problems 
645
(f) of this account are correct statements necessary 
for a clear and complete explanation? (ii) Which are 
correct statements that are not necessary to account 
for the higher thermometer reading? (iii)Which are 
incorrect statements?
8. An ideal gas is contained in a vessel at 300 K. The tem-
perature of the gas is then increased to 900 K. (i) By 
what factor does the average kinetic energy of the mol-
ecules change, (a) a factor of 9, (b) a factor of 3, (c) a 
factor of !3
, (d) a factor of 1, or (e) a factor of 
1
3
? Using 
the same choices as in part (i), by what factor does each 
of the following change: (ii) the rms molecular speed 
of the molecules, (iii) the average momentum change 
that one molecule undergoes in a collision with one 
particular wall, (iv) the rate of collisions of molecules 
with walls, and (v) the pressure of the gas.
9. Which of the assumptions below is not made in the 
kinetic theory of gases? (a) The number of molecules 
is very large. (b) The molecules obey Newton’s laws 
of motion. (c) The forces between molecules are long 
range. (d) The gas is a pure substance. (e) The aver-
age separation between molecules is large compared 
to their dimensions.
5. A gas is at 200 K. If we wish to double the rms speed of 
the molecules of the gas, to what value must we raise its 
temperature? (a) 283 K (b) 400 K (c) 566 K (d) 800 K 
(e)1130K
6. Rank the following from largest to smallest, noting any 
cases of equality. (a) the average speed of molecules in 
a particular sample of ideal gas (b) the most probable 
speed (c) the root-mean-square speed (d) the average 
vector velocity of the molecules
7. A sample of gas with a thermometer immersed in the 
gas is held over a hot plate. A student is asked to give 
a step-by-step account of what makes our observation 
of the temperature of the gas increase. His response 
includes the following steps. (a) The molecules speed 
up. (b) Then the molecules collide with one another 
more often. (c) Internal friction makes the colli-
sions inelastic. (d) Heat is produced in the collisions.  
(e) The molecules of the gas transfer more energy to 
the thermometer when they strike it, so we observe 
that the temperature has gone up. (f) The same pro-
cess can take place without the use of a hot plate if 
you quickly push in the piston in an insulated cylinder 
containing the gas. (i) Which of the parts (a) through  
Conceptual Questions
1. 
denotes answer available in Student Solutions Manual/Study Guide
1. Hot air rises, so why does it generally become cooler 
as you climb a mountain? Note: Air has low thermal 
conductivity.
2. Why does a diatomic gas have a greater energy con-
tent per mole than a monatomic gas at the same 
temperature?
3. When alcohol is rubbed on your body, it lowers your 
skin temperature. Explain this effect.
4. What happens to a helium-filled latex balloon released 
into the air? Does it expand or contract? Does it stop 
rising at some height?
5. Which is denser, dry air or air saturated with water 
vapor? Explain.
6. One container is filled with helium gas and another 
with argon gas. Both containers are at the same tem-
perature. Which molecules have the higher rms speed? 
Explain.
7. Dalton’s law of partial pressures states that the total 
pressure of a mixture of gases is equal to the sum of 
the pressures that each gas in the mixture would exert 
if it were alone in the container. Give a convincing 
argument for this law based on the kinetic theory of 
gases.
atoms? (c) What is the rms speed of the helium  
atoms?
2. A cylinder contains a mixture of helium and argon gas 
in equilibrium at 1508C. (a) What is the average kinetic 
energy for each type of gas molecule? (b) What is the 
rms speed of each type of molecule?
M
Section 21.1  Molecular Model of an Ideal Gas
Problem 30 in Chapter 19 can be assigned with this 
section.
1. (a) How many atoms of helium gas fill a spherical 
balloon of diameter 30.0 cm at 20.08C and 1.00 atm? 
(b) What is the average kinetic energy of the helium 
M
Problems
The problems found in this  
chapter may be assigned 
online in Enhanced WebAssign
1.
 straightforward; 
2. 
intermediate;  
3. 
challenging
1.
full solution available in the Student 
Solutions Manual/Study Guide
AMT
Analysis Model tutorial available in 
Enhanced WebAssign
GP
Guided Problem
M
Master It tutorial available in Enhanced 
WebAssign
W
Watch It video solution available in 
Enhanced WebAssign
BIO
Q/C
S
Convert pdf form to web form - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
embed pdf into website; convert pdf form to html form
Convert pdf form to web form - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
converter pdf to html; pdf to html converter
646
chapter 21 the Kinetic theory of Gases
3. In a 30.0-s interval, 500 hailstones strike a glass win-
dow of area 0.600 m2 at an angle of 45.08 to the win-
dow surface. Each hailstone has a mass of 5.00 g and a 
speed of 8.00m/s. Assuming the collisions are elastic, 
find (a) the average force and (b) the average pressure 
on the window during this interval.
4. In an ultrahigh vacuum system (with typical pressures 
lower than 1027 pascal), the pressure is measured to 
be 1.00 3 10210 torr (where 1 torr 5 133 Pa). Assum-
ing the temperature is 300 K, find the number of mol-
ecules in a volume of 1.00 m3.
5. A spherical balloon of volume 4.00 3 103 cm3 contains 
helium at a pressure of 1.20 3 105 Pa. How many moles 
of helium are in the balloon if the average kinetic 
energy of the helium atoms is 3.60 3 10222 J?
6. A spherical balloon of volume V contains helium at a 
pressure P. How many moles of helium are in the bal-
loon if the average kinetic energy of the helium atoms 
is K
?
7. A 2.00-mol sample of oxygen gas is confined to a 5.00-L 
vessel at a pressure of 8.00 atm. Find the average trans-
lational kinetic energy of the oxygen molecules under 
these conditions.
8. Oxygen, modeled as an ideal gas, is in a container and 
has a temperature of 77.08C. What is the rms-average 
magnitude of the momentum of the gas molecules in 
the container?
9. Calculate the mass of an atom of (a) helium, (b) iron, 
and (c) lead. Give your answers in kilograms. The 
atomic masses of these atoms are 4.00 u, 55.9 u, and 
207 u, respectively.
10. The rms speed of an oxygen molecule (O
2
) in a con-
tainer of oxygen gas is 625 m/s. What is the tempera-
ture of the gas?
11. A 5.00-L vessel contains nitrogen gas at 27.0°C and  
3.00 atm. Find (a) the total translational kinetic energy 
of the gas molecules and (b) the average kinetic energy 
per molecule.
12. A 7.00-L vessel contains 3.50 moles of gas at a pres-
sure of 1.60 3 106 Pa. Find (a) the temperature of the 
gas and (b) the average kinetic energy of the gas mol-
ecules in the vessel. (c) What additional information 
would you need if you were asked to find the average 
speed of the gas molecules?
13. In a period of 1.00 s, 5.00 3 1023 nitrogen molecules 
strike a wall with an area of 8.00 cm2. Assume the mol-
ecules move with a speed of 300 m/s and strike the 
wall head-on in elastic collisions. What is the pressure 
exerted on the wall? Note: The mass of one N
2
molecule 
is 4.65 3 10226 kg.
Section 21.2  Molar Specific heat of an Ideal Gas
Note: You may use data in Table 21.2 about particular 
gases. Here we define a “monatomic ideal gas” to have 
molar specific heats C
V
53
2
R and C
P
55
2
R, and a 
“diatomic ideal gas” to have C
V
5
5
2
R and C
P
5
7
2
R.
W
M
S
W
Q/C
W
M
14. In a constant-volume process, 209 J of energy is trans-
ferred by heat to 1.00 mol of an ideal monatomic gas 
initially at 300 K. Find (a) the work done on the gas, 
(b) the increase in internal energy of the gas, and  
(c) its final temperature.
15. A sample of a diatomic ideal gas has pressure P and 
volume V. When the gas is warmed, its pressure triples 
and its volume doubles. This warming process includes 
two steps, the first at constant pressure and the second 
at constant volume. Determine the amount of energy 
transferred to the gas by heat.
16. Review. A house has well-insulated walls. It contains 
a volume of 100 m3 of air at 300 K. (a) Calculate 
the energy required to increase the temperature of 
this diatomic ideal gas by 1.008C. (b) What If? If all 
this energy could be used to lift an object of mass m 
through a height of 2.00 m, what is the value of m?
17. A 1.00-mol sample of hydrogen gas is heated at con-
stant pressure from 300 K to 420 K. Calculate (a) the 
energy transferred to the gas by heat, (b) the increase 
in its internal energy, and (c) the work done on the gas.
18. A vertical cylinder with a heavy piston contains air 
at 300 K. The initial pressure is 2.00 3 105 Pa, and 
the initial volume is 0.350 m3. Take the molar mass 
of air as 28.9 g/mol and assume C
V
55
2
R. (a) Find 
the specific heat of air at constant volume in units of  
J/kg ? 8C. (b) Calculate the mass of the air in the cyl-
inder. (c) Suppose the piston is held fixed. Find the 
energy input required to raise the temperature of the 
air to 700 K. (d) What If? Assume again the conditions 
of the initial state and assume the heavy piston is free 
to move. Find the energy input required to raise the 
temperature to 700 K.
19. Calculate the change in internal energy of 3.00 mol of 
helium gas when its temperature is increased by 2.00 K.
20. A 1.00-L insulated bottle is full of tea at 90.08C. You pour 
out one cup of tea and immediately screw the stopper 
back on the bottle. Make an order-of-magnitude esti-
mate of the change in temperature of the tea remaining 
in the bottle that results from the admission of air at 
room temperature. State the quantities you take as data 
and the values you measure or estimate for them.
21. Review. This problem is a continuation of Problem 39 
in Chapter 19. A hot-air balloon consists of an enve-
lope of constant volume 400 m3. Not including the air 
inside, the balloon and cargo have mass 200 kg. The 
air outside and originally inside is a diatomic ideal 
gas at 10.0°C and 101 kPa, with density 1.25 kg/m3. 
A propane burner at the center of the spherical enve-
lope injects energy into the air inside. The air inside 
stays at constant pressure. Hot air, at just the tempera-
ture required to make the balloon lift off, starts to fill 
the envelope at its closed top, rapidly enough so that 
negligible energy flows by heat to the cool air below 
it or out through the wall of the balloon. Air at 10°C 
leaves through an opening at the bottom of the enve-
lope until the whole balloon is filled with hot air at 
uniform temperature. Then the burner is shut off and 
W
S
M
VB.NET Image: Professional Form Processing and Recognition SDK in
on the top right of our web page. you have checked your forms before using form printing add provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
convert fillable pdf to html form; convert pdf to html file
Process Forms in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
Twain Scanning; DICOM Reading; Form Recognition & Processing. Online PDF Editor (beta); Online Document Viewer; Online Convert PDF to Word; Online Convert
convert pdf into html; add pdf to website
problems 
647
How much work is required to produce the same com-
pression in an adiabatic process? (c) What is the final 
pressure in part (a)? (d)What is the final pressure in 
part (b)?
29. Air in a thundercloud expands as it rises. If its initial 
temperature is 300 K and no energy is lost by ther-
mal conduction on expansion, what is its temperature 
when the initial volume has doubled?
30. Why is the following situation impossible? A new die-
sel engine that increases fuel economy over previ-
ous models is designed. Automobiles fitted with this 
design become incredible best sellers. Two design fea-
tures are responsible for the increased fuel economy:  
(1) the engine is made entirely of aluminum to reduce 
the weight of the automobile, and (2) the exhaust of 
the engine is used to prewarm the air to 508C before 
it enters the cylinder to increase the final temperature 
of the compressed gas. The engine has a compression 
ratio—that is, the ratio of the initial volume of the air 
to its final volume after compression—of 14.5. The 
compression process is adiabatic, and the air behaves 
as a diatomic ideal gas with g 5 1.40.
31. During the power stroke in a four-stroke automo-
bile engine, the piston is forced down as the mixture 
of combustion products and air undergoes an adia-
batic expansion. Assume (1) the engine is running at  
2 500 cycles/min; (2) the gauge pressure immediately 
before the expansion is 20.0 atm; (3) the volumes of the 
mixture immediately before and after the expansion 
are 50.0 cm3 and 400cm3, respectively (Fig. P21.31); 
(4) the time interval for the expansion is one-fourth 
that of the total cycle; and (5) the mixture behaves like 
an ideal gas with specific heat ratio 1.40. Find the aver-
age power generated during the power stroke.
Before
After
50.0 cm
3
400.0 cm
3
Cl
Cl
Figure P21.23
24. Why is the following situation impossible? A team of 
researchers discovers a new gas, which has a value of  
g 5 C
P
/C
V
of 1.75.
25. The relationship between the heat capacity of a sam-
ple and the specific heat of the sample material is dis-
cussed in Section 20.2. Consider a sample containing 
2.00 mol of an ideal diatomic gas. Assuming the mol-
ecules rotate but do not vibrate, find (a) the total heat 
capacity of the sample at constant volume and (b) the 
total heat capacity at constant pressure. (c) What If? 
Repeat parts (a) and (b), assuming the molecules both 
rotate and vibrate.
Section 21.4  Adiabatic Processes for an Ideal Gas
26. A 2.00-mol sample of a diatomic ideal gas expands 
slowly and adiabatically from a pressure of 5.00 atm 
and a volume of 12.0 L to a final volume of 30.0 L.  
(a) What is the final pressure of the gas? (b) What are 
the initial and final temperatures? Find (c) Q, (d) DE
int
 
and (e) W  for the gas during this process.
27. During the compression stroke of a certain gasoline 
engine, the pressure increases from 1.00 atm to 20.0 atm.  
If the process is adiabatic and the air–fuel mixture 
behaves as a diatomic ideal gas, (a) by what factor does 
the volume change and (b) by what factor does the 
temperature change? Assuming the compression starts 
with 0.016 0 mol of gas at 27.08C, find the values of (c) Q,  
(d) DE
int
, and (e)W  that characterize the process.
28. How much work is required to compress 5.00 mol of 
air at 20.08C and 1.00 atm to one-tenth of the origi-
nal volume (a)by an isothermal process? (b) What If?  
S
M
M
W
W
C#: How to Determine the Display Format for Web Doucment Viewing
RasterEdge web document viewer for .NET can convert PDF, Word, Excel and the same time, and then render image form to show on your C# project aspx web page
convert pdf to html form; converting pdfs to html
C#: How to Add HTML5 Document Viewer Control to Your Web Page
Add a new Web Form to your C# _tabFile.addCommand(new RECommand("convert")); _tabFile.addCommand _userCmdDemoPdf = new UserCommand("pdf"); _userCmdDemoPdf.addCSS
online convert pdf to html; convert pdf to html online
648
chapter 21 the Kinetic theory of Gases
speeds for the two isotopes of chlorine, 35Cl and 37Cl, 
as they diffuse through the air. (b) Which isotope 
moves faster?
39. Review. At what temperature would the average speed 
of helium atoms equal (a) the escape speed from the 
Earth, 1.12 3 104 m/s, and (b) the escape speed from 
the Moon, 2.37 3 103 m/s? Note: The mass of a helium 
atom is 6.64 3 10227 kg.
40. Consider a container of nitrogen gas molecules at 
900K. Calculate (a) the most probable speed, (b) the 
average speed, and (c) the rms speed for the molecules. 
(d)State how your results compare with the values dis-
played in Figure 21.11.
41. Assume the Earth’s atmosphere has a uniform tem-
perature of 20.08C and uniform composition, with 
an effective molar mass of 28.9 g/mol. (a) Show that 
the number density of molecules depends on height y 
above sea level according to
n
V
1
y
2
5n
0
e2m
0
gy/k
B
T
where n
0
is the number density at sea level (where y 5 0). 
This result is called the law of atmospheres. (b) Commer-
cial jetliners typically cruise at an altitude of 11.0 km.  
Find the ratio of the atmospheric density there to the 
density at sea level.
42. From the Maxwell–Boltzmann speed distribution, 
show that the most probable speed of a gas molecule 
is given by Equation 21.44. Note: The most probable 
speed corresponds to the point at which the slope of 
the speed distribution curve dN
v
/dv is zero.
43. The law of atmospheres states that the number density 
of molecules in the atmosphere depends on height y 
above sea level according to
n
V
1
y
2
5n
0
e2m
0
gy/k
B
T
where n
0
is the number density at sea level (where y 5  
0). The average height of a molecule in the Earth’s 
atmosphere is given by
y
avg
5
3
`
0
yn
V
1
y
2
dy
3
`
0
n
V
1
y
2
dy
5
3
`
0
ye2m
0
gy/k
B
T dy
3
`
0
e2m
0
gy/k
B
T dy
(a) Prove that this average height is equal to k
B
T/m
0
g
(b) Evaluate the average height, assuming the temper-
ature is 10.08C and the molecular mass is 28.9 u, both 
uniform throughout the atmosphere.
Additional Problems
44. Eight molecules have speeds of 3.00 km/s, 4.00 km/s, 
5.80km/s, 2.50 km/s, 3.60 km/s, 1.90 km/s, 3.80 km/s, 
and 6.60 km/s. Find (a) the average speed of the mol-
ecules and (b) the rms speed of the molecules.
45. A small oxygen tank at a gauge pressure of 125 atm has 
a volume of 6.88 L at 21.08C. (a) If an athlete breathes 
oxygen from this tank at the rate of 8.50 L/min when 
measured at atmospheric pressure and the tempera-
ture remains at 21.08C, how long will the tank last 
before it is empty? (b) At a particular moment during 
Q/C
S
pressure of the compressed air? (d)What is the volume 
of the compressed air? (e) What is the temperature of 
the compressed air? (f) What is the increase in inter-
nal energy of the gas during the compression? What 
If? The pump is made of steel that is 2.00 mm thick. 
Assume 4.00 cm of the cylinder’s length is allowed to 
come to thermal equilibrium with the air. (g) What is 
the volume of steel in this 4.00-cm length? (h) What is 
the mass of steel in this 4.00-cm length? (i) Assume the 
pump is compressed once. After the adiabatic expan-
sion, conduction results in the energy increase in part 
(f) being shared between the gas and the 4.00-cm 
length of steel. What will be the increase in tempera-
ture of the steel after one compression?
33. A 4.00-L sample of a diatomic ideal gas with spe-
cific heat ratio 1.40, confined to a cylinder, is carried 
through a closed cycle. The gas is initially at 1.00 atm 
and 300 K. First, its pressure is tripled under constant 
volume. Then, it expands adiabatically to its original 
pressure. Finally, the gas is compressed isobarically to 
its original volume. (a) Draw a PV diagram of this cycle. 
(b) Determine the volume of the gas at the end of the 
adiabatic expansion. (c)Find the temperature of the 
gas at the start of the adiabatic expansion. (d) Find  
the temperature at the end of the cycle. (e) What was 
the net work done on the gas for this cycle?
34. An ideal gas with specific heat ratio g confined to a cyl-
inder is put through a closed cycle. Initially, the gas is 
at P
i
V
i
, and T
i
. First, its pressure is tripled under con-
stant volume. It then expands adiabatically to its origi-
nal pressure and finally is compressed isobarically to 
its original volume. (a) Draw a PV diagram of this cycle. 
(b) Determine the volume at the end of the adiabatic 
expansion. Find (c) the temperature of the gas at the 
start of the adiabatic expansion and (d) the tempera-
ture at the end of the cycle. (e) What was the net work 
done on the gas for this cycle?
Section 21.5  Distribution of Molecular Speeds
35. Helium gas is in thermal equilibrium with liquid 
helium at 4.20 K. Even though it is on the point of con-
densation, model the gas as ideal and determine the 
most probable speed of a helium atom (mass 5 6.64 3 
10–27 kg) in it.
36. Fifteen identical particles have various speeds: one has 
a speed of 2.00 m/s, two have speeds of 3.00 m/s, three 
have speeds of 5.00 m/s, four have speeds of 7.00 m/s, 
three have speeds of 9.00 m/s, and two have speeds of 
12.0m/s. Find (a) the average speed, (b) the rms speed, 
and (c)the most probable speed of these particles.
37. One cubic meter of atomic hydrogen at 08C at atmo-
spheric pressure contains approximately 2.70 3 1025 
atoms. The first excited state of the hydrogen atom 
has an energy of 10.2 eV above that of the lowest state, 
called the ground state. Use the Boltzmann factor 
to find the number of atoms in the first excited state  
(a) at 08C and at (b) (1.00 3 104)8C.
38. Two gases in a mixture diffuse through a filter at rates 
proportional to their rms speeds. (a) Find the ratio of 
S
M
W
C# Image: How to Integrate Web Document and Image Viewer
RasterEdgeImagingDeveloperGuide8.0.pdf: from this user manual, you can find the detailed instructions and Now, you may add a new Web Form to your web project.
how to convert pdf into html; convert from pdf to html
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Create Online TIFF Document Viewer
We still demonstrate how to create more web viewers on PDF and Word documents at the DLL into your C#.NET web page, you may create a new Web Form (Default.aspx
pdf to html converter online; convert pdf to web
problems 
649
y, and z directions plus elastic potential energy associ-
ated with the Hooke’s law forces exerted by neighbor-
ing atoms on it in the x, y, and z directions. According 
to the theorem of equipartition of energy, assume the 
average energy of each atom is 1
2
k
B
T for each degree of 
freedom. (a) Prove that the molar specific heat of the 
solid is 3R. The Dulong–Petit law states that this result 
generally describes pure solids at sufficiently high tem-
peratures. (You may ignore the difference between the 
specific heat at constant pressure and the specific heat 
at constant volume.) (b) Evaluate the specific heat c of 
iron. Explain how it compares with the value listed in 
Table 20.1. (c) Repeat the evaluation and comparison 
for gold.
51. A certain ideal gas has a molar specific heat of C
V
57
2
R. 
A 2.00-mol sample of the gas always starts at pressure 
1.003 105 Pa and temperature 300 K. For each of the 
following processes, determine (a) the final pressure, 
(b) the final volume, (c) the final temperature, (d) the 
change in internal energy of the gas, (e) the energy 
added to the gas by heat, and (f) the work done on the 
gas. (i) The gas is heated at constant pressure to 400 K.  
(ii) The gas is heated at constant volume to 400 K.  
(iii) The gas is compressed at constant temperature to 
1.20 3 105 Pa. (iv) The gas is compressed adiabatically 
to 1.20 3 105 Pa.
52. The compressibility k of a substance is defined as the 
fractional change in volume of that substance for a 
given change in pressure:
k52
1
V
dV
dP
(a) Explain why the negative sign in this expression 
ensures k is always positive. (b) Show that if an ideal 
gas is compressed isothermally, its compressibility is 
given by k
1
5 1/P. (c) What If? Show that if an ideal gas 
is compressed adiabatically, its compressibility is given 
by k
2
5 1/(gP). Determine values for (d) k
1
and (e) k
2
for a monatomic ideal gas at a pressure of 2.00 atm.
53. Review. Oxygen at pressures much greater than 1 atm 
is toxic to lung cells. Assume a deep-sea diver breathes 
a mixture of oxygen (O
2
) and helium (He). By weight, 
what ratio of helium to oxygen must be used if the 
diver is at an ocean depth of 50.0 m?
54. Examine the data for polyatomic gases in Table 21.2 
and give a reason why sulfur dioxide has a higher spe-
cific heat at constant volume than the other polyatomic 
gases at 300 K.
55. Model air as a diatomic ideal gas with M 5 28.9 g/mol.  
A cylinder with a piston contains 1.20 kg of air at 
25.08C and 2.00 3 105 Pa. Energy is transferred by 
heat into the system as it is permitted to expand, with 
the pressure rising to 4.00 3 105 Pa. Throughout the 
expansion, the relationship between pressure and vol-
ume is given by
P 5 CV1/2
where C is a constant. Find (a) the initial volume, (b) the  
final volume, (c) the final temperature, (d) the work 
done on the air, and (e) the energy transferred by heat.
BIO
Q/C
this process, what is the ratio of the rms speed of the 
molecules remaining in the tank to the rms speed of 
those being released at atmospheric pressure?
46. The dimensions of a classroom are 4.20 m 3 3.00m3 
2.50 m. (a) Find the number of molecules of air in 
the classroom at atmospheric pressure and 20.08C.  
(b) Find the mass of this air, assuming the air consists 
of diatomic molecules with molar mass 28.9 g/mol.  
(c) Find the average kinetic energy of the molecules. 
(d) Find the rms molecular speed. (e) What If? 
Assume the molar specific heat of the air is inde-
pendent of temperature. Find the change in internal 
energy of the air in the room as the temperature is 
raised to 25.08C. (f) Explain how you could convince 
a fellow student that your answer to part (e) is correct, 
even though it sounds surprising.
47. The Earth’s atmosphere consists primarily of oxygen 
(21%) and nitrogen (78%). The rms speed of oxygen 
molecules (O
2
) in the atmosphere at a certain loca-
tion is 535m/s. (a) What is the temperature of the 
atmosphere at this location? (b) Would the rms speed 
of nitrogen molecules (N
2
) at this location be higher, 
equal to, or lower than 535 m/s? Explain. (c) Deter-
mine the rms speed of N
2
at his location.
48. The mean free path , of a molecule is the average dis-
tance that a molecule travels before colliding with 
another molecule. It is given by
,5
1
!2
pd2N
V
where d is the diameter of the molecule and N
V
is the 
number of molecules per unit volume. The number of 
collisions that a molecule makes with other molecules 
per unit time, or collision frequency f, is given by
f5
v
avg
,
(a) If the diameter of an oxygen molecule is 2.00 3 
10210m, find the mean free path of the molecules 
in a scuba tank that has a volume of 12.0 L and is 
filled with oxygen at a gauge pressure of 100 atm at a 
temperature of 25.08C. (b)What is the average time 
interval between molecular collisions for a molecule 
of this gas?
49. An air rifle shoots a lead pellet by allowing high- 
pressure air to expand, propelling the pellet down the 
rifle barrel. Because this process happens very quickly, 
no appreciable thermal conduction occurs and the 
expansion is essentially adiabatic. Suppose the rifle 
starts with 12.0 cm3 of compressed air, which behaves 
as an ideal gas with g 5 1.40. The expanding air 
pushes a 1.10-g pellet as a piston with cross-sectional 
area 0.030 0 cm2 along the 50.0-cm-long gun barrel. 
What initial pressure is required to eject the pellet 
with a muzzle speed of 120 m/s? Ignore the effects 
of the air in front of the bullet and friction with the 
inside walls of the barrel.
50. In a sample of a solid metal, each atom is free to 
vibrate about some equilibrium position. The atom’s 
energy consists of kinetic energy for motion in the x, 
Q/C
Q/C
Q/C
AMT
AMT
Q/C
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
C#.NET can manipulate & convert standard PDF developers to conduct high fidelity PDF file conversion C#.NET applications, like ASP.NET web form application and
changing pdf to html; embed pdf into html
C# PDF: How to Create PDF Document Viewer in C#.NET with
to images or svg file; Free to convert viewing PDF designed PDF document using C# code; PDF document viewer be created in C# Web Forms, Windows Form and mobile
convert pdf link to html; convert pdf to url online
650
chapter 21 the Kinetic theory of Gases
as that of a molecule in an ideal gas. Consider a spheri-
cal particle of density 1.00 3 103 kg/m3 in water at 
20.08C. (a) For a particle of diameter d, evaluate the 
rms speed. (b) The particle’s actual motion is a ran-
dom walk, but imagine that it moves with constant 
velocity equal in magnitude to its rms speed. In what 
time interval would it move by a distance equal to its 
own diameter? (c) Evaluate the rms speed and the time 
interval for a particle of diameter 3.00 mm. (d) Evalu-
ate the rms speed and the time interval for a sphere of 
mass 70.0 kg, modeling your own body.
62. A vessel contains 1.00 3 104 oxygen molecules at 500 K.  
(a) Make an accurate graph of the Maxwell speed distri-
bution function versus speed with points at speed inter-
vals of 100 m/s. (b) Determine the most probable speed 
from this graph. (c) Calculate the average and rms 
speeds for the molecules and label these points on your 
graph. (d) From the graph, estimate the fraction of mol-
ecules with speeds in the range 300 m/s to 600 m/s.
63. A pitcher throws a 0.142-kg baseball at 47.2 m/s. As it 
travels 16.8 m to home plate, the ball slows down to 
42.5 m/s because of air resistance. Find the change 
in temperature of the air through which it passes. To 
find the greatest possible temperature change, you 
may make the following assumptions. Air has a molar 
specific heat of C
P
57
2
R and an equivalent molar mass 
of 28.9 g/mol. The process is so rapid that the cover 
of the baseball acts as thermal insulation and the tem-
perature of the ball itself does not change. A change 
in temperature happens initially only for the air in a 
cylinder 16.8 m in length and 3.70 cm in radius. This 
air is initially at 20.08C.
64. The latent heat of vaporization for water at room tem-
perature is 2 430 J/g. Consider one particular molecule 
at the surface of a glass of liquid water, moving upward 
with sufficiently high speed that it will be the next 
molecule to join the vapor. (a) Find its translational 
kinetic energy. (b)Find its speed. Now consider a thin 
gas made only of molecules like that one. (c) What is 
its temperature? (d)Why are you not burned by water 
evaporating from a vessel at room temperature?
65. A sample of a monatomic ideal gas occupies 5.00 L at 
atmospheric pressure and 300 K (point A in Fig. P21.65). 
It is warmed at constant volume to 3.00 atm (point B). 
Then it is allowed to expand isothermally to 1.00 atm 
(point C) and at last compressed isobarically to its origi-
nal state. (a)Find the number of moles in the sample. 
AMT
Q/C
Q/C
56. Review. As a sound wave passes through a gas, the 
compressions are either so rapid or so far apart that 
thermal conduction is prevented by a negligible time 
interval or by effective thickness of insulation. The 
compressions and rarefactions are adiabatic. (a) Show 
that the speed of sound in an ideal gas is
v5
Å
gRT
M
where M is the molar mass. The speed of sound in a 
gas is given by Equation 17.8; use that equation and 
the definition of the bulk modulus from Section 12.4. 
(b)Compute the theoretical speed of sound in air at 
20.08C and state how it compares with the value in 
Table 17.1. Take M5 28.9 g/mol. (c) Show that the 
speed of sound in an ideal gas is
v5
Å
gk
B
T
m
0
where m
0
is the mass of one molecule. (d) State how 
the result in part (c) compares with the most probable, 
average, and rms molecular speeds.
57. Twenty particles, each of mass m
0
and confined to a 
volume V, have various speeds: two have speed v, three 
have speed 2v, five have speed 3v, four have speed 
4v, three have speed 5v, two have speed 6v, and one 
has speed 7v. Find (a)the average speed, (b) the rms 
speed, (c) the most probable speed, (d) the average 
pressure the particles exert on the walls of the vessel, 
and (e) the average kinetic energy per particle.
58. In a cylinder, a sample of an ideal gas with number of 
moles n undergoes an adiabatic process. (a) Starting 
with the expression W52
e
P dV and using the condi-
tion PVg 5 constant, show that the work done on the 
gas is
W5a
1
g21
b
1
P
f
V
f
2P
i
V
i
2
(b) Starting with the first law of thermodynamics, show 
that the work done on the gas is equal to nC
V
(T
f
T
i
). 
(c)Are these two results consistent with each other? 
Explain.
59. As a 1.00-mol sample of a monatomic ideal gas expands 
adiabatically, the work done on it is 22.50 3 103 J. The 
initial temperature and pressure of the gas are 500 K 
and 3.60atm. Calculate (a) the final temperature and 
(b) the final pressure.
60. A sample consists of an amount n in moles of a mona-
tomic ideal gas. The gas expands adiabatically, with 
work W done on it. (Work W is a negative number.) 
The initial temperature and pressure of the gas are T
i
and P
i
. Calculate (a) the final temperature and (b) the 
final pressure.
61. When a small particle is suspended in a fluid, bom-
bardment by molecules makes the particle jitter about 
at random. Robert Brown discovered this motion in 
1827 while studying plant fertilization, and the motion 
has become known as Brownian motion. The particle’s 
average kinetic energy can be taken as 3
2
k
B
T, the same 
Q/C
S
S
Q/C
S
P (atm)
3
0
5
10
(L)
B
A
C
2
1
15
Figure P21.65
C# PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in C#.net, ASP
In some situations, it is quite necessary to convert PDF document into SVG image format. indexed, scripted, and supported by most of the up to date web browsers
convert pdf to html code; how to convert pdf file to html document
problems 
651
70. On the PV diagram for an ideal gas, one isothermal 
curve and one adiabatic curve pass through each point 
as shown in Figure P21.70. Prove that the slope of the 
adiabatic curve is steeper than the slope of the iso-
therm at that point by the factor g.
V
Adiabatic
process
P
Isothermal
process
Figure P21.70
71. In Beijing, a restaurant keeps a pot of chicken broth 
simmering continuously. Every morning, it is topped 
up to contain 10.0 L of water along with a fresh 
chicken, vegetables, and spices. The molar mass of 
water is 18.0 g/mol. (a) Find the number of molecules 
of water in the pot. (b) During a certain month, 90.0% 
of the broth was served each day to people who then 
emigrated immediately. Of the water molecules in the 
pot on the first day of the month, when was the last 
one likely to have been ladled out of the pot? (c) The 
broth has been simmering for centuries, through wars, 
earthquakes, and stove repairs. Suppose the water that 
was in the pot long ago has thoroughly mixed into the 
Earth’s hydrosphere, of mass 1.32 3 1021 kg. How many 
of the water molecules originally in the pot are likely to 
be present in it again today?
72. Review. (a) If it has enough kinetic energy, a molecule 
at the surface of the Earth can “escape the Earth’s grav-
itation” in the sense that it can continue to move away 
from the Earth forever as discussed in Section 13.6. 
Using the principle of conservation of energy, show 
that the minimum kinetic energy needed for “escape” 
is m
0
gR
E
, where m
0
is the mass of the molecule, g is 
the free-fall acceleration at the surface, and R
E
is the 
radius of the Earth. (b)Calculate the temperature for 
which the minimum escape kinetic energy is ten times 
the average kinetic energy of an oxygen molecule.
73. Using multiple laser beams, physicists have been able 
to cool and trap sodium atoms in a small region. In 
one experiment, the temperature of the atoms was 
reduced to 0.240 mK. (a) Determine the rms speed 
of the sodium atoms at this temperature. The atoms 
can be trapped for about 1.00 s. The trap has a linear 
dimension of roughly 1.00 cm. (b) Over what approxi-
mate time interval would an atom wander out of the 
trap region if there were no trapping action?
Challenge Problems
74. Equations 21.42 and 21.43 show that v
rms
v
avg
for a 
collection of gas particles, which turns out to be true 
whenever the particles have a distribution of speeds. 
Let us explore this inequality for a two-particle gas.  
S
Q/C
S
Find (b) the temperature at point B, (c) the temperature 
at point C, and (d) the volume at point C. (e) Now con-
sider the processes A S B, B S C, and C S A. Describe 
how to carry out each process experimentally. (f) Find 
QW, and DE
int 
for each of the processes. (g) For the 
whole cycle A S B S C S A, find QW, and DE
int
.
66. Consider the particles in a gas centrifuge, a device 
used to separate particles of different mass by whirling 
them in a circular path of radius r at angular speed v. 
The force acting on a gas molecule toward the center 
of the centrifuge is m
0
v2r. (a) Discuss how a gas centri-
fuge can be used to separate particles of different mass.  
(b) Suppose the centrifuge contains a gas of particles 
of identical mass. Show that the density of the particles 
as a function of r is
n
1
r
2
5n
0
em
0
r2v2/2k
B
T
67. For a Maxwellian gas, use a computer or programma-
ble calculator to find the numerical value of the ratio 
N
v
(v)/N
v
(v
mp
) for the following values of v: (a) v 5  
(v
mp
/50.0), (b)(v
mp
/10.0), (c) (v
mp
/2.00), (d) v
mp
(e)2.00v
mp
, (f)10.0v
mp
, and (g) 50.0v
mp
. Give your 
results to three significant figures.
68. A triatomic molecule can have a linear configuration, 
as does CO
2
(Fig. P21.68a), or it can be nonlinear, like 
H
2
O (Fig. P21.68b). Suppose the temperature of a gas 
of triatomic molecules is sufficiently low that vibrational 
motion is negligible. What is the molar specific heat 
at constant volume, expressed as a multiple of the uni-
versal gas constant, (a) if the molecules are linear and  
(b) if the molecules are nonlinear? At high tempera-
tures, a triatomic molecule has two modes of vibration, 
and each contributes 1
2
R to the molar specific heat for its 
kinetic energy and another 
1
2
R for its potential energy. 
Identify the high-temperature molar specific heat at 
constant volume for a triatomic ideal gas of (c) linear 
molecules and (d) nonlinear molecules. (e) Explain how 
specific heat data can be used to determine whether a 
triatomic molecule is linear or nonlinear. Are the data 
in Table 21.2 sufficient to make this determination?
O
H
H
O
O
C
a
b
Figure P21.68
69. Using the Maxwell–Boltzmann speed distribution 
function, verify Equations 21.42 and 21.43 for (a) the 
rms speed and (b) the average speed of the molecules 
of a gas at a temperature T. The average value of vn is
vn
5
1
N
3
`
0
vnN
v
dv
Use the table of integrals B.6 in Appendix B.
Q/C
S
Q/C
S
652
chapter 21 the Kinetic theory of Gases
parallel to the axis of the cylinder until it comes to 
rest at an equilibrium position (Fig. P21.75b). Find the 
final temperatures in the two compartments.
T
1i
= 550 K T
2i
= 250 K
T
1f
T
2f
a
b
Figure P21.75
Let the speed of one particle be v
1
av
avg
and the other 
particle have speed v
2
5 (2 2 a)v
avg
. (a) Show that the 
average of these two speeds is v
avg
. (b) Show that
v2
rms
v2
avg
(2 2 2a 1 a2)
(c) Argue that the equation in part (b) proves that, in 
general, v
rms
v
avg
. (d) Under what special condition 
will v
rms
5 v
avg
for the two-particle gas?
75. A cylinder is closed at both ends and has insulating 
walls. It is divided into two compartments by an insu-
lating piston that is perpendicular to the axis of the 
cylinder as shown in Figure P21.75a. Each compart-
ment contains 1.00 mol of oxygen that behaves as an 
ideal gas with g 5 1.40. Initially, the two compartments 
have equal volumes and their temperatures are 550 K 
and 250 K. The piston is then allowed to move slowly 
AMT
A Stirling engine from the early 
nineteenth century. Air is heated in the 
lower cylinder using an external source. 
As this happens, the air expands and 
pushes against a piston, causing it to 
move. The air is then cooled, allowing the 
cycle to begin again. This is one example 
of a heat engine, which we study in this 
chapter. 
(
© 
SSPL/The Image Works)
22.1 Heat Engines and the Second 
Law of Thermodynamics
22.2 Heat Pumps and Refrigerators
22.3 Reversible and  
Irreversible Processes
22.4 The Carnot Engine
22.5 Gasoline and Diesel Engines
22.6 Entropy
22.7 Changes in Entropy for 
Thermodynamic Systems
22.8 Entropy and the Second Law
c h a p p t t e r 
22
The first law of thermodynamics, which we studied in Chapter 20, is a statement of 
conservation of energy and is a special-case reduction of Equation 8.2. This law states 
that a change in internal energy in a system can occur as a result of energy transfer by 
heat, by work, or by both. Although the first law of thermodynamics is very important, 
it makes no distinction between processes that occur spontaneously and those that do 
not. Only certain types of energy transformation and energy transfer processes actually 
take place in nature, however. The second law of thermodynamics, the major topic in this 
chapter, establishes which processes do and do not occur. The following are examples 
heat engines, entropy, 
and the Second Law of 
thermodynamics
653
654
chapter 22 heat engines, entropy, and the Second Law of thermodynamics
of processes that do not violate the first law of thermodynamics if they proceed in either 
direction, but are observed in reality to proceed in only one direction:
  When two objects at different temperatures are placed in thermal contact with each 
other, the net transfer of energy by heat is always from the warmer object to the cooler 
object, never from the cooler to the warmer.
  A rubber ball dropped to the ground bounces several times and eventually comes to rest, 
but a ball lying on the ground never gathers internal energy from the ground and begins 
bouncing on its own.
  An oscillating pendulum eventually comes to rest because of collisions with air molecules 
and friction at the point of suspension. The mechanical energy of the system is converted 
to internal energy in the air, the pendulum, and the suspension; the reverse conversion of 
energy never occurs.
All these processes are irreversible; that is, they are processes that occur naturally in one 
direction only. No irreversible process has ever been observed to run backward. If it were to 
do so, it would violate the second law of thermodynamics.1
22.1  Heat Engines and the Second Law  
of Thermodynamics
heat engine is a device that takes in energy by heat2 and, operating in a cyclic 
process, expels a fraction of that energy by means of work. For instance, in a typical 
process by which a power plant produces electricity, a fuel such as coal is burned 
and the high-temperature gases produced are used to convert liquid water to 
steam. This steam is directed at the blades of a turbine, setting it into rotation. The 
mechanical energy associated with this rotation is used to drive an electric genera-
tor. Another device that can be modeled as a heat engine is the internal combustion 
engine in an automobile. This device uses energy from a burning fuel to perform 
work on pistons that results in the motion of the automobile.
Let us consider the operation of a heat engine in more detail. A heat engine car-
ries some working substance through a cyclic process during which (1) the working 
substance absorbs energy by heat from a high-temperature energy reservoir, (2) work 
is done by the engine, and (3) energy is expelled by heat to a lower-temperature 
reservoir. As an example, consider the operation of a steam engine (Fig. 22.1), which 
uses water as the working substance. The water in a boiler absorbs energy from burn-
ing fuel and evaporates to steam, which then does work by expanding against a pis-
ton. After the steam cools and condenses, the liquid water produced returns to the 
boiler and the cycle repeats.
It is useful to represent a heat engine schematically as in Figure 22.2. The engine 
absorbs a quantity of energy |Q
h
| from the hot reservoir. For the mathematical 
discussion of heat engines, we use absolute values to make all energy transfers by 
heat positive, and the direction of transfer is indicated with an explicit positive or 
negative sign. The engine does work W
eng
(so that negative work W 5 2W
eng
is done 
on the engine) and then gives up a quantity of energy |Q
c
| to the cold reservoir. 
Lord Kelvin
British physicist and mathematician 
(1824–1907)
Born William Thomson in Belfast, Kel-
vin was the first to propose the use of 
an absolute scale of temperature. The 
Kelvin temperature scale is named in 
his honor. Kelvin’s work in thermody-
namics led to the idea that energy can-
not pass spontaneously from a colder 
object to a hotter object.
©
M
a
r
y
E
v
a
n
s
P
i
c
t
u
r
e
L
i
b
r
a
r
y
/
A
l
a
m
y
1Although a process occurring in the time-reversed sense has never been observed, it is possible for it to occur. As we 
shall see later in this chapter, however, the probability of such a process occurring is infinitesimally small. From this 
viewpoint, processes occur with a vastly greater probability in one direction than in the opposite direction.
2We use heat as our model for energy transfer into a heat engine. Other methods of energy transfer are possible in 
the model of a heat engine, however. For example, the Earth’s atmosphere can be modeled as a heat engine in which 
the input energy transfer is by means of electromagnetic radiation from the Sun. The output of the atmospheric heat 
engine causes the wind structure in the atmosphere.
Figure 22.1 
A steam-driven 
locomotive obtains its energy 
by burning wood or coal. The 
generated energy vaporizes water 
into steam, which powers the 
locomotive. Modern locomotives 
use diesel fuel instead of wood or 
coal. Whether old-fashioned or 
modern, such locomotives can be 
modeled as heat engines, which 
extract energy from a burning 
fuel and convert a fraction of it to 
mechanical energy.
©
A
n
d
y
M
o
o
r
e
/
P
h
o
t
o
l
i
b
r
a
r
y
/
J
u
p
i
t
e
r
i
m
a
g
e
s
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested