An aluminum calorimeter with a mass of 100 g con-
tains 250 g of water. The calorimeter and water are in 
thermal equilibrium at 10.0°C. Two metallic blocks are 
placed into the water. One is a 50.0-g piece of copper 
at 80.0°C. The other has a mass of 70.0 g and is origi-
nally at a temperature of 100°C. The entire system sta-
bilizes at a final temperature of 20.0°C. (a) Determine 
the specific heat of the unknown sample. (b) Using the 
data in Table 20.1, can you make a positive identifica-
tion of the unknown material? Can you identify a pos-
sible material? (c) Explain your answers for part (b).
14. A 3.00-g copper coin at 25.0°C drops 50.0 m to the 
ground. (a) Assuming 60.0% of the change in gravita-
tional potential energy of the coin–Earth system goes 
into increasing the internal energy of the coin, deter-
mine the coin’s final temperature. (b) What If? Does 
the result depend on the mass of the coin? Explain.
15. Two thermally insulated vessels are connected by a nar-
row tube fitted with a valve that is initially closed as 
shown in Figure P20.15. One vessel of volume 16.8 L 
contains oxygen at a temperature of 300 K and a pres-
sure of 1.75 atm. The other vessel of volume 22.4 L con-
tains oxygen at a temperature of 450 K and a pressure 
of 2.25 atm. When the valve is opened, the gases in 
the two vessels mix and the temperature and pressure 
become uniform throughout. (a) What is the final tem-
perature? (b) What is the final pressure?
Q/C
W
Q/C
525g. Determine the specific heat of silver from these 
data.
7. In cold climates, including the northern United States, 
a house can be built with very large windows facing 
south to take advantage of solar heating. Sunlight shin-
ing in during the daytime is absorbed by the floor, 
interior walls, and objects in the room, raising their 
temperature to 38.0°C. If the house is well insulated, 
you may model it as losing energy by heat steadily at 
the rate 6 000 W on a day in April when the average 
exterior temperature is 4°C and when the conventional 
heating system is not used at all. During the period 
between 5:00 p.m. and 7:00 a.m., the temperature of 
the house drops and a sufficiently large “thermal mass” 
is required to keep it from dropping too far. The ther-
mal mass can be a large quantity of stone (with specific 
heat 850 J/kg ? °C) in the floor and the interior walls 
exposed to sunlight. What mass of stone is required if 
the temperature is not to drop below 18.0°C overnight?
8. A 50.0-g sample of copper is at 25.0°C. If 1 200 J of 
energy is added to it by heat, what is the final tempera-
ture of the copper?
9. An aluminum cup of mass 200 g contains 800 g of 
water in thermal equilibrium at 80.0°C. The combina-
tion of cup and water is cooled uniformly so that the 
temperature decreases by 1.50°C per minute. At what 
rate is energy being removed by heat? Express your 
answer in watts.
10. If water with a mass m
h
at temperature T
h
is poured 
into an aluminum cup of mass m
Al
containing mass m
c
of water at T
c
, where T
h
T
c
, what is the equilibrium 
temperature of the system?
11. A 1.50-kg iron horseshoe initially at 600°C is dropped 
into a bucket containing 20.0 kg of water at 25.0°C. 
What is the final temperature of the water–horseshoe 
system? Ignore the heat capacity of the container and 
assume a negligible amount of water boils away.
12. An electric drill with a steel drill bit of mass m 5 27.0g 
and diameter 0.635 cm is used to drill into a cubical 
steel block of mass M 5 240 g. Assume steel has the 
same properties as iron. The cutting process can be 
modeled as happening at one point on the circumfer-
ence of the bit. This point moves in a helix at constant 
tangential speed 40.0 m/s and exerts a force of con-
stant magnitude 3.20 N on the block. As shown in Fig-
ure P20.12, a groove in the bit carries the chips up to 
the top of the block, where they form a pile around the 
hole. The drill is turned on and drills into the block for 
a time interval of 15.0 s. Let’s assume this time interval 
is long enough for conduction within the steel to bring 
it all to a uniform temperature. Furthermore, assume 
the steel objects lose a negligible amount of energy by 
conduction, convection, and radiation into their envi-
ronment. (a) Suppose the drill bit cuts three-quarters 
of the way through the block during 15.0s. Find the 
temperature change of the whole quantity of steel.  
(b) What If? Now suppose the drill bit is dull and cuts 
only one-eighth of the way through the block in 15.0 s. 
Identify the temperature change of the whole quantity 
S
M
Q/C
Pistons locked
in place
Valve
P = 1.75 atm
V = 16.8 L
T = 300 K
P = 2.25 atm
V = 22.4 L
T = 450 K
Figure P20.15
C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#
Robust .NET components and dlls for filling in PDF form online in ASP.NET WebForm application. Able to fill out all PDF form field in C#.NET.
convert pdf to html form; convert pdf to html code online
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
C#: Convert PDF to HTML; C#: Convert PDF to Jpeg; C# File: Compress PDF; C# File: Merge PDF; C# Protect: Add Password to PDF; C# Form: extract value from fields;
how to convert pdf to html email; convert pdf into webpage
problems 
619
down, keeping the pressure of the gas constant. How 
much work is done on the gas as the temperature of 
0.200 mol of the gas is raised from 20.0°C to 300°C?
26. An ideal gas is enclosed in a cylinder that has a mov-
able piston on top. The piston has a mass m and an 
area A and is free to slide up and down, keeping the 
pressure of the gas constant. How much work is done 
on the gas as the temperature of n mol of the gas is 
raised from T
1
to T
2
?
27. One mole of an ideal gas is warmed slowly so that it 
goes from the PV state (P
i
V
i
) to (3P
i
, 3V
i
) in such a 
way that the pressure of the gas is directly proportional 
to the volume. (a) How much work is done on the gas 
in the process? (b) How is the temperature of the gas 
related to its volume during this process?
28. (a) Determine the work done on a gas that expands 
from i to f as indicated in Figure P20.28. (b) What If? 
How much work is done on the gas if it is compressed 
from f to i along the same path?
6 × 106
P (Pa)
4 × 106
2 × 106
i
f
(m3)
4
3
2
1
0
Figure P20.28
29. An ideal gas is taken through a quasi-static process 
described by P 5 aV2, with a 5 5.00 atm/m6, as shown 
in Figure P20.29. The gas is expanded to twice its origi-
nal volume of 1.00 m3. How much work is done on the 
expanding gas in this process?
P
i
f
P = V2
V
1.00 m3
2.00 m3
a
Figure P20.29
Section 20.5  The First law of Thermodynamics
30. A gas is taken through the 
cyclic process described 
in Figure P20.30. (a) Find 
the net energy transferred 
to the system by heat dur-
ing one complete cycle. 
(b) What If? If the cycle 
is reversed—that is, the 
process follows the path 
ACBA—what is the net 
energy input per cycle by 
heat?
S
S
Q/C
W
M
4
6
2
8
(kPa)
B
C
A
6
10
8
(m3)
Figure P20.30 
Problems 30 and 31.
W
Section 20.3  latent Heat
16. A 50.0-g copper calorimeter contains 250 g of water at 
20.0°C. How much steam at 100°C must be condensed 
into the water if the final temperature of the system is 
to reach 50.0°C?
17. A 75.0-kg cross-country 
skier glides over snow 
as in Figure P20.17. The 
coefficient of friction 
between skis and snow 
is 0.200. Assume all the 
snow beneath his skis is 
at 0°C and that all the 
internal energy gener-
ated by friction is added 
to snow, which sticks to 
his skis until it melts. 
How far would he have 
to ski to melt 1.00 kg of 
snow?
18. How much energy is required to change a 40.0-g ice 
cube from ice at 210.0°C to steam at 110°C?
19. A 75.0-g ice cube at 0°C is placed in 825 g of water at 
25.0°C. What is the final temperature of the mixture?
20. A 3.00-g lead bullet at 30.0°C is fired at a speed of  
240 m/s into a large block of ice at 0°C, in which it 
becomes embedded. What quantity of ice melts?
21. Steam at 100°C is added to ice at 0°C. (a) Find the 
amount of ice melted and the final temperature when 
the mass of steam is 10.0 g and the mass of ice is 50.0 g. 
(b) What If? Repeat when the mass of steam is 1.00 g 
and the mass of ice is 50.0 g.
22. A 1.00-kg block of copper at 20.0°C is dropped into 
a large vessel of liquid nitrogen at 77.3 K. How many 
kilograms of nitrogen boil away by the time the cop-
per reaches 77.3 K? (The specific heat of copper is  
0.092 0 cal/g ? °C, and the latent heat of vaporization 
of nitrogen is 48.0 cal/g.)
23. In an insulated vessel, 250 g of ice at 0°C is added to 
600g of water at 18.0°C. (a) What is the final tempera-
ture of the system? (b) How much ice remains when 
the system reaches equilibrium?
24. An automobile has a mass of 1 500 kg, and its alumi-
num brakes have an overall mass of 6.00 kg. (a) Assume 
all the mechanical energy that transforms into internal 
energy when the car stops is deposited in the brakes 
and no energy is transferred out of the brakes by heat. 
The brakes are originally at 20.0°C. How many times 
can the car be stopped from 25.0 m/s before the brakes 
start to melt? (b) Identify some effects ignored in part 
(a) that are important in a more realistic assessment of 
the warming of the brakes.
Section 20.4 Work and Heat in Thermodynamic Processes
25. An ideal gas is enclosed in a cylinder with a movable 
piston on top of it. The piston has a mass of 8 000 g 
and an area of 5.00 cm2 and is free to slide up and 
Figure P20.17
i
S
t
o
c
k
p
h
o
t
o
.
c
o
m
/
t
e
c
h
n
o
t
r
M
W
AMT
M
W
Q/C
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Convert PDF to images, like Tiff. Convert image files to PDF. File & Page Process. Edit, remove images from PDF. Add, edit, delete links. Form Process.
convert pdf to html; convert pdf to web form
VB.NET PDF Field Edit library: insert, delete, update pdf form
The demo code below can help you to add form fields to PDF file in VB.NET class. This is VB.NET sample code for deleting PDF document form field.
convert from pdf to html; change pdf to html
620
chapter 20 the First Law of thermodynamics
40. In Figure P20.40, the change in 
internal energy of a gas that is taken 
from A to C along the blue path is 
1800 J. The work done on the gas 
along the red path ABC is 2500 J. 
(a) How much energy must be 
added to the system by heat as it 
goes from A through B to C? (b) If 
the pressure at point A is five times 
that of point C, what is the work 
done on the system in going from C to D? (c) What is 
the energy exchanged with the surroundings by heat  
as the gas goes from C to A along the green path? (d) If 
the change in internal energy in going from point D to 
point A is 1500 J, how much energy must be added to 
the system by heat as it goes from point C to point D?
41. An ideal gas initially at P
i
V
i
, and T
i
is taken through 
a cycle as shown in Figure 
P20.41. (a)Find the net work 
done on the gas per cycle 
for 1.00 mol of gas initially 
at 0°C. (b)What is the net 
energy added by heat to the 
gas per cycle?
42. An ideal gas initially at P
i
V
i
, and T
i
is taken through 
a cycle as shown in Figure 
P20.41. (a) Find the net work done on the gas per cycle. 
(b) What is the net energy added by heat to the system 
per cycle?
Section 20.7  Energy Transfer Mechanisms  
in Thermal Processes
43. A glass windowpane in a home is 0.620 cm thick and 
has dimensions of 1.00 m 3 2.00 m. On a certain day, 
the temperature of the interior surface of the glass is 
25.0°C and the exterior surface temperature is 0°C.  
(a) What is the rate at which energy is transferred by 
heat through the glass? (b) How much energy is trans-
ferred through the window in one day, assuming the 
temperatures on the surfaces remain constant?
44. A concrete slab is 12.0 cm thick and has an area of 
5.00m2. Electric heating coils are installed under the 
slab to melt the ice on the surface in the winter months. 
What minimum power must be supplied to the coils to 
maintain a temperature difference of 20.0°C between 
the bottom of the slab and its surface? Assume all the 
energy transferred is through the slab.
45. A student is trying to decide what to wear. His bed-
room is at 20.0°C. His skin temperature is 35.0°C. The 
area of his exposed skin is 1.50 m2. People all over the 
world have skin that is dark in the infrared, with emis-
sivity about 0.900. Find the net energy transfer from 
his body by radiation in 10.0 min.
46. The surface of the Sun has a temperature of about  
5 800 K. The radius of the Sun is 6.96 3 108 m. Calcu-
late the total energy radiated by the Sun each second. 
Assume the emissivity of the Sun is 0.986.
B
C
D
A
P
P
i
3P
i
V
i
3V
i
V
Figure P20.41 
Problems 41 and 42.
W
S
BIO
31. Consider the cyclic process depicted in Figure P20.30. 
If Q is negative for the process BC and DE
int
is nega-
tive for the process CA, what are the signs of QW, 
and DE
int
that are associated with each of the three 
processes?
32. Why is the following situation impossible? An ideal gas 
undergoes a process with the following parameters: Q 5  
10.0 J, W5 12.0 J, and DT 5 22.00°C.
33. A thermodynamic system undergoes a process in which 
its internal energy decreases by 500 J. Over the same 
time interval, 220 J of work is done on the system. Find 
the energy transferred from it by heat.
34. A sample of an ideal gas goes through the process 
shown in Figure P20.34. From A to B, the process 
is adiabatic; from B to C, it is isobaric with 345 kJ of 
energy entering the system by heat; from C to D, the 
process is isothermal; and from D to A, it is isobaric 
with 371 kJ of energy leaving the system by heat. Deter-
mine the difference in internal energy E
int,B
2 E
int,A
.
1
3
P(atm)
0.09 0.2 2 0.4
1.2
A
C
B
D
V(m
3
)
Figure P20.34
Section 20.6  Some Applications of the First law  
of Thermodynamics
35. A 2.00-mol sample of helium gas initially at 300 K, and 
0.400 atm is compressed isothermally to 1.20 atm. Not-
ing that the helium behaves as an ideal gas, find (a) the 
final volume of the gas, (b) the work done on the gas, 
and (c)the energy transferred by heat.
36. (a) How much work is done on the steam when 1.00 mol  
of water at 100°C boils and becomes 1.00 mol of steam 
at 100°C at 1.00 atm pressure? Assume the steam to 
behave as an ideal gas. (b) Determine the change in 
internal energy of the system of the water and steam as 
the water vaporizes.
37. An ideal gas initially at 300 K undergoes an isobaric 
expansion at 2.50 kPa. If the volume increases from 
1.00 m3 to 3.00 m3 and 12.5 kJ is transferred to the gas 
by heat, what are (a) the change in its internal energy 
and (b) its final temperature?
38. One mole of an ideal gas does 3 000 J of work on its 
surroundings as it expands isothermally to a final 
pressure of 1.00 atm and volume of 25.0 L. Determine 
(a) the initial volume and (b) the temperature of the 
gas.
39. A 1.00-kg block of aluminum is warmed at atmospheric 
pressure so that its temperature increases from 22.0°C 
to 40.0°C. Find (a) the work done on the aluminum, 
(b) the energy added to it by heat, and (c) the change 
in its internal energy.
W
M
M
W
P
V
C
D
B
A
Figure P20.40
problems 
621
by using the thermal window instead of the single-pane 
window? Include the contributions of inside and out-
side stagnant air layers.
54. At our distance from the Sun, the intensity of solar 
radiation is 1 370 W/m2. The temperature of the 
Earth is affected by the greenhouse effect of the atmo-
sphere. This phenomenon describes the effect of 
absorption of infrared light emitted by the surface so 
as to make the surface temperature of the Earth 
higher than if it were airless. For comparison, consider 
a spherical object of radius r with no atmosphere at 
the same distance from the Sun as the Earth. Assume 
its emissivity is the same for all kinds of electromag-
netic waves and its temperature is uniform over its sur-
face. (a) Explain why the projected area over which it 
absorbs sunlight is pr2 and the surface area over 
which it radiates is 4pr2. (b) Compute its steady-state 
temperature. Is it chilly?
55. A bar of gold (Au) is in ther-
mal contact with a bar of silver 
(Ag) of the same length and 
area (Fig. P20.55). One end 
of the compound bar is main-
tained at 80.0°C, and the oppo-
site end is at 30.0°C. When the 
energy transfer reaches steady 
state, what is the temperature 
at the junction?
56. For bacteriological testing of 
water supplies and in medical 
clinics, samples must routinely be incubated for 24h at 
37°C. Peace Corps volunteer and MIT engineer Amy 
Smith invented a low-cost, low-maintenance incuba-
tor. The incubator consists of a foam-insulated box 
containing a waxy material that melts at 37.0°C inter-
spersed among tubes, dishes, or bottles containing 
the test samples and growth medium (bacteria food). 
Outside the box, the waxy material is first melted by a 
stove or solar energy collector. Then the waxy material 
is put into the box to keep the test samples warm as 
the material solidifies. The heat of fusion of the phase-
change material is 205 kJ/kg. Model the insulation as 
a panel with surface area 0.490 m2, thickness 4.50 cm, 
and conductivity 0.012 0 W/m ? °C. Assume the exte-
rior temperature is 23.0°C for 12.0 h and 16.0°C for 
12.0 h. (a) What mass of the waxy material is required 
to conduct the bacteriological test? (b) Explain why 
your calculation can be done without knowing the 
mass of the test samples or of the insulation.
57. A large, hot pizza floats in outer space after being jet-
tisoned as refuse from a spacecraft. What is the order 
of magnitude (a) of its rate of energy loss and (b)of 
its rate of temperature change? List the quantities you 
estimate and the value you estimate for each.
Additional Problems
58. A gas expands from I to F in Figure P20.58 (page 622). 
The energy added to the gas by heat is 418 J when the 
gas goes from I to F along the diagonal path. (a) What 
is the change in internal energy of the gas? (b) How 
Q/C
Insulation
Au
Ag
30.0° C
80.0° C
Figure P20.55
BIO
Q/C
M
47. The tungsten filament of a certain 100-W lightbulb 
radiates 2.00 W of light. (The other 98 W is carried 
away by convection and conduction.) The filament has 
a surface area of 0.250 mm2 and an emissivity of 0.950. 
Find the filament’s temperature. (The melting point of 
tungsten is 3 683 K.)
48. At high noon, the Sun delivers 1 000 W to each square 
meter of a blacktop road. If the hot asphalt trans-
fers energy only by radiation, what is its steady-state 
temperature?
49. Two lightbulbs have cylindrical filaments much greater 
in length than in diameter. The evacuated bulbs are 
identical except that one operates at a filament tem-
perature of 2 100°C and the other operates at 2 000°C. 
(a) Find the ratio of the power emitted by the hot-
ter lightbulb to that emitted by the cooler lightbulb.  
(b) With the bulbs operating at the same respective 
temperatures, the cooler lightbulb is to be altered by 
making its filament thicker so that it emits the same 
power as the hotter one. By what factor should the 
radius of this filament be increased?
50. The human body must maintain its core temperature 
inside a rather narrow range around 37°C. Metabolic 
processes, notably muscular exertion, convert chemical 
energy into internal energy deep in the interior. From 
the interior, energy must flow out to the skin or lungs 
to be expelled to the environment. During moderate 
exercise, an 80-kg man can metabolize food energy at 
the rate 300 kcal/h, do 60 kcal/h of mechanical work, 
and put out the remaining 240 kcal/h of energy by 
heat. Most of the energy is carried from the body inte-
rior out to the skin by forced convection (as a plumber 
would say), whereby blood is warmed in the interior 
and then cooled at the skin, which is a few degrees 
cooler than the body core. Without blood flow, living 
tissue is a good thermal insulator, with thermal con-
ductivity about 0.210 W/m · °C. Show that blood flow 
is essential to cool the man’s body by calculating the 
rate of energy conduction in kcal/h through the tissue 
layer under his skin. Assume that its area is 1.40 m2, its 
thickness is 2.50 cm, and it is maintained at 37.0°C on 
one side and at 34.0°C on the other side.
51. A copper rod and an aluminum rod of equal diameter 
are joined end to end in good thermal contact. The 
temperature of the free end of the copper rod is held 
constant at 100°C and that of the far end of the alumi-
num rod is held at 0°C. If the copper rod is 0.150 m 
long, what must be the length of the aluminum rod so 
that the temperature at the junction is 50.0°C?
52. A box with a total surface area of 1.20 m2 and a wall 
thickness of 4.00 cm is made of an insulating material. 
A 10.0-W electric heater inside the box maintains the 
inside temperature at 15.0°C above the outside temper-
ature. Find the thermal conductivity k of the insulating 
material.
53. (a) Calculate the R-value of a thermal window made of 
two single panes of glass each 0.125 in. thick and sepa-
rated by a 0.250-in. air space. (b) By what factor is the 
transfer of energy by heat through the window reduced 
BIO
M
622
chapter 20 the First Law of thermodynamics
stream of the liquid while energy is added by heat 
at a known rate. A liquid of density 900 kg/m3 flows 
through the calorimeter with volume flow rate of 
2.00 L/min. At steady state, a temperature difference 
3.50°C is established between the input and output 
points when energy is supplied at the rate of 200 W. 
What is the specific heat of the liquid?
64. flow calorimeter is an apparatus used to measure the 
specific heat of a liquid. The technique of flow calo-
rimetry involves measuring the temperature differ-
ence between the input and output points of a flowing 
stream of the liquid while energy is added by heat at 
a known rate. A liquid of density r flows through the 
calorimeter with volume flow rate R. At steady state, a 
temperature difference DT is established between the 
input and output points when energy is supplied at the 
rate P. What is the specific heat of the liquid?
65. Review. Following a collision between a large space-
craft and an asteroid, a copper disk of radius 28.0 m  
and thickness 1.20 m at a temperature of 850°C is 
floating in space, rotating about its symmetry axis 
with an angular speed of 25.0 rad/s. As the disk radi-
ates infrared light, its temperature falls to 20.0°C. No 
external torque acts on the disk. (a)Find the change 
in kinetic energy of the disk. (b) Find the change in 
internal energy of the disk. (c) Find the amount of 
energy it radiates.
66. An ice-cube tray is filled with 75.0 g of water. After 
the filled tray reaches an equilibrium temperature of 
20.0°C, it is placed in a freezer set at 28.00°C to make 
ice cubes. (a) Describe the processes that occur as 
energy is being removed from the water to make ice. 
(b) Calculate the energy that must be removed from 
the water to make ice cubes at 28.00°C.
67. On a cold winter day, you buy roasted chestnuts from 
a street vendor. Into the pocket of your down parka 
you put the change he gives you: coins constituting  
9.00 g of copper at –12.0°C. Your pocket already con-
tains 14.0 g of silver coins at 30.0°C. A short time later 
the temperature of the copper coins is 4.00°C and is 
increasing at a rate of 0.500°C/s. At this time, (a) what 
is the temperature of the silver coins and (b) at what 
rate is it changing?
68. The rate at which a resting person converts food energy 
is called one’s basal metabolic rate (BMR). Assume that 
the resulting internal energy leaves a person’s body 
by radiation and convection of dry air. When you jog, 
most of the food energy you burn above your BMR 
becomes internal energy that would raise your body 
temperature if it were not eliminated. Assume that 
evaporation of perspiration is the mechanism for 
eliminating this energy. Suppose a person is jogging 
for “maximum fat burning,” converting food energy at 
the rate 400 kcal/h above his BMR, and putting out 
energy by work at the rate 60.0 W. Assume that the heat 
of evaporation of water at body temperature is equal 
to its heat of vaporization at 100°C. (a) Determine the 
hourly rate at which water must evaporate from his 
skin. (b) When you metabolize fat, the hydrogen atoms 
S
AMT
Q/C
BIO
much energy must be added to the gas by heat along 
the indirect path IAF?
I
A
F
(atm)
4
3
2
1
0
1
4
2
3
(liters)
Figure P20.58
59. Gas in a container is at a pressure of 1.50 atm and a 
volume of 4.00 m3. What is the work done on the gas 
(a) if it expands at constant pressure to twice its initial 
volume, and (b) if it is compressed at constant pressure 
to one-quarter its initial volume?
60. Liquid nitrogen has a boiling point of 77.3 K and a 
latent heat of vaporization of 2.01 3 105 J/kg. A 25.0-W 
electric heating element is immersed in an insulated 
vessel containing 25.0 L of liquid nitrogen at its boil-
ing point. How many kilograms of nitrogen are boiled 
away in a period of 4.00 h?
61. An aluminum rod 0.500 m in length and with a cross- 
sectional area of 2.50 cm2 is inserted into a thermally 
insulated vessel containing liquid helium at 4.20 K. 
The rod is initially at 300 K. (a) If one-half of the rod 
is inserted into the helium, how many liters of helium 
boil off by the time the inserted half cools to 4.20 K? 
Assume the upper half does not yet cool. (b) If the cir-
cular surface of the upper end of the rod is maintained 
at 300 K, what is the approximate boil-off rate of liq-
uid helium in liters per second after the lower half has 
reached 4.20 K? (Aluminum has thermal conductivity 
of 3 100 W/m · K at 4.20 K; ignore its temperature vari-
ation. The density of liquid helium is 125 kg/m3.)
62. Review. Two speeding lead bullets, one of mass 12.0g 
moving to the right at 300 m/s and one of mass 8.00 g 
moving to the left at 400 m/s, collide head-on, and all 
the material sticks together. Both bullets are originally 
at temperature 30.0°C. Assume the change in kinetic 
energy of the system appears entirely as increased 
internal energy. We would like to determine the tem-
perature and phase of the bullets after the collision. 
(a)What two analysis models are appropriate for the 
system of two bullets for the time interval from before 
to after the collision? (b)From one of these models, 
what is the speed of the combined bullets after the 
collision? (c)How much of the initial kinetic energy 
has transformed to internal energy in the system after 
the collision? (d)Does all the lead melt due to the col-
lision? (e) What is the temperature of the combined 
bullets after the collision? (f) What is the phase of the 
combined bullets after the collision?
63. flow calorimeter is an apparatus used to measure the 
specific heat of a liquid. The technique of flow calo-
rimetry involves measuring the temperature difference  
between the input and output points of a flowing 
M
M
AMT
GP
problems 
623
rial of the meteoroid rises momentarily to the same 
final temperature. Find this temperature. Assume the 
specific heat of liquid and of gaseous aluminum is  
1 170 J/kg ? °C.
74. Why is the following situation impossible? A group of camp-
ers arises at 8:30 a.m. and uses a solar cooker, which 
consists of a curved, reflecting surface that concen-
trates sunlight onto the object to be warmed (Fig. 
P20.74). During the day, the maximum solar intensity 
reaching the Earth’s surface at the cooker’s location 
is I 5 600 W/m2. The cooker faces the Sun and has a 
face diameter of d 5 0.600 m. Assume a fraction f of 
40.0% of the incident energy is transferred to 1.50L 
of water in an open container, initially at 20.0°C. The 
water comes to a boil, and the campers enjoy hot cof-
fee for breakfast before hiking ten miles and returning 
by noon for lunch.
Figure P20.74
75. During periods of high activity, the Sun has more sun-
spots than usual. Sunspots are cooler than the rest of 
the luminous layer of the Sun’s atmosphere (the pho-
tosphere). Paradoxically, the total power output of the 
active Sun is not lower than average but is the same 
or slightly higher than average. Work out the details 
of the following crude model of this phenomenon. 
Consider a patch of the photosphere with an area of  
5.10 3 1014 m2. Its emissivity is 0.965. (a) Find the power 
it radiates if its temperature is uniformly 5 800 K,  
corresponding to the quiet Sun. (b) To represent a 
sunspot, assume 10.0% of the patch area is at 4 800 K  
and the other 90.0% is at 5 890 K. Find the power 
output of the patch. (c) State how the answer to part 
(b) compares with the answer to part (a). (d) Find 
the average temperature of the patch. Note that this 
cooler temperature results in a higher power output.
76. (a) In air at 0°C, a 1.60-kg copper block at 0°C is set 
sliding at 2.50 m/s over a sheet of ice at 0°C. Friction 
brings the block to rest. Find the mass of the ice that 
melts. (b) As the block slows down, identify its energy 
input Q, its change in internal energy DE
int
, and the 
change in mechanical energy for the block–ice system. 
(c) For the ice as a system, identify its energy input Q 
and its change in internal energy DE
int
. (d) A 1.60-kg  
block of ice at 0°C is set sliding at 2.50m/s over a sheet 
of copper at 0°C. Friction brings the block to rest. 
Find the mass of the ice that melts. (e)Evaluate Q and 
DE
int
for the block of ice as a system and DE
mech
for the 
block–ice system. (f) Evaluate Q and DE
int
for the metal 
Q/C
in the fat molecule are transferred to oxygen to form 
water. Assume that metabolism of 1.00 g of fat gener-
ates 9.00 kcal of energy and produces 1.00 g of water. 
What fraction of the water the jogger needs is provided 
by fat metabolism?
69. An iron plate is held against an iron wheel so that a 
kinetic friction force of 50.0 N acts between the two 
pieces of metal. The relative speed at which the two sur-
faces slide over each other is 40.0 m/s. (a) Calculate the 
rate at which mechanical energy is converted to internal 
energy. (b) The plate and the wheel each have a mass of 
5.00 kg, and each receives 50.0% of the internal energy. 
If the system is run as described for 10.0 s and each 
object is then allowed to reach a uniform internal tem-
perature, what is the resultant temperature increase? 
70. A resting adult of average size converts chemical energy 
in food into internal energy at the rate 120 W, called 
her basal metabolic rate. To stay at constant temperature, 
the body must put out energy at the same rate. Several 
processes exhaust energy from your body. Usually, the 
most important is thermal conduction into the air in 
contact with your exposed skin. If you are not wear-
ing a hat, a convection current of warm air rises verti-
cally from your head like a plume from a smokestack. 
Your body also loses energy by electromagnetic radia-
tion, by your exhaling warm air, and by evaporation of 
perspiration. In this problem, consider still another 
pathway for energy loss: moisture in exhaled breath. 
Suppose you breathe out 22.0 breaths per minute, each 
with a volume of 0.600 L. Assume you inhale dry air 
and exhale air at 37.0°C containing water vapor with a 
vapor pressure of 3.20 kPa. The vapor came from evap-
oration of liquid water in your body. Model the water 
vapor as an ideal gas. Assume its latent heat of evapora-
tion at 37.0°C is the same as its heat of vaporization at 
100°C. Calculate the rate at which you lose energy by 
exhaling humid air.
71. A 40.0-g ice cube floats in 200 g of water in a 100-g 
copper cup; all are at a temperature of 0°C. A piece of 
lead at 98.0°C is dropped into the cup, and the final 
equilibrium temperature is 12.0°C. What is the mass of 
the lead?
72. One mole of an ideal gas is contained in a cylinder 
with a movable piston. The initial pressure, volume, 
and temperature are P
i
V
i
, and T
i
, respectively. Find 
the work done on the gas in the following processes. 
In operational terms, describe how to carry out each 
process and show each process on a PV diagram.  
(a) an isobaric compression in which the final volume 
is one-half the initial volume (b) an isothermal com-
pression in which the final pressure is four times the 
initial pressure (c) an isovolumetric process in which 
the final pressure is three times the initial pressure
73. Review. A 670-kg meteoroid happens to be composed 
of aluminum. When it is far from the Earth, its tem-
perature is 215.0°C and it moves at 14.0 km/s relative 
to the planet. As it crashes into the Earth, assume the 
internal energy transformed from the mechanical 
energy of the  meteoroid–Earth system is shared equally 
between the meteoroid and the Earth and all the mate-
BIO
M
S
Q/C
624
chapter 20 the First Law of thermodynamics
Mass of water: 
0.400 kg
Mass of calorimeter: 
0.040 kg
Specific heat of calorimeter: 
0.63 kJ/kg ? °C
Initial temperature of aluminum: 
27.0°C
Mass of aluminum: 
0.200 kg
Final temperature of mixture: 
66.3°C
(a) Use these data to determine the specific heat of 
aluminum. (b) Explain whether your result is within 
15% of the value listed in Table 20.1.
Challenge Problems
81. Consider the piston– 
cylinder apparatus shown 
in Figure P20.81. The bot-
tom of the cylinder con-
tains 2.00kg of water at 
just under 100.0°C. The 
cylinder has a radius of  
r 5 7.50cm. The piston of 
mass m 5 3.00kg sits on 
the surface of the water. 
An electric heater in the 
cylinder base transfers 
energy into the water at a rate of 100W. Assume the 
cylinder is much taller than shown in the figure, so  
we don’t need to be concerned about the piston reach-
ing the top of the cylinder. (a) Once the water begins 
boiling, how fast is the piston rising? Model the steam 
as an ideal gas. (b) After the water has completely 
turned to steam and the heater continues to transfer 
energy to the steam at the same rate, how fast is the 
piston rising?
82. A spherical shell has inner radius 3.00 cm and outer 
radius 7.00 cm. It is made of material with thermal 
conductivity k 5 0.800 W/m ? °C. The interior is main-
tained at temperature 5°C and the exterior at 40°C. 
After an interval of time, the shell reaches a steady 
state with the temperature at each point within it 
remaining constant in time. (a)Explain why the rate 
of energy transfer P must be the same through each 
spherical surface, of radius r, within the shell and must 
satisfy
dT
dr
5
P
4pkr2
(b) Next, prove that
3
40
5
dT5
P
4pk
3
0.07
0.03
r22 dr
where T is in degrees Celsius and r is in meters.  
(c) Find the rate of energy transfer through the shell. 
(d) Prove that
3
T
5
dT51.84 
3
r
0.03
r22 dr
where T is in degrees Celsius and r is in meters.  
(e) Find the temperature within the shell as a func-
tion of radius. (f)Find the temperature at r 5 5.00 cm, 
halfway through the shell.
m
Water
Electric
heater in
base of
cylinder
r
Figure P20.81
Q/C
sheet as a system. (g) A thin, 1.60-kg slab of copper at 
20°C is set sliding at 2.50 m/s over an identical station-
ary slab at the same temperature. Friction quickly stops 
the motion. Assuming no energy is transferred to the 
environment by heat, find the change in temperature 
of both objects. (h)Evaluate Q and DE
int
for the slid-
ing slab and DE
mech
for the two-slab system. (i) Evalu-
ate Q and DE
int
for the stationary slab.
77. Water in an electric teakettle is boiling. The power 
absorbed by the water is 1.00 kW. Assuming the pres-
sure of vapor in the kettle equals atmospheric pres-
sure, determine the speed of effusion of vapor from 
the kettle’s spout if the spout has a cross-sectional area 
of 2.00 cm2. Model the steam as an ideal gas.
78. The average thermal conductivity of the walls (includ-
ing the windows) and roof of the house depicted in 
Figure P20.78 is 0.480 W/m ? °C, and their average 
thickness is 21.0 cm. The house is kept warm with 
natural gas having a heat of combustion (that is, the 
energy provided per cubic meter of gas burned) of  
9 300 kcal/m3. How many cubic meters of gas must be 
burned each day to maintain an inside temperature of 
25.0°C if the outside temperature is 0.0°C? Disregard 
radiation and the energy transferred by heat through 
the ground.
5.00 m 
10.0 m 
8.00 m 
37.0°
Figure P20.78
79. A cooking vessel on a slow burner contains 10.0 kg of 
water and an unknown mass of ice in equilibrium at 
0°C at time t 5 0. The temperature of the mixture is 
measured at various times, and the result is plotted in 
Figure P20.79. During the first 50.0 min, the mixture 
remains at 0°C. From 50.0min to 60.0 min, the tem-
perature increases to 2.00°C. Ignoring the heat capac-
ity of the vessel, determine the initial mass of the ice.
0
1
2
3
20
40
60
T (°C)
t (min)
0
Figure P20.79
80. A student measures the following data in a calorimetry 
experiment designed to determine the specific heat of 
aluminum:
Initial temperature of water 
and calorimeter: 
70.0°C
M
Q/C
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested