23.3 coulomb's Law 
695
Table 23.1
Charge and Mass of the Electron, Proton, and Neutron
Particle 
Charge (C) 
Mass (kg)
Electron (e) 
21.602 176 5 3 10219 
9.109 4 3 10231
Proton (p) 
11.602 176 5 3 10219 
1.672 62 3 10227
Neutron (n) 
1.674 93 3 10227
Example 23.1   The Hydrogen Atom
The electron and proton of a hydrogen atom are separated (on the average) by a distance of approximately  
5.3 3 10211m. Find the magnitudes of the electric force and the gravitational force between the two particles.
Conceptualize  Think about the two particles separated by the very small distance given in the problem statement. In 
Chapter 13, we mentioned that the gravitational force between an electron and a proton is very small compared to the 
electric force between them, so we expect this to be the case with the results of this example.
Categorize  The electric and gravitational forces will be evaluated from universal force laws, so we categorize this 
example as a substitution problem.
SoluTIon
Use Coulomb’s law to find the magnitude of 
the electric force:
F
e
5k
e
0
e
00
2e
0
r2
5
1
8.9883109 N
#
m2/C2
2
1
1.60310219 C
22
15.3310211 m22
5   8.2 3 1028 N
Use Newton’s law of universal gravitation  
and Table 23.1 (for the particle masses) to 
find the magnitude of the gravitational force:
F
g
5G 
m
e
m
p
r2
5
1
6.674310211 N
#
m2/kg2
2
1
9.11310231 kg
21
1.67310227 kg
2
1
5.3310211 m
22
5   3.6 3 10247 N
The ratio F
e
/F
g
< 2 3 1039. Therefore, the gravitational force between charged atomic particles is negligible when com-
pared with the electric force. Notice the similar forms of Newton’s law of universal gravitation and Coulomb’s law of 
electric forces. Other than the magnitude of the forces between elementary particles, what is a fundamental difference 
between the two forces?
When dealing with Coulomb’s law, remember that force is a vector quantity and 
must be treated accordingly. Coulomb’s law expressed in vector form for the elec-
tric force exerted by a charge q
1
on a second charge q
2
, written F
S
12
, is
F
S
12
5k
e
q
1
q
2
r
2
r^
12
(23.6)
where  r^
12
is a unit vector directed from q
1
toward q
2
as shown in Figure 23.6a (page 
696). Because the electric force obeys Newton’s third law, the electric force exerted 
by q
2
on q
1
is equal in magnitude to the force exerted by q
1
on q
2
and in the opposite 
direction; that is, F
S
21
52F
S
12
. Finally, Equation 23.6 shows that if q
1
and q
2
have the 
WWVector form of Coulomb’s law
words, only a very small fraction of the total available charge is transferred between 
the rod and the rubbing material.
The charges and masses of the electron, proton, and neutron are given in Table 
23.1. Notice that the electron and proton are identical in the magnitude of their 
charge but vastly different in mass. On the other hand, the proton and neutron are 
similar in mass but vastly different in charge. Chapter 46 will help us understand 
these interesting properties.
Pdf to web converter - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
convert pdf into html email; attach pdf to html
Pdf to web converter - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
converting pdfs to html; online convert pdf to html
696
chapter 23 electric Fields
same sign as in Figure 23.6a, the product q
1
q
2
is positive and the electric force on one 
particle is directed away from the other particle. If q
1
and q
2
are of opposite sign as 
shown in Figure 23.6b, the product q
1
q
2
is negative and the electric force on one par-
ticle is directed toward the other particle. These signs describe the relative direction 
of the force but not the absolute direction. A negative product indicates an attractive 
force, and a positive product indicates a repulsive force. The absolute direction of the 
force on a charge depends on the location of the other charge. For example, if an x 
axis lies along the two charges in Figure 23.6a, the product q
1
q
2
is positive, but F
S
12
points in the positive x direction and F
S
21
points in the negative x direction.
When more than two charges are present, the force between any pair of them is 
given by Equation 23.6. Therefore, the resultant force on any one of them equals the 
vector sum of the forces exerted by the other individual charges. For example, if four 
charges are present, the resultant force exerted by particles 2, 3, and 4 on particle 1 is
F
S
1
F
S
21
F
S
31
F
S
41
uick Quiz 23.3  Object A has a charge of 12 mC, and object B has a charge  
of 16 mC. Which statement is true about the electric forces on the objects?  
(a) F
S
AB
523F
S
BA
(b) F
S
AB
52F
S
BA
(c) 3F
S
AB
52F
S
BA
(d) F
S
AB
53F
S
BA
(e)  F
S
AB
F
S
BA
(f) 3F
S
AB
F
S
BA
Example 23.2   Find the Resultant Force
Consider three point charges located at the corners of a right triangle as shown in 
Figure 23.7, where q
1
q
3
5 5.00 mC, q
2
5 22.00 mC, and a 5 0.100 m. Find the 
resultant force exerted on q
3
.
Conceptualize  Think about the net force on q
3
. Because charge q
3
is near two 
other charges, it will experience two electric forces. These forces are exerted in dif-
ferent directions as shown in Figure 23.7. Based on the forces shown in the figure, 
estimate the direction of the net force vector.
Categorize  Because two forces are exerted on charge q
3
, we categorize this exam-
ple as a vector addition problem.
Analyze  The directions of the individual forces exerted by q
1
and q
2
on q
3
are 
shown in Figure 23.7. The force F
S
23
exerted by q
2
on q
3
is attractive because q
2
and q
3
have opposite signs. In the coordinate system shown in Figure 23.7, the 
attractive force F
S
23
is to the left (in the negative x direction).
The force F
S
13
exerted by q
1
on q
3
is repulsive because both charges are positive. The repulsive force F
S
13
makes an 
angle of 45.08 with the x axis.
SoluTIon
Figure 23.6 
Two point charges 
separated by a distance r exert a 
force on each other that is given 
by Coulomb’s law. The force F
S
21
exerted by q
2
on q
1
is equal in mag-
nitude and opposite in direction to 
the force F
S
12
exerted by q
1
on q
2
.
r
q
1
q
2
r
12
ˆ
When the charges are of the 
same sign, the force is repulsive.
a
b
F
12
S
F
21
S
+
+
q
1
q
2
When the charges are of opposite 
signs, the force is attractive.
F
12
S
F
21
S
+
-
+
+
-
F
13
S
F
23
S
q
3
q
1
q
2
a
a
y
x
2a
Figure 23.7 
(Example 23.2) The 
force exerted by q
1
on q
3
is F
S
13
. The 
force exerted by q
2
on q
3
is F
S
23
.  
The resultant force F
S
3
exerted on q
3
is the vector sum F
S
13
F
S
23
.
C# PDF: How to Create PDF Document Viewer in C#.NET with
NET Framework version 2.0 and above. Creating C# PDF Web / Windows / Mobile Viewer. C#.NET PDF Document Web Viewer, C#.NET PDF Document Mobile Viewer.
converting pdf to html email; best website to convert pdf to word
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Web Security. Your PDF and JPG files will be deleted from our servers an hour after the conversion.
convert pdf to html online; convert pdf into html code
23.3 coulomb's Law 
697
Finalize  The net force on q
3
is upward and toward the left in Figure 23.7. If q
3
moves in response to the net force, the 
distances between q
3
and the other charges change, so the net force changes. Therefore, if q
3
is free to move, it can 
be modeled as a particle under a net force as long as it is recognized that the force exerted on q
3
is not constant. As a 
reminder, we display most numerical values to three significant figures, which leads to operations such as 7.94 N 1  
(28.99 N) 5 21.04 N above. If you carry all intermediate results to more significant figures, you will see that this 
operation is correct.
What if the signs of all three charges were changed to the opposite signs? How would that affect the result 
for F
S
3
?
Answer  The charge q
3
would still be attracted toward q
2
and repelled from q
1
with forces of the same magnitude. 
Therefore, the final result for F
S
3
would be the same.
WhaT IF?
Use Equation 23.1 to find the magni-
tude of F
S
23
:
F
23
5k
e
0
q
2
00
q
3
0
a2
5
1
8.9883109 N
#
m2/C2
2
12.0031026 C215.0031026 C2
1
0.100 m
22
58.99 N
Find the magnitude of the force F
S
13
:
F
13
5k
e
0q
1
00q
3
0
1
"2
a
22
5
1
8.9883109 N
#
m2/C2
2
15.0031026 C215.0031026 C2
2
1
0.100 m
22
511.2 N
Find the x and y components of the force F
S
13
:
F
13x
5 (11.2 N) cos 45.08 5 7.94 N
F
13y
5 (11.2 N) sin 45.08 5 7.94 N
Find the components of the resultant force acting on q
3
:
F
3x
F
13x
F
23x
5 7.94 N 1 (28.99 N) 5 21.04 N
F
3y
F
13y
F
23y
5 7.94 N 1 0 5 7.94 N
Express the resultant force acting on q
3
in unit-vector 
form:
F
S
3
5
1
21.04
i
^
17.94 j
^
2
N
Example 23.3   Where Is the Net Force Zero? 
Three point charges lie along the x axis as shown in Figure 23.8. The positive 
charge q
1
5 15.0 mC is at x 5 2.00 m, the positive charge q
2
5 6.00 mC is at the ori-
gin, and the net force acting on q
3
is zero. What is the x coordinate of q
3
?
Conceptualize  Because q
3
is near two other charges, it experiences two electric 
forces. Unlike the preceding example, however, the forces lie along the same line 
in this problem as indicated in Figure 23.8. Because q
3
is negative and q
1
and q
2
are positive, the forces F
S
13
and F
S
23
are both attractive. Because q
2
is the smaller 
charge, the position of q
3
at which the force is zero should be closer to q
2
than to q
1
.
Categorize  Because the net force on q
3
is zero, we model the point charge as a 
particle in equilibrium.
AM
SoluTIon
2.00 m
x
q
1
x
y
q
3
q
2
2.00 - x 
+
+
-
F
13
S
F
23
S
Figure 23.8 
(Example 23.3) Three 
point charges are placed along the x 
axis. If the resultant force acting on 
q
3
is zero, the force F
S
13
exerted by 
q
1
on q
3
must be equal in magnitude 
and opposite in direction to the force  
F
S
23
exerted by q
2
on q
3
.
Analyze  Write an expression for the net force on 
charge q
3
when it is in equilibrium:
F
S
3
F
S
23
F
S
13
52k
e
0q
2
00q
3
0
x2
i
^
1k
e
0q
1
00q
3
0
1
2.002x
22
i
^
50
▸ 23.2 
continued
continued
Move the second term to the right side of the equation 
and set the coefficients of the unit vector 
i
^
equal:
k
e
0q
2
00q
3
0
x2
5k
e
0q
1
00q
3
0
1
2.002x
22
DocImage SDK for .NET: Web Document Image Viewer Online Demo
Please click Browse to upload a file to display in web viewer. Suppported files are Word, Excel, PowerPoint, PDF, Tiff, Dicom and main raster image formats.
how to convert pdf into html; convert from pdf to html
C# Image: Guide for Customizaing Options in Web Viewer
RasterEdge .NET Web Viewer Library for C# provides Visual C# programmers with two modes to display PDF, Office Word, Excel, and PowerPoint files.
pdf to web converter; convert pdf to html form
698
chapter 23 electric Fields
Example 23.4   Find the Charge on the Spheres 
Two identical small charged spheres, each having a mass 
of 3.00 3 1022 kg, hang in equilibrium as shown in Figure 
23.9a. The length L of each string is 0.150 m, and the angle 
u is 5.008. Find the magnitude of the charge on each sphere.
Conceptualize  Figure 23.9a helps us conceptualize this 
example. The two spheres exert repulsive forces on each 
other. If they are held close to each other and released, they 
move outward from the center and settle into the configura-
tion in Figure 23.9a after the oscillations have vanished due 
to air resistance.
Categorize  The key phrase “in equilibrium” helps us model 
each sphere as a particle in equilibrium. This example is sim-
ilar to the particle in equilibrium problems in Chapter 5 
with the added feature that one of the forces on a sphere is 
an electric force.
Analyze  The force diagram for the left-hand sphere is shown in Figure 23.9b. The sphere is in equilibrium under the 
application of the force T
S
from the string, the electric force F
S
e
from the other sphere, and the gravitational force mg
S
.
AM
SoluTIon
mg
T cos 
T sin u 
u
+
F
e
S
T
S
a
b
u
u
L
L
q
a
q
+
+
u
u
Figure 23.9 
(Example 23.4) (a) Two identical spheres, 
each carrying the same charge q, suspended in equilibrium. 
(b)Diagram of the forces acting on the sphere on the left 
part of (a).
From the particle in equilibrium model, set the net force 
on the left-hand sphere equal to zero for each component:
(1)   
o
F
x
T sin u 2 F
e
5 0   S   T sin u 5 F
e
(2)   
o
F
y
T cos u 2 mg 5 0   S   T cos u 5 mg
Divide Equation (1) by Equation (2) to find F
e
:
(3)   tan u5
F
e
mg
S   F
e
5mg tan u
Eliminate k
e
and uq
3
u and rearrange the equation:
(2.00 2 x)2uq
2
u 5 x2uq
1
u
Solve for x:
x5
2.00 "
0
q
2
0
"
0
q
2
0
6"
0
q
1
0
Substitute numerical values, choosing the plus sign:
x5
2.00 "6.0031026 C
"6.0031026 C
1"15.031026 C
5 0.775 m
Finalize  Notice that the movable charge is indeed closer to q
2
as we predicted in the Conceptualize step. The second 
solution to the equation (if we choose the negative sign) is x 5 23.44 m. That is another location where the magnitudes 
of the forces on q
3
are equal, but both forces are in the same direction, so they do not cancel.
Suppose q
3
is constrained to move only along the x axis. From its initial position at x 5 0.775 m, it is pulled 
a small distance along the x axis. When released, does it return to equilibrium, or is it pulled farther from equilib-
rium? That is, is the equilibrium stable or unstable?
Answer  If q
3
is moved to the right, F
S
13
becomes larger and F
S
23
becomes smaller. The result is a net force to the right, 
in the same direction as the displacement. Therefore, the charge q
3
would continue to move to the right and the equi-
librium is unstable. (See Section 7.9 for a review of stable and unstable equilibria.)
If q
3
is constrained to stay at a fixed x coordinate but allowed to move up and down in Figure 23.8, the equilibrium is 
stable. In this case, if the charge is pulled upward (or downward) and released, it moves back toward the equilibrium 
position and oscillates about this point.
WhaT IF?
▸ 23.3 
continued
Take the square root of both sides of the equation:
(2.00 2 x)"
0
q
2
0
5 6x"
0
q
1
0
C# Image: Create Web Image Viewer in C#.NET Application
If needed, you can view detailed guidance on how to create a PDF web viewer, how to view TIFF document image file online and how to create an online web
converting pdf to html; pdf to html converter
C#: How to Add HTML5 Document Viewer Control to Your Web Page
are to load the necessary resources for creating web document viewer events take RE default var _userCmdDemoPdf = new UserCommand("pdf"); _userCmdDemoPdf.addCSS
convert pdf to web; convert pdf to html online for
23.4 Analysis Model: Particle in a Field (Electric)
699
Finalize If the sign of the charges were not given in Figure 23.9, we could not determine them. In fact, the sign of the 
charge is not important. The situation is the same whether both spheres are positively charged or negatively charged.
Suppose your roommate proposes solving this problem without the assumption that the charges are of 
equal magnitude. She claims the symmetry of the problem is destroyed if the charges are not equal, so the strings would 
make two different angles with the vertical and the problem would be much more complicated. How would you respond?
Answer The symmetry is not destroyed and the angles are not different. Newton’s third law requires the magnitudes of 
the electric forces on the two spheres to be the same, regardless of the equality or nonequality of the charges. The solu
tion to the example remains the same with one change: the value of  in the solution is replaced by 
in 
the new situation, where  and  are the values of the charges on the two spheres. The symmetry of the problem 
would be destroyed if the masses of the spheres were not the same. In this case, the strings would make different angles 
with the vertical and the problem would be more complicated.
What If?
Use the geometry of the right triangle in Figure 23.9a to 
find a relationship between 
, and 
(4)   sin u5
sin 
Solve Coulomb’s law (Eq. 23.1) for the charge  on each 
sphere and substitute from Equations (3) and (4):
mg tan  sin 
Substitute numerical values:
3.00
10  kg219.80 m
tan 5.00 0 23 3 0.150 m  sin 5.00 0 24
8.988
10 N
4.42
10  C
23.4 Analysis Model: Particle in a Field (Electric)
In Section 5.1, we discussed the differences between contact forces and field forces. 
Two field forces—the gravitational force in Chapter 13 and the electric force here—
have been introduced into our discussions so far. As pointed out earlier, field forces 
can act through space, producing an effect even when no physical contact occurs 
between interacting objects. Such an interaction can be modeled as a two-step pro
cess: a source particle establishes a field, and then a charged particle interacts with 
the field and experiences a force. The gravitational field  at a point in space due to 
a source particle was defined in Section 13.4 to be equal to the gravitational force 
acting on a test particle of mass  divided by that mass: 
Then the 
force exerted by the field is 
(Eq. 5.5). 
The concept of a field was developed by Michael Faraday (1791–1867) in the con
text of electric forces and is of such practical value that we shall devote much atten
tion to it in the next several chapters. In this approach, an electric field is said to exist 
in the region of space around a charged object, the source charge. The presence of 
the electric field can be detected by placing a test charge in the field and noting the 
electric force on it. As an example, consider Figure 23.10, which shows a small positive 
test charge  placed near a second object carrying a much greater positive charge 
We define the electric field due to the source charge at the location of the test charge 
to be the electric force on the test charge per unit charge, or, to be more specific, 
the electric field vector  at a point in space is defined as the electric force  act
ing on a positive test charge  placed at that point divided by the test charge:
(23.7)
WWDefinition of electric field
When using Equation 23.7, we must assume the test charge  is small enough that it does not disturb the charge distri
bution responsible for the electric field. If the test charge is great enough, the charge on the metallic sphere is redistrib
uted and the electric field it sets up is different from the field it sets up in the presence of the much smaller test charge.
igure 23.10
A small positive 
test charge  placed at point 
near an object carrying a much 
larger positive charge  expe
riences an electric field  at 
point  established by the source 
charge Q. We will always assume 
that the test charge is so small 
that the field of the source charge 
is unaffected by its presence.
C#: How to Determine the Display Format for Web Doucment Viewing
All Formats. XDoc.HTML5 Viewer. XDoc.Windows Viewer. XDoc.Converter. View & Process. RasterEdge web document viewer for .NET can convert PDF, Word, Excel and
batch convert pdf to html; convert pdf to web link
C# Image: How to Integrate Web Document and Image Viewer
0.pdf: from this user manual, you can find the detailed instructions and explanations for why & how to create & insert a professional .NET web document image
adding pdf to html; convert pdf into html file
700
chapter 23 electric Fields
The vector E
S
has the SI units of newtons per coulomb (N/C). The direction of E
S
as shown in Figure 23.10 is the direction of the force a positive test charge experi-
ences when placed in the field. Note that E
S
is the field produced by some charge or 
charge distribution separate from the test charge; it is not the field produced by the 
test charge itself. Also note that the existence of an electric field is a property of its 
source; the presence of the test charge is not necessary for the field to exist. The 
test charge serves as a detector of the electric field: an electric field exists at a point if 
a test charge at that point experiences an electric force. 
If an arbitrary charge q is placed in an electric field E
S
, it experiences an electric 
force given by
F
S
e
5qE
S
(23.8)
This equation is the mathematical representation of the electric version of the par-
ticle in a field analysis model. If q is positive, the force is in the same direction as the 
field. If q is negative, the force and the field are in opposite directions. Notice the  
similarity between Equation 23.8 and the corresponding equation from the gravita-
tional version of the particle in a field model, F
S
g
5mg
S
(Section 5.5). Once the 
magnitude and direction of the electric field are known at some point, the electric 
force exerted on any charged particle placed at that point can be calculated from 
Equation 23.8.
To determine the direction of an electric field, consider a point charge q as a 
source charge. This charge creates an electric field at all points in space surround-
ing it. A test charge q
0
is placed at point P, a distance r from the source charge, as in 
Figure 23.11a. We imagine using the test charge to determine the direction of the 
electric force and therefore that of the electric field. According to Coulomb’s law, 
the force exerted by q on the test charge is
F
S
e
5k
e
qq
0
r
2
r^
where  r^ is a unit vector directed from q toward q
0
. This force in Figure 23.11a is 
directed away from the source charge q. Because the electric field at P, the position  
of the test charge, is defined by E
S
F
S
e
/q
0
, the electric field at P created by q is
E
S
5k
e
q
r2
r
(23.9)
If the source charge q is positive, Figure 23.11b shows the situation with the test charge 
removed: the source charge sets up an electric field at P, directed away from q. If q is 
Pitfall Prevention 23.1
Particles only Equation 23.8 is 
valid only for a particle of charge q
that is, an object of zero size. For 
a charged object of finite size in an 
electric field, the field may vary 
in magnitude and direction over 
the size of the object, so the cor-
responding force equation may be 
more complicated.
q
P
r
ˆ
q
q
0
r
P
r
ˆ
P
q
q
0
P
r
ˆ
q
r
ˆ
F
e
S
F
e
S
E
S
E
S
If q is negative, 
the force on 
the test charge 
q
0
is directed 
toward q
For a negative 
source charge, 
the electric 
field at P points 
radially inward 
toward q.
+
+
-
-
If q is positive, 
the force on 
the test charge 
q
0
is directed 
away from q
For a positive 
source charge, 
the electric 
field at P points 
radially outward 
from q. 
a
b
c
d
Figure 23.11 
(a), (c) When a test 
charge q
0
is placed near a source 
charge q, the test charge experi-
ences a force. (b),(d) At a point P 
near a source charge q, there exists 
an electric field.
This dramatic photograph cap-
tures a lightning bolt striking a 
tree near some rural homes. Light-
ning is associated with very strong 
electric fields in the atmosphere.
C
o
u
r
t
e
s
y
J
o
h
n
n
y
A
u
t
e
r
y
C# Image: Save or Print Document and Image in Web Viewer
If there's no printer connected or your web browser doesn't support document or image printing, you can only preview it on web viewer in PDF or TIFF format.
convert pdf to html code; converting pdf to html code
23.4 analysis Model: particle in a Field (electric) 
701
negative as in Figure 23.11c, the force on the test charge is toward the source charge, 
so the electric field at P is directed toward the source charge as in Figure 23.11d.
To calculate the electric field at a point P due to a small number of point charges, 
we first calculate the electric field vectors at P individually using Equation 23.9 and 
then add them vectorially. In other words, at any point P, the total electric field due 
to a group of source charges equals the vector sum of the electric fields of all the 
charges. This superposition principle applied to fields follows directly from the vec-
tor addition of electric forces. Therefore, the electric field at point P due to a group 
of source charges can be expressed as the vector sum
E
S
5k
e
a
i
q
i
r
i
2
r
^
i
(23.10)
where r
i
is the distance from the ith source charge q
i
to the point P and r^
i
is a unit 
vector directed from q
i
toward P.
In Example 23.6, we explore the electric field due to two charges using the super-
position principle. Part (B) of the example focuses on an electric dipole, which is 
defined as a positive charge q and a negative charge 2q separated by a distance 2a. 
The electric dipole is a good model of many molecules, such as hydrochloric acid 
(HCl). Neutral atoms and molecules behave as dipoles when placed in an external 
electric field. Furthermore, many molecules, such as HCl, are permanent dipoles. 
The effect of such dipoles on the behavior of materials subjected to electric fields is 
discussed in Chapter 26.
uick Quiz 23.4  A test charge of 13 mC is at a point P where an external electric 
field is directed to the right and has a magnitude of 4 3 106 N/C. If the test 
charge is replaced with another test charge of 23 mC, what happens to the exter-
nal electric field at P(a) It is unaffected. (b) It reverses direction. (c) It changes 
in a way that cannot be determined.
WW Electric field due to a finite 
number of point charges
Imagine an object with 
charge that we call a 
source charge. The source 
charge establishes an 
electric field E
S
through-
out space. Now imagine 
a particle with charge q is placed in that 
field. The particle interacts with the elec-
tric field so that the particle experiences 
an electric force given by
F
S
e
5qE
S
(23.8)
Analysis Model   Particle in a Field (Electric)
Examples:
• an electron moves between the deflection plates of a cathode ray 
oscilloscope and is deflected from its original path
• charged ions experience an electric force from the electric field in a 
velocity selector before entering a mass spectrometer (Chapter 29)
• an electron moves around the nucleus in the electric field estab-
lished by the proton in a hydrogen atom as modeled by the Bohr 
theory (Chapter 42)
• a hole in a semiconducting material moves in response to the elec-
tric field established by applying a voltage to the material (Chap-
ter 43)
q
E
S
F
qE
S
S
Example 23.5   A Suspended Water Droplet 
A water droplet of mass 3.00 3 10212 kg is located in the air near the ground during a stormy day. An atmospheric 
electric field of magnitude 6.00 3 103 N/C points vertically downward in the vicinity of the water droplet. The droplet 
remains suspended at rest in the air.  What is the electric charge on the droplet?
Conceptualize Imagine the water droplet hovering at rest in the air. This situation is not what is normally observed, so 
something must be holding the water droplet up.
AM
SoluTIon
continued
702
chapter 23 electric Fields
Analyze  Find the magnitude of the electric field at 
P due to charge q
1
:
E
1
5k
e
0q
1
0
r
1
2
5k
e
0q
1
0
a1y2
Find the magnitude of the electric field at P due to 
charge q
2
:
E
2
5k
e
0q
2
0
r
2
2
5k
e
0q
2
0
b1y2
Write the electric field vectors for each charge in 
unit-vector form:
E
S
1
5k
e
0q
1
0
a1y2
cos f
i
^
1k
e
0q
1
0
a1y2
sin f
j
^
E
S
2
5k
e
0
q
2
0
b1y2
cos u
i
^
2k
e
0
q
2
0
b1y2
sin u
j
^
Example 23.6   Electric Field Due to Two Charges
Charges q
1
and q
2
are located on the x axis, at distances a and b, respectively, from the 
origin as shown in Figure 23.12.
(A)  Find the components of the net electric field at the point P, which is at position (0, y).
Conceptualize  Compare this example with Exam-
ple 23.2. There, we add vector forces to find the net 
force on a charged particle. Here, we add electric 
field vectors to find the net electric field at a point 
in space. If a charged particle were placed at P, we 
could use the particle in a field model to find the 
electric force on the particle.
Categorize  We have two source charges and wish to find the resultant electric field, so we categorize this example as 
one in which we can use the superposition principle represented by Equation 23.10.
SoluTIon
▸ 23.5 
continued
Substitute numerical values:
Solve for the charge on the water droplet:
q52
mg
E
Using the two particle in a field models mentioned in the Catego-
rize step, substitute for the forces in Equation (1), recognizing 
that the vertical component of the electric field is negative: 
q
1
2E
2
2mg50
Write Newton’s second law from the particle in equilibrium model 
in the vertical direction:
(1)   
a
F
y
50   S   F
e
2F
g
50
q52
1
3.00
3
10212
kg
21
9.80
m/s2
2
6.00
3
103
N/C
24.90
3
10215
C
Finalize Noting the smallest unit of free charge in Equation 23.5, the charge on the water droplet is a large number 
of these units. Notice that the electric force is upward to balance the downward gravitational force. The problem state-
ment claims that the electric field is in the downward direction. Therefore, the charge found above is negative so that 
the electric force is in the direction opposite to the electric field.
Categorize The droplet can be modeled as a particle and is described by two analysis models associated with fields: 
the particle in a field (gravitational) and the particle in a field (electric). Furthermore, because the droplet is subject to forces 
but remains at rest, it is also described by the particle in equilibrium model.
Analyze
f
f
u
u
+
-
E
S
E
1
S
E
2
S
P
y
x
b
a
q
r
2
r
1
2
q
1
Figure 23.12 
(Example 23.6) The total 
electric field E
S
at P equals the vector sum 
E
S
1
E
S
2
, where E
S
1
is the field due to the 
positive charge q
1
and E
S
2
is the field due 
to the negative charge q
2
.
23.4 analysis Model: particle in a Field (electric) 
703
(B)  Evaluate the electric field at point P in the special case that uq
1
u 5 uq
2
u and a 5 b.
Conceptualize  Figure 23.13 shows the situation in 
this special case. Notice the symmetry in the situa-
tion and that the charge distribution is now an elec-
tric dipole.
Categorize  Because Figure 23.13 is a special case of 
the general case shown in Figure 23.12, we can cat-
egorize this example as one in which we can take the 
result of part (A) and substitute the appropriate val-
ues of the variables.
SoluTIon
P
y
r
a
q
a
q
x
u
u
u
u
+
-
E
S
E
2
S
E
1
S
Figure 23.13 
(Example 23.6) 
When the charges in Figure 
23.12 are of equal magnitude 
and equidistant from the origin, 
the situation becomes symmet-
ric as shown here.
Analyze  Based on the symmetry in Figure 
23.13, evaluate Equations (1) and (2) from 
part (A) with a 5 b, uq
1
u 5 uq
2
u 5 q, and f 5 u:
(3)    E
x
5k
e
q
a1y2
cos u1k
e
q
a1y2
cos u52k
e
q
a1y2
cos u
E
y
5k
e
q
a
2
1y
2
sin u2k
e
q
a
2
1y
2
sin u50
From the geometry in Figure 23.13, evaluate 
cos u:
(4)   cos u5
a
r
5
a
1
a2 1y2
21/2
Substitute Equation (4) into Equation (3):
E
x
52k
e
q
a1y2
c
a
1a1y221/2
d 5
k
e
2aq
1a1y223/2
(C)  Find the electric field due to the electric dipole when point P is a distance y .. a from the origin.
SoluTIon
In the solution to part (B), because y .. a, neglect a2 com-
pared with y2 and write the expression for E in this case:
(5)   E < 
k
e
2aq
y3
Write the components of the net electric field 
vector:
(1)   E
x
5E
1x
1E
2x
5
k
e
0q
1
0
a2 1y2
cos f1k
e
0q
2
0
b2 1y2
cos u
(2)   E
y
5E
1y
1E
2y
5
k
e
0
q
1
0
a2 1y2
sin f2k
e
0
q
2
0
b1y2
sin u
▸ 23.6 
continued
Finalize  From Equation (5), we see that at points far from a dipole but along the perpendicular bisector of the line 
joining the two charges, the magnitude of the electric field created by the dipole varies as 1/r3, whereas the more 
slowly varying field of a point charge varies as 1/r2 (see Eq. 23.9). That is because at distant points, the fields of the two 
charges of equal magnitude and opposite sign almost cancel each other. The 1/r3 variation in E for the dipole also is 
obtained for a distant point along the x axis and for any general distant point.
704
chapter 23 electric Fields
23.5  Electric Field of a Continuous  
Charge Distribution
Equation 23.10 is useful for calculating the electric field due to a small number of 
charges. In many cases, we have a continuous distribution of charge rather than a col-
lection of discrete charges. The charge in these situations can be described as contin-
uously distributed along some line, over some surface, or throughout some volume.
To set up the process for evaluating the electric field created by a continuous 
charge distribution, let’s use the following procedure. First, divide the charge dis-
tribution into small elements, each of which contains a small charge Dq as shown 
in Figure 23.14. Next, use Equation 23.9 to calculate the electric field due to one of 
these elements at a point P. Finally, evaluate the total electric field at P due to the 
charge distribution by summing the contributions of all the charge elements (that 
is, by applying the superposition principle).
The electric field at P due to one charge element carrying charge Dq is
DE
S
5k
e
Dq
r2
r^
where r is the distance from the charge element to point P and r^ is a unit vector 
directed from the element toward P. The total electric field at P due to all elements 
in the charge distribution is approximately
E
S
<k
e
a
i
Dq
i
r
i
2
r
^
i
where the index i refers to the ith element in the distribution. Because the number 
of elements is very large and the charge distribution is modeled as continuous, the 
total field at P in the limit Dq
i
S 0 is
E
S
5k
e
lim
Dq
i
S0
a
i
Dq
i
r
i
2
r^
i
5k
e
3
dq
r2
r
(23.11)
where the integration is over the entire charge distribution. The integration in 
Equation 23.11 is a vector operation and must be treated appropriately.
Let’s illustrate this type of calculation with several examples in which the charge 
is distributed on a line, on a surface, or throughout a volume. When performing 
such calculations, it is convenient to use the concept of a charge density along with 
the following notations:
• If a charge Q is uniformly distributed throughout a volume V, the volume 
charge density r is defined by
r;
Q
V
where r has units of coulombs per cubic meter (C/m3).
• If a charge Q is uniformly distributed on a surface of area A, the surface 
charge density s (Greek letter sigma) is defined by
s;
Q
A
where s has units of coulombs per square meter (C/m2).
• If a charge Q is uniformly distributed along a line of length ,, the linear 
charge density l is defined by
l;
Q
,
where l has units of coulombs per meter (C/m).
Electric field due to 
a continuous charge 
distribution
Volume charge density 
Surface charge density 
linear charge density 
r
1
r
2
r
3
ˆ
P
r
1
ˆ
r
2
ˆ
r
3
q
1
E
1
E
3
E
2
S
S
S
q
2
q
3
Figure 23.14 
The electric field 
at P due to a continuous charge dis-
tribution is the vector sum of the 
fields DE
S
i
due to all the elements 
Dq
i
of the charge distribution. 
Three sample elements are shown.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested