2.4
Image Sampling and Quantization
63
FIGURE2.21
(Continued)
(e)–(h) Image
displayed in 16,8,
4,and 2 intensity
levels.(Original
courtesy of 
Dr.David R.
Pickens,
Department of
Radiology &
Radiological
Sciences,
Vanderbilt
University
Medical Center.)
very fine ridge-like structures in areas of constant or nearly constant intensity
(particularly in the skull).This effect,caused by the use of an insufficient num-
ber of intensity levels in smooth areas of a digital image,is called false con-
touring,so called because the ridges resemble topographic contours in a map.
False contouring generally is quite visible in images displayed using 16 or less
uniformly spaced intensity levels,as the images in Figs.2.21(e)through (h) show.
As a very rough rule of thumb,and assuming integer powers of 2 for conve-
nience,images of size 
pixels with 64 intensity levels and printed on a
size format on the order of 
are about the lowest spatial and intensity
resolution images that can be expected to be reasonably free of objectionable
sampling checkerboards and false contouring.
5* 5 cm
256* 256
e
f
g
h
GONZ_CH02v6.QXD  7/23/07  10:20 AM  Page 63
How to convert pdf into html - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
best pdf to html converter online; convert pdf to html5
How to convert pdf into html - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
convert pdf form to html; conversion pdf to html
64
Chapter 2
Digital Image Fundamentals
The results in Examples 2.2 and 2.3 illustrate the effects produced on image
quality by varying Nand kindependently.However,these results only partially
answer the question of how varying Nand kaffects images because we have not
considered yet any relationships that might exist between these two parame-
ters.An early study by Huang [1965] attempted to quantify experimentally the
effects on image quality produced by varying Nand ksimultaneously.The ex-
periment consisted of a set of subjective tests.Images similar to those shown in
Fig.2.22were used.The woman’s face is representative of an image with rela-
tively little detail; the picture of the cameraman contains an intermediate
amount of detail;and the crowd picture contains,by comparison,a large amount
of detail.
Sets of these three types of images were generated by varying Nand k,and
observers were then asked to rank them according to their subjective quality.
Results were summarized in the form of so-called isopreference curvesin the
Nk-plane.(Figure 2.23shows average isopreference curves representative of
curves corresponding to the images in Fig.2.22.) Each point in the Nk-plane
represents an image having values of Nand kequal to the coordinates of that
point.Points lying on an isopreference curve correspond to images of equal
subjective quality.It was found in the course of the experiments that the iso-
preference curves tended to shift right and upward,but their shapes in each of
the three image categories were similar to those in Fig.2.23.This is not unex-
pected,because a shift up and right in the curves simply means larger values
for Nand k,which implies better picture quality.
The key point of interest in the context of the present discussion is that iso-
preference curves tend to become more vertical as the detail in the image in-
creases.This result suggests that for images with a large amount of detail
only a few intensity levels may be needed.For example,the isopreference
curve in Fig.2.23corresponding to the crowd is nearly vertical.This indicates
that,for a fixed value of N,the perceived quality for this type of image is
FIGURE2.22
(a) Image with a low level of detail.(b) Image with a medium level of detail.(c) Image with a
relatively large amount of detail.(Image (b) courtesy of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.)
a
b
c
GONZ_CH02v6.QXD  7/23/07  10:20 AM  Page 64
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Parameters: Name, Description, Valid Value. value, The char wil be added into PDF page, 0
convert pdf to web page; adding pdf to html page
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
with specified zoom value and save it into stream The magnification of the original PDF page size Description: Convert to DOCX/TIFF with specified resolution and
convert pdf to html email; convert pdf to url
2.4
Image Sampling and Quantization
65
Face
256
128
64
32
4
5
k
N
Crowd
Cameraman
FIGURE2.23
Typical
isopreference
curves for the
three types of
images in 
Fig.2.22.
nearly independent of the number of intensity levels used (for the range of in-
tensity levels shown in Fig.2.23).It is of interest also to note that perceived
quality in the other two image categories remained the same in some intervals
in which the number of samples was increased,but the number of intensity
levels actually decreased.The most likely reason for this result is that a de-
crease in ktends to increase the apparent contrast,a visual effect that humans
often perceive as improved quality in an image.
2.4.4 Image Interpolation
Interpolation is a basic tool used extensively in tasks such as zooming,shrink-
ing,rotating,and geometric corrections.Our principal objective in this section
is to introduce interpolation and apply it to image resizing (shrinking and
zooming),which are basically image resamplingmethods.Uses of interpola-
tion in applications such as rotation and geometric corrections are discussed in
Section 2.6.5.We also return to this topic in Chapter 4,where we discuss image
resampling in more detail.
Fundamentally,interpolationis the process of using known data to estimate
values at unknown locations.We begin the discussion of this topic with a sim-
ple example.Suppose that an image of size 
pixels has to be en-
larged 1.5 times to 
pixels.A simple way to visualize zooming is to
create an imaginary 
grid with the same pixel spacing as the original,
and then shrink it so that it fits exactly over the original image.Obviously,the
pixel spacing in the shrunken 
grid will be less than the pixel spacing
in the original image.To perform intensity-level assignment for any point in
the overlay,we look for its closest pixel in the original image and assign the in-
tensity of that pixel to the new pixel in the 
grid.When we are fin-
ished assigning intensities to all the points in the overlay grid,we expand it to
the original specified size to obtain the zoomed image.
750 * 750
750 * 750
750* 750
750 *750
500 * 500
GONZ_CH02v6.QXD  7/23/07  10:20 AM  Page 65
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
with specified zoom value and save it into stream The magnification of the original PDF page size Description: Convert to DOCX/TIFF with specified resolution and
convert pdf into html file; best pdf to html converter
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Merge several images into PDF. Insert images into PDF form field.
convert fillable pdf to html; create html email from pdf
66
Chapter 2
Digital Image Fundamentals
EXAMPLE 2.4:
Comparison of
interpolation
approaches for
image shrinking
and zooming.
Figure 2.24(a)is the same image as Fig.2.20(d),which was obtained by re-
ducing the resolution of the 1250 dpi image in Fig.2.20(a)to 72 dpi (the size
shrank from the original size of 
to 
pixels) and then
zooming the reduced image back to its original size.To generate Fig.2.20(d)
we used nearest neighbor interpolation both to shrink and zoom the image.As
we commented before,the result in Fig.2.24(a)is rather poor.Figures 2.24(b)
and (c) are the results of repeating the sameprocedure but using,respectively,
bilinear and bicubic interpolation for both shrinking and zooming.The result
obtained by using bilinear interpolation is a significant improvement over near-
est neighbor interpolation.The bicubic result is slightly sharper than the bilin-
ear image.Figure 2.24(d)is the same as Fig.2.20(c),which was obtained using
nearest neighbor interpolation for both shrinking and zooming.We comment-
ed in discussing that figure that reducing the resolution to 150 dpi began show-
ing degradation in the image.Figures 2.24(e)and (f) show the results of using
213 *162
3692* 2812
The method just discussed is called nearest neighbor interpolationbecause it
assigns to each new location the intensity of its nearest neighbor in the original
image (pixel neighborhoods are discussed formally in Section 2.5).This ap-
proach is simple but,as we show later in this section,it has the tendency to
produce undesirable artifacts,such as severe distortion of straight edges.For
this reason,it is used infrequently in practice.A more suitable approach is
bilinear interpolation,in which we use the four nearest neighbors to estimate
the intensity at a given location.Let 
denote the coordinates of the loca-
tion to which we want to assign an intensity value (think of it as a point of the
grid described previously),and let 
denote that intensity value.For bi-
linear interpolation,the assigned value is obtained using the equation
(2.4-6)
where the four coefficients are determined from the four equations in four un-
knowns that can be written using the four nearest neighbors of point 
.As
you will see shortly,bilinear interpolation gives much better results than near-
est neighbor interpolation,with a modest increase in computational burden.
The next level of complexity is bicubic interpolation,which involves the six-
teen nearest neighbors of a point.The intensity value assigned to point 
is
obtained using the equation
(2.4-7)
where the sixteen coefficients are determined from the sixteen equations in
sixteen unknowns that can be written using the sixteen nearest neighbors of
point 
.Observe that Eq.(2.4-7) reduces in form to Eq.(2.4-6) if the lim-
its of both summations in the former equation are 0 to 1.Generally,bicubic in-
terpolation does a better job of preserving fine detail than its bilinear
counterpart.Bicubic interpolation is the standard used in commercial image
editing programs,such as Adobe Photoshop and Corel Photopaint.
(x, y)
v(x, y) ) =
a
3
i=0
a
3
j=0
a
ij
x
i
y
j
(x, y)
(x, y)
v(x, y) ) = ax+ by + cxy + d
(x, y)
v
(x, y)
Contrary to what the
name suggests,note that
bilinear interpolation is
notlinear because of the
xyterm.
GONZ_CH02v6.QXD  7/23/07  10:20 AM  Page 66
Online Convert PDF to HTML5 files. Best free online PDF html
Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF file to HTML. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button or drag-and-drop your pdf file into the drop area.
attach pdf to html; converting pdf to html format
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
project. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Add file. Insert images into PDF form field in VB.NET. An
how to convert pdf into html code; how to add pdf to website
2.4
Image Sampling and Quantization
67
FIGURE2.24
(a) Image reduced to 72 dpi and zoomed back to its original size (
pixels) using
nearest neighbor interpolation.This figure is the same as Fig.2.20(d).(b) Image shrunk and zoomed using
bilinear interpolation.(c) Same as (b) but using bicubic interpolation.(d)–(f) Same sequence,but shrinking
down to 150 dpi instead of 72 dpi [Fig.2.24(d)is the same as Fig.2.20(c)].Compare Figs.2.24(e)and (f),
especially the latter,with the original image in Fig.2.20(a).
3692 *2812
bilinear and bicubic interpolation,respectively,to shrink and zoom the image.
In spite of a reduction in resolution from 1250 to 150,these last two images
compare reasonably favorably with the original, showing once again the
power of these two interpolation methods.As before,bicubic interpolation
yielded slightly sharper results.
a
b
c
d
e
f
GONZ_CH02v6.QXD  7/23/07  10:20 AM  Page 67
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Divide PDF File into Two Using C#. This is an C# example of splitting a PDF to two new PDF files. Split PDF Document into Multiple PDF Files in C#.
how to convert pdf to html email; convert pdf to web link
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Split PDF file into two or multiple files in ASP.NET webpage online. Support to break a large PDF file into smaller files in .NET WinForms.
embed pdf into webpage; export pdf to html
68
Chapter 2
Digital Image Fundamentals
It is possible to use more neighbors in interpolation,and there are more
complex techniques,such as using splines and wavelets,that in some instances
can yield better results than the methods just discussed.While preserving fine
detail is an exceptionally important consideration in image generation for 3-D
graphics (Watt [1993], , Shirley [2002]) and in medical image processing
(Lehmann et al.[1999]),the extra computational burden seldom is justifiable
for general-purpose digital image processing,where bilinear or bicubic inter-
polation typically are the methods of choice.
2.5 Some Basic Relationships between Pixels
In this section,we consider several important relationships between pixels in a
digital image.As mentioned before,an image is denoted by 
.When refer-
ring in this section to a particular pixel,we use lowercase letters,such as pand q.
2.5.1 Neighbors of a Pixel
A pixel pat coordinates 
has four horizontaland verticalneighbors whose
coordinates are given by
This set of pixels,called the 4-neighborsof p,is denoted by 
Each pixel is
a unit distance from 
,and some of the neighbor locations of plie outside
the digital image if 
is on the border of the image.We deal with this issue
in Chapter 3.
The four diagonalneighbors of phave coordinates
and are denoted by 
These points,together with the 4-neighbors,are called
the 8-neighborsof p,denoted by 
As before,some of the neighbor locations
in 
and 
fall outside the image if 
is on the border of the image.
2.5.2 Adjacency, Connectivity, Regions, and Boundaries
Let Vbe the set of intensity values used to define adjacency.In a binary image,
if we are referring to adjacency of pixels with value 1.In a gray-scale
image,the idea is the same,but set Vtypically contains more elements.For exam-
ple,in the adjacency of pixels with a range of possible intensity values 0 to 255,set
Vcould be any subset of these 256 values.We consider three types of adjacency:
(a)
4-adjacency.Two pixels pand qwith values from Vare 4-adjacent if qis in
the set 
(b)
8-adjacency.Two pixels pand qwith values from Vare 8-adjacent if qis in
the set 
(c)
m-adjacency(mixed adjacency).Two pixels pand qwith values from Vare
m-adjacent if
(i) qis in 
or
(ii) qis in 
andthe set 
has no pixels whose values
are from V.
N
4
(p)¨N
4
(q)
N
D
(p)
N
4
(p),
N
8
(p).
N
4
(p).
V = 516
(x, y)
N
8
(p)
N
D
(p)
N
8
(p).
N
D
(p).
(x+ 1, y y + 1), (x+ + 1, y y - 1), (x- - 1, y y + 1), (x- - 1, y y - 1)
(x, y)
(x, y)
N
4
(p).
(x+ 1, y), (x- - 1, y), (x, y y + 1), (x, y y - 1)
(x, y)
(x, y)
f
We use the symbols 
and to denote set
intersection and union,
respectively.Given sets
Aand B,recall that their
intersectionis the set of
elements that are mem-
bers of both Aand B.
The unionof these two
sets is the set of elements
that are members of A,
of B,or of both.We
discuss sets in more
detail in Section 2.6.4.
´
¨
GONZ_CH02v6.QXD  7/23/07  10:20 AM  Page 68
2.5
Some Basic Relationships between Pixels
69
Mixed adjacency is a modification of 8-adjacency.It is introduced to eliminate the
ambiguities that often arise when 8-adjacency is used.For example,consider the
pixel arrangement shown in Fig.2.25(a)for 
The three pixels at the top
of Fig.2.25(b)show multiple (ambiguous) 8-adjacency,as indicated by the dashed
lines.This ambiguity is removed by using m-adjacency,as shown in Fig.2.25(c).
A (digital) path(or curve) from pixel pwith coordinates 
to pixel q
with coordinates 
is a sequence of distinct pixels with coordinates
where 
and pixels 
and 
are
adjacent for 
In this case, is the length of the path. . If
the path is a closedpath.We can define 4-,8-,or m-paths
depending on the type of adjacency specified.For example,the paths shown in
Fig.2.25(b)between the top right and bottom right points are 8-paths,and the
path in Fig.2.25(c)is an m-path.
Let Srepresent a subset of pixels in an image.Two pixels pand qare said to
be connectedin Sif there exists a path between them consisting entirely of pix-
els in S.For any pixel pin S,the setof pixels that are connected to it in Sis
called a connected componentof S.If it only has one connected component,
then set Sis called a connected set.
Let Rbe a subset of pixels in an image.We call Rregionof the image if R
is a connected set.Two regions, , and are said to be adjacentif their union
forms a connected set.Regions that are not adjacent are said to be disjoint.We
consider 4- and 8-adjacency when referring to regions.For our definition to
make sense,the type of adjacency used must be specified.For example,the two
regions (of 1s) in Fig.2.25(d)are adjacent only if 8-adjacency is used (according
to the definition in the previous paragraph,a 4-path between the two regions
does not exist,so their union is not a connected set).
R
j
R
i
(x
0
, y
0
) = (x
n
, y
n
),
1… i … n.
(x
i-1
, y
i-1
)
(x
i
, y
i
)
(x
0
, y
0
) = (x, y), (x
n
, y
n
) = (s, t),
(x
0
, y
0
), (x
1
, y
1
),Á, (x
n
, y
n
)
(s, t)
(x, y)
V = 516.
1 1
0
0 0 1
0
0
0
1 1 1 1
1
0
R
i
R
j
0 0 1
1 1 1 1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
0
0
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1 1
1 1
0
0 0 1
1 1
0
1
FIGURE2.25
(a) An arrangement of pixels.(b) Pixels that are 8-adjacent (adjacency is
shown by dashed lines;note the ambiguity).(c) m-adjacency.(d) Two regions (of 1s) that
are adjacent if 8-adjecency is used.(e) The circled point is part of the boundary of the 
1-valued pixels only if 8-adjacency between the region and background is used.(f) The
inner boundary of the 1-valued region does not form a closed path,but its outer
boundary does.
a
b
c
d
e
f
GONZ_CH02v6.QXD  7/23/07  10:20 AM  Page 69
70
Chapter 2
Digital Image Fundamentals
Suppose that an image contains disjoint regions,
none of which touches the image border.
Let denote the union of all the K
regions,and let 
denote its complement (recall that the complementof a
set Sis the set of points that are not in S).We call all the points in 
the
foreground,and all the points in 
the backgroundof the image.
The boundary(also called the borderor contour) of a region Ris the set of
points that are adjacent to points in the complement of R.Said another way,
the border of a region is the set of pixels in the region that have at least one
background neighbor.Here again, we must specify the connectivity being
used to define adjacency.For example,the point circled in Fig.2.25(e)is not a
member of the border of the 1-valued region if 4-connectivity is used between
the region and its background.As a rule,adjacency between points in a region
and its background is defined in terms of 8-connectivity to handle situations
like this.
The preceding definition sometimes is referred to as the inner borderof
the region to distinguish it from its outer border,which is the corresponding
border in the background.This distinction is important in the development of
border-following algorithms.Such algorithms usually are formulated to fol-
low the outer boundary in order to guarantee that the result will form a
closed path. For instance, the inner border of the 1-valued region in Fig.
2.25(f) is the region itself.This border does not satisfy the definition of a
closed path given earlier.On the other hand,the outer border of the region
does form a closed path around the region.
If Rhappens to be an entire image (which we recall is a rectangular set of
pixels),then its boundary is defined as the set of pixels in the first and last rows
and columns of the image.This extra definition is required because an image
has no neighbors beyond its border.Normally,when we refer to a region,we
are referring to a subset of an image,and any pixels in the boundary of the
region that happen to coincide with the border of the image are included im-
plicitly as part of the region boundary.
The concept of an edgeis found frequently in discussions dealing with re-
gions and boundaries.There is a key difference between these concepts,how-
ever. The boundary of a finite region forms a closed path and is thus a
“global”concept.As discussed in detail in Chapter 10,edges are formed from
pixels with derivative values that exceed a preset threshold.Thus,the idea of
an edge is a “local”concept that is based on a measure of intensity-level dis-
continuity at a point.It is possible to link edge points into edge segments,and
sometimes these segments are linked in such a way that they correspond to
boundaries,but this is not always the case.The one exception in which edges
and boundaries correspond is in binary images.Depending on the type of
connectivity and edge operators used (we discuss these in Chapter 10),the
edge extracted from a binary region will be the same as the region boundary.
(R
u
)
c
R
u
(R
u
)
c
R
u
R
k
, k k = 1, 2,Á, K,
We make this assumption to avoid having to deal with special cases.This is done without loss of gener-
ality because if one or more regions touch the border of an image,we can simply pad the image with a
1-pixel-wide border of background values.
GONZ_CH02v6.QXD  7/23/07  10:20 AM  Page 70
2.5
Some Basic Relationships between Pixels
71
This is intuitive.Conceptually,until we arrive at Chapter 10,it is helpful to
think of edges as intensity discontinuities and boundaries as closed paths.
2.5.3 Distance Measures
For pixels p,q,and z,with coordinates (x,y),(s,t),and (v,w),respectively,D
is a distance functionor metricif
(a)
(b)
and
(c)
The Euclidean distancebetween pand qis defined as
(2.5-1)
For this distance measure,the pixels having a distance less than or equal to
some value rfrom (x,y) are the points contained in a disk of radius rcentered
at (x,y).
The distance(called the city-block distance) between pand qis defined as
(2.5-2)
In this case,the pixels having a 
distance from (x,y) less than or equal to
some value rform a diamond centered at (x,y).For example,the pixels with
distance 
from (x,y) (the center point) form the following contours of
constant distance:
The pixels with 
are the 4-neighbors of (x,y).
The distance(called the chessboard distance) between pand qis defined as
(2.5-3)
In this case,the pixels with 
distance from (x,y) less than or equal to some
value form a square centered at 
. For example, , the pixels with
from (x,y) (the center point) form the following contours of
constant distance:
The pixels with 
are the 8-neighbors of (x,y).
D
8
= 1
2 2 2 2 2 2 2
2 1 1 1 1 1 2
2 1 0 0 1 1 2
2 1 1 1 1 1 2
2 2 2 2 2 2 2
D
8
distance … 2
(x, y)
D
8
D
8
(p, q) ) = max(
ƒ
x- s
ƒ, ƒ
y - t
ƒ
)
D
8
D
4
= 1
2
2
1
2
2
1
0
1
2
2
1
2
2
… 2
D
4
D
4
D
4
(p, q) ) = = ƒ
x - s
ƒ + ƒ
y - - t
ƒ
D
4
D
e
(p, q) ) =
C
(x- s)
2
+ (y y - - t)
2
D
1
2
D(p, z) ) … D(p, q) ) + D(q, z).
D(p, q) ) =D(q, p),
D(p, q) ) Ú0
(D(p, q) ) = 0
iff
p = q),
GONZ_CH02v6.QXD  7/23/07  10:20 AM  Page 71
72
Chapter 2
Digital Image Fundamentals
Note that the and distances between pand qare independent of any
paths that might exist between the points because these distances involve only
the coordinates of the points.If we elect to consider m-adjacency,however,the
distance between two points is defined as the shortest m-path between the
points.In this case,the distance between two pixels will depend on the values
of the pixels along the path,as well as the values of their neighbors.For in-
stance,consider the following arrangement of pixels and assume that p,
and
have value 1 and that and can have a value of 0 or 1:
Suppose that we consider adjacency of pixels valued 1 (i.e.,
).If 
and are 0,the length of the shortest m-path (the 
distance) between p
and is 2.If is 1,then and pwill no longer be m-adjacent (see the defi-
nition of m-adjacency) and the length of the shortest m-path becomes 3 (the
path goes through the points 
).Similar comments apply if is 1 (and
is 0);in this case,the length of the shortest m-path also is 3.Finally,if both
and are 1,the length of the shortest m-path between pand is 4.In this
case,the path goes through the sequence of points 
2.6 An Introduction to the Mathematical Tools Used 
in Digital Image Processing
This section has two principal objectives:(1) to introduce you to the various
mathematical tools we use throughout the book;and (2) to help you begin de-
veloping a “feel”for how these tools are used by applying them to a variety of
basic image-processing tasks,some of which will be used numerous times in
subsequent discussions.We expand the scope of the tools and their application
as necessary in the following chapters.
2.6.1 Array versus Matrix Operations
An arrayoperation involving one or more images is carried out on a pixel-by-
pixelbasis.We mentioned earlier in this chapter that images can be viewed
equivalently as matrices.In fact,there are many situations in which opera-
tions between images are carried out using matrix theory (see Section 2.6.6).
It is for this reason that a clear distinction must be made between array and
matrix operations.For example,consider the following 
images:
The array productof these two images is
B
a
11
a
12
a
21
a
22
RB
b
11
b
12
b
21
b
22
R = = B
a
11
b
11
a
12
b
12
a
21
b
21
a
22
b
22
R
B
a
11
a
12
a
21
a
22
R
and
B
b
11
b
12
b
21
b
22
R
2* 2
pp
1
p
2
p
3
p
4
.
p
4
p
3
p
1
p
1
p
3
pp
1
p
2
p
4
p
2
p
1
p
4
D
m
p
3
p
1
V = 516
p
1
p
p
3
p
2
p
4
p
3
p
1
p
4
p
2
,
D
m
D
8
D
4
Before proceeding, you
may find it helpful to
download and study the
review material available
in the Tutorials section of
the book Web site. . The
review covers introduc-
tory material on matrices
and vectors, , linear sys-
tems, set theory, , and
probability.
GONZ_CH02v6.QXD  7/23/07  10:20 AM  Page 72
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested