2.5 Motion Diagrams 
35
derivatives. These rules, which are listed in Appendix B.6, enable us to evaluate 
derivatives quickly. For instance, one rule tells us that the derivative of any con-
stant is zero. As another example, suppose x is proportional to some power of t 
such as in the expression
x Atn
where A and n are constants. (This expression is a very common functional form.) 
The derivative of x with respect to t is
dx
dt
5nAtn21
Applying this rule to Example 2.6, in which v
x
5 40 2 5t2, we quickly find that the 
acceleration is a
x
dv
x
/dt 5 210t, as we found in part (B) of the example.
2.5 Motion Diagrams
The concepts of velocity and acceleration are often confused with each other, but 
in fact they are quite different quantities. In forming a mental representation of a 
moving object, a pictorial representation called a motion diagram is sometimes use-
ful to describe the velocity and acceleration while an object is in motion.
A motion diagram can be formed by imagining a stroboscopic photograph of a 
moving object, which shows several images of the object taken as the strobe light 
flashes at a constant rate. Figure 2.1a is a motion diagram for the car studied in 
Section 2.1. Figure 2.10 represents three sets of strobe photographs of cars moving 
along a straight roadway in a single direction, from left to right. The time intervals 
between flashes of the stroboscope are equal in each part of the diagram. So as 
to not confuse the two vector quantities, we use red arrows for velocity and purple 
arrows for acceleration in Figure 2.10. The arrows are shown at several instants dur-
ing the motion of the object. Let us describe the motion of the car in each diagram.
In Figure 2.10a, the images of the car are equally spaced, showing us that the car 
moves through the same displacement in each time interval. This equal spacing is 
consistent with the car moving with constant positive velocity and zero acceleration. We 
could model the car as a particle and describe it with the particle under constant 
velocity model.
In Figure 2.10b, the images become farther apart as time progresses. In this 
case, the velocity arrow increases in length with time because the car’s displace-
ment between adjacent positions increases in time. These features suggest the car is 
moving with a positive velocity and a positive acceleration. The velocity and acceleration 
are in the same direction. In terms of our earlier force discussion, imagine a force 
pulling on the car in the same direction it is moving: it speeds up.
Figure 2.10 
Motion diagrams 
of a car moving along a straight 
roadway in a single direction. 
The velocity at each instant is 
indicated by a red arrow, and the 
constant acceleration is indicated 
by a purple arrow.
v
v
v
a
a
This car moves at 
constant velocity (zero 
acceleration). 
This car has a constant 
acceleration in the 
direction of its velocity. 
This car has a 
constant acceleration 
in the direction 
opposite its velocity.
a
b
c
Convert pdf to web pages - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
convert pdf to web page online; embed pdf into web page
Convert pdf to web pages - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
convert pdf to web pages; how to convert pdf to html
36
chapter 2 Motion in One Dimension
In Figure 2.10c, we can tell that the car slows as it moves to the right because its 
displacement between adjacent images decreases with time. This case suggests the 
car moves to the right with a negative acceleration. The length of the velocity arrow 
decreases in time and eventually reaches zero. From this diagram, we see that the 
acceleration and velocity arrows are not in the same direction. The car is moving 
with a positive velocity, but with a negative acceleration. (This type of motion is exhib-
ited by a car that skids to a stop after its brakes are applied.) The velocity and accel-
eration are in opposite directions. In terms of our earlier force discussion, imagine 
a force pulling on the car opposite to the direction it is moving: it slows down.
Each purple acceleration arrow in parts (b) and (c) of Figure 2.10 is the same 
length. Therefore, these diagrams represent motion of a particle under constant accel-
eration. This important analysis model will be discussed in the next section.
uick Quiz 2.5 Which one of the following statements is true? (a) If a car is trav-
eling eastward, its acceleration must be eastward. (b) If a car is slowing down, 
its acceleration must be negative. (c) A particle with constant acceleration can 
never stop and stay stopped.
2.6 Analysis Model: Particle  
Under Constant Acceleration
If the acceleration of a particle varies in time, its motion can be complex and difficult 
to analyze. A very common and simple type of one-dimensional motion, however, is 
that in which the acceleration is constant. In such a case, the average acceleration 
a
x,avg
over any time interval is numerically equal to the instantaneous acceleration a
x
at any instant within the interval, and the velocity changes at the same rate through-
out the motion. This situation occurs often enough that we identify it as an analysis 
model: the particle under constant acceleration. In the discussion that follows, we 
generate several equations that describe the motion of a particle for this model.
If we replace a
x,avg
by a
x
in Equation 2.9 and take t
i
5 0 and t
f
to be any later time 
t, we find that
a
x
5
v
xf
2v
xi
t20
or
v
xf
v
xi
a
x
t (for constant a
x
(2.13)
This powerful expression enables us to determine an object’s velocity at any time 
t if we know the object’s initial velocity v
xi
and its (constant) acceleration a
x
. A  
velocity–time graph for this constant-acceleration motion is shown in Figure 2.11b. 
The graph is a straight line, the slope of which is the acceleration a
x
; the (constant) 
slope is consistent with a
x
5 dv
x
/dt being a constant. Notice that the slope is posi-
tive, which indicates a positive acceleration. If the acceleration were negative, the 
slope of the line in Figure 2.11b would be negative. When the acceleration is con-
stant, the graph of acceleration versus time (Fig. 2.11c) is a straight line having a 
slope of zero.
Because velocity at constant acceleration varies linearly in time according to 
Equation 2.13, we can express the average velocity in any time interval as the arith-
metic mean of the initial velocity v
xi
and the final velocity v
xf
:
v
x,avg
5
v
xi
1v
xf
2
1
for constant a
x
2
(2.14)
v
x
v
xi
v
xf
t
v
xi
a
x
t
t
t
Slope =  a
x
a
x
t
Slope = 0
x
t
x
i
Slope = v
xi
t
Slope = v
xf
a
x
a
b
c
Figure 2.11 
A particle under 
constant acceleration a
x
moving 
along the x axis: (a)the position–
time graph, (b)the velocity–time 
graph, and (c) the acceleration–
time graph.
C# PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in C#.net, ASP
Instantly convert all PDF document pages to SVG image files in C#.NET class application. Perform high-fidelity PDF to SVG conversion in both ASP.NET web and
embed pdf into website; pdf to html conversion
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Support adding and inserting one or multiple pages to existing PDF document. Support to create new page to PDF document in both web server-side application
convert pdf to html5 open source; convert pdf to html open source
2.6 analysis Model: particle Under constant acceleration 
37
Notice that this expression for average velocity applies only in situations in which 
the acceleration is constant.
We can now use Equations 2.1, 2.2, and 2.14 to obtain the position of an object as 
a function of time. Recalling that Dx in Equation 2.2 represents x
f
2 x
i
and recog-
nizing that Dt 5 t
f
t
i
t 2 0 5 t, we find that
x
f
2x
i
5v
x,avg 
t5
1
2
1
v
xi
1v
xf
2
t 
x
f
5x
i
1
1
2
1
v
xi
1v
xf
2
t
1
for constant a
x
2
(2.15)
This equation provides the final position of the particle at time t in terms of the 
initial and final velocities.
We can obtain another useful expression for the position of a particle under 
constant acceleration by substituting Equation 2.13 into Equation 2.15:
x
f
5x
i
1
1
2
3
v
xi
1
1
v
xi
1a
x
t
24
t
x
f
5x
i
1v
xi
t1
1
2
a
x
t
2
1
for constant a
x
2
(2.16)
This equation provides the final position of the particle at time t in terms of the 
initial position, the initial velocity, and the constant acceleration.
The position–time graph for motion at constant (positive) acceleration shown 
in Figure 2.11a is obtained from Equation 2.16. Notice that the curve is a parab-
ola. The slope of the tangent line to this curve at t 5 0 equals the initial velocity 
v
xi
, and the slope of the tangent line at any later time t equals the velocity v
xf
at 
that time.
Finally, we can obtain an expression for the final velocity that does not contain 
time as a variable by substituting the value of t from Equation 2.13 into Equation 2.15:
x
f
5x
i
1
1
2
1
v
xi
1v
xf
2
a
v
xf
2v
xi
a
x
b
5x
i
1
v
xf
2
2v
xi
2
2a
x
v
xf
2 v
xi
2 1 2a
x
(x
f
x
i
) (for constant a
x
(2.17)
This equation provides the final velocity in terms of the initial velocity, the constant 
acceleration, and the position of the particle.
For motion at zero acceleration, we see from Equations 2.13 and 2.16 that
v
xf
5v
xi
5v
x
x
f
5x
i
1v
x
t
f
when a
x
50
That is, when the acceleration of a particle is zero, its velocity is constant and its 
position changes linearly with time. In terms of models, when the acceleration of a 
particle is zero, the particle under constant acceleration model reduces to the par-
ticle under constant velocity model (Section 2.3).
Equations 2.13 through 2.17 are kinematic equations that may be used to solve 
any problem involving a particle under constant acceleration in one dimension. 
These equations are listed together for convenience on page 38. The choice of 
which equation you use in a given situation depends on what you know beforehand. 
Sometimes it is necessary to use two of these equations to solve for two unknowns. 
You should recognize that the quantities that vary during the motion are position 
x
f
, velocity v
xf
, and time t.
You will gain a great deal of experience in the use of these equations by solving 
a number of exercises and problems. Many times you will discover that more than 
one method can be used to obtain a solution. Remember that these equations of 
kinematics cannot be used in a situation in which the acceleration varies with time. 
They can be used only when the acceleration is constant.
WW Position as a function of 
velocity and time for the 
particle under constant 
acceleration model
WW Position as a function of time 
for the particle under con-
stant acceleration model
WW  Velocity as a function  
of position for the  
particle under constant 
acceleration model
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
a more suitable choice for publishing in web services than Using this C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion library C# developers can easily and quickly convert a large
embed pdf to website; convert pdf to url link
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
HTML5 Viewer for C# .NET is an advanced web viewer of rich annotation functionalities. To view, convert, edit, process, protect, sign PDF files, please
convert pdf to web form; change pdf to html
38
chapter 2 Motion in One Dimension
uick Quiz 2.6 In Figure 2.12, match each v
x
t graph on the top with the a
x
t 
graph on the bottom that best describes the motion.
Example 2.7   Carrier Landing 
A jet lands on an aircraft carrier at a speed of 140 mi/h (< 63 m/s).
(A) What is its acceleration (assumed constant) if it stops in 2.0 s due to an arresting cable that snags the jet and 
brings it to a stop?
You might have seen movies or television shows in which a jet lands on an aircraft carrier and is brought to rest sur-
prisingly fast by an arresting cable. A careful reading of the problem reveals that in addition to being given the initial 
speed of 63 m/s, we also know that the final speed is zero. Because the acceleration of the jet is assumed constant, we 
model it as a particle under constant acceleration. We define our x axis as the direction of motion of the jet. Notice that we 
have no information about the change in position of the jet while it is slowing down.
AM
Solution
Analysis Model   Particle Under Constant Acceleration
Examples
• a car accelerating at a constant rate 
along a straight freeway
• a dropped object in the absence of air 
resistance (Section 2.7)
• an object on which a constant net force 
acts (Chapter 5)
• a charged particle in a uniform electric 
field (Chapter 23)
Imagine a moving object that can be modeled as a particle. If it 
begins from position x
i
and initial velocity v
xi
and moves in a straight 
line with a constant acceleration a
x
, its subsequent position and 
velocity are described by the following kinematic equations: 
v
xf
v
xi
a
x
t 
(2.13)
v
x,avg
5
v
xi
1v
xf
2
(2.14)
x
f
5x
i
1
1
2
1
v
xi
1v
xf
2
t 
(2.15)
x
f
5x
i
1v
xi
t11
2
a
x
t2 
(2.16)
v
xf
2 5 v
xi
21 2a
x
(x
f
x
i
(2.17)
v
a
t
v
x
t
a
x
t
v
x
t
a
x
t
v
x
t
a
x
a
b
c
d
e
f
Figure 2.12 
(Quick Quiz 2.6)  
Parts (a), (b), and (c) are v
x
–t graphs 
of objects in one-dimensional 
motion. The possible accelerations 
of each object as a function of time 
are shown in scrambled order in (d), 
(e), and (f).
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer, Create Web Doc & Image Viewer in C#.NET
PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET convert PDF to SVG. VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB to Use XDoc.HTML5 Viewer to Create a Customized Web Viewer in
pdf to html converter; best website to convert pdf to word
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, Zero Footprint AJAX Document Image
View, Convert, Edit, Sign Documents and Images. Wide range of web browsers support including IE9+ powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
convert pdf into html code; convert pdf to html format
Equation 2.13 is the only equation in the particle 
under constant acceleration model that does not 
involve position, so we use it to find the acceleration of 
the jet, modeled as a particle:
a
x
5
v
xf
2v
xi
t
<
0263 m/s
2.0 s
5  232 m/s2
(B) If the jet touches down at position x
i
5 0, what is its final position?
Solution
Use Equation 2.15 to solve for the final position:
x
f
5x
i
1
1
2
1
v
xi
1v
xf
2
t501
1
2
1
63 m/s10
21
2.0 s
2
5  63 m
Given the size of aircraft carriers, a length of 63 m seems reasonable for stopping the jet. The idea of using arresting 
cables to slow down landing aircraft and enable them to land safely on ships originated at about the time of World War I. 
The cables are still a vital part of the operation of modern aircraft carriers.
Suppose the jet lands on the deck of the aircraft carrier with a speed faster than 63 m/s but has the same 
acceleration due to the cable as that calculated in part (A). How will that change the answer to part (B)?
Answer If the jet is traveling faster at the beginning, it will stop farther away from its starting point, so the answer to 
part (B) should be larger. Mathematically, we see in Equation 2.15 that if v
xi
is larger, then x
f
will be larger.
WhAt iF?
2.6 analysis Model: particle Under constant acceleration 
39
Example 2.8   Watch Out for the Speed Limit!
A car traveling at a constant speed of 45.0 m/s passes a 
trooper on a motorcycle hidden behind a billboard. One sec-
ond after the speeding car passes the billboard, the trooper 
sets out from the billboard to catch the car, accelerating at a 
constant rate of 3.00 m/s2. How long does it take the trooper 
to overtake the car?
A pictorial representation (Fig. 2.13) helps clarify the 
sequence of events. The car is modeled as a particle under con-
stant velocity, and the trooper is modeled as a particle under 
constant acceleration.
First, we write expressions for the position of each vehicle as a function of time. It is convenient to choose the posi-
tion of the billboard as the origin and to set t
B
5 0 as the time the trooper begins moving. At that instant, the car has 
already traveled a distance of 45.0 m from the billboard because it has traveled at a constant speed of v
x
5 45.0 m/s for 
1 s. Therefore, the initial position of the speeding car is x
B
5 45.0 m.
AM
Solution
Figure 2.13 
(Example 2.8) A speeding car passes a hid-
den trooper.
t
C
= ?
t
B
= 0
t
A
= -1.00 s
A
B
C
Using the particle under constant velocity model, apply 
Equation 2.7 to give the car’s position at any time t:
x
car
x
B
v
x car
t
A quick check shows that at 5 0, this expression gives the car’s correct initial position when the trooper begins to 
move: x
car 
x
5 45.0 m.
The trooper starts from rest at t
5 0 and accelerates at 
a
x
5 3.00 m/s2 away from the origin. Use Equation 2.16 
to give her position at any time t:
x
f
5x
i
1v
xi
t1
1
2
a
x
t2
x
trooper
501
1
0
2
t1
1
2
a
x
t5
1
2
a
x
t2
Set the positions of the car and trooper equal to repre-
sent the trooper overtaking the car at position C:
trooper
x
car
1
2
a
x
t5x
B
1v
x car
t
▸ 2.7 
continued
continued
C# PDF: How to Create PDF Document Viewer in C#.NET with
Support rendering web viewer PDF document to images or svg file; Free to convert viewing PDF document to TIFF file for document management;
change pdf to html format; convert url pdf to word
DocImage SDK for .NET: Web Document Image Viewer Online Demo
Document Viewer Demo to View, Annotate, Convert and Print upload a file to display in web viewer Suppported files are Word, Excel, PowerPoint, PDF, Tiff, Dicom
convert pdf into html email; online pdf to html converter
40
chapter 2 Motion in One Dimension
2.7 Freely Falling Objects
It is well known that, in the absence of air resistance, all objects dropped near the 
Earth’s surface fall toward the Earth with the same constant acceleration under 
the influence of the Earth’s gravity. It was not until about 1600 that this conclusion 
was accepted. Before that time, the teachings of the Greek philosopher Aristotle 
(384–322 BC) had held that heavier objects fall faster than lighter ones.
The Italian Galileo Galilei (1564–1642) originated our present-day ideas con-
cerning falling objects. There is a legend that he demonstrated the behavior of fall-
ing objects by observing that two different weights dropped simultaneously from 
the Leaning Tower of Pisa hit the ground at approximately the same time. Although 
there is some doubt that he carried out this particular experiment, it is well estab-
lished that Galileo performed many experiments on objects moving on inclined 
planes. In his experiments, he rolled balls down a slight incline and measured the 
distances they covered in successive time intervals. The purpose of the incline was 
to reduce the acceleration, which made it possible for him to make accurate mea-
surements of the time intervals. By gradually increasing the slope of the incline, 
he was finally able to draw conclusions about freely falling objects because a freely 
falling ball is equivalent to a ball moving down a vertical incline.
You might want to try the following experiment. Simultaneously drop a coin and 
a crumpled-up piece of paper from the same height. If the effects of air resistance 
are negligible, both will have the same motion and will hit the floor at the same 
time. In the idealized case, in which air resistance is absent, such motion is referred 
Galileo Galilei
Italian physicist and astronomer 
(1564–1642)
Galileo formulated the laws that govern 
the motion of objects in free fall and 
made many other significant discover-
ies in physics and astronomy. Galileo 
publicly defended Nicolaus Copernicus’s 
assertion that the Sun is at the center of 
the Universe (the heliocentric system). 
He published Dialogue Concerning Two 
New World Systems to support the 
Copernican model, a view that the Cath-
olic Church declared to be heretical.
G
e
o
r
g
i
o
s
K
o
l
l
i
d
a
s
/
S
h
u
t
t
e
r
s
t
o
c
k
.
c
o
m
Why didn’t we choose t 5 0 as the time at which the car passes the trooper? If we did so, we would not be able to use 
the particle under constant acceleration model for the trooper. Her acceleration would be zero for the first second and 
then 3.00 m/s2 for the remaining time. By defining the time t 5 0 as when the trooper begins moving, we can use the 
particle under constant acceleration model for her movement for all positive times.
What if the trooper had a more powerful motorcycle with a larger acceleration? How would that change 
the time at which the trooper catches the car? 
Answer If the motorcycle has a larger acceleration, the trooper should catch up to the car sooner, so the answer for 
the time should be less than 31 s. Because all terms on the right side of Equation (1) have the acceleration a
x
in the 
denominator, we see symbolically that increasing the acceleration will decrease the time at which the trooper catches 
the car.
WhAt iF?
Evaluate the solution, choosing the positive root because 
that is the only choice consistent with a time t . 0:
t5
45.0 m/s
3.00 m/s2
1
Å
1
45.0 m/s
22
13.00 m/s222
1
2
1
45.0 m
2
3.00 m/s2
 31.0 s
▸ 2.8 
continued
Rearrange to give a quadratic equation:
1
2
a
x
t
2
2v
x car
t2x
B
50
Solve the quadratic equation for the time at which the 
trooper catches the car (for help in solving quadratic 
equations, see Appendix B.2.):
t5
v
x car
6"v2
x car
12a
x
x
B
a
x
(1)   t5
v
x car
a
x
6
Å
v2
x car
a
x
2
1
2x
B
a
x
C# Imaging - Scan Barcode Image in C#.NET
Recognize PDF-417 2D barcode in .NET WinForms & ASP.NET web applications using C# programming code. C# QR Code Barcode Image Reading.
converting pdf to html code; convert pdf to website html
2.7 Freely Falling Objects 
41
Conceptual Example 2.9   The Daring Skydivers
A skydiver jumps out of a hovering helicopter. A few seconds later, another skydiver jumps out, and they both fall along 
the same vertical line. Ignore air resistance so that both skydivers fall with the same acceleration. Does the difference 
in their speeds stay the same throughout the fall? Does the vertical distance between them stay the same throughout 
the fall?
Solution
At any given instant, the speeds of the skydivers are dif-
ferent because one had a head start. In any time interval 
Dt after this instant, however, the two skydivers increase 
their speeds by the same amount because they have the 
same acceleration. Therefore, the difference in their 
speeds remains the same throughout the fall.
Pitfall Prevention 2.6
g
and g Be sure not to confuse 
the italic symbol g for free-fall 
acceleration with the nonitalic 
symbol g used as the abbreviation 
for the unit gram.
Pitfall Prevention 2.7
the Sign of 
g
Keep in mind that 
g is a positive number. It is tempt-
ing to substitute 29.80m/s2 for g
but resist the temptation. Down-
ward gravitational acceleration is 
indicated explicitly by stating the 
acceleration as a
y
5 2g.
Pitfall Prevention 2.8
Acceleration at the top of the 
Motion A common misconcep-
tion is that the acceleration of a 
projectile at the top of its trajec-
tory is zero. Although the velocity 
at the top of the motion of an 
object thrown upward momen-
tarily goes to zero, the acceleration 
is still that due to gravity at this 
point. If the velocity and accelera-
tion were both zero, the projectile 
would stay at the top.
to as free-fall motion. If this same experiment could be conducted in a vacuum, in 
which air resistance is truly negligible, the paper and the coin would fall with the 
same acceleration even when the paper is not crumpled. On August 2, 1971, astro-
naut David Scott conducted such a demonstration on the Moon. He simultaneously 
released a hammer and a feather, and the two objects fell together to the lunar sur-
face. This simple demonstration surely would have pleased Galileo!
When we use the expression freely falling object, we do not necessarily refer to an 
object dropped from rest. A freely falling object is any object moving freely under 
the influence of gravity alone, regardless of its initial motion. Objects thrown 
upward or downward and those released from rest are all falling freely once they 
are released. Any freely falling object experiences an acceleration directed down-
ward, regardless of its initial motion.
We shall denote the magnitude of the free-fall acceleration, also called the accelera-
tion due to gravity, by the symbol g. The value of g decreases with increasing altitude 
above the Earth’s surface. Furthermore, slight variations in g occur with changes 
in latitude. At the Earth’s surface, the value of g is approximately 9.80 m/s2. Unless 
stated otherwise, we shall use this value for g when performing calculations. For 
making quick estimates, use g 5 10 m/s2.
If we neglect air resistance and assume the free-fall acceleration does not vary 
with altitude over short vertical distances, the motion of a freely falling object mov-
ing vertically is equivalent to the motion of a particle under constant acceleration in 
one dimension. Therefore, the equations developed in Section 2.6 for the particle 
under constant acceleration model can be applied. The only modification for freely 
falling objects that we need to make in these equations is to note that the motion 
is in the vertical direction (the y direction) rather than in the horizontal direc-
tion (x) and that the acceleration is downward and has a magnitude of 9.80m/s2. 
Therefore, we choose a
y
5 2g 5 29.80 m/s2, where the negative sign means that 
the acceleration of a freely falling object is downward. In Chapter 13, we shall study 
how to deal with variations in g with altitude.
uick Quiz 2.7 Consider the following choices: (a) increases, (b) decreases,  
(c) increases and then decreases, (d) decreases and then increases, (e)remains 
the same. From these choices, select what happens to (i) the acceleration and 
(ii) the speed of a ball after it is thrown upward into the air.
The first jumper always has a greater speed than the 
second. Therefore, in a given time interval, the first sky-
diver covers a greater distance than the second. Conse-
quently, the separation distance between them increases.
42
chapter 2 Motion in One Dimension
Use Equation 2.13 to calculate the time at which the 
stone reaches its maximum height:
v
yf
5v
yi
1a
y
t t5
v
yf
2v
yi
a
y
Substitute numerical values:
t5t
B
5
0220.0 m/s
29.80 m/s2
 2.04 s
(B) Find the maximum height of the stone.
As in part (A), choose the initial and final points at the beginning and the end of the upward flight. 
Solution
Set y
A
5 0 and substitute the time from part 
(A) into Equation 2.16 to find the maximum 
height:
y
max
5y
B
5y
A
1v
xA
t11
2
a
y
t2
y
B
501
1
20.0 m/s
21
2.04 s
2
11
2
1
29.80 m/s2
21
2.04 s
22
5  20.4 m
(C) Determine the velocity of the stone when it returns to the height from which it was thrown.
Choose the initial point where the stone is launched and the final point when it passes this position coming down.
Solution
Substitute known values into Equation 2.17:
v
yC
2 5 v
yA
2 1 2a
y
(y
C
y
A
)
v
yC
2 5 (20.0 m/s)2 1 2(29.80 m/s2)(0 2 0) 5 400 m2/s2
v
yC
5   220.0 m/s
Example 2.10   Not a Bad Throw for a Rookie!
AM
E
D
C
B
t
D
= 5.00 s
y
D
= -22.5 m
v
yD
= -29.0 m/s
a
yD
= -9.80 m/s
2
t
C
= 4.08 s
y
C
= 0
v
yC
= -20.0 m/s
a
yC
= -9.80 m/s
2
t
B
= 2.04 s
y
B
= 20.4 m
v
yB
= 0
a
yB
= -9.80 m/s
2
50.0 m
t
E
= 5.83 s
y
E
= -50.0 m
v
yE
= -37.1 m/s
a
yE
= -9.80 m/s
2
t
A
= 0
y
A
= 0
v
yA
= 20.0 m/s
a
yA
= -9.80 m/s
2
A
A stone thrown from the top of a building is given an initial velocity 
of 20.0 m/s straight upward. The stone is launched 50.0 m above the 
ground, and the stone just misses the edge of the roof on its way down 
as shown in Figure 2.14.
(A) Using t
A
5 0 as the time the stone leaves the thrower’s hand at 
position A, determine the time at which the stone reaches its maxi-
mum height.
You most likely have experience 
with dropping objects or throw-
ing them upward and watching 
them fall, so this problem should 
describe a familiar experience. 
To simulate this situation, toss a 
small object upward and notice 
the time interval required for it 
to fall to the floor. Now imagine 
throwing that object upward from the roof of a building. Because the 
stone is in free fall, it is modeled as a particle under constant acceleration 
due to gravity.
Recognize that the initial velocity is positive because the stone 
is launched upward. The velocity will change sign after the stone 
reaches its highest point, but the acceleration of the stone will always 
be downward so that it will always have a negative value. Choose an 
initial point just after the stone leaves the person’s hand and a final 
point at the top of its flight.
Solution
Figure 2.14 
(Example 2.10) Position, 
velocity, and acceleration values at 
various times for a freely falling stone 
thrown initially upward with a velocity 
v
yi
5 20.0 m/s. Many of the quantities 
in the labels for points in the motion 
of the stone are calculated in the 
example. Can you verify the other val-
ues that are not?
When taking the square root, we could choose either a positive or a negative root. We choose the negative root because 
we know that the stone is moving downward at point C. The velocity of the stone when it arrives back at its original 
height is equal in magnitude to its initial velocity but is opposite in direction.
(D) Find the velocity and position of the stone at t 5 5.00 s.
Choose the initial point just after the throw and the final point 5.00 s later.
Solution
Calculate the velocity at D from Equation 2.13:
v
yD
v
yA
a
y
5 20.0 m/s 1 (29.80 m/s2)(5.00 s) 5   229.0 m/s
Use Equation 2.16 to find the position of the 
stone at t
D
5 5.00 s:
y
D
5y
A
1v
yA
t1
1
2
a
y
t2
5 0 1 (20.0 m/s)(5.00 s) 1 
1
2
(29.80 m/s2)(5.00 s)2
  222.5 m
2.8 Kinematic equations Derived from calculus 
43
2.8 Kinematic Equations Derived from Calculus
This section assumes the reader is familiar with the techniques of integral calculus. 
If you have not yet studied integration in your calculus course, you should skip this 
section or cover it after you become familiar with integration.
The velocity of a particle moving in a straight line can be obtained if its position 
as a function of time is known. Mathematically, the velocity equals the derivative of 
the position with respect to time. It is also possible to find the position of a particle 
if its velocity is known as a function of time. In calculus, the procedure used to 
perform this task is referred to either as integration or as finding the antiderivative. 
Graphically, it is equivalent to finding the area under a curve.
Suppose the v
x
t graph for a particle moving along the x axis is as shown in 
Figure 2.15 on page 44. Let us divide the time interval t
f
2 t
i
into many small inter-
vals, each of duration Dt
n
. From the definition of average velocity, we see that the 
displacement of the particle during any small interval, such as the one shaded in 
Figure 2.15, is given by Dx
n
v
xn,avg
Dt
n
, where v
xn,avg
is the average velocity in that 
interval. Therefore, the displacement during this small interval is simply the area of 
the shaded rectangle in Figure 2.15. The total displacement for the interval t
f
t
i
is 
the sum of the areas of all the rectangles from t
i
to t
f
:
Dx5
a
n
v
xn,avg
Dt
n
where the symbol o (uppercase Greek sigma) signifies a sum over all terms, that is, 
over all values of n. Now, as the intervals are made smaller and smaller, the num-
ber of terms in the sum increases and the sum approaches a value equal to the area 
▸ 2.10 
continued
The choice of the time defined as t 5 0 is arbitrary and up to you to select as the problem solver. As an example of this 
arbitrariness, choose t 5 0 as the time at which the stone is at the highest point in its motion. Then solve parts (C) and 
(D) again using this new initial instant and notice that your answers are the same as those above.
What if the throw were from 30.0 m above the ground instead of 50.0 m? Which answers in parts (A) to 
(D) would change?
Answer None of the answers would change. All the motion takes place in the air during the first 5.00 s. (Notice that 
even for a throw from 30.0 m, the stone is above the ground at t 5 5.00 s.) Therefore, the height of the throw is not an 
issue. Mathematically, if we look back over our calculations, we see that we never entered the height of the throw into 
any equation.
WhAt iF?
44
chapter 2 Motion in One Dimension
under the curve in the velocity–time graph. Therefore, in the limit n S `, or Dt
n
S 0, 
the displacement is
Dx5lim
Dt
n
S
0
a
n
v
xn,avg
Dt
n
(2.18)
If we know the v
x
t graph for motion along a straight line, we can obtain the dis-
placement during any time interval by measuring the area under the curve corre-
sponding to that time interval.
The limit of the sum shown in Equation 2.18 is called a definite integral and is 
written
lim
Dt
n
S
0
a
n
v
xn,avg
Dt
n
5
3
t
f
t
i
v
x
1
t
2
dt 
(2.19)
where v
x
(t) denotes the velocity at any time t. If the explicit functional form of v
x
(t
is known and the limits are given, the integral can be evaluated. Sometimes the 
v
x
t graph for a moving particle has a shape much simpler than that shown in Fig-
ure 2.15. For example, suppose an object is described with the particle under con-
stant velocity model. In this case, the v
x
t graph is a horizontal line as in Figure 2.16 
and the displacement of the particle during the time interval Dt is simply the area 
of the shaded rectangle:
Dx v
xi
Dt (when v
x
v
xi
5 constant)
Kinematic Equations
We now use the defining equations for acceleration and velocity to derive two of 
our kinematic equations, Equations 2.13 and 2.16.
The defining equation for acceleration (Eq. 2.10),
a
x
5
dv
x
dt
may be written as dv
x
a
x
dt or, in terms of an integral (or antiderivative), as
v
xf
2v
xi
5
3
t
0
a
x 
dt
For the special case in which the acceleration is constant, a
x
can be removed from 
the integral to give
v
xf
2v
xi
5a
x
3
t
0
dt5a
x
1
t20
2
5a
x
t 
(2.20)
which is Equation 2.13 in the particle under constant acceleration model.
Now let us consider the defining equation for velocity (Eq. 2.5):
v
x
5
dx
dt
Definite integral 
Figure 2.16 
The velocity–time 
curve for a particle moving with 
constant velocity v
xi
. The displace-
ment of the particle during the 
time interval t
f
t
i
is equal to the 
area of the shaded rectangle.
v
x
= v
xi
= constant
t
f
v
xi
t
t
t
i
v
x
v
xi
v
x
t
t
n
t
i
t
f
v
xn,avg
The area of the shaded rectangle 
is equal to the displacement in 
the time interval ∆t
n
.
Figure 2.15 
Velocity versus time 
for a particle moving along the 
x axis. The total area under the 
curve is the total displacement of 
the particle.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested