In a tabletop plasma ball, the colorful 
lines emanating from the sphere 
give evidence of strong electric 
fields. Using Gauss’s law, we show 
in this chapter that the electric field 
surrounding a uniformly charged 
sphere is identical to that of a point 
charge. 
(Steve Cole/Getty Images)
24.1 Electric Flux
24.2 Gauss’s Law
24.3 Application of Gauss’s 
Law to Various Charge 
Distributions
24.4 Conductors in Electrostatic 
Equilibrium
c h a p p t t e r
Gauss’s Law
725
In Chapter 23, we showed how to calculate the electric field due to a given charge 
distribution by integrating over the distribution. In this chapter, we describe Gauss’s law and 
an alternative procedure for calculating electric fields. Gauss’s law is based on the inverse-
square behavior of the electric force between point charges. Although Gauss’s law is a 
direct consequence of Coulomb’s law, it is more convenient for calculating the electric fields 
of highly symmetric charge distributions and makes it possible to deal with complicated 
problems using qualitative reasoning. As we show in this chapter, Gauss’s law is important in 
understanding and verifying the properties of conductors in electrostatic equilibrium.
4.1 Electric Flux
The concept of electric field lines was described qualitatively in Chapter 23. We 
now treat electric field lines in a more quantitative way.
Consider an electric field that is uniform in both magnitude and direction as 
shown in Figure 24.1. The field lines penetrate a rectangular surface of area 
whose plane is oriented perpendicular to the field. Recall from Section 23.6 that 
the number of lines per unit area (in other words, the line density) is proportional to 
the magnitude of the electric field. Therefore, the total number of lines penetrat
ing the surface is proportional to the product EA. This product of the magnitude 
of the electric field  and surface area  perpendicular to the field is called the 
electric flux
(uppercase Greek letter phi):
(24.1)
Figure 24.1
Field lines repre-
senting a uniform electric field 
penetrating a plane of area  per-
pendicular to the field. 
Best pdf to html converter - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
convert pdf into html email; converter pdf to html
Best pdf to html converter - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
best pdf to html converter; convert pdf form to html form
726
chapter 24 Gauss’s Law
From the SI units of E and A, we see that F
E
has units of newton meters squared per 
coulomb (N ? m2/C). Electric flux is proportional to the number of electric field 
lines penetrating some surface.
If the surface under consideration is not perpendicular to the field, the flux 
through it must be less than that given by Equation 24.1. Consider Figure 24.2, where 
the normal to the surface of area A is at an angle u to the uniform electric field. Notice 
that the number of lines that cross this area A is equal to the number of lines that 
cross the area A
, which is a projection of area A onto a plane oriented perpendicu-
lar to the field. The area A is the product of the length and the width of the surface:  
A 5 ,w. At the left edge of the figure, we see that the widths of the surfaces are related 
by w
w cos u. The area A
is given by A
,w
,w cos u and we see that the two 
areas are related by A
A cos u. Because the flux through A equals the flux through 
A
, the flux through A is
F
E
EA
EA cos u 
(24.2)
From this result, we see that the flux through a surface of fixed area A has a maxi-
mum value EA when the surface is perpendicular to the field (when the normal to 
the surface is parallel to the field, that is, when u 5 08 in Fig. 24.2); the flux is zero 
when the surface is parallel to the field (when the normal to the surface is perpen-
dicular to the field, that is, when u 5 908).
In this discussion, the angle u is used to describe the orientation of the surface 
of area A. We can also interpret the angle as that between the electric field vector 
and the normal to the surface. In this case, the product E cos u in Equation 24.2 is 
the component of the electric field perpendicular to the surface. The flux through 
the surface can then be written F
E
5 (E cos u)A 5 E
n
A, where we use E
n
as the com-
ponent of the electric field normal to the surface.
We assumed a uniform electric field in the preceding discussion. In more gen-
eral situations, the electric field may vary over a large surface. Therefore, the defi-
nition of flux given by Equation 24.2 has meaning only for a small element of area 
over which the field is approximately constant. Consider a general surface divided 
into a large number of small elements, each of area DA
i
. It is convenient to define 
a vector DA
S
i
whose magnitude represents the area of the ith element of the large 
surface and whose direction is defined to be perpendicular to the surface element as 
shown in Figure 24.3. The electric field E
S
i
at the location of this element makes an 
angle u
i
with the vector DA
S
i
. The electric flux F
E,i
through this element is
F
E,i
5E
i
DA
i
cos u
i
E
S
i
?DA
S
i
where we have used the definition of the scalar product of two vectors  
(A
S
?B
S
;AB cos u; see Chapter 7). Summing the contributions of all elements 
gives an approximation to the total flux through the surface:
F
E
<
a
E
S
i
?DA
S
i
If the area of each element approaches zero, the number of elements approaches 
infinity and the sum is replaced by an integral. Therefore, the general definition of 
electric flux is
F
E
;
3
surface
E
S
?dA
S
(24.3)
Equation 24.3 is a surface integral, which means it must be evaluated over the surface 
in question. In general, the value of F
E
depends both on the field pattern and on 
the surface.
We are often interested in evaluating the flux through a closed surface, defined as 
a surface that divides space into an inside and an outside region so that one cannot 
move from one region to the other without crossing the surface. The surface of a 
sphere, for example, is a closed surface. By convention, if the area element in Equa-
Definition of electric flux 
A
w
w
A
Normal
u
u
E
S
The number of field lines that 
go through the area A
is the 
same as the number that go 
through area A.
,
Figure 24.2 
Field lines repre-
senting a uniform electric field 
penetrating an area A whose nor-
mal is at an angle u to the field.
The electric field makes an angle
u
i
with the vector ∆A
i
, defined as
being normal to the surface
element.  
u
i
E
i
S
S
A
i
S
Figure 24.3 
A small element of 
surface area DA
i
in an electric field.
Online Convert PDF to HTML5 files. Best free online PDF html
Our PDF to HTML converter library control is a 100% clean .NET document image solution, which is designed to help .NET developers convert PDF to HTML webpage
convert pdf to html email; batch convert pdf to html
Purchase RasterEdge Product License Online
Now. Converter XDoc.Converter for .NET. Best file conversions for most common business files, including Adobe PDF, Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, HTML, Open
pdf to web converter; convert pdf to html5 open source
24.1 electric Flux 
727
tion 24.3 is part of a closed surface, the direction of the area vector is chosen so 
that the vector points outward from the surface. If the area element is not part of a 
closed surface, the direction of the area vector is chosen so that the angle between 
the area vector and the electric field vector is less than or equal to 90°.
Consider the closed surface in Figure 24.4. The vectors DA
S
i
point in different 
directions for the various surface elements, but for each element they are normal to 
the surface and point outward. At the element labeled , the field lines are cross-
ing the surface from the inside to the outside and u , 908; hence, the flux F
E,1
5
E
S
?DA
S
1
through this element is positive. For element , the field lines graze the 
surface (perpendicular to DA
S
2
); therefore, u 5 908 and the flux is zero. For ele-
ments such as , where the field lines are crossing the surface from outside to 
inside, 1808 . u . 908 and the flux is negative because cosu is negative. The net 
flux through the surface is proportional to the net number of lines leaving the sur-
face, where the net number means the number of lines leaving the surface minus the num-
ber of lines entering the surface. If more lines are leaving than entering, the net flux is 
positive. If more lines are entering than leaving, the net flux is negative. Using the 
symbol r to represent an integral over a closed surface, we can write the net flux F
E
through a closed surface as
F
E
5
C
E
S
?dA
S
5
C
E
n
dA 
(24.4)
where E
n
represents the component of the electric field normal to the surface.
uick Quiz 24.1  Suppose a point charge is located at the center of a spheri-
cal surface. The electric field at the surface of the sphere and the total flux 
through the sphere are determined. Now the radius of the sphere is halved. 
E
n
E
n
u
u
E
S
E
S
E
S
A
3
S
A
2
S
A
1
S
The electric
flux through
this area
element is
negative.  
The electric
flux through
this area
element is
zero. 
The electric
flux through
this area
element is
positive.  
Figure 24.4 
A closed surface in 
an electric field. The area vectors 
are, by convention, normal to the 
surface and point outward. 
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Graphics, and REImage in C#.NET Project. Best PDF converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET for converting PDF to image in C#.NET application.
change pdf to html format; convert pdf to html with
Online Convert PDF file to Tiff. Best free online PDF Tif
Online PDF to Tiff Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to Tiff. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button
converting pdf to html code; adding pdf to html page
728
chapter 24 Gauss’s Law
24.2 Gauss’s Law
In this section, we describe a general relationship between the net electric flux 
through a closed surface (often called a gaussian surface) and the charge enclosed 
by the surface. This relationship, known as Gauss’s law, is of fundamental impor-
tance in the study of electric fields.
Consider a positive point charge q located at the center of a sphere of radius r as 
shown in Figure 24.6. From Equation 23.9, we know that the magnitude of the elec-
tric field everywhere on the surface of the sphere is E 5 k
e
q/r2. The field lines are 
directed radially outward and hence are perpendicular to the surface at every point 
on the surface. That is, at each surface point, E
S
is parallel to the  vector DA
S
i
repre-
senting a local element of area DA
i
surrounding the surface point. Therefore,
E
S
?DA
S
i
5E DA
i
and, from Equation 24.4, we find that the net flux through the gaussian surface is
F
E
5
C
E
S
?dA
S
5
C
E dA5E 
C
dA 
What happens to the flux through the sphere and the magnitude of the elec-
tric field at the surface of the sphere? (a) The flux and field both increase. 
(b) The flux and field both decrease. (c) The flux increases, and the field 
decreases. (d) The flux decreases, and the field increases. (e) The flux remains 
the same, and the field increases. (f) The flux decreases, and the field remains 
the same.
Write the integrals for the net flux through faces   
and :
F
E
5
3
1
E
S
?dA
S
1
3
2
E
S
?dA
S
For face , E
S
is constant and directed inward but dA
S
1
is directed outward (u 5 1808). Find the flux through 
this face:
3
1
E
S
?dA
S
5
3
1
E
1
cos 1808
2
dA52E 
3
1
dA52EA52E,2
For face , E
S
is constant and outward and in the same 
direction as dA
S
2
(u 5 08). Find the flux through this face:
3
2
E
S
?dA
S
5
3
2
E
1
cos 08
2
dA5E 
3
2
dA51EA5E,2
Find the net flux by adding the flux over all six faces:
F
E
52E,1E,101010105
0
Spherical
gaussian
surface
E
S
A
i
S
r
q
+
Figure 24.6 
A spherical gauss-
ian surface of radius r surround-
ing a positive point charge q. 
Example 24.1   Flux Through a Cube
Consider a uniform electric field E
S
oriented in the x direction in empty 
space. A cube of edge length , is placed in the field, oriented as shown in 
Figure 24.5. Find the net electric flux through the surface of the cube.
Conceptualize  Examine Figure 24.5 carefully. Notice that the electric 
field lines pass through two faces perpendicularly and are parallel to 
four other faces of the cube.
Categorize  We evaluate the flux from its definition, so we categorize 
this example as a substitution problem.
The flux through four of the faces (, , and the unnumbered 
faces) is zero because E
S
is parallel to the four faces and therefore per-
pendicular to dA
S
on these faces.
SolutIon
y
z
x
d
d
d
d
A
3
S
A
1
S
A
4
S
A
2
S
E
S
Figure 24.5 
(Example 24.1) A closed surface in 
the shape of a cube in a uniform electric field ori-
ented parallel to the x axis. Side  is the bottom of 
the cube, and side  is opposite side .
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you.
convert pdf to html open source; best pdf to html converter online
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
HTML Document Viewer for Azure, C# HTML Document Viewer Best PDF Viewer control as well as a powerful An advanced .NET WPF PDF converter library for converting
convert pdf to url online; add pdf to website html
24.2 Gauss’s Law 
729
where we have moved E outside of the integral because, by symmetry, E is constant 
over the surface. The value of E is given by E 5 k
e
q/r2. Furthermore, because the 
surface is spherical, rdA 5 A 5 4pr2. Hence, the net flux through the gaussian 
surface is
F
E
5k
e
q
r2
1
4pr2
2
54pk
e
q 
Recalling from Equation 23.3 that k
e
5 1/4pP
0
, we can write this equation in the form
F
E
5
q
P
0
(24.5)
Equation 24.5 shows that the net flux through the spherical surface is propor-
tional to the charge inside the surface. The flux is independent of the radius r 
because the area of the spherical surface is proportional to r2, whereas the electric 
field is proportional to 1/r2. Therefore, in the product of area and electric field, 
the dependence on r cancels.
Now consider several closed surfaces surrounding a charge q as shown in Figure 
24.7. Surface S
1
is spherical, but surfaces S
2
and S
3
are not. From Equation 24.5, the 
flux that passes through S
1
has the value q/P
0
. As discussed in the preceding section, 
flux is proportional to the number of electric field lines passing through a surface. 
The construction shown in Figure 24.7 shows that the number of lines through S
1
is 
equal to the number of lines through the nonspherical surfaces S
2
and S
3
. Therefore,
the net flux through any closed surface surrounding a point charge q is given 
by q/P
0
and is independent of the shape of that surface.
Now consider a point charge located outside a closed surface of arbitrary shape as 
shown in Figure 24.8. As can be seen from this construction, any electric field line 
entering the surface leaves the surface at another point. The number of electric 
field lines entering the surface equals the number leaving the surface. Therefore, 
the net electric flux through a closed surface that surrounds no charge is zero. 
Applying this result to Example 24.1, we see that the net flux through the cube is 
zero because there is no charge inside the cube.
Let’s extend these arguments to two generalized cases: (1) that of many point 
charges and (2) that of a continuous distribution of charge. We once again use the 
superposition principle, which states that the electric field due to many charges is 
The net electric flux is the 
same through all surfaces.  
+
S
3
S
2
S
1
Figure 24.7 
Closed surfaces of 
various shapes surrounding a posi-
tive charge.
The number of field lines 
entering the surface equals the 
number leaving the surface.  
q
+
Figure 24.8 
A point charge 
located outside a closed surface. 
Karl Friedrich Gauss
German mathematician and astrono- 
mer (1777–1855)
Gauss received a doctoral degree in 
mathematics from the University of 
Helmstedt in 1799. In addition to his 
work in electromagnetism, he made 
contributions to mathematics and 
science in number theory, statistics, 
non-Euclidean geometry, and cometary 
orbital mechanics. He was a founder 
of the German Magnetic Union, which 
studies the Earth’s magnetic field on a 
continual basis.
©
P
h
o
t
o
R
e
s
e
a
r
c
h
e
r
s
/
A
l
a
m
y
C# PDF Print Library: Print PDF documents in C#.net, ASP.NET
C# HTML Document Viewer for Azure, C# HTML Document Viewer NET PDF Document Printer A best PDF printer control for Visual Studio .NET and compatible with C#
converting pdf to html format; how to convert pdf to html
VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF in Visual Basic Class. Best VB.NET adobe PDF to Tiff converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET.
how to convert pdf into html; embed pdf into webpage
730
chapter 24 Gauss’s Law
the vector sum of the electric fields produced by the individual charges. Therefore, 
the flux through any closed surface can be expressed as
C
E
S
?dA
S
5
C
1
E
S
1
E
S
2
1
c
2
?dA
S
where E
S
is the total electric field at any point on the surface produced by the vec-
tor addition of the electric fields at that point due to the individual charges. Con-
sider the system of charges shown in Figure 24.9. The surface S surrounds only 
one charge, q
1
; hence, the net flux through S is q
1
/P
0
. The flux through S due 
to charges q
2
q
3
, and q
4
outside it is zero because each electric field line from  
these charges that enters S at one point leaves it at another. The surface S9 sur-
rounds charges q
2
and q
3
; hence, the net flux through it is (q
2
q
3
)/P
0
. Finally, the 
net flux through surface S0 is zero because there is no charge inside this surface. 
That is, all the electric field lines that enter S0 at one point leave at another. Charge 
q
4
does not contribute to the net flux through any of the surfaces.
The mathematical form of Gauss’s law is a generalization of what we have just 
described and states that the net flux through any closed surface is
F
E
5
C
E
S
?dA
S
5
q
in
P
0
(24.6)
where E
S
represents the electric field at any point on the surface and q
in
represents 
the net charge inside the surface.
When using Equation 24.6, you should note that although the charge q
in
is the 
net charge inside the gaussian surface, E
S
represents the total electric field, which 
includes contributions from charges both inside and outside the surface.
In principle, Gauss’s law can be solved for E
S
to determine the electric field due 
to a system of charges or a continuous distribution of charge. In practice, however, 
this type of solution is applicable only in a limited number of highly symmetric 
situations. In the next section, we use Gauss’s law to evaluate the electric field for 
charge distributions that have spherical, cylindrical, or planar symmetry. If one 
chooses the gaussian surface surrounding the charge distribution carefully, the 
integral in Equation 24.6 can be simplified and the electric field determined.
uick Quiz 24.2  If the net flux through a gaussian surface is zero, the following 
four statements could be true. Which of the statements must be true? (a)There are 
no charges inside the surface. (b) The net charge inside the surface is zero.  
(c) The electric field is zero everywhere on the surface. (d)The number of elec-
tric field lines entering the surface equals the number leaving the surface.
Charge q
4
does not contribute to 
the flux through any surface 
because it is outside all surfaces.  
S
S
S
q
1
+
q
4
+
q
2
q
3
-
-
Figure 24.9 
The net electric 
flux through any closed surface 
depends only on the charge inside 
that surface. The net flux through 
surface S is q
1
/P
0
, the net flux 
through surface S9 is (q
2
q
3
)/P
0
and the net flux through surface 
S0 is zero. 
Pitfall Prevention 24.1
Zero Flux Is not Zero Field  
In two situations, there is 
zero flux through a closed 
surface: either (1) there are 
no charged particles enclosed 
by the surface or (2) there are 
charged particles enclosed, 
but the net charge inside the 
surface is zero. For either situ-
ation, it is incorrect to conclude 
that the electric field on the 
surface is zero. Gauss’s law 
states that the electric flux is 
proportional to the enclosed 
charge, not the electric field.
Conceptual Example 24.2   Flux Due to a Point Charge
A spherical gaussian surface surrounds a point charge q. Describe what happens to the total flux through the surface 
if (A) the charge is tripled, (B) the radius of the sphere is doubled, (C) the surface is changed to a cube, and (D) the 
charge is moved to another location inside the surface.
(A) The flux through the surface is tripled because flux is proportional to the amount of charge inside the surface.
(B) The flux does not change because all electric field lines from the charge pass through the sphere, regardless of 
its radius.
(C) The flux does not change when the shape of the gaussian surface changes because all electric field lines from 
the charge pass through the surface, regardless of its shape.
(D) The flux does not change when the charge is moved to another location inside that surface because Gauss’s law 
refers to the total charge enclosed, regardless of where the charge is located inside the surface.
SolutIon
24.3 application of Gauss’s Law to Various charge Distributions 
731
Example 24.3   A Spherically Symmetric Charge Distribution
An insulating solid sphere of radius a has a uniform 
volume charge density r and carries a total positive 
charge Q (Fig. 24.10).
(A)  Calculate the magnitude of the electric field at a 
point outside the sphere.
Conceptualize  Notice how this problem differs from 
our previous discussion of Gauss’s law. The electric 
field due to point charges was discussed in Section 
24.2. Now we are considering the electric field due 
to a distribution of charge. We found the field for 
various distributions of charge in Chapter 23 by inte-
grating over the distribution. This example demon-
strates a difference from our discussions in Chapter 
23. In this chapter, we find the electric field using 
Gauss’s law.
Categorize  Because the charge is distributed uni-
formly throughout the sphere, the charge distribution 
has spherical symmetry and we can apply Gauss’s law to find the electric field.
Analyze To reflect the spherical symmetry, let’s choose a spherical gaussian surface of radius r, concentric with the 
sphere, as shown in Figure 24.10a. For this choice, condition (2) is satisfied everywhere on the surface and E
S
?dA
S
5E dA.
SolutIon
24.3  Application of Gauss’s Law to Various  
Charge Distributions
As mentioned earlier, Gauss’s law is useful for determining electric fields when the 
charge distribution is highly symmetric. The following examples demonstrate ways 
of choosing the gaussian surface over which the surface integral given by Equation 
24.6 can be simplified and the electric field determined. In choosing the surface, 
always take advantage of the symmetry of the charge distribution so that E can be 
removed from the integral. The goal in this type of calculation is to determine a 
surface for which each portion of the surface satisfies one or more of the following 
conditions:
1. The value of the electric field can be argued by symmetry to be constant 
over the portion of the surface.
2. The dot product in Equation 24.6 can be expressed as a simple algebraic 
product E dA because E
S
and dA
S
are parallel.
3. The dot product in Equation 24.6 is zero because E
S
and dA
S
are 
perpendicular.
4. The electric field is zero over the portion of the surface.
Different portions of the gaussian surface can satisfy different conditions as 
long as every portion satisfies at least one condition. All four conditions are used in 
examples throughout the remainder of this chapter and will be identified by num-
ber. If the charge distribution does not have sufficient symmetry such that a gauss-
ian surface that satisfies these conditions can be found, Gauss’s law is still true, but 
is not useful for determining the electric field for that charge distribution.
Gaussian
sphere
Gaussian
sphere
For points outside the sphere, 
a large, spherical gaussian 
surface is drawn concentric 
with the sphere.
For points inside the sphere, 
a spherical gaussian surface 
smaller than the sphere is 
drawn.
r
a
a
b
Figure 24.10 
(Example 24.3) A uniformly charged insulating 
sphere of radius a and total charge Q. In diagrams such as this one, 
the dotted line represents the intersection of the gaussian surface 
with the plane of the page.
Pitfall Prevention 24.2
Gaussian Surfaces Are not Real  
A gaussian surface is an imaginary 
surface you construct to satisfy the 
conditions listed here. It does not 
have to coincide with a physical 
surface in the situation.
continued
732
chapter 24 Gauss’s Law
Replace E
S
?dA
S
in Gauss’s law with E dA:
F
E
5
C
E
S
?dA
S
5
C
E dA5
Q
P
0
By symmetry, E has the same value everywhere on the 
surface, which satisfies condition (1), so we can remove  
E from the integral:
C
E dA5E 
C
dA5E
1
4pr2
2
5
Q
P
0
Solve for E:
(1)   E5
Q
4pP
0
r2
5
k
e
Q
r2
1
for r . a
2
Finalize  This field is identical to that for a point charge. Therefore, the electric field due to a uniformly charged 
sphere in the region external to the sphere is equivalent to that of a point charge located at the center of the sphere.
(B)  Find the magnitude of the electric field at a point inside the sphere.
Analyze  In this case, let’s choose a spherical gaussian surface having radius r , a, concentric with the insulating 
sphere (Fig. 24.10b). Let V9 be the volume of this smaller sphere. To apply Gauss’s law in this situation, recognize that 
the charge q
in
within the gaussian surface of volume V9 is less than Q.
SolutIon
Notice that conditions (1) and (2) are satisfied every-
where on the gaussian surface in Figure 24.10b. Apply 
Gauss’s law in the region r , a:
C
E dA5E 
C
dA5E14pr22 5
q
in
P
0
Calculate q
in
by using q
in
5 rV9:
q
in
5rVr5r
14
3
pr3
2
Solve for E and substitute for q
in
:
E5
q
in
4pP
0
r2
5
r
14
3
pr3
2
4pP
0
r2
5
r
3P
0
r
Substitute r5Q/
4
3
pa3 and P
0
5 1/4pk
e
:
(2)   E5
Q/4
3
pa3
3
1
1/4pk
e
2
r5
k
e
Q
a3
r
1
for r , a
2
Finalize  This result for E differs from the one obtained in part (A). It shows that 
ES 0 as r S 0. Therefore, the result eliminates the problem that would exist at  
r5 0 if E varied as 1/r2 inside the sphere as it does outside the sphere. That is, if  
E ~ 1/r2 for r , a, the field would be infinite at r 5 0, which is physically impossible.
Suppose the radial position r 5 a is approached from inside the 
sphere and from outside. Do we obtain the same value of the electric field from 
both directions?
Answer  Equation (1) shows that the electric field approaches a value from the out-
side given by
E5lim
r
S
a
ak
e
Q
r2
b5k
e
Q
a2
From the inside, Equation (2) gives
E5lim
r Sa
ak
e
Q
a3
rb5k
e
Q
a3
a5k
e
Q
a2
Therefore, the value of the field is the same as the surface is approached from 
both directions. A plot of E versus r is shown in Figure 24.11. Notice that the mag-
nitude of the field is continuous.
WhAt IF?
a
E
a
r
k
e
Q
r
2
=
=
k
e
Q
a
3
r
Figure 24.11 
(Example 24.3)  
A plot of E versus r for a uniformly 
charged insulating sphere. The 
electric field inside the sphere  
(r , a) varies linearly with r. The 
field outside the sphere (r . a) is 
the same as that of a point charge  
Q located at r 5 0.
▸ 24.3 
continued
24.3 application of Gauss’s Law to Various charge Distributions 
733
Example 24.4   A Cylindrically Symmetric Charge Distribution
Find the electric field a distance r from a line of posi-
tive charge of infinite length and constant charge per 
unit length l (Fig. 24.12a).
Conceptualize  The line of charge is infinitely long. 
Therefore, the field is the same at all points equidis-
tant from the line, regardless of the vertical position 
of the point in Figure 24.12a. We expect the field to 
become weaker as we move farther away from the line 
of charge.
Categorize  Because the charge is distributed uni-
formly along the line, the charge distribution has cylin-
drical symmetry and we can apply Gauss’s law to find 
the electric field.
Analyze  The symmetry of the charge distribution 
requires that E
S
be perpendicular to the line charge and  
directed outward as shown in Figure 24.12b. To reflect the symmetry of the charge distribution, let’s choose a cylindri-
cal gaussian surface of radius r and length , that is coaxial with the line charge. For the curved part of this surface, E
S
is 
constant in magnitude and perpendicular to the surface at each point, satisfying conditions (1) and (2). Furthermore, 
the flux through the ends of the gaussian cylinder is zero because E
S
is parallel to these surfaces. That is the first appli-
cation we have seen of condition(3).
We must take the surface integral in Gauss’s law over the entire gaussian surface. Because E
S
?dA
S
is zero for the flat 
ends of the cylinder, however, we restrict our attention to only the curved surface of the cylinder.
SolutIon
+
+
+
Gaussian
surface
r
E
S
E
S
dA
S
+
+
+
+
a
b
++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Figure 24.12 
(Example 24.4) (a) An infinite line of charge sur-
rounded by a cylindrical gaussian surface concentric with the line. 
(b) An end view shows that the electric field at the cylindrical sur-
face is constant in magnitude and perpendicular to the surface.
Apply Gauss’s law and conditions (1) and (2) for the 
curved surface, noting that the total charge inside our 
gaussian surface is l,:
F
E
5
C
E
S
?dA
S
5E 
C
dA5EA5
q
in
P
0
5
l,
P
0
Substitute the area A 5 2pr, of the curved surface:
E
1
2pr,
2
5
l,
P
0
Solve for the magnitude of the electric field:
E5
l
2pP
0
r
 
2k
e
l
r
(24.7)
What if the line segment in this example were not infinitely long?
Answer  If the line charge in this example were of finite length, the electric field would not be given by Equation 
24.7. A finite line charge does not possess sufficient symmetry to make use of Gauss’s law because the magnitude of 
the electric field is no longer constant over the surface of the gaussian cylinder: the field near the ends of the line 
would be different from that far from the ends. Therefore, condition (1) would not be satisfied in this situation. 
Furthermore, E
S
is not perpendicular to the cylindrical surface at all points: the field vectors near the ends would 
have a component parallel to the line. Therefore, condition (2) would not be satisfied. For points close to a finite line 
charge and far from the ends, Equation 24.7 gives a good approximation of the value of the field.
It is left for you to show (see Problem 33) that the electric field inside a uniformly charged rod of finite radius and 
infinite length is proportional to r.
WhAt IF?
Finalize  This result shows that the electric field due to a cylindrically symmetric charge distribution varies as 1/r
whereas the field external to a spherically symmetric charge distribution varies as 1/r2. Equation 24.7 can also be 
derived by direct integration over the charge distribution. (See Problem 44 in Chapter 23.)
734
chapter 24 Gauss’s Law
Example 24.5   A Plane of Charge
Find the electric field due to an infinite plane of positive charge with uniform 
surface charge density s.
Conceptualize  Notice that the plane of charge is infinitely large. Therefore, the 
electric field should be the same at all points equidistant from the plane. How 
would you expect the electric field to depend on the distance from the plane?
Categorize  Because the charge is distributed uniformly on the plane, the charge 
distribution is symmetric; hence, we can use Gauss’s law to find the electric field.
Analyze  By symmetry, E
S
must be perpendicular to the plane at all points. The 
direction of E
S
is away from positive charges, indicating that the direction of E
S
on one side of the plane must be opposite its direction on the other side as shown 
in Figure 24.13. A gaussian surface that reflects the symmetry is a small cylinder 
whose axis is perpendicular to the plane and whose ends each have an area A 
and are equidistant from the plane. Because E
S
is parallel to the curved  surface of 
the cylinder—and therefore perpendicular to dA
S
at all points on this surface— 
condition (3) is satisfied and there is no contribution to the surface integral from this surface. For the flat ends of the 
cylinder, conditions (1) and (2) are satisfied. The flux through each end of the cylinder is EA; hence, the total flux 
through the entire gaussian surface is just that through the ends, F
E
5 2EA.
SolutIon
A
Gaussian
surface
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
E
S
E
S
Figure 24.13 
(Example 24.5) A 
cylindrical gaussian surface pen-
etrating an infinite plane of charge. 
The flux is EA through each end 
of the gaussian surface and zero 
through its curved surface.
Write Gauss’s law for this surface, noting that the 
enclosed charge is q
in
5 sA:
F
E
52EA5
q
in
P
0
5
sA
P
0
Solve for E:
E 5 
s
2P
0
(24.8)
Finalize  Because the distance from each flat end of 
the cylinder to the plane does not appear in Equation 
24.8, we conclude that E 5 s/2P
0
at any distance from 
the plane. That is, the field is uniform everywhere. Fig-
ure 24.14 shows this uniform field due to an infinite 
plane of charge, seen edge-on.
Suppose two infinite planes of charge are 
parallel to each other, one positively charged and the 
other negatively charged. The surface charge densities 
of both planes are of the same magnitude. What does 
the electric field look like in this situation?
Answer  We first addressed this configuration in the 
What If? section of Example 23.9. The electric fields 
due to the two planes add in the region between the 
planes, resulting in a uniform field of magnitude s/P
0
and cancel elsewhere to give a field of zero. Figure 24.15 
shows the field lines for such a configuration. This 
method is a practical way to achieve uniform electric 
fields with finite-sized planes placed close to each other.
WhAt IF?
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
Figure 24.14 
(Example 24.5) 
The electric field lines due to an 
infinite plane of positive charge.
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Figure 24.15 
(Example 24.5) 
The electric field lines between 
two infinite planes of charge, 
one positive and one negative. 
In practice, the field lines near 
the edges of finite-sized sheets 
of charge will curve outward.
Conceptual Example 24.6   Don’t Use Gauss’s Law Here! 
Explain why Gauss’s law cannot be used to calculate the electric field near an electric dipole, a charged disk, or a tri-
angle with a point charge at each corner.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested