21.3 the equipartition of energy 
635
21.3 The Equipartition of Energy
Predictions based on our model for molar specific heat agree quite well with the 
behavior of monatomic gases, but not with the behavior of complex gases (see Table 
21.2). The value predicted by the model for the quantity C
P
C
V
R, however, is 
the same for all gases. This similarity is not surprising because this difference is the 
result of the work done on the gas, which is independent of its molecular structure.
To clarify the variations in C
V
and C
P
in gases more complex than monatomic 
gases, let’s explore further the origin of molar specific heat. So far, we have 
assumed the sole contribution to the internal energy of a gas is the translational 
kinetic energy of the molecules. The internal energy of a gas, however, includes 
contributions from the translational, vibrational, and rotational motion of the mol-
ecules. The rotational and vibrational motions of molecules can be activated by 
collisions and therefore are “coupled” to the translational motion of the molecules. 
The branch of physics known as statistical mechanics has shown that, for a large num-
ber of particles obeying the laws of Newtonian mechanics, the available energy is, 
on average, shared equally by each independent degree of freedom. Recall from 
Section 21.1 that the equipartition theorem states that, at equilibrium, each degree 
of freedom contributes 
1
2
k
B
T of energy per molecule.
Let’s consider a diatomic gas whose molecules have the shape of a dumbbell (Fig. 
21.5). In this model, the center of mass of the molecule can translate in the xy, and 
z directions (Fig. 21.5a). In addition, the molecule can rotate about three mutually 
perpendicular axes (Fig. 21.5b). The rotation about the y axis can be neglected 
because the molecule’s moment of inertia I
y
and its rotational energy 
1
2
I
y
v2 about 
this axis are negligible compared with those associated with the x and z axes. (If 
the two atoms are modeled as particles, then I
y
is identically zero.) Therefore, there 
are five degrees of freedom for translation and rotation: three associated with the 
translational motion and two associated with the rotational motion. Because each 
degree of freedom contributes, on average, 
1
2
k
B
T of energy per molecule, the inter-
nal energy for a system of N molecules, ignoring vibration for now, is
E
int
53N
11
2
k
B
T
2
12N
11
2
k
B
T
2
5
5
2
Nk
B
T5
5
2
nRT 
We can use this result and Equation 21.28 to find the molar specific heat at con-
stant volume:
C
V
5
1
n
dE
int
dT
5
1
n
d
dT
15
2
nRT
2
5
5
2
R 5 20.8 J/mol ? K 
(21.33)
From Equations 21.31 and 21.32, we find that
C
P
5C
V
1R5
7
2
R  5 29.1 J/mol ? K 
g5
C
P
C
V
5
7
2
R
5
2
R
5
7
5
51.40 
These results agree quite well with most of the data for diatomic molecules given 
in Table 21.2. That is rather surprising because we have not yet accounted for the 
possible vibrations of the molecule.
In the model for vibration, the two atoms are joined by an imaginary spring (see 
Fig. 21.5c). The vibrational motion adds two more degrees of freedom, which cor-
respond to the kinetic energy and the potential energy associated with vibrations 
along the length of the molecule. Hence, a model that includes all three types of 
motion predicts a total internal energy of
E
int
53N
11
2
k
B
T
2
12N
11
2
k
B
T
2
12N
11
2
k
B
T
2
5
7
2
Nk
B
T5
7
2
nRT 
and a molar specific heat at constant volume of
C
V
5
1
n
dE
int
dT
5
1
n
d
dT
17
2
nRT
2
5
7
2
R 5 29.1 J/mol ? K 
(21.34)
x
z
y
y
x
z
Rotational motion about 
the various axes
Vibrational motion along 
the molecular axis
a
b
c
Figure 21.5 
Possible motions of 
a diatomic molecule.
Convert pdf to html open source - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
convert pdf to html online for; add pdf to website
Convert pdf to html open source - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
convert pdf to html open source; convert pdf to html with
636
chapter 21 the Kinetic theory of Gases
This value is inconsistent with experimental data for molecules such as H
2
and N
2
(see Table 21.2) and suggests a breakdown of our model based on classical physics.
It might seem that our model is a failure for predicting molar specific heats for 
diatomic gases. We can claim some success for our model, however, if measure-
ments of molar specific heat are made over a wide temperature range rather than at 
the single temperature that gives us the values in Table 21.2. Figure 21.6 shows the 
molar specific heat of hydrogen as a function of temperature. The remarkable fea-
ture about the three plateaus in the graph’s curve is that they are at the values of the 
molar specific heat predicted by Equations 21.29, 21.33, and 21.34! For low tempera-
tures, the diatomic hydrogen gas behaves like a monatomic gas. As the temperature 
rises to room temperature, its molar specific heat rises to a value for a diatomic gas, 
consistent with the inclusion of rotation but not vibration. For high temperatures, 
the molar specific heat is consistent with a model including all types of motion.
Before addressing the reason for this mysterious behavior, let’s make some brief 
remarks about polyatomic gases. For molecules with more than two atoms, three 
axes of rotation are available. The vibrations are more complex than for diatomic 
molecules. Therefore, the number of degrees of freedom is even larger. The result is 
an even higher predicted molar specific heat, which is in qualitative agreement with 
experiment. The molar specific heats for the polyatomic gases in Table 21.2 are higher 
than those for diatomic gases. The more degrees of freedom available to a molecule, 
the more “ways” there are to store energy, resulting in a higher molar specific heat.
A Hint of Energy Quantization
Our model for molar specific heats has been based so far on purely classical notions. 
It predicts a value of the specific heat for a diatomic gas that, according to Figure 
21.6, only agrees with experimental measurements made at high temperatures. To 
explain why this value is only true at high temperatures and why the plateaus in 
Figure 21.6 exist, we must go beyond classical physics and introduce some quantum 
physics into the model. In Chapter 18, we discussed quantization of frequency for 
vibrating strings and air columns; only certain frequencies of standing waves can 
exist. That is a natural result whenever waves are subject to boundary conditions.
Quantum physics (Chapters 40 through 43) shows that atoms and molecules 
can be described by the waves under boundary conditions analysis model. Conse-
quently, these waves have quantized frequencies. Furthermore, in quantum physics, 
the energy of a system is proportional to the frequency of the wave representing the 
system. Hence, the energies of atoms and molecules are quantized.
For a molecule, quantum physics tells us that the rotational and vibrational ener-
gies are quantized. Figure 21.7 shows an energy-level diagram for the rotational 
Translation
Rotation
Vibration
Temperature (K)
C
V
(
J
/
m
o
l
·
K
)
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
10
20
50
100 200
500 10002000
5000 10000
7
2
R
5
2
R
3
2
R
The horizontal scale is logarithmic.
Hydrogen liquefies 
at 20 K.
Figure 21.6 
The molar specific 
heat of hydrogen as a function of 
temperature.
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
it is feasible for users to extract text content from source PDF document file the following C# example code for text extraction from PDF page Open a document
embed pdf into web page; embed pdf into html
VB.NET PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in
Decode source PDF document file into an in-memory object, namely 2.pdf" Dim outputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" Annot_8.pdf" ' open a PDF file
convert pdf into html; converting pdf to html format
21.4 adiabatic processes for an Ideal Gas 
637
and vibrational quantum states of a diatomic molecule. The lowest allowed state 
is called the ground state. The black lines show the energies allowed for the mol-
ecule. Notice that allowed vibrational states are separated by larger energy gaps 
than are rotational states.
At low temperatures, the energy a molecule gains in collisions with its neighbors 
is generally not large enough to raise it to the first excited state of either rotation or 
vibration. Therefore, even though rotation and vibration are allowed according to 
classical physics, they do not occur in reality at low temperatures. All molecules are 
in the ground state for rotation and vibration. The only contribution to the mol-
ecules’ average energy is from translation, and the specific heat is that predicted by 
Equation 21.29.
As the temperature is raised, the average energy of the molecules increases. In 
some collisions, a molecule may have enough energy transferred to it from another 
molecule to excite the first rotational state. As the temperature is raised further, 
more molecules can be excited to this state. The result is that rotation begins to 
contribute to the internal energy, and the molar specific heat rises. At about room 
temperature in Figure 21.6, the second plateau has been reached and rotation con-
tributes fully to the molar specific heat. The molar specific heat is now equal to the 
value predicted by Equation 21.33.
There is no contribution at room temperature from vibration because the mole-
cules are still in the ground vibrational state. The temperature must be raised even 
further to excite the first vibrational state, which happens in Figure 21.6 between 
1 000 K and 10 000 K. At 10 000 K on the right side of the figure, vibration is con-
tributing fully to the internal energy and the molar specific heat has the value pre-
dicted by Equation 21.34.
The predictions of this model are supportive of the theorem of equipartition of 
energy. In addition, the inclusion in the model of energy quantization from quan-
tum physics allows a full understanding of Figure 21.6.
uick Quiz 21.3  The molar specific heat of a diatomic gas is measured at constant 
volume and found to be 29.1 J/mol ? K. What are the types of energy that are con-
tributing to the molar specific heat? (a) translation only (b)translation and rota-
tion only (c) translation and vibration only (d) translation, rotation, and vibration
uick Quiz 21.4  The molar specific heat of a gas is measured at constant volume 
and found to be 11R/2. Is the gas most likely to be (a) monatomic, (b)diatomic, 
or (c) polyatomic?
21.4 Adiabatic Processes for an Ideal Gas
As noted in Section 20.6, an adiabatic process is one in which no energy is trans-
ferred by heat between a system and its surroundings. For example, if a gas is com-
pressed (or expanded) rapidly, very little energy is transferred out of (or into) the 
system by heat, so the process is nearly adiabatic. Such processes occur in the cycle 
of a gasoline engine, which is discussed in detail in Chapter 22. Another example 
of an adiabatic process is the slow expansion of a gas that is thermally insulated 
from its surroundings. All three variables in the ideal gas law—PV, and T—change 
during an adiabatic process.
Let’s imagine an adiabatic gas process involving an infinitesimal change in 
volume dV and an accompanying infinitesimal change in temperature dT. The  
work done on the gas is 2P dV. Because the internal energy of an ideal gas depends 
only on temperature, the change in the internal energy in an adiabatic process 
is the same as that for an isovolumetric process between the same temperatures,  
dE
int
nC
V
dT (Eq. 21.27). Hence, the first law of thermodynamics, DE
int
Q 1 W, 
with Q 5 0, becomes the infinitesimal form
dE
int
nC
V
dT 5 2P dV 
(21.35)
Rotational
states
Rotational
states
Vibrational
states
E
N
E
R
G
Y
The rotational states lie closer 
together in energy than do the
vibrational states.
Figure 21.7 
An energy-level dia-
gram for vibrational and rotational 
states of a diatomic molecule. 
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
Description: Combine the source PDF streams into one PDF file and save it to a new PDF file on the disk. Parameters: Name, Description, Valid Value.
convert pdf link to html; how to convert pdf into html
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Online C# source code for extracting, copying and pasting PDF The portable document format, known as PDF document, is of file that allows users to open & read
converting pdf to html; attach pdf to html
638
chapter 21 the Kinetic theory of Gases
Taking the total differential of the equation of state of an ideal gas, PV 5 nRT, gives
P dV 1 V dP 5 nR dT 
(21.36)
Eliminating dT from Equations 21.35 and 21.36, we find that
P dV1V dP52
R
C
V
P dV 
Substituting R 5 C
P
C
V
and dividing by PV gives
dV
V
1
dP
P
52a
C
P
2C
V
C
V
b
dV
V
5
1
12g
2
dV
V
dP
P
1g 
dV
V
50 
Integrating this expression, we have
ln P 1 g ln V 5 constant 
which is equivalent to
PVg 5 constant 
(21.37)
The PV diagram for an adiabatic expansion is shown in Figure 21.8. Because  
g . 1, the PV curve is steeper than it would be for an isothermal expansion, for 
which PV 5 constant. By the definition of an adiabatic process, no energy is trans-
ferred by heat into or out of the system. Hence, from the first law, we see that DE
int
is negative (work is done by the gas, so its internal energy decreases) and so DT also 
is negative. Therefore, the temperature of the gas decreases (T
f
T
i
) during an adi-
abatic expansion.2 Conversely, the temperature increases if the gas is compressed 
adiabatically. Applying Equation 21.37 to the initial and final states, we see that
P
i
V
i
g 5 P
f
V
f
g 
(21.38)
Using the ideal gas law, we can express Equation 21.37 as
TVg21 5 constant 
(21.39)
Relationship between 
P
and 
V
 
for an adiabatic process 
involving an ideal gas
Relationship between 
T
and 
V
 
for an adiabatic process 
involving an ideal gas
2In the adiabatic free expansion discussed in Section 20.6, the temperature remains constant. In this unique pro-
cess,  no work is done because the gas expands into a vacuum. In general, the temperature decreases in an adiabatic 
expansion in which work is done.
Example 21.3   A Diesel Engine Cylinder
Air at 20.08C in the cylinder of a diesel engine is compressed from an initial pressure of 1.00 atm and volume of 
800.0cm3 to a volume of 60.0 cm3. Assume air behaves as an ideal gas with g 5 1.40 and the compression is adiabatic. 
Find the final pressure and temperature of the air.
Conceptualize  Imagine what happens if a gas is compressed into a smaller volume. Our discussion above and Figure 
21.8 tell us that the pressure and temperature both increase.
Categorize  We categorize this example as a problem involving an adiabatic process.
SoluTIoN
T
i
T
f
Isotherms
P
V
P
i
P
f
V
i
V
f
i
f
The temperature of a 
gas decreases in an 
adiabatic expansion.
Figure 21.8 
The PV diagram 
for an adiabatic expansion of an 
ideal gas. 
Analyze  Use Equation 21.38 to find the final pressure:
P
f
5P
i
a
V
i
V
f
b
g
5
1
1.00 atm
2
a
800.0 cm3
60.0 cm3
b
1.40
  37.6 atm
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
Convert OpenOffice Text Document to PDF with embedded fonts. to change ODT, ODS, ODP forms to fillable PDF formats in Visual Online source code for C#.NET class.
pdf to html converter online; convert pdf to html code c#
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
addition, texts, pictures and font formatting of source PDF file are accurately retained in converted Word document file. Why do we need to convert PDF to Word
best pdf to html converter online; converting pdf into html
21.5 Distribution of Molecular Speeds 
639
Finalize  The temperature of the gas increases by a factor of 826 K/293 K 5 2.82. The high compression in a diesel 
engine raises the temperature of the gas enough to cause the combustion of fuel without the use of spark plugs.
21.5 Distribution of Molecular Speeds
Thus far, we have considered only average values of the energies of all the molecules 
in a gas and have not addressed the distribution of energies among individual mol-
ecules. The motion of the molecules is extremely chaotic. Any individual molecule 
collides with others at an enormous rate, typically a billion times per second. Each 
collision results in a change in the speed and direction of motion of each of the 
participant molecules. Equation 21.22 shows that rms molecular speeds increase 
with increasing temperature. At a given time, what is the relative number of mol-
ecules that possess some characteristic such as energy within a certain range?
We shall address this question by considering the number density n
V
(E). This 
quantity, called a distribution function, is defined so that n
V
(EdE is the number of 
molecules per unit volume with energy between E and E 1 dE. (The ratio of the 
number of molecules that have the desired characteristic to the total number of 
molecules is the probability that a particular molecule has that characteristic.) In 
general, the number density is found from statistical mechanics to be
n
V
1
E
2
5n
0
e2E/k
B
T 
(21.40)
where n
0
is defined such that n
0
dE is the number of molecules per unit volume hav-
ing energy between E 5 0 and E 5 dE. This equation, known as the Boltzmann dis-
tribution law, is important in describing the statistical mechanics of a large number 
of molecules. It states that the probability of finding the molecules in a particular 
energy state varies exponentially as the negative of the energy divided by k
B
T. All 
the molecules would fall into the lowest energy level if the thermal agitation at a 
temperature T did not excite the molecules to higher energy levels.
WWBoltzmann distribution law
Use the ideal gas law to find the final temperature:
P
i
V
i
T
i
5
P
f
V
f
T
f
T
f
5
P
f
V
f
P
i
V
i
T
i
5
1
37.6 atm
21
60.0 cm3
2
1
1.00 atm
21
800.0 cm3
2
1293 K2 
5 826 K 5   5538C
▸ 21.3 
continued
Example 21.4   Thermal Excitation of Atomic Energy Levels
As discussed in Section 21.4, atoms can occupy only certain discrete energy levels. Con-
sider a gas at a temperature of 2 500 K whose atoms can occupy only two energy levels 
separated by 1.50 eV, where 1 eV (electron volt) is an energy unit equal to 1.60 3 10219 J 
(Fig. 21.9). Determine the ratio of the number of atoms in the higher energy level to the 
number in the lower energy level.
Conceptualize  In your mental representation of this example, remember that only two 
possible states are allowed for the system of the atom. Figure 21.9 helps you visualize the 
two states on an energy-level diagram. In this case, the atom has two possible energies, E
1
and E
2
, where E
1
E
2
.
SoluTIoN
continued
Pitfall Prevention 21.2
The Distribution Function  
The distribution function n
V
(E
is defined in terms of the number 
of molecules with energy in the 
range E to E 1 dE rather than in 
terms of the number of molecules 
with energy E. Because the num-
ber of molecules is finite and the 
number of possible values of the 
energy is infinite, the number of 
molecules with an exact energy E 
may be zero.
E
1
E
2
1.50 eV
E
N
E
R
G
Y
Figure 21.9 
(Example 
21.4) Energy-level diagram 
for a gas whose atoms can 
occupy two energy states.
C# Word - MailMerge Processing in C#.NET
da.Fill(data); //Open the document DOCXDocument document0 = DOCXDocument.Open( docFilePath ); int counter = 1; // Loop though all records in the data source.
convert pdf fillable form to html; convert pdf to web page
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Separate source PDF document file by defined page range in VB.NET class application. Divide PDF file into multiple files by outputting PDF file size.
best website to convert pdf to word; convert url pdf to word
640
chapter 21 the Kinetic theory of Gases
Now that we have discussed the distribution of energies among molecules in a 
gas, let’s think about the distribution of molecular speeds. In 1860, James Clerk 
Maxwell (1831–1879) derived an expression that describes the distribution of 
molecular speeds in a very definite manner. His work and subsequent developments 
by other scientists were highly controversial because direct detection of molecules 
could not be achieved experimentally at that time. About 60 years later, however, 
experiments were devised that confirmed Maxwell’s predictions.
Let’s consider a container of gas whose molecules have some distribution of 
speeds. Suppose we want to determine how many gas molecules have a speed in the 
range from, for example, 400 to 401 m/s. Intuitively, we expect the speed distribu-
tion to depend on temperature. Furthermore, we expect the distribution to peak 
in the vicinity of v
rms
. That is, few molecules are expected to have speeds much less 
than or much greater than v
rms
because these extreme speeds result only from an 
unlikely chain of collisions.
The observed speed distribution of gas molecules in thermal equilibrium is 
shown in Figure 21.10. The quantity N
v
, called the Maxwell–Boltzmann speed dis-
tribution function, is defined as follows. If N is the total number of molecules, the 
number of molecules with speeds between v and v 1 dv is dN5 N
v
dv. This number 
is also equal to the area of the shaded rectangle in Figure 21.10. Furthermore, the 
fraction of molecules with speeds between v and v1 dv is (N
v
dv)/N. This fraction 
is also equal to the probability that a molecule has a speed in the range v to v 1 dv.
Evaluate k
B
T in the exponent:
k
B
T5
1
1.38310223 J/K
21
2 500 K
2
a
1 eV
1.60310219 J
b50.216 eV
Substitute this value into Equation (1):
n
V
1
E
2
2
n
V
1
E
1
2
5e21.50 eV/0.216 eV 5e26.96 5 9.52 3 1024
Finalize  This result indicates that at T 5 2 500 K, only a small fraction of the atoms are in the higher energy level. In 
fact, for every atom in the higher energy level, there are about 1 000 atoms in the lower level. The number of atoms in 
the higher level increases at even higher temperatures, but the distribution law specifies that at equilibrium there are 
always more atoms in the lower level than in the higher level.
What if the energy levels in Figure 21.9 were closer together in energy? Would that increase or decrease 
the fraction of the atoms in the upper energy level?
Answer  If the excited level is lower in energy than that in Figure 21.9, it would be easier for thermal agitation to excite 
atoms to this level and the fraction of atoms in this energy level would be larger, which we can see mathematically by 
expressing Equation (1) as
r
2
5e2
1
E
2
2E
1
2
/k
B
T
where r
2
is the ratio of atoms having energy E
2
to those with energy E
1
. Differentiating with respect to E
2
, we find
dr
2
dE
2
5
d
dE
2
3
e2
1
E
2
2E
1
2
/k
B
T452
1
k
B
T
e2
1
E
2
2E
1
2
/k
B
T ,0
Because the derivative has a negative value, as E
2
decreases, r
2
increases.
WhAT IF?
Ludwig Boltzmann
Austrian physicist (1844–1906)
Boltzmann made many important 
contributions to the development of 
the kinetic theory of gases, electro-
magnetism, and thermodynamics. His 
pioneering work in the field of kinetic 
theory led to the branch of physics 
known as statistical mechanics.
©
I
N
T
E
R
F
O
T
O
/
A
l
a
m
y
Analyze  Set up the ratio of the number of 
atoms in the higher energy level to the num-
ber in the lower energy level and use Equa-
tion 21.40 to express each number:
(1)   
n
V
1
E
2
2
n
V
1
E
1
2
5
n
0
e2E
2
/k
B
T
n
0
e2E
1
/k
B
T
5e2
1
E
2
2E
1
2
/k
B
T
Categorize  We categorize this example as one in which we focus on particles in a two-state quantized system. We will 
apply the Boltzmann distribution law to this system.
▸ 21.4 
continued
21.5 Distribution of Molecular Speeds 
641
The fundamental expression that describes the distribution of speeds of N gas 
molecules is
N
v
54pN a
m
0
2pk
B
T
b
3/2
v
2
e
2m
0
v2/2k
B
T
(21.41)
where m
0
is the mass of a gas molecule, k
B
is Boltzmann’s constant, and T is the 
absolute temperature.3 Observe the appearance of the Boltzmann factor e
2E/k
B
T
with E5
1
2
m
0
v
2
.
As indicated in Figure 21.10, the average speed is somewhat lower than the 
rms speed. The most probable speed v
mp
is the speed at which the distribution curve 
reaches a peak. Using Equation 21.41, we find that
v
rms
5"
v
2
5
Å
3k
B
T
m
0
51.73
Å
k
B
T
m
0
(21.42)
v
avg
5
Å
8k
B
T
pm
0
51.60
Å
k
B
T
m
0
(21.43)
v
mp
5
Å
2k
B
T
m
0
51.41
Å
k
B
T
m
0
(21.44)
Equation 21.42 has previously appeared as Equation 21.22. The details of the deri-
vations of these equations from Equation 21.41 are left for the end-of-chapter prob-
lems (see Problems 42 and 69). From these equations, we see that
v
rms
v
avg
v
mp
Figure 21.11 represents speed distribution curves for nitrogen, N
2
. The curves 
were obtained by using Equation 21.41 to evaluate the distribution function at vari-
ous speeds and at two temperatures. Notice that the peak in each curve shifts to 
the right as T increases, indicating that the average speed increases with increasing 
temperature, as expected. Because the lowest speed possible is zero and the upper 
classical limit of the speed is infinity, the curves are asymmetrical. (In Chapter 39, 
we show that the actual upper limit is the speed of light.)
Equation 21.41 shows that the distribution of molecular speeds in a gas depends 
both on mass and on temperature. At a given temperature, the fraction of mol-
ecules with speeds exceeding a fixed value increases as the mass decreases. Hence, 
3 For the derivation of this expression, see an advanced textbook on thermodynamics.
v
mp
v
rms
N
v
v
v
avg
N
v
dv
The number of molecules 
having speeds ranging from v 
to v + dv equals the area of 
the tan rectangle, N
dv.
Figure 21.10 
The speed distri-
bution of gas molecules at some 
temperature. The function N
v
approaches zero as v approaches 
infinity.
Figure 21.11 
The speed distri-
bution function for 105 nitrogen 
molecules at 300 K and 900 K.
200
160
120
80
40
200
400
600
800 1000 0 1200 1400 1
600
T = 300 K
T = 900 K
N
v
[
m
o
l
e
c
u
l
e
s
/
(
m
/
s
)
]
v
rms
v
avg
v (m/s)
v
mp
0
0
The total area under either curve is 
equal to N, the total number of 
molecules. In this case, N = 10
5
.
Note that v
rms
v
avg
v
mp
.
642
chapter 21 the Kinetic theory of Gases
lighter molecules such as H
2
and He escape into space more readily from the 
Earth’s atmosphere than do heavier molecules such as N
2
and O
2
. (See the discus-
sion of escape speed in Chapter 13. Gas molecules escape even more readily from 
the Moon’s surface than from the Earth’s because the escape speed on the Moon is 
lower than that on the Earth.)
The speed distribution curves for molecules in a liquid are similar to those 
shown in Figure 21.11. We can understand the phenomenon of evaporation of a 
liquid from this distribution in speeds, given that some molecules in the liquid 
are more energetic than others. Some of the faster-moving molecules in the liq-
uid penetrate the surface and even leave the liquid at temperatures well below the 
boiling point. The molecules that escape the liquid by evaporation are those that 
have sufficient energy to overcome the attractive forces of the molecules in the 
liquid phase. Consequently, the molecules left behind in the liquid phase have a 
lower average kinetic energy; as a result, the temperature of the liquid decreases. 
Hence, evaporation is a cooling process. For example, an alcohol-soaked cloth can 
be placed on a feverish head to cool and comfort a patient.
Example 21.5   A System of Nine Particles
Nine particles have speeds of 5.00, 8.00, 12.0, 12.0, 12.0, 14.0, 14.0, 17.0, and 20.0 m/s.
(A)  Find the particles’ average speed.
Conceptualize  Imagine a small number of particles moving in random directions with the few speeds listed. This situ-
ation is not representative of the large number of molecules in a gas, so we should not expect the results to be consis-
tent with those from statistical mechanics.
Categorize  Because we are dealing with a small number of particles, we can calculate the average speed directly.
SoluTIoN
Analyze  Find the average 
speed of the particles by divid-
ing the sum of the speeds by 
the total number of particles:
v
avg
5
1
5.0018.00112.0112.0112.0114.0114.0117.0120.0
2
m/s
9
5   12.7 m/s
Find the average speed 
squared of the particles 
by dividing the sum of the 
speeds squared by the total 
number of particles:
v2
5
1
5.0018.002112.02112.02112.02114.0114.0117.02120.02
2
m2/s2 
9
5 178 m2/s2
Find the rms speed of the par-
ticles by taking the square root:
v
rms
5"v
2
5"178 m2/s2
5 13.3 m/s
(B)  What is the rms speed of the particles?
SoluTIoN
(C)  What is the most probable speed of the particles?
Three of the particles have a speed of 12.0 m/s, two have a speed of 14.0 m/s, and the remaining four have different 
speeds. Hence, the most probable speed v
mp
is 12.0 m/s.
Finalize  Compare this example, in which the number of particles is small and we know the individual particle speeds, 
with the next example.
SoluTIoN
21.5 Distribution of Molecular Speeds 
643
Example 21.6   Molecular Speeds in a Hydrogen Gas
A 0.500-mol sample of hydrogen gas is at 300 K.
(A)  Find the average speed, the rms speed, and the most probable speed of the hydrogen molecules.
Conceptualize  Imagine a huge number of particles in a real gas, all moving in random directions with different speeds.
Categorize  We cannot calculate the averages as was done in Example 21.5 because the individual speeds of the par-
ticles are not known. We are dealing with a very large number of particles, however, so we can use the Maxwell-
Boltzmann speed distribution function.
SoluTIoN
Analyze  Use Equation 21.43 to find the average speed:
v
avg
51.60
Å
k
B
T
m
0
51.60 
Å
1
1.38310223 J/K
21
300 K
2
2
1
1.67310227 kg
2
  1.78 3 103 m/s
Use Equation 21.42 to find the rms speed:
v
rms
51.73
Å
k
B
T
m
0
51.73
Å
11.38310223 J/K21300 K2
2
1
1.67310227 kg
2
5   1.93 3 103 m/s 
Use Equation 21.44 to find the most probable speed:
v
mp
51.41
Å
k
B
T
m
0
51.41
Å
1
1.38310223 J/K
21
300 K
2
211.67310227 kg2
  1.57 3 103 m/s 
Use Equation 21.41 to evaluate the number of molecules 
in a narrow speed range between v and v 1 dv:
(1)   N
v 
dv54pN
a
m
0
2pk
B
T
b
3/2
v2e2m
0
v2/2k
B
T dv
Evaluate the constant in 
front of v2:
4pN
a
m
0
2pk
B
T
b
3/2
54pnN
A
a
m
0
2pk
B
T
b
3/2
54p
1
0.500 mol
21
6.02310
23
mol
212
c
2
1
1.67310227 kg
2
2p
1
1.38310223 J/K
21
300 K
2
d
3/2
5 1.74 3 1014 s3/m3
Evaluate the exponent of e that appears in Equation (1):
2
m
0
v2
2k
B
T
52
2
1
1.67310227 kg
21
400 m/s
22
2
1
1.38310223 J/K
21
300 K
2
520.064 5
Evaluate N
v
dv using these values in Equation (1):
N
v
dv5
1
1.7431014 s3/m3
21
400 m/s
22
e20.064 5
1
1 m/s
2
5   2.61 3 1019 molecules 
(B)  Find the number of molecules with speeds between 400 m/s and 401 m/s.
SoluTIoN
Finalize  In this evaluation, we could calculate the result without integration because dv 5 1 m/s is much smaller than  
v 5 400 m/s. Had we sought the number of particles between, say, 400 m/s and 500 m/s, we would need to integrate 
Equation (1) between these speed limits.
644
chapter 21 the Kinetic theory of Gases
Summary
The pressure of N molecules of an ideal gas contained in 
a volume V is
P5
2
3
a
N
V
b
11
2
m
0
v2
2
(21.15)
The average translational kinetic energy per molecule 
of a gas, 1
2
m
0
v2
, is related to the temperature T of the gas 
through the expression
1
2
m
0
v2
5
3
2
k
B
T 
(21.19)
where k
B
is Boltzmann’s constant. Each translational degree 
of freedom (xy, or z) has 
1
2
k
B
T of energy associated with it.
The internal energy of N molecules (or n mol) 
of an ideal monatomic gas is
E
int
5
3
2
Nk
B
T5
3
2
nRT 
(21.25)
The change in internal energy for n mol of any 
ideal gas that undergoes a change in temperature 
DT is
DE
int
5nC
V
DT 
(21.27)
where C
V
is the molar specific heat at constant 
volume.
The molar specific heat of an ideal monatomic gas 
at constant volume is C
V
53
2
R; the molar specific heat 
at constant pressure is C
P
55
2
R. The ratio of specific 
heats is given by g5C
P
/C
V
55
3
.
The Boltzmann distribution law describes the distri-
bution of particles among available energy states. The 
relative number of particles having energy between E 
and E1 dE is n
V
(EdE, where
n
V
1
E
2
5n
0
e2E/k
B
T 
(21.40)
The Maxwell–Boltzmann speed distribution function 
describes the distribution of speeds of molecules in a 
gas:
N
v
54pN
a
m
0
2pk
B
T
b
3/2
v2e2m
0
v2/2k
B
T 
(21.41)
If an ideal gas undergoes an adiabatic expansion or 
compression, the first law of thermodynamics, together 
with the equation of state, shows that
PVg5constant 
(21.37)
Equation 21.41 enables us to calculate the root-
mean-square speed, the average speed, and the most 
probable speed of molecules in a gas:
v
rms
5"
v2
5
Å
3k
B
T
m
0
51.73
Å
k
B
T
m
0
(21.42)
v
avg
5
Å
8k
B
T
pm
0
51.60
Å
k
B
T
m
0
(21.43)
v
mp
5
Å
2k
B
T
m
0
51.41
Å
k
B
T
m
0
(21.44)
Concepts and Principles
!3
times the original speed. (e)It increases by a factor 
of 6.
3. Two samples of the same ideal gas have the same pres-
sure and density. Sample B has twice the volume of 
sample A. What is the rms speed of the molecules in 
sample B? (a)twice that in sample A (b) equal to that 
in sample A (c)half that in sample A (d) impossible to 
determine
4. A helium-filled latex balloon initially at room tem-
perature is placed in a freezer. The latex remains 
flexible. (i)Does the balloon’s volume (a) increase,  
(b) decrease, or (c)remain the same? (ii) Does the 
pressure of the helium gas (a) increase significantly, 
(b) decrease significantly, or (c) remain approximately 
the same?
1. Cylinder A contains oxygen (O
2
) gas, and cylinder B 
contains nitrogen (N
2
) gas. If the molecules in the two 
cylinders have the same rms speeds, which of the fol-
lowing statements is false? (a) The two gases have dif-
ferent temperatures. (b) The temperature of cylinder 
B is less than the temperature of cylinder A. (c) The 
temperature of cylinder B
is greater than the tempera-
ture of cylinder A. (d) The average kinetic energy of 
the nitrogen molecules is less than the average kinetic 
energy of the oxygen molecules.
2. An ideal gas is maintained at constant pressure. If 
the temperature of the gas is increased from 200 K  
to 600 K, what happens to the rms speed of the mol-
ecules? (a) It increases by a factor of 3. (b) It remains 
the same. (c) It is one-third the original speed. (d) It is 
Objective Questions
1. 
denotes answer available in Student Solutions Manual/Study Guide
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested