25.4 Obtaining the Value of the electric Field from the electric potential 
755
25.4  Obtaining the Value of the Electric Field  
from the Electric Potential
The electric field E
S
and the electric potential V are related as shown in Equation 
25.3, which tells us how to find DV if the electric field E
S
is known. What if the situ-
ation is reversed? How do we calculate the value of the electric field if the electric 
potential is known in a certain region?
From Equation 25.3, the potential difference dV between two points a distance 
ds apart can be expressed as
dV52E
S
?ds
S
(25.15)
If the electric field has only one component E
x
, then E
S
?ds
S
5E
x
dx. Therefore, 
Equation 25.15 becomes dV 5 2E
x
dx, or
E
x
52
dV
dx
(25.16)
That is, the x component of the electric field is equal to the negative of the deriv-
ative of the electric potential with respect to x. Similar statements can be made 
about the y and z components. Equation 25.16 is the mathematical statement of 
the electric field being a measure of the rate of change with position of the electric 
potential as mentioned in Section 25.1.
Experimentally, electric potential and position can be measured easily with a 
voltmeter (a device for measuring potential difference) and a meterstick. Conse-
quently, an electric field can be determined by measuring the electric potential at 
several positions in the field and making a graph of the results. According to Equa-
tion 25.16, the slope of a graph of V versus x at a given point provides the magnitude 
of the electric field at that point.
Imagine starting at a point and then moving through a displacement ds
S
along 
an equipotential surface. For this motion, dV 5 0 because the potential is constant 
along an equipotential surface. From Equation 25.15, we see that dV52E
S
?ds
S
5 0; 
therefore, because the dot product is zero, E
S
must be perpendicular to the displace-
ment along the equipotential surface. This result shows that the equipotential sur-
faces must always be perpendicular to the electric field lines passing through them.
As mentioned at the end of Section 25.2, the equipotential surfaces associated 
with a uniform electric field consist of a family of planes perpendicular to the 
field lines. Figure 25.11a shows some representative equipotential surfaces for this 
situation.
Figure 25.11 
Equipotential surfaces (the dashed blue lines are intersections of these surfaces with the page) and elec-
tric field lines. In all cases, the equipotential surfaces are perpendicular to the electric field lines at every point.
q
+
A uniform electric field produced 
by an infinite sheet of charge
A spherically symmetric electric 
field produced by a point charge
An electric field produced by an 
electric dipole
a
b
c
E
S
How to convert pdf file to html document - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
online convert pdf to html; convert pdf to html with images
How to convert pdf file to html document - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
convert pdf table to html; pdf to html converters
756
chapter 25 electric potential
If the charge distribution creating an electric field has spherical symmetry such 
that the volume charge density depends only on the radial distance r, the electric 
field is radial. In this case, E
S
?ds
S
5E
r
dr, and we can express dV as dV 5 2E
r
dr. 
Therefore,
E
r
52
dV
dr
(25.17)
For example, the electric potential of a point charge is V 5 k
e
q/r. Because V is a 
function of r only, the potential function has spherical symmetry. Applying Equa-
tion 25.17, we find that the magnitude of the electric field due to the point charge 
is E
r
5 k
e
q/r2, a familiar result. Notice that the potential changes only in the radial 
direction, not in any direction perpendicular to r. Therefore, V (like E
r
) is a func-
tion only of r, which is again consistent with the idea that equipotential surfaces are 
perpendicular to field lines. In this case, the equipotential surfaces are a family of 
spheres concentric with the spherically symmetric charge distribution (Fig. 25.11b). 
The equipotential surfaces for an electric dipole are sketched in Figure 25.11c.
In general, the electric potential is a function of all three spatial coordinates. If 
V(r) is given in terms of the Cartesian coordinates, the electric field components 
E
x
E
y
, and E
z
can readily be found from V(xy, z) as the partial derivatives2
E
x
5 2
'V
'x
E
y
5 2
'V
'y
E
z
5 2
'V
'z
(25.18)
uick Quiz 25.4  In a certain region of space, the electric potential is zero every-
where along the x axis. (i) From this information, you can conclude that the x 
component of the electric field in this region is (a) zero, (b) in the positive x 
direction, or (c) in the negative x direction. (ii) Suppose the electric potential 
is 12 V everywhere along the x axis. From the same choices, what can you con-
clude about the x component of the electric field now?
25.5  Electric Potential Due to Continuous  
Charge Distributions
In Section 25.3, we found how to determine the electric potential due to a small 
number of charges. What if we wish to find the potential due to a continuous dis-
tribution of charge? The electric potential in this situation can be calculated using 
two different methods. The first method is as follows. If the charge distribution is 
known, we consider the potential due to a small charge element dq, treating this 
element as a point charge (Fig. 25.12). From Equation 25.11, the electric potential 
dV at some point P due to the charge element dq is
dV5k
e
dq
r
(25.19)
where r is the distance from the charge element to point P. To obtain the total 
potential at point P, we integrate Equation 25.19 to include contributions from all 
elements of the charge distribution. Because each element is, in general, a different 
distance from point P and k
e
is constant, we can express V as
V5k
e
3
dq
r
(25.20)
Finding the electric field  
from the potential
Electric potential due to  
a continuous charge 
distribution
2In vector notation, E
S
is often written in Cartesian coordinate systems as
E
S
52=V52
a
i
^
'
'x
1j
^
'
'y
1k
^
'
'z
b
V
where = is called the gradient operator.
P
dq
1
r
1
r
2
r
3
dq
2
dq
3
Figure 25.12 
The electric 
potential at point P due to a 
continuous charge distribution 
can be calculated by dividing the 
charge distribution into elements 
of charge dq and summing the 
electric potential contributions 
over all elements. Three sample 
elements of charge are shown.
Online Convert PDF to HTML5 files. Best free online PDF html
component makes it extremely easy for C# developers to convert and transform a multi-page PDF document and save each PDF page as a separate HTML file in .NET
attach pdf to html; pdf to html
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
All object data. File attachment. Hidden layer content. Convert smooth lines to curves. VB.NET Demo Code to Optimize An Exist PDF File in Visual C#.NET Project.
convert url pdf to word; convert from pdf to html
25.5 electric potential Due to continuous charge Distributions 
757
In effect, we have replaced the sum in Equation 25.12 with an integral. In this 
expression for V, the electric potential is taken to be zero when point P is infinitely 
far from the charge distribution.
The second method for calculating the electric potential is used if the electric 
field is already known from other considerations such as Gauss’s law. If the charge 
distribution has sufficient symmetry, we first evaluate E
S
using Gauss’s law and then 
substitute the value obtained into Equation 25.3 to determine the potential differ-
ence DV between any two points. We then choose the electric potential V to be zero 
at some convenient point.
Problem-Solving Strategy  Calculating Electric Potential
The following procedure is recommended for solving problems that involve the 
determination of an electric potential due to a charge distribution.
1. Conceptualize. Think carefully about the individual charges or the charge distri-
bution you have in the problem and imagine what type of potential would be created. 
Appeal to any symmetry in the arrangement of charges to help you visualize the 
potential.
2. Categorize. Are you analyzing a group of individual charges or a continuous 
charge distribution? The answer to this question will tell you how to proceed in the 
Analyze step.
3. Analyze. When working problems involving electric potential, remember that it is 
scalar quantity, so there are no components to consider. Therefore, when using the 
superposition principle to evaluate the electric potential at a point, simply take the 
algebraic sum of the potentials due to each charge. You must keep track of signs, 
however.
As with potential energy in mechanics, only changes in electric potential are sig-
nificant; hence, the point where the potential is set at zero is arbitrary. When dealing 
with point charges or a finite-sized charge distribution, we usually define V 5 0 to be 
at a point infinitely far from the charges. If the charge distribution itself extends to 
infinity, however, some other nearby point must be selected as the reference point.
(a) If you are analyzing a group of individual charges: Use the superposition principle, 
which states that when several point charges are present, the resultant potential 
at a point P in space is the algebraic sum of the individual potentials at P due to the 
individual charges (Eq. 25.12). Example 25.4 below demonstrates this procedure.
(b) If you are analyzing a continuous charge distribution: Replace the sums for evaluat-
ing the total potential at some point P from individual charges by integrals (Eq. 
25.20). The total potential at P is obtained by integrating over the entire charge 
distribution. For many problems, it is possible in performing the integration to 
express dq and r in terms of a single variable. To simplify the integration, give 
careful consideration to the geometry involved in the problem. Examples 25.5 
through 25.7 demonstrate such a procedure.
To obtain the potential from the electric field: Another method used to obtain the 
potential is to start with the definition of the potential difference given by Equation 
25.3. If E
S
is known or can be obtained easily (such as from Gauss’s law), the line inte-
gral of E
S
?ds
S
can be evaluated.
4. Finalize. Check to see if your expression for the potential is consistent with your 
mental representation and reflects any symmetry you noted previously. Imagine 
varying parameters such as the distance of the observation point from the charges 
or the radius of any circular objects to see if the mathematical result changes in a 
reasonable way.
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
All object data. File attachment. Hidden layer content. Convert smooth lines to curves. Flatten visible layers. C#.NET DLLs: Compress PDF Document.
convert pdf to html; convert pdf to url link
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
VB.NET Demo code to Append PDF Document. In addition, VB.NET users can append a PDF file to the end of a current PDF document and combine to a single PDF file.
converting pdfs to html; how to add pdf to website
758
chapter 25 electric potential
Example 25.4   The Electric Potential Due to a Dipole
An electric dipole consists of two charges of equal magnitude and opposite sign 
separated by a distance 2a as shown in Figure 25.13. The dipole is along the x axis 
and is centered at the origin.
(A)  Calculate the electric potential at point P on the y axis.
Conceptualize  Compare this situation to that in part (B) of Example 23.6. It is the 
same situation, but here we are seeking the electric potential rather than the electric 
field.
Categorize  We categorize the problem as one in which we have a small number of 
particles rather than a continuous distribution of charge. The electric potential can be evaluated by summing the 
potentials due to the individual charges.
SoluTIon
a
a
q
R
P
x
x
y
-q
+
-
y
Figure 25.13 
(Example 25.4) 
An electric dipole located on the 
x axis.
Analyze  Use Equation 25.12 to find the electric potential 
at P due to the two charges:
V
P
5k
e
a
i
q
i
r
i
5k
e
a
q
"a
2
1y
2
1
2q
"a
2
1y
2
b
5
0
(B)  Calculate the electric potential at point R on the positive x axis.
SoluTIon
Use Equation 25.12 to find the electric potential at R due 
to the two charges:
V
R
5k
e
a
i
q
i
r
i
5k
e
a
2q
x2a
1
q
x1a
b
5
2
2k
e
qa
x2a2
(C)  Calculate V and E
x
at a point on the x axis far from the dipole.
SoluTIon
Use Equation 25.16 and this result to calculate the x 
component of the electric field at a point on the x axis 
far from the dipole:
E
x
5 2
dV
dx
5 2
d
dx
a2
2k
e
qa
x2
b
52k
e
qa 
d
dx
a
1
x2
b5
2
4k
e
qa
x3
1
x .. a
2
For point R far from the dipole such that x .. a, neglect 
a2 in the denominator of the answer to part (B) and 
write V in this limit:
V
R
5 lim
x..a
a2
2k
e
qa
x2a2
b<
2
2k
e
qa
x2
1
x .. a
2
Finalize  The potentials in parts (B) and (C) are negative because points on the positive x axis are closer to the nega-
tive charge than to the positive charge. For the same reason, the x component of the electric field is negative. Notice 
that we have a 1/r3 falloff of the electric field with distance far from the dipole, similar to the behavior of the electric 
field on the y axis in Example 23.6.
Suppose you want to find the electric field at a point P on the y axis. In part (A), the electric potential was 
found to be zero for all values of y. Is the electric field zero at all points on the y axis?
Answer  No. That there is no change in the potential along the y axis tells us only that the y component of the electric 
field is zero. Look back at Figure 23.13 in Example 23.6. We showed there that the electric field of a dipole on the y 
axis has only an x component. We could not find the x component in the current example because we do not have an 
expression for the potential near the y axis as a function of x.
WhaT IF?
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Separate source PDF document file by defined page range in VB.NET class application. Divide PDF file into multiple files by outputting PDF file size.
export pdf to html; pdf to html conversion
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
C#.NET PDF to HTML Conversion. If you want to transform and convert PDF document to HTML file format, this article should be read.
embed pdf into web page; pdf to web converter
25.5 electric potential Due to continuous charge Distributions 
759
Example 25.5   Electric Potential Due to a Uniformly Charged Ring
(A)  Find an expression for the electric potential at a point P located on the per-
pendicular central axis of a uniformly charged ring of radius a and total charge Q.
Conceptualize  Study Figure 25.14, in which the ring is oriented so that its plane 
is perpendicular to the x axis and its center is at the origin. Notice that the 
symmetry of the situation means that all the charges on the ring are the same 
distance from point P. Compare this example to Example 23.8. Notice that no 
vector considerations are necessary here because electric potential is a scalar.
Categorize  Because the ring consists of a continuous distribution of charge 
rather than a set of discrete charges, we must use the integration technique rep-
resented by Equation 25.20 in this example.
Analyze  We take point P to be at a distance x from the center of the ring as 
shown in Figure 25.14.
SoluTIon
a
2
+x
2
dq
a
P
x
x
Figure 25.14 
(Example 25.5) A uni-
formly charged ring of radius a lies in 
a plane perpendicular to the x axis. 
All elements dq of the ring are the 
same distance from a point P lying  
on the x axis.
Noting that a and x do not vary for an integration over 
the ring, bring "a1x2
in front of the integral sign 
and integrate over the ring:
V5
k
e
"a1x2
3
dq5
k
e
Q
"a1x2
(25.21)
Use Equation 25.20 to express V in terms of the 
geometry:
V5k
e
3
dq
r
5k
e
3
dq
"a1x2
(B)  Find an expression for the magnitude of the electric field at point P.
SoluTIon
From symmetry, notice that along the x axis E
S
can have 
only an x component. Therefore, apply Equation 25.16 to 
Equation 25.21:
E
x
5 2
dV
dx
52k
e
Q 
d
dx
1
a1x2
221/2
52k
e
Q
1
2
1
2
21
a1x2
223/21
2x
2
E
x
k
e
x
1
a2 1x2 
23/2
Q 
(25.22)
Finalize  The only variable in the expressions for V and E
x
is x. That is not surprising because our calculation is valid 
only for points along the x axis, where y and z are both zero. This result for the electric field agrees with that obtained 
by direct integration (see Example 23.8). For practice, use the result of part (B) in Equation 25.3 to verify that the 
potential is given by the expression in part (A).
Example 25.6   Electric Potential Due to a Uniformly Charged Disk
A uniformly charged disk has radius R and surface charge density s.
(A)  Find the electric potential at a point P along the perpendicular central axis of the disk.
Conceptualize  If we consider the disk to be a set of concentric rings, we can use our result from Example 25.5—
which gives the potential due to a ring of radius a—and sum the contributions of all rings making up the disk. Figure 
SoluTIon
continued
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
Using this PDF document concatenating library SDK, C# developers can easily merge and append one PDF document to another PDF document file, and choose to
convert pdf to html code c#; add pdf to website
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
In order to convert PDF document to Word file using VB.NET programming code, you have to integrate following assemblies into your VB.NET class application by
pdf to html; convert pdf into html
760
chapter 25 electric potential
25.15 shows one such ring. Because point P is on 
the central axis of the disk, symmetry again tells 
us that all points in a given ring are the same dis-
tance from P.
Categorize  Because the disk is continuous, we 
evaluate the potential due to a continuous charge 
distribution rather than a group of individual 
charges.
As in Example 25.5, use Equation 25.16 to find the elec-
tric field at any axial point:
E
x
5 2
dV
dx
5
2pk
e
sc12
x
1
R1x2
21/2
 
(25.24)
Finalize  Compare Equation 25.24 with the result of Example 23.9. They are the same. The calculation of V and E
S
for 
an arbitrary point off the x axis is more difficult to perform because of the absence of symmetry and we do not treat 
that situation in this book.
This integral is of the common form 
e
un du, where 
n52
1
2
and u 5 r2 1 x2, and has the value un11/(n 1 1). 
Use this result to evaluate the integral:
V 5 
2pk
e
s
31
R1x2
21/2
2x
4
(25.23)
To obtain the total potential at P, integrate this expression 
over the limits r 5 0 to r 5 R, noting that x is a constant:
V5pk
e
3
R
0
2r dr
"r1x2
5pk
e
3
R
0
1
r
2
1x
2221/2
2r dr
Use this result in Equation 25.21 in Example 25.5 (with a 
replaced by the variable r and Q replaced by the differen-
tial dq) to find the potential due to the ring:
dV5
k
e
dq
"r1x2
5
k
e
2psr dr
"r1x2
Analyze  Find the amount of charge dq on a ring of radius 
r and width dr as shown in Figure 25.15:
dq5s dA5s
1
2pr dr
2
52psr dr
(B)  Find the x component of the electric field at a point P along the perpendicular central axis of the disk.
SoluTIon
Example 25.7   Electric Potential Due to a Finite Line of Charge
A rod of length , located along the x axis has a total charge Q and a 
uniform linear charge density l. Find the electric potential at a point P 
located on the y axis a distance a from the origin (Fig. 25.16).
Conceptualize  The potential at P due to every segment of charge on the 
rod is positive because every segment carries a positive charge. Notice that 
we have no symmetry to appeal to here, but the simple geometry should 
make the problem solvable.
Categorize  Because the rod is continuous, we evaluate the potential due to 
a continuous charge distribution rather than a group of individual charges.
Analyze  In Figure 25.16, the rod lies along the x axis, dx is the length of one 
small segment, and dq is the charge on that segment. Because the rod has a 
charge per unit length l, the charge dq on the small segment is dq 5 l dx.
SoluTIon
▸ 25.6 
continued
d
r
dA = 2pr dr 
x
P
r
R
r
2
+x
2
x
Figure 25.15 
(Example 25.6) A 
uniformly charged disk of radius 
R lies in a plane perpendicular to 
the x axis. The calculation of the 
electric potential at any point P on 
the x axis is simplified by dividing 
the disk into many rings of radius r 
and width dr, with area 2pr dr.
dx
x
x
O
dq
r
a
P
y
Figure 25.16 
(Example 25.7) A uniform line 
charge of length , located along the x axis. To 
calculate the electric potential at P, the line 
charge is divided into segments each of length 
dx and each carrying a charge dq 5 l dx.
25.6 electric potential Due to a charged conductor 
761
25.6 Electric Potential Due to a Charged Conductor
In Section 24.4, we found that when a solid conductor in equilibrium carries a net 
charge, the charge resides on the conductor’s outer surface. Furthermore, the elec-
tric field just outside the conductor is perpendicular to the surface and the field 
inside is zero.
We now generate another property of a charged conductor, related to electric 
potential. Consider two points A and B on the surface of a charged conductor as 
shown in Figure 25.17. Along a surface path connecting these points, E
S
is always 
What if you were asked to find the electric 
field at point P? Would that be a simple calculation?
Answer  Calculating the electric field by means of Equa-
tion 23.11 would be a little messy. There is no symmetry 
to appeal to, and the integration over the line of charge 
would represent a vector addition of electric fields at point 
P. Using Equation 25.18, you could find E
y
by replacing a 
with y in Equation 25.25 and performing the differentia-
tion with respect to y. Because the charged rod in Figure 
WhaT IF?
25.16 lies entirely to the right of x 5 0, the electric field at 
point P would have an x component to the left if the rod is 
charged positively. You cannot use Equation 25.18 to find 
the x component of the field, however, because the poten-
tial due to the rod was evaluated at a specific value of  
x (x5 0) rather than a general value of x. You would have 
to find the potential as a function of both x and y to be 
able to find the x and y components of the electric field 
using Equation 25.18.
Evaluate the result between the limits:
V5k
e
Q
,
3
ln 
1
,1"a1,2
2
2ln a
4
5
k
e
Q
,
ln a
,1"a1,2
a
(25.25)
Noting that k
e
and l 5 Q/, are constants and can be 
removed from the integral, evaluate the integral with 
the help of Appendix B:
V5k
e
3
,
0
dx
"a1x2
5k
e
Q
,
ln 
1
x1"a1x2
2
`
,
0
Find the total potential at P by integrating this expres-
sion over the limits x 5 0 to x 5 ,:
V5
3
,
0
k
e
dx
"a1x2
Find the potential at P due to one segment of the rod  
at an arbitrary position x:
dV5k
e
dq
r
5k
e
dx
"a1x2
Pitfall Prevention 25.6
Potential May not Be Zero  
The electric potential inside the 
conductor is not necessarily zero 
in Figure 25.17, even though the 
electric field is zero. Equation 
25.15 shows that a zero value of 
the field results in no change in 
the potential from one point 
to another inside the conduc-
tor. Therefore, the potential 
everywhere inside the conductor, 
including the surface, has the 
same value, which may or may not 
be zero, depending on where the 
zero of potential is defined.
Notice from the spacing of the 
positive signs that the surface 
charge density is nonuniform.
A
B
E
S
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
Figure 25.17 
An arbitrarily shaped conductor carrying a 
positive charge. When the conductor is in electrostatic equi-
librium, all the charge resides at the surface, E
S
50 inside 
the conductor, and the direction of E
S
immediately outside 
the conductor is perpendicular to the surface. The electric 
potential is constant inside the conductor and is equal to the 
potential at the surface. 
Finalize  If , ,, a, the potential at P should approach that of a point charge because the rod is very short compared 
to the distance from the rod to P.  By using a series expansion for the natural logarithm from Appendix B.5, it is easy 
to show that Equation 25.25 becomes V = k
e
Q/a.
▸ 25.7 
continued
762
chapter 25 electric potential
perpendicular to the displacement ds
S
; therefore, E
S
?ds
S
50. Using this result and 
Equation 25.3, we conclude that the potential difference between A and B is nec-
essarily zero:
V
B
2V
A
5 2
3
B
A
E
S
?ds
S
50 
This result applies to any two points on the surface. Therefore, V is constant every-
where on the surface of a charged conductor in equilibrium. That is,
the surface of any charged conductor in electrostatic equilibrium is an equi-
potential surface: every point on the surface of a charged conductor in equi-
librium is at the same electric potential. Furthermore, because the electric 
field is zero inside the conductor, the electric potential is constant everywhere 
inside the conductor and equal to its value at the surface. 
Because of the constant value of the potential, no work is required to move a charge 
from the interior of a charged conductor to its surface.
Consider a solid metal conducting sphere of radius R and total positive charge Q 
as shown in Figure 25.18a. As determined in part (A) of Example 24.3, the electric 
field outside the sphere is k
e
Q/r2 and points radially outward. Because the field 
outside a spherically symmetric charge distribution is identical to that of a point 
charge, we expect the potential to also be that of a point charge, k
e
Q/r. At the 
surface of the conducting sphere in Figure 25.18a, the potential must be k
e
Q/R. 
Because the entire sphere must be at the same potential, the potential at any point 
within the sphere must also be k
e
Q/R. Figure 25.18b is a plot of the electric poten-
tial as a function of r, and Figure 25.18c shows how the electric field varies with r.
When a net charge is placed on a spherical conductor, the surface charge density 
is uniform as indicated in Figure 25.18a. If the conductor is nonspherical as in Fig-
ure 25.17, however, the surface charge density is high where the radius of curvature 
is small (as noted in Section 24.4) and low where the radius of curvature is large. 
Because the electric field immediately outside the conductor is proportional to the 
surface charge density, the electric field is large near convex points having small radii 
of curvature and reaches very high values at sharp points. In Example 25.8, the rela-
tionship between electric field and radius of curvature is explored mathematically.
b
c
a
R
V
k
e
Q
R
k
e
Q
r
r
E
k
e
Q
r
2
r
R
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
Figure 25.18 
(a) The excess 
charge on a conducting sphere of 
radius R is uniformly distributed 
on its surface. (b) Electric potential 
versus distance r from the center 
of the charged conducting sphere. 
(c) Electric field magnitude versus 
distance r from the center of the 
charged conducting sphere.
Example 25.8   Two Connected Charged Spheres
Two spherical conductors of radii r
1
and r
2
are separated by a distance much 
greater than the radius of either sphere. The spheres are connected by a con-
ducting wire as shown in Figure 25.19. The charges on the spheres in equilib-
rium are q
1
and q
2
, respectively, and they are uniformly charged. Find the ratio 
of the magnitudes of the electric fields at the surfaces of the spheres.
Conceptualize  Imagine the spheres are much farther apart than shown in Fig-
ure 25.19. Because they are so far apart, the field of one does not affect the 
charge distribution on the other. The conducting wire between them ensures 
that both spheres have the same electric potential.
Categorize  Because the spheres are so far apart, we model the charge dis-
tribution on them as spherically symmetric, and we can model the field and 
potential outside the spheres to be that due to point charges.
SoluTIon
r
1
q
1
r
2
q
2
Figure 25.19 
(Example 25.8) Two 
charged spherical conductors connected 
by a conducting wire. The spheres are at 
the same electric potential V.
Analyze  Set the electric potentials at the surfaces of the 
spheres equal to each other:
5k
e
q
1
r
1
5k
e
q
2
r
2
25.6 electric potential Due to a charged conductor 
763
A Cavity Within a Conductor
Suppose a conductor of arbitrary shape contains a cavity as shown in Figure 25.20. 
Let’s assume no charges are inside the cavity. In this case, the electric field inside 
the cavity must be zero regardless of the charge distribution on the outside surface 
of the conductor as we mentioned in Section 24.4. Furthermore, the field in the 
cavity is zero even if an electric field exists outside the conductor.
To prove this point, remember that every point on the conductor is at the same 
electric potential; therefore, any two points A and B on the cavity’s surface must 
be at the same potential. Now imagine a field E
S
exists in the cavity and evaluate the 
potential difference V
B
V
A
defined by Equation 25.3:
V
B
2V
A
5 2
3
B
A
E
S
?ds
S
Because V
B
V
A
5 0, the integral of E
S
?ds
S
must be zero for all paths between  
any two points A and B on the conductor. The only way that can be true for all 
paths is if E
S
is zero everywhere in the cavity. Therefore, a cavity surrounded by con-
ducting walls is a field-free region as long as no charges are inside the cavity.
Corona Discharge
A phenomenon known as corona discharge is often observed near a conductor 
such as a high-voltage power line. When the electric field in the vicinity of the con-
ductor is sufficiently strong, electrons resulting from random ionizations of air  
molecules near the conductor accelerate away from their parent molecules. These 
rapidly moving electrons can ionize additional molecules near the conductor, creat-
ing more free electrons. The observed glow (or corona discharge) results from the 
recombination of these free electrons with the ionized air molecules. If a conduc-
tor has an irregular shape, the electric field can be very high near sharp points or 
edges of the conductor; consequently, the ionization process and corona discharge 
are most likely to occur around such points.
Corona discharge is used in the electrical transmission industry to locate bro-
ken or faulty components. For example, a broken insulator on a transmission 
tower has sharp edges where corona discharge is likely to occur. Similarly, corona 
discharge will occur at the sharp end of a broken conductor strand. Observation 
of these discharges is difficult because the visible radiation emitted is weak and 
most of the radiation is in the ultraviolet. (We will discuss ultraviolet radiation and 
other portions of the electromagnetic spectrum in Section 34.7.) Even use of tra-
ditional ultraviolet cameras is of little help because the radiation from the corona 
Solve for the ratio of charges on the spheres:
(1)   
q
1
q
2
5
r
1
r
2
Write expressions for the magnitudes of the electric 
fields at the surfaces of the spheres:
E
1
5k
e
q
1
r
1
2
and
E
2
5k
e
q
2
r
2
2
Evaluate the ratio of these two fields:
E
1
E
2
5
q
1
q
2
r
2
2
r
1
2
Substitute for the ratio of charges from Equation (1):
(2)   
E
1
E
2
5
r
1
r
2
r
2
2
r
1
2
5
r
2
r
1
Finalize  The field is stronger in the vicinity of the smaller sphere even though the electric potentials at the surfaces of 
both spheres are the same. If r
2
S 0, then E
2
S `, verifying the statement above that the electric field is very large at 
sharp points.
A
B
The electric field in the cavity is 
zero regardless of the charge on 
the conductor.
Figure 25.20 
A conductor in 
electrostatic equilibrium contain-
ing a cavity.
▸ 25.8 
continued
764
chapter 25 electric potential
discharge is overwhelmed by ultraviolet radiation from the Sun. Newly developed 
dual- spectrum devices combine a narrow-band ultraviolet camera with a visible-
light camera to show a daylight view of the corona discharge in the actual location 
on the transmission tower or cable. The ultraviolet part of the camera is designed 
to operate in a wavelength range in which radiation from the Sun is very weak.
25.7 The Millikan Oil-Drop Experiment
Robert Millikan performed a brilliant set of experiments from 1909 to 1913 in 
which he measured e, the magnitude of the elementary charge on an electron, and 
demonstrated the quantized nature of this charge. His apparatus, diagrammed in 
Figure 25.21, contains two parallel metallic plates. Oil droplets from an atomizer 
are allowed to pass through a small hole in the upper plate. Millikan used x-rays 
to ionize the air in the chamber so that freed electrons would adhere to the oil 
drops, giving them a negative charge. A horizontally directed light beam is used to 
illuminate the oil droplets, which are viewed through a telescope whose long axis is 
perpendicular to the light beam. When viewed in this manner, the droplets appear 
as shining stars against a dark background and the rate at which individual drops 
fall can be determined.
Let’s assume a single drop having a mass m and carrying a charge q is being 
viewed and its charge is negative. If no electric field is present between the plates, 
the two forces acting on the charge are the gravitational force mg
S
acting down-
ward3 and a viscous drag force F
S
D
acting upward as indicated in Figure 25.22a. The 
drag force is proportional to the drop’s speed as discussed in Section 6.4. When the 
drop reaches its terminal speed v
T
the two forces balance each other (mg 5 F
D
).
Now suppose a battery connected to the plates sets up an electric field between 
the plates such that the upper plate is at the higher electric potential. In this case, a 
third force qE
S
acts on the charged drop. The particle in a field model applies twice 
to the particle: it is in a gravitational field and an electric field. Because q is negative 
and E
S
is directed downward, this electric force is directed upward as shown in Fig-
ure 25.22b. If this upward force is strong enough, the drop moves upward and the 
drag force F
S
r
D
acts downward. When the upward electric force qE
S
balances the sum 
of the gravitational force and the downward drag force F
S
r
D
, the drop reaches a new 
terminal speed v9
T
in the upward direction.
With the field turned on, a drop moves slowly upward, typically at rates of hun-
dredths of a centimeter per second. The rate of fall in the absence of a field is 
comparable. Hence, one can follow a single droplet for hours, alternately rising and 
falling, by simply turning the electric field on and off.
v
S
Telescope with
scale in eyepiece
Oil droplets
Pinhole
d
q
+
-
S
on the drop, so we will not consider it in our analysis.
q
q
-
-
v
T
S
v
T
S
mg
S
mg
S
F
D
S
F
D
S
E
S
E
S
a
b
With the electric field off, the 
droplet falls at terminal velocity 
v
T
under the influence of the 
gravitational and drag forces.
S
When the electric field is turned 
on, the droplet moves upward at 
terminal velocity v
T
′ under the 
influence of the electric, 
gravitational, and drag forces.
S
Figure 25.22 
The forces acting 
on a negatively charged oil drop-
let in the Millikan experiment.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested