Problems 
745
67. An infinitely long insulating cylinder of radius R has a 
volume charge density that varies with the radius as
r5r
0
aa2
r
b
b
where r
0
a, and b are positive constants and r is the 
distance from the axis of the cylinder. Use Gauss’s law 
to determine the magnitude of the electric field at 
radial distances (a)r, R and (b) r . R.
68. A particle with charge Q is located 
on the axis of a circle of radius R at 
a distance b from the plane of the 
circle (Fig. P24.68). Show that if 
one-fourth of the electric flux from 
the charge passes through the cir-
cle, then R5!3
b.
69. Review. A slab of insulating mate-
rial (infinite in the y and z direc-
tions) has a thickness d and a uni-
form positive charge density r. An edge view of the 
slab is shown in Figure P24.61. (a) Show that the mag-
nitude of the electric field a distance x from its center 
and inside the slab is E 5 rx/P
0
. (b) What If? Suppose 
an electron of charge 2e and mass m
e
can move freely 
within the slab. It is released from rest at a distance x 
from the center. Show that the electron exhibits simple 
harmonic motion with a frequency
f5
1
2pÅ
re
m
e
P
0
S
R
Q
b
+
Figure P24.68
S
S
leaving the closed surface. (b)What net charge is 
enclosed by the surface?
64. A sphere of radius 2a is made of 
a nonconducting material that 
has a uniform volume charge 
density r. Assume the mate-
rial does not affect the elec-
tric field. A spherical cavity of 
radius a is now removed from 
the sphere as shown in Figure 
P24.64. Show that the electric 
field within the cavity is uni-
form and is given by E
x
5 0 and E
y
5 ra/3P
0
.
65. A spherically symmetric charge distribution has a 
charge density given by r 5 a/r, where a is constant. 
Find the electric field within the charge distribution 
as a function of r. Note: The volume element dV for a 
spherical shell of radius r and thickness dr is equal to 
4pr2dr.
66. A solid insulating sphere of radius R has a nonuni-
form charge density that varies with r according to 
the expression r 5 Ar2, where A is a constant and  
r , R is measured from the center of the sphere.  
(a) Show that the magnitude of the electric field out-
side (r . R) the sphere is E5 AR5/5P
0
r2. (b) Show 
that the magnitude of the electric field inside (r , R
the sphere is E 5 Ar3/5P
0
Note: The volume element 
dV for a spherical shell of radius r and thickness dr is 
equal to 4pr2dr.
y
x
2a
a
Figure P24.64
S
S
S
Convert pdf to html file - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
convert pdf into html code; conversion pdf to html
Convert pdf to html file - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
embed pdf into web page; pdf to html converter online
746 
In Chapter 23, we linked our new study of electromagnetism to our earlier studies of 
force. Now we make a new link to our earlier investigations into energy. The concept of 
potential energy was introduced in Chapter 7 in connection with such conservative forces as 
the gravitational force and the elastic force exerted by a spring. By using the law of conser-
vation of energy, we could solve various problems in mechanics that were not solvable with 
an approach using forces. The concept of potential energy is also of great value in the study 
of electricity. Because the electrostatic force is conservative, electrostatic phenomena can 
be conveniently described in terms of an electric potential energy. This idea enables us to 
define a quantity known as electric potential. Because the electric potential at any point in 
an electric field is a scalar quantity, we can use it to describe electrostatic phenomena more 
simply than if we were to rely only on the electric field and electric forces. The concept of 
electric potential is of great practical value in the operation of electric circuits and devices 
that we will study in later chapters.
25.1 Electric Potential and Potential Difference
When a charge q is placed in an electric field E
S
created by some source charge dis- 
tribution, the particle in a field model tells us that there is an electric force qE
S
25.1 Electric Potential and 
Potential Difference
25.2 Potential Difference in a 
Uniform Electric Field
25.3 Electric Potential and 
Potential Energy Due  
to Point Charges
25.4 Obtaining the Value of 
the Electric Field from the 
Electric Potential
25.5 Electric Potential Due 
to Continuous Charge 
Distributions
25.6 Electric Potential Due to a 
Charged Conductor
25.7 The Millikan Oil-Drop 
Experiment
25.8 Applications of 
Electrostatics
c h a p p t t e r 
25
electric potential
Processes occurring during 
thunderstorms cause large 
differences in electric potential 
between a thundercloud and the 
ground. The result of this potential 
difference is an electrical discharge 
that we call lightning, such as  
this display. Notice at the left that 
a downward channel of lightning 
(a stepped leader) is about to make 
contact with a channel coming up 
from the ground (a return stroke).  
(Costazzurra/Shutterstock.com)
Online Convert PDF to HTML5 files. Best free online PDF html
Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF file to HTML. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button or drag-and-drop your pdf file into the drop area.
changing pdf to html; convert pdf into html file
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Convert smooth lines to curves. Detect and merge image fragments. Flatten visible layers. VB.NET Demo Code to Optimize An Exist PDF File in Visual C#.NET Project
add pdf to website; convert pdf to html code for email
25.1 electric potential and potential Difference 
747
acting on the charge. This force is conservative because the force between charges 
described by Coulomb’s law is conservative. Let us identify the charge and the field 
as a system. If the charge is free to move, it will do so in response to the electric 
force. Therefore, the electric field will be doing work on the charge. This work 
is internal to the system. This situation is similar to that in a gravitational system: 
When an object is released near the surface of the Earth, the gravitational force 
does work on the object. This work is internal to the object–Earth system as dis-
cussed in Sections 7.7 and 7.8.
When analyzing electric and magnetic fields, it is common practice to use the 
notation ds
S
to represent an infinitesimal displacement vector that is oriented tan-
gent to a path through space. This path may be straight or curved, and an integral 
performed along this path is called either a path integral or a line integral (the two 
terms are synonymous).
For an infinitesimal displacement ds
S
of a point charge q immersed in an electric 
field, the work done within the charge–field system by the electric field on the charge 
is W
int
F
S
e
?ds
S
5qE
S
?ds
S
. Recall from Equation 7.26 that internal work done in a 
system is equal to the negative of the change in the potential energy of the system: 
W
int
5 2DU. Therefore, as the charge q is displaced, the electric potential energy 
of the charge–field system is changed by an amount dU52W
int
52qE
S
?ds
S
. For a 
finite displacement of the charge from some point A in space to some other point 
B, the change in electric potential energy of the system is
DU52q 
3
B
A
E
S
?ds
S
(25.1)
The integration is performed along the path that q follows as it moves from A to 
B. Because the force qE
S
is conservative, this line integral does not depend on the 
path taken from A to B.
For a given position of the charge in the field, the charge–field system has a 
potential energy U relative to the configuration of the system that is defined as U5 
0. Dividing the potential energy by the charge gives a physical quantity that depends 
only on the source charge distribution and has a value at every point in an electric 
field. This quantity is called the electric potential (or simply the potential) V:
V5
U
q
(25.2)
Because potential energy is a scalar quantity, electric potential also is a scalar 
quantity.
The potential difference DV 5 V
B
V
A
between two points A and B in an elec-
tric field is defined as the change in electric potential energy of the system when a 
charge q is moved between the points (Eq. 25.1) divided by the charge:
D;
DU
q
52
3
B
A
E
S
?ds
S
(25.3)
In this definition, the infinitesimal displacement ds
S
is interpreted as the displace-
ment between two points in space rather than the displacement of a point charge 
as in Equation 25.1.
Just as with potential energy, only differences in electric potential are meaningful. 
We often take the value of the electric potential to be zero at some convenient point 
in an electric field.
Potential difference should not be confused with difference in potential 
energy. The potential difference between A and B exists solely because of a source 
charge and depends on the source charge distribution (consider points A and 
B in the discussion above without the presence of the charge q).  For a poten-
tial energy to exist, we must have a system of two or more charges. The potential 
WW Change in electric potential 
energy of a system
WW Potential difference between 
two points
Pitfall Prevention 25.1
Potential and Potential Energy  
The potential is characteristic of 
the field only, independent of a 
charged particle that may be 
placed in the field. Potential energy 
is characteristic of the charge-field sys-
tem due to an interaction between 
the field and a charged particle 
placed in the field.
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
Convert PDF to Tiff; C#: Convert PDF to HTML; C#: Convert PDF to Jpeg; C# File: Compress PDF; C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF;
convert pdf to html code; convert pdf to html5
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
Professional VB.NET PDF file merging SDK support Visual Studio .NET. Merge PDF without size limitation. Append one PDF file to the end of another one in VB.NET.
convert pdf to website html; convert pdf to html online for
748
chapter 25 electric potential
energy belongs to the system and changes only if a charge is moved relative to 
the rest of the system. This situation is similar to that for the electric field. An 
electric field exists solely because of a source charge. An electric force requires two 
charges: the source charge to set up the field and another charge placed within 
that field.
Let’s now consider the situation in which an external agent moves the charge in 
the field. If the agent moves the charge from A to B without changing the kinetic 
energy of the charge, the agent performs work that changes the potential energy 
of the system: W 5 DU. From Equation 25.3, the work done by an external agent in 
moving a charge q through an electric field at constant velocity is
W 5 q DV 
(25.4)
Because electric potential is a measure of potential energy per unit charge, the 
SI unit of both electric potential and potential difference is joules per coulomb, 
which is defined as a volt (V):
1 V ; 1 J/C 
That is, as we can see from Equation 25.4, 1 J of work must be done to move a 1-C 
charge through a potential difference of 1 V.
Equation 25.3 shows that potential difference also has units of electric field times 
distance. It follows that the SI unit of electric field (N/C) can also be expressed in 
volts per meter:
1 N/C 5 1 V/m 
Therefore, we can state a new interpretation of the electric field:
The electric field is a measure of the rate of change of the electric potential 
with respect to position.
A unit of energy commonly used in atomic and nuclear physics is the electron 
volt (eV), which is defined as the energy a charge–field system gains or loses when a 
charge of magnitude e (that is, an electron or a proton) is moved through a poten-
tial difference of 1 V. Because 1 V 5 1 J/C and the fundamental charge is equal to 
1.60 3 10219 C, the electron volt is related to the joule as follows:
1 eV 5 1.60 3 10219 C ? V 5 1.60 3 10219 J 
(25.5)
For instance, an electron in the beam of a typical dental x-ray machine may have 
a speed of 1.4 3 108 m/s. This speed corresponds to a kinetic energy 1.1 3 10214 J 
(using relativistic calculations as discussed in Chapter 39), which is equivalent to 
6.7 3 104 eV. Such an electron has to be accelerated from rest through a potential 
difference of 67 kV to reach this speed.
uick Quiz 25.1  In Figure 25.1, two points A and B are located within a region 
in which there is an electric field. (i) How would you describe the potential dif-
ference DV 5 V
B
V
A
? (a) It is positive. (b) It is negative. (c) It is zero. (ii) A 
negative charge is placed at A and then moved to B. How would you describe 
the change in potential energy of the charge–field system for this process? 
Choose from the same possibilities.
25.2 Potential Difference in a Uniform Electric Field
Equations 25.1 and 25.3 hold in all electric fields, whether uniform or varying, but 
they can be simplified for the special case of a uniform field. First, consider a uni-
form electric field directed along the negative y axis as shown in Figure 25.2a. Let’s 
calculate the potential difference between two points A and B separated by a dis-
B
A
E
S
Figure 25.1 
(Quick Quiz 25.1) 
Two points in an electric field.
Pitfall Prevention 25.2
Voltage A variety of phrases are 
used to describe the potential dif-
ference between two points, the 
most common being voltage, aris-
ing from the unit for potential. A 
voltage applied to a device, such as 
a television, or across a device is the 
same as the potential difference 
across the device. Despite popular 
language, voltage is not something 
that moves through a device.
Pitfall Prevention 25.3
The Electron Volt The electron 
volt is a unit of energy, NOT of 
potential. The energy of any system 
may be expressed in eV, but this 
unit is most convenient for describ-
ing the emission and absorption 
of visible light from atoms. Ener-
gies of nuclear processes are often 
expressed in MeV.
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Application. Best and professional adobe PDF file splitting SDK for Visual Studio .NET. outputOps); Divide PDF File into Two Using C#.
embed pdf into html; convert pdf to webpage
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Professional VB.NET PDF file splitting SDK for Visual Studio and .NET framework 2.0. Split PDF file into two or multiple files in ASP.NET webpage online.
convert pdf into webpage; convert pdf to html format
25.2 potential Difference in a Uniform electric Field 
749
tance d, where the displacement s
S
points from A toward B and is parallel to the 
field lines. Equation 25.3 gives
V
B
2V
A
5DV52
3
B
A
E
S
?ds
S
52
3
B
A
E ds 
1
cos 08
2
52
3
B
A
E ds 
Because E is constant, it can be removed from the integral sign, which gives
DV52E 
3
B
A
ds 
D5 2Ed 
(25.6)
The negative sign indicates that the electric potential at point B is lower than 
at point A; that is, V
B
V
A
. Electric field lines always point in the direction of 
decreasing electric potential as shown in Figure 25.2a.
Now suppose a charge q moves from A to B. We can calculate the change in the 
potential energy of the charge–field system from Equations 25.3 and 25.6:
DU 5 q DV 5 2qEd 
(25.7)
This result shows that if q is positive, then DU is negative. Therefore, in a system 
consisting of a positive charge and an electric field, the electric potential energy 
of the system decreases when the charge moves in the direction of the field. If a 
positive charge is released from rest in this electric field, it experiences an electric 
force qE
S
in the direction of E
S
(downward in Fig. 25.2a). Therefore, it accelerates 
downward, gaining kinetic energy. As the charged particle gains kinetic energy, the 
electric potential energy of the charge–field system decreases by an equal amount. 
This equivalence should not be surprising; it is simply conservation of mechanical 
energy in an isolated system as introduced in Chapter 8.
Figure 25.2b shows an analogous situation with a gravitational field. When a 
particle with mass m is released in a gravitational field, it accelerates downward, 
gaining kinetic energy. At the same time, the gravitational potential energy of the 
object–field system decreases.
The comparison between a system of a positive charge residing in an electrical 
field and an object with mass residing in a gravitational field in Figure 25.2 is use-
ful for conceptualizing electrical behavior. The electrical situation, however, has 
one feature that the gravitational situation does not: the charge can be negative. 
If q is negative, then DU in Equation 25.7 is positive and the situation is reversed.  
WW Potential difference between 
two points in a uniform 
electric field
When a positive charge moves 
from point 
A
to point 
B
, the 
electric potential energy of the 
charge–field system decreases.
When an object with mass moves 
from point 
A
to point 
B
, the 
gravitational potential energy of 
the object–field system decreases.
E
S
+
d
q
B
A
a
g
S
d
m
B
A
b
Figure 25.2 
(a) When the elec-
tric field E
S
is directed downward, 
point B is at a lower electric 
potential than point A. (b) A 
gravitational analog to the situa-
tion in (a).
Pitfall Prevention 25.4
The Sign of D
V
The negative sign 
in Equation 25.6 is due to the 
fact that we started at point A 
and moved to a new point in the 
same direction as the electric field 
lines. If we started from B and 
moved to A, the potential differ-
ence would be 1Ed. In a uniform 
electric field, the magnitude of 
the potential difference is Ed and 
the sign can be determined by the 
direction of travel.
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
Why do we need to convert PDF to Word file in VB.NET class application? The main reason for PDF to Word conversion lies in the fact
embed pdf to website; adding pdf to html
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
All object data. File attachment. Hidden layer content. Convert smooth lines to curves. Flatten visible layers. C#.NET DLLs: Compress PDF Document.
convert pdf to web page online; create html email from pdf
750
chapter 25 electric potential
Example 25.1   The Electric Field Between Two Parallel Plates of Opposite Charge
A battery has a specified potential difference DV between its terminals and establishes that potential difference between 
conductors attached to the terminals. A 12-V battery is connected between two parallel plates as shown in Figure 25.5. 
The separation between the plates is d 5 0.30 cm, and we assume the electric field between the plates to be uniform. 
(This assumption is reasonable if the plate separation is small relative to the plate dimensions and we do not consider 
locations near the plate edges.) Find the magnitude of the electric field between the plates.
A system consisting of a negative charge and an electric field gains electric potential 
energy when the charge moves in the direction of the field. If a negative charge is 
released from rest in an electric field, it accelerates in a direction opposite the direc-
tion of the field. For the negative charge to move in the direction of the field, an 
external agent must apply a force and do positive work on the charge.
Now consider the more general case of a charged particle that moves between A 
and B in a uniform electric field such that the vector s
S
is not parallel to the field 
lines as shown in Figure 25.3. In this case, Equation 25.3 gives
DV52
3
B
A
E
S
?ds
S
52E
S
?
3
B
A
ds
S
52E
S
?s
S
(25.8)
where again E
S
was removed from the integral because it is constant. The change in 
potential energy of the charge–field system is
DU5qDV52qE
S
?s
S
(25.9)
Finally, we conclude from Equation 25.8 that all points in a plane perpendicular 
to a uniform electric field are at the same electric potential. We can see that in 
Figure 25.3, where the potential difference V
B
V
A
is equal to the potential dif-
ference V
C
V
A
. (Prove this fact to yourself by working out two dot products for 
E
S
?s
S
: one for s
S
ASB
, where the angle u between E
S
and s
S
is arbitrary as shown in 
Figure 25.3, and one for s
S
ASC
, where u 5 0.) Therefore, V
B
V
C
. The name equi-
potential surface is given to any surface consisting of a continuous distribution of 
points having the same electric potential.
The equipotential surfaces associated with a uniform electric field consist of a 
family of parallel planes that are all perpendicular to the field. Equipotential sur-
faces associated with fields having other symmetries are described in later sections.
uick Quiz 25.2  The labeled points in Figure 25.4 are on a series of equipoten-
tial surfaces associated with an electric field. Rank (from greatest to least) the 
work done by the electric field on a positively charged particle that moves from 
A to B, from B to C, from C to D, and from D to E.
Change in potential between 
two points in a uniform 
electric field
9 V 
8 V 
7 V 
6 V 
E
D
B
A
C
Figure 25.4 
(Quick Quiz 25.2) 
Four equipotential surfaces.
d
A
B
C
u
E
S
s
S
Point 
B
is at a lower electric 
potential than point 
A
.
Points 
B
and 
C
are at the 
same electric potential.
Figure 25.3 
A uniform 
electric field directed along 
the positive x axis. Three 
points in the electric field 
are labeled.
25.2 potential Difference in a Uniform electric Field 
751
Use Equation 25.6 to evaluate the magnitude of the elec-
tric field between the plates:
E5
0
V
B
2V
A
0
d
5
12 V
0.3031022 m
5 4.0 3 103 V/m
The configuration of plates in Figure 25.5 is called a parallel-plate capacitor and is examined in greater detail in Chapter26.
Example 25.2   Motion of a Proton in a Uniform Electric Field 
A proton is released from rest at point A in a uniform electric field that has a 
magnitude of 8.0 3 104 V/m (Fig. 25.6). The proton undergoes a displacement 
of magnitude d 5 0.50 m to point B in the direction of E
S
. Find the speed of the 
proton after completing the displacement.
Conceptualize  Visualize the proton in Figure 25.6 moving downward through 
the potential difference. The situation is analogous to an object falling through 
a gravitational field. Also compare this example to Example 23.10 where a posi-
tive charge was moving in a uniform electric field. In that example, we applied 
the particle under constant acceleration and nonisolated system models. Now 
that we have investigated electric potential energy, what model can we use here?
Categorize  The system of the proton and the two plates in Figure 25.6 does not 
interact with the environment, so we model it as an isolated system for energy.
Analyze
AM
SoluTIon
Solve for the final speed of the proton and substitute for 
DV from Equation 25.6:
v5
Å
22e DV
m
5
Å
22e
1
2Ed
2
m
5
Å
2e Ed
m
Substitute the changes in energy for both terms:
11
2
mv20
2
1e DV50
Write the appropriate reduction of Equation 8.2, the 
conservation of energy equation, for the isolated system 
of the charge and the electric field:
DK 1 DU 5 0
Substitute numerical values:
v5
Å
2
1
1.6310219 C
21
8.03104 V
21
0.50 m
2
1.67310227 kg
5   2.8 3 106 m/s
d
A
B
E
S
v
B
S
v
A
= 0
S
+
+
 +  +  +  +  +  +
 -  -  -  -  -  -
Figure 25.6 
(Example 25.2) A 
proton accelerates from A to B in 
the direction of the electric field.
+
-
V = 12 V
A
B
d
Figure 25.5 
(Example 25.1) A 
12-V battery connected to two paral-
lel plates. The electric field between 
the plates has a magnitude given by 
the potential difference DV divided 
by the plate separation d.
▸ 25.1 
continued
Conceptualize  In Example 24.5, we illustrated the uniform electric field between parallel plates. The new feature to 
this problem is that the electric field is related to the new concept of electric potential.
Categorize  The electric field is evaluated from a relationship between field and potential given in this section, so we 
categorize this example as a substitution problem.
SoluTIon
continued
752
chapter 25 electric potential
25.3  Electric Potential and Potential Energy Due  
to Point Charges
As discussed in Section 23.4, an isolated positive point charge q produces an electric 
field directed radially outward from the charge. To find the electric potential at a 
point located a distance r from the charge, let’s begin with the general expression 
for potential difference, Equation 25.3,
V
B
2V
A
52
3
B
A
E
S
?ds
S
where A and B are the two arbitrary points shown in Figure 25.7. At any point in 
space, the electric field due to the point charge is E
S
5
1
k
e
q/r2
2
r^ (Eq. 23.9), where 
r^ is a unit vector directed radially outward from the charge. Therefore, the quantity 
E
S
?ds
S
can be expressed as
E
S
?ds
S
5k
e
q
r2
r
^
?ds
S
Because the magnitude of r^ is 1, the dot product r^?ds
S
5ds cos u, where u is the 
angle between r^ and ds
S
. Furthermore, ds cos u is the projection of ds
S
onto r^; there-
fore, ds cos u 5 dr. That is, any displacement ds
S
along the path from point A to 
point B produces a change dr in the magnitude of r
S
, the position vector of the point 
relative to the charge creating the field. Making these substitutions, we find that 
E
S
?ds
S
5
1
k
e
q/r
22
dr; hence, the expression for the potential difference becomes
V
B
2V
A
52k
e
q 
3
r
B
r
A
dr
r2
5k
e
q
r
`
r
B
r
A
V
B
2V
A
5k
e
q
c
1
r
B
2
1
r
A
d
(25.10)
Equation 25.10 shows us that the integral of E
S
?ds
S
is independent of the path 
between points A and B. Multiplying by a charge q
0
that moves between points A 
and B, we see that the integral of q
0
E
S
?ds
S
is also independent of path. This latter 
integral, which is the work done by the electric force on the charge q
0
, shows that 
the electric force is conservative (see Section 7.7). We define a field that is related 
to a conservative force as a conservative field. Therefore, Equation 25.10 tells us 
that the electric field of a fixed point charge q is conservative. Furthermore, Equa-
tion 25.10 expresses the important result that the potential difference between any 
two points A and B in a field created by a point charge depends only on the radial 
coordinates r
A
and r
B
. It is customary to choose the reference of electric potential 
for a point charge to be V 5 0 at r
A
5 `. With this reference choice, the electric 
potential due to a point charge at any distance r  from the charge is
V5k
e
q
r
(25.11)
Pitfall Prevention 25.5
Similar Equation Warning Do not 
confuse Equation 25.11 for the 
electric potential of a point charge 
with Equation 23.9 for the electric 
field of a point charge. Potential 
is proportional to 1/r, whereas 
the magnitude of the field is pro-
portional to 1/r2. The effect of a 
charge on the space surrounding 
it can be described in two ways. 
The charge sets up a vector elec-
tric field E
S
, which is related to 
the force experienced by a charge 
placed in the field. It also sets up a 
scalar potential V, which is related 
to the potential energy of the two-
charge system when a charge is 
placed in the field.
The two dashed circles represent 
intersections of spherical equi- 
potential surfaces with the page.
dr
d
q
A
B
B
A
u
r
S
r
S
r
S
s
S
+
r
ˆ
Figure 25.7 
The potential dif-
ference between points A and B 
due to a point charge q depends 
only on the initial and final radial 
coordinates r
A
and r
B
.
Finalize  Because DV is negative for the field, DU is also negative for the proton–field system. The negative value of DU 
means the potential energy of the system decreases as the proton moves in the direction of the electric field. As the 
proton accelerates in the direction of the field, it gains kinetic energy while the electric potential energy of the system 
decreases at the same time.
Figure 25.6 is oriented so that the proton moves downward. The proton’s motion is analogous to that of an object 
falling in a gravitational field. Although the gravitational field is always downward at the surface of the Earth, an elec-
tric field can be in any direction, depending on the orientation of the plates creating the field. Therefore, Figure 25.6 
could be rotated 908 or 1808 and the proton could move horizontally or upward in the electric field!
▸ 25.2 
continued
25.3 electric potential and potential energy Due to point charges 
753
We obtain the electric potential resulting from two or more point charges by 
applying the superposition principle. That is, the total electric potential at some 
point P due to several point charges is the sum of the potentials due to the individual 
charges. For a group of point charges, we can write the total electric potential at P as
V5k
e
a
i
q
i
r
i
(25.12)
Figure 25.8a shows a charge q
1
, which sets up an electric field throughout space. 
The charge also establishes an electric potential at all points, including point P, 
where the electric potential is V
1
. Now imagine that an external agent brings a 
charge q
2
from infinity to point P. The work that must be done to do this is given 
by Equation 25.4, W 5 q
2
DV. This work represents a transfer of energy across the 
boundary of the two-charge system, and the energy appears in the system as poten-
tial energy U when the particles are separated by a distance r
12
as in Figure 25.8b. 
From Equation 8.2, we have W 5 DU. Therefore, the electric potential energy of a 
pair of point charges1 can be found as follows:
DU5W5q
2
DV   S   U205q
2
ak
e
q
1
r
12
20b 
U5k
e
q
1
q
2
r
12
(25.13)
If the charges are of the same sign, then U is positive. Positive work must be done by 
an external agent on the system to bring the two charges near each other (because 
charges of the same sign repel). If the charges are of opposite sign, as in Figure 25.8b, 
then U is negative. Negative work is done by an external agent against the attractive 
force between the charges of opposite sign as they are brought near each other; a force 
must be applied opposite the displacement to prevent q
2
from accelerating toward q
1
.
If the system consists of more than two charged particles, we can obtain the total 
potential energy of the system by calculating U for every pair of charges and sum-
ming the terms algebraically. For example, the total potential energy of the system 
of three charges shown in Figure 25.9 is
U5k
e
a
q
1
q
2
r
12
1
q
1
q
3
r
13
1
q
2
q
3
r
23
(25.14)
Physically, this result can be interpreted as follows. Imagine q
1
is fixed at the posi-
tion shown in Figure 25.9 but q
2
and q
3
are at infinity. The work an external agent 
must do to bring q
2
from infinity to its position near q
1
is k
e
q
1
q
2
/r
12
, which is the first 
term in Equation 25.14. The last two terms represent the work required to bring q
3
from infinity to its position near q
1
and q
2
. (The result is independent of the order 
in which the charges are transported.)
WW Electric potential due to  
several point charges
1The expression for the electric potential energy of a system made up of two point charges, Equation 25.13, is of the 
same form as the equation for the gravitational potential energy of a system made up of two point masses, 2Gm
1
m
2
/r 
(see Chapter 13). The similarity is not surprising considering that both expressions are derived from an inverse-
square force law.
q
1
r
12
V
1
k
e
q
1
r
12
P
+
q
2
q
1
r
12
+
-
The potential energy of 
the pair of charges is
given by k
e
q
1
q
2
/r
12
.
A potential k
e
q
1
/r
12
exists at point P due to 
charge q
1
.
a
b
Figure 25.8 
(a) Charge q
1  
establishes an electric potential 
V
1
at point P. (b) Charge q
2
is 
brought from infinity to point P.
q
2
q
1
q
3
r
13
r
12
r
23
+
+
+
The potential energy of this 
system of charges is given by 
Equation 25.14.
Figure 25.9 
Three point 
charges are fixed at the positions 
shown.
754
chapter 25 electric potential
Example 25.3   The Electric Potential Due to Two Point Charges
As shown in Figure 25.10a, a charge q
1
5 2.00 mC is 
located at the origin and a charge q
2
5 26.00 mC is 
located at (0, 3.00) m.
(A)  Find the total electric potential due to these charges 
at the point P, whose coordinates are (4.00, 0)m.
Conceptualize  Recognize first that the 2.00-mC and  
26.00-mC charges are source charges and set up an 
electric field as well as a potential at all points in space, 
including point P.
Categorize  The potential is evaluated using an equa-
tion developed in this chapter, so we categorize this 
example as a substitution problem.
SoluTIon
uick Quiz 25.3  In Figure 25.8b, take q
2
to be a negative source charge and q
1
to be a second charge whose sign can be changed. (i) If q
1
is initially positive 
and is changed to a charge of the same magnitude but negative, what happens 
to the potential at the position of q
1
due to q
2
? (a) It increases. (b) It decreases. 
(c) It remains the same. (ii) When q
1
is changed from positive to negative, what 
happens to the potential energy of the two-charge system? Choose from the 
same possibilities.
4.00 m
4.00 m
x
y
x
-6.00 mC
y
2.00 mC
3.00 mC
P
3.00 m
-6.00 mC
2.00 mC
3.00 m
a
b
+
-
+
+
-
Figure 25.10 
(Example 25.3) (a) The electric potential at P due 
to the two charges q
1
and q
2
is the algebraic sum of the potentials 
due to the individual charges. (b) A third charge q
3
5 3.00 mC is 
brought from infinity to point P.
Substitute numerical values:
V
P
5 18.9883109 N
#
m2/C22
a
2.00310
26
C
4.00 m
1
26.00310
26
C
5.00 m
b
  26.29 3 103 V
Use Equation 25.12 for the system of two 
source charges:
V
P
5k
e
a
q
1
r
1
1
q
2
r
2
b
(B)  Find the change in potential energy of the system of two charges plus a third charge q
3
5 3.00 mC as the latter 
charge moves from infinity to point P (Fig. 25.10b).
SoluTIon
Substitute numerical values to evaluate DU:
DU 5 U
f
U
i
q
3
V
P
2 0 5 (3.00 3 1026 C)(26.29 3 103 V)
5   21.89 3 1022 J
Assign U
i
5 0 for the system to the initial configura-
tion in which the charge q
3
is at infinity. Use Equa-
tion 25.2 to evaluate the potential energy for the 
configuration in which the charge is at P:
U
f
5q
3
V
P
Therefore, because the potential energy of the system has decreased, an external agent has to do positive work to 
remove the charge q
3
from point P back to infinity.
You are working through this example with a classmate and she says, “Wait a minute! In part (B), we 
ignored the potential energy associated with the pair of charges q
1
and q
2
!” How would you respond?
Answer  Given the statement of the problem, it is not necessary to include this potential energy because part (B) asks 
for the change in potential energy of the system as q
3
is brought in from infinity. Because the configuration of charges 
q
1
and q
2
does not change in the process, there is no DU associated with these charges. Had part (B) asked to find the 
change in potential energy when all three charges start out infinitely far apart and are then brought to the positions in 
Figure 25.10b, however, you would have to calculate the change using Equation 25.14.
WhaT IF?
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested