25.8 applications of electrostatics 
765
After recording measurements on thousands of droplets, Millikan and his 
coworkers found that all droplets, to within about 1% precision, had a charge equal 
to some integer multiple of the elementary charge e:
q 5 ne    n 5 0, 21, 22, 23, . . . 
where e 5 1.60 3 10219 C. Millikan’s experiment yields conclusive evidence that 
charge is quantized. For this work, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1923.
25.8 Applications of Electrostatics
The practical application of electrostatics is represented by such devices as light-
ning rods and electrostatic precipitators and by such processes as xerography and 
the painting of automobiles. Scientific devices based on the principles of electro-
statics include electrostatic generators, the field-ion microscope, and ion-drive 
rocket engines. Details of two devices are given below.
The Van de Graaff Generator
Experimental results show that when a charged conductor is placed in contact with 
the inside of a hollow conductor, all the charge on the charged conductor is trans-
ferred to the hollow conductor. In principle, the charge on the hollow conductor 
and its electric potential can be increased without limit by repetition of the process.
In 1929, Robert J. Van de Graaff (1901–1967) used this principle to design and 
build an electrostatic generator, and a schematic representation of it is given in 
Figure 25.23. This type of generator was once used extensively in nuclear physics 
research. Charge is delivered continuously to a high-potential electrode by means 
of a moving belt of insulating material. The high-voltage electrode is a hollow metal 
dome mounted on an insulating column. The belt is charged at point A by means of 
a corona discharge between comb-like metallic needles and a grounded grid. The 
needles are maintained at a positive electric potential of typically 104 V. The positive 
charge on the moving belt is transferred to the dome by a second comb of needles at 
point B. Because the electric field inside the dome is negligible, the positive charge 
on the belt is easily transferred to the conductor regardless of its potential. In prac-
tice, it is possible to increase the electric potential of the dome until electrical dis-
charge occurs through the air. Because the “breakdown” electric field in air is about 
3 3 106 V/m, a sphere 1.00 m in radius can be raised to a maximum potential of  
33 106 V. The potential can be increased further by increasing the dome’s radius 
and placing the entire system in a container filled with high-pressure gas.
Van de Graaff generators can produce potential differences as large as 20 mil-
lion volts. Protons accelerated through such large potential differences receive 
enough energy to initiate nuclear reactions between themselves and various target 
nuclei. Smaller generators are often seen in science classrooms and museums. If a 
person insulated from the ground touches the sphere of a Van de Graaff genera-
tor, his or her body can be brought to a high electric potential. The person’s hair 
acquires a net positive charge, and each strand is repelled by all the others as in the 
opening photograph of Chapter 23.
The Electrostatic Precipitator
One important application of electrical discharge in gases is the electrostatic precipi-
tator. This device removes particulate matter from combustion gases, thereby reduc-
ing air pollution. Precipitators are especially useful in coal-burning power plants 
and industrial operations that generate large quantities of smoke. Current systems 
are able to eliminate more than 99% of the ash from smoke.
Figure 25.24a (page 766) shows a schematic diagram of an electrostatic precipi-
tator. A high potential difference (typically 40 to 100 kV) is maintained between 
The charge is deposited 
on the belt at point A and 
transferred to the hollow 
conductor at point B.
B
A
Metal dome
Belt
Ground
+
P
Insulator
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
Figure 25.23 
Schematic dia-
gram of a Van de Graaff generator. 
Charge is transferred to the metal 
dome at the top by means of a 
moving belt. 
Convert pdf to webpage - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
convert pdf to html with; convert pdf to url link
Convert pdf to webpage - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
add pdf to website html; convert pdf to webpage
766
chapter 25 electric potential
a wire running down the center of a duct and the walls of the duct, which are 
grounded. The wire is maintained at a negative electric potential with respect to 
the walls, so the electric field is directed toward the wire. The values of the field 
near the wire become high enough to cause a corona discharge around the wire; 
the air near the wire contains positive ions, electrons, and such negative ions as 
O
2
2. The air to be cleaned enters the duct and moves near the wire. As the electrons 
and negative ions created by the discharge are accelerated toward the outer wall by 
the electric field, the dirt particles in the air become charged by collisions and 
ion capture. Because most of the charged dirt particles are negative, they too are 
drawn to the duct walls by the electric field. When the duct is periodically shaken, 
the particles break loose and are collected at the bottom.
In addition to reducing the level of particulate matter in the atmosphere (com-
pare Figs. 25.24b and c), the electrostatic precipitator recovers valuable materials in 
the form of metal oxides.
Figure 25.24 
(a) Schematic diagram of an electrostatic precipitator. Compare the air pollution when the electrostatic precipi-
tator is (b) operating and (c) turned off.
The high negative electric 
potential maintained on the 
central wire creates a corona 
discharge in the vicinity
of the wire.
-
+
Insulator
Clean air
out
Weight
Battery
Dirty
air in
Dirt out
a
b
c
B
y
C
o
u
r
t
e
s
y
o
f
T
e
n
o
v
a
T
A
K
R
A
F
Summary
The potential difference DV between points A and B in an electric field E
S
is 
defined as
D;
DU
q
52
3
B
A
E
S
?ds
S
(25.3)
where DU is given by Equation 25.1 on page 767. The electric potential V 5 U/q 
is a scalar quantity and has the units of joules per coulomb, where 1 J/C ; 1 V.
An equipotential surface 
is one on which all points are 
at the same electric potential. 
Equipotential surfaces are 
perpendicular to electric 
field lines.
Definitions
Online Convert PDF to HTML5 files. Best free online PDF html
HTML converter library control is a 100% clean .NET document image solution, which is designed to help .NET developers convert PDF to HTML webpage using simple
convert pdf to html link; convert pdf to html code for email
VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
Able to convert PDF to Tiff in .NET WinForms application and ASP.NET webpage. Convert PDF file to Tiff and jpeg in ASPX webpage online.
convert pdf into web page; convert pdf to html5
Objective Questions 
767
Concepts and Principles
When a positive charge q is moved between 
points A and B in an electric field E
S
, the change in 
the potential energy of the charge–field system is
DU52q 
3
B
A
E
S
?ds
S
(25.1)
If we define V 5 0 at r 5 `, the electric potential due 
to a point charge at any distance r from the charge is
V5k
e
q
r
(25.11)
The electric potential associated with a group of point 
charges is obtained by summing the potentials due to 
the individual charges.
If the electric potential is known as a function 
of coordinates xy, and z, we can obtain the com-
ponents of the electric field by taking the negative 
derivative of the electric potential with respect to 
the coordinates. For example, the x component of 
the electric field is
E
x
5 2
dV
dx
(25.16)
The electric potential energy associated with a pair 
of point charges separated by a distance r
12
is
U5k
e
q
1
q
2
r
12
(25.13)
We obtain the potential energy of a distribution of 
point charges by summing terms like Equation 25.13 
over all pairs of particles.
The electric potential due to a continuous charge distri-
bution is
V5k
e
3
dq
r
(25.20)
Every point on the surface of a charged conductor in elec-
trostatic equilibrium is at the same electric potential. The 
potential is constant everywhere inside the conductor and 
equal to its value at the surface.
The potential difference between two points separated 
by a distance d in a uniform electric field E
S
is
DV52Ed 
(25.6)
if the direction of travel between the points is in the same 
direction as the electric field.
them? Choose from the same possibilities. Arnold 
Arons, the only physics teacher yet to have his picture 
on the cover of Time magazine, suggested the idea for 
this question.
4. The electric potential at x 5 3.00 m is 120 V, and the 
electric potential at x 5 5.00 m is 190 V. What is the x 
component of the electric field in this region, assum-
ing the field is uniform? (a) 140 N/C (b) 2140 N/C 
(c)35.0N/C (d)235.0 N/C (e) 75.0 N/C
5. Rank the potential energies of the four systems of par-
ticles shown in Figure OQ25.5 from largest to smallest. 
Include equalities if appropriate.
-
-
r
-Q
-Q
b
+
Q
-
2r
-Q
c
-2Q
-Q
-
-
2r
d
+
+
Q
r
2Q
a
Figure oQ25.5
6. In a certain region of space, a uniform electric field 
is in the x direction. A particle with negative charge 
is carried from x 5 20.0 cm to x 5 60.0 cm. (i) Does 
1. In a certain region of space, the electric field is zero. 
From this fact, what can you conclude about the elec-
tric potential in this region? (a) It is zero. (b) It does 
not vary with position. (c) It is positive. (d) It is nega-
tive. (e) None of those answers is necessarily true.
2. Consider the equipotential surfaces shown in Figure 
25.4. In this region of space, what is the approximate 
direction of the electric field? (a) It is out of the page. 
(b) It is into the page. (c) It is toward the top of the 
page. (d) It is toward the bottom of the page. (e) The 
field is zero.
3. (i) A metallic sphere A of radius 1.00 cm is several 
centimeters away from a metallic spherical shell B of 
radius 2.00cm. Charge 450 nC is placed on A, with no 
charge on B or anywhere nearby. Next, the two objects 
are joined by a long, thin, metallic wire (as shown in 
Fig. 25.19), and finally the wire is removed. How is the 
charge shared between A and B? (a) 0 on A, 450 nC 
on B (b) 90.0 nC on A and 360 nC on B, with equal 
surface charge densities (c)150 nC on A and 300 nC 
on B (d) 225 nC on A and 225nC on B (e) 450nC on A 
and 0 on B (ii) A metallic sphere A of radius 1 cm with 
charge 450 nC hangs on an insulating thread inside 
an uncharged thin metallic spherical shell B of radius 
2cm. Next, A is made temporarily to touch the inner 
surface of B. How is the charge then shared between 
Objective Questions
1. 
denotes answer available in Student Solutions Manual/Study Guide
C# Word - Convert Word to HTML in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB.NET Imaging, VB.NET OCR How to Convert Word to HTML Webpage with C#
how to change pdf to html format; converting pdf to html format
C# powerpoint - Convert PowerPoint to HTML in C#.NET
HTML in C#.NET. How to Convert PowerPoint to HTML Webpage with C# PowerPoint Conversion SDK. PowerPoint to HTML Conversion Overview.
how to convert pdf into html; convert pdf to html file
768
chapter 25 electric potential
at the center due to the four charges? (a) 18.0 3 104 V 
(b) 4.50 3 104V (c) 0 (d) 24.50 3 104 V (e) 9.00 3 104 V
11. A proton is released from rest at the origin in a uni-
form electric field in the positive x direction with 
magnitude 850N/C. What is the change in the elec-
tric potential energy of the proton–field system when 
the proton travels to x 5 2.50 m? (a) 3.40 3 10216 J  
(b) 23.40 3 10216 J (c)2.503 10216 J (d) 22.50 3 10216 J  
(e) 21.60 3 10219 J
12. A particle with charge 240.0 nC is on the x axis at the 
point with coordinate x 5 0. A second particle, with 
charge 220.0 nC, is on the x axis at x 5 0.500 m. (i) Is the 
point at a finite distance where the electric field is zero 
(a) to the left of x 5 0, (b) between x 5 0 and x 5 0.500 m,  
or (c) to the right of x 5 0.500 m? (ii) Is the electric 
potential zero at this point? (a) No; it is positive. (b) Yes.  
(c) No; it is negative. (iii) Is there a point at a finite dis-
tance where the electric potential is zero? (a) Yes; it is to 
the left of x 5 0. (b) Yes; it is between x 5 0 and x 5  
0.500 m. (c) Yes; it is to the right of x 5 0.500 m. (d) No.
13. A filament running along the x axis from the origin 
to x5 80.0 cm carries electric charge with uniform 
density. At the point P with coordinates (x 5 80.0 cm,  
y 5 80.0 cm), this filament creates electric potential 
100 V. Now we add another filament along the y axis, 
running from the origin to y 5 80.0 cm, carrying the 
same amount of charge with the same uniform density. 
At the same point P, is the electric potential created by 
the pair of filaments (a) greater than 200 V, (b) 200 V, 
(c) 100V, (d) between 0 and 200 V, or (e) 0?
14. In different experimental trials, an electron, a proton, 
or a doubly charged oxygen atom (O22), is fired within a 
vacuum tube. The particle’s trajectory carries it through 
a point where the electric potential is 40.0 V and then 
through a point at a different potential. Rank each of 
the following cases according to the change in kinetic 
energy of the particle over this part of its flight from 
the largest increase to the largest decrease in kinetic 
energy. In your ranking, display any cases of equality. 
(a) An electron moves from 40.0V to 60.0 V. (b) An elec-
tron moves from 40.0 V to 20.0V. (c) A proton moves 
from 40.0 V to 20.0 V. (d) A proton moves from 40.0 V to 
10.0 V. (e) An O22 ion moves from 40.0 V to 60.0 V.
15. A helium nucleus (charge 5 2e, mass 5 6.63 3 10227 kg)  
traveling at 6.20 3 105 m/s enters an electric field, trav-
eling from point A, at a potential of 1.50 3 103 V, to 
point B, at 4.00 3 103 V. What is its speed at point B? 
(a) 7.91 3 105m/s (b) 3.78 3 105 m/s (c) 2.13 3 105 m/s  
(d) 2.52 3 106 m/s (e) 3.01 3 108 m/s
the electric potential energy of the charge–field system  
(a) increase, (b) remain constant, (c) decrease, or  
(d) change unpredictably? (ii) Has the particle moved 
to a position where the electric potential is (a) higher 
than before, (b) unchanged, (c) lower than before, or 
(d) unpredictable?
7. Rank the electric poten-
tials at the four points 
shown in Figure OQ25.7 
from largest to smallest.
8. An electron in an x-ray 
machine is accelerated 
through a potential dif-
ference of 1.00 3 104 V  
before it hits the tar-
get. What is the kinetic 
energy of the electron in 
electron volts? (a) 1.00 3 
104 eV (b) 1.60 3 10215 eV (c) 1.60 3 10222eV (d)6.25 3 
1022 eV (e) 1.60 3 10219 eV
9. Rank the electric potential energies of the systems of 
charges shown in Figure OQ25.9 from largest to small-
est. Indicate equalities if appropriate.
+
+
+
+
d
d
Q
Q
Q
Q
+
+
+
d
d
Q
Q
Q
+
+
+
-Q
-Q
d
d
d
Q
Q
d
d
d
Q
Q
Q
+
+
-
-
a
c
b
d
Figure oQ25.9
10. Four particles are positioned on the rim of a circle. 
The charges on the particles are 10.500 mC, 11.50 mC, 
21.00mC, and 20.500 mC. If the electric potential at 
the center of the circle due to the 10.500 mC charge 
alone is 4.50 3 104 V, what is the total electric potential 
Q
2Q
+
+
A
B
C
d
d
D
Figure oQ25.7
Conceptual Questions
1. 
denotes answer available in Student Solutions Manual/Study Guide
1. What determines the maximum electric potential to 
which the dome of a Van de Graaff generator can be 
raised?
2. Describe the motion of a proton (a) after it is released 
from rest in a uniform electric field. Describe the 
changes (if any) in (b) its kinetic energy and (c) the 
electric potential energy of the proton–field system.
3. When charged particles are separated by an infinite 
distance, the electric potential energy of the pair is 
zero. When the particles are brought close, the elec-
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, create and convert PDF
edit PDF document page in ASPX webpage, set and edit RasterEdge provide HTML5 PDF Viewer and Editor to help C# users to view, annotate, convert and edit
pdf to html conversion; how to convert pdf file to html document
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
Best VB.NET adobe PDF to Microsoft Office Word converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET. Convert PDF to Word in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET webpage.
best website to convert pdf to word; convert from pdf to html
problems 
769
grounding wire is touched to the leftmost point on the 
sphere instead. (a)Will electrons still drain away, mov-
ing closer to the negatively charged rod as they do so? 
(b) What kind of charge, if any, remains on the sphere?
5. Distinguish between electric potential and electric 
potential energy.
6. Describe the equipotential surfaces for (a) an infinite 
line of charge and (b) a uniformly charged sphere.
tric potential energy of a pair with the same sign is 
positive, whereas the electric potential energy of a pair 
with opposite signs is negative. Give a physical explana-
tion of this statement.
4. Study Figure 23.3 and the accompanying text discussion 
of charging by induction. When the grounding wire is 
touched to the rightmost point on the sphere in Fig-
ure 23.3c, electrons are drained away from the sphere 
to leave the sphere positively charged. Suppose the 
A are (20.200, 20.300)m, and those of point B are 
(0.400, 0.500) m. Calculate the electric potential differ-
ence V
B
V
A
using the dashed-line path.
6. Starting with the definition of work, prove that at every 
point on an equipotential surface, the surface must be 
perpendicular to the electric field there.
7. An electron moving parallel to the x axis has an ini-
tial speed of 3.70 3 106 m/s at the origin. Its speed is 
reduced to 1.40 3 105 m/s at the point x 5 2.00 cm.  
(a) Calculate the electric potential difference between 
the origin and that point. (b) Which point is at the 
higher potential?
8. (a) Find the electric potential difference DV
e
required 
to stop an electron (called a “stopping potential”) mov-
ing with an initial speed of 2.85 3 107 m/s. (b) Would 
a proton traveling at the same speed require a greater 
or lesser magnitude of electric potential difference? 
Explain. (c) Find a symbolic expression for the ratio 
of the proton stopping potential and the electron stop-
ping potential, DV
p
/DV
e
.
9. A particle having charge q 5 12.00 mC and mass m 5 
0.010 0 kg is connected to a string that is L 5 1.50 m 
long and tied to the pivot point P in Figure P25.9. The 
particle, string, and pivot point all lie on a frictionless, 
Q/C
S
M
AMT
Q/C
AMT
Problems
The problems found in this  
chapter may be assigned 
online in Enhanced WebAssign
1.
 straightforward; 
2. 
intermediate;  
3. 
challenging
1.
full solution available in the Student 
Solutions Manual/Study Guide
AMT
Analysis Model tutorial available in 
Enhanced WebAssign
GP
Guided Problem
M
Master It tutorial available in Enhanced 
WebAssign
W
Watch It video solution available in 
Enhanced WebAssign
BIO
Q/C
S
Section 25.1  Electric Potential and Potential Difference
Section 25.2  Potential Difference in a uniform Electric Field
1. Oppositely charged parallel plates are separated 
by 5.33 mm. A potential difference of 600 V exists 
between the plates. (a) What is the magnitude of the 
electric field between the plates? (b) What is the mag-
nitude of the force on an electron between the plates? 
(c) How much work must be done on the electron to 
move it to the negative plate if it is initially positioned 
2.90 mm from the positive plate?
2. A uniform electric field of magnitude 250 V/m is 
directed in the positive x direction. A 112.0-mC charge 
moves from the origin to the point (x, y) 5 (20.0 cm,  
50.0 cm). (a) What is the change in the potential 
energy of the charge–field system? (b) Through what 
potential difference does the charge move?
3. (a) Calculate the speed of a proton that is accelerated 
from rest through an electric potential difference of 
120V. (b) Calculate the speed of an electron that is accel-
erated through the same electric potential difference.
4. How much work is done (by a battery, generator, or 
some other source of potential difference) in moving 
Avogadro’s number of electrons from an initial point 
where the electric potential 
is 9.00 V to a point where the 
electric potential is 25.00 V? 
(The potential in each case is 
measured relative to a com-
mon reference point.)
5. A uniform electric field 
of magnitude 325 V/m is 
directed in the negative y 
direction in Figure P25.5. 
The coordinates of point 
M
M
W
W
+
v
S
P
m
Top view
q
L
u
v
= 0
+
E
S
Figure P25.9
x
y
E
S
A
B
Figure P25.5
C# Excel - Convert Excel to HTML in C#.NET
C# Excel - Convert Excel to HTML in C#.NET. How to Convert Excel to HTML Webpage with C# Excel Conversion SDK. Excel to HTML Conversion Overview.
change pdf to html format; to html
VB.NET TIFF: Convert TIFF to HTML Web Page Using VB.NET TIFF
converters, like VB.NET PDF to HTML converter toolkit to convert PDF document to HTML webpage and VB.NET Word to HTML conversion add-on to transform Microsoft
embed pdf to website; best pdf to html converter
770
chapter 25 electric potential
horizontal table. The particle is released from rest 
when the string makes an angle u 5 60.08 with a uni-
form electric field of magnitude E 5 300 V/m. Deter-
mine the speed of the particle when the string is paral-
lel to the electric field.
10. Review. A block having 
mass m and charge 1Q 
is connected to an insu-
lating spring having a 
force constant k. The 
block lies on a friction-
less, insulating, hori-
zontal track, and the 
system is immersed in a 
uniform electric field of magnitude E directed as shown 
in Figure P25.10. The block is released from rest when 
the spring is unstretched (at x 5 0). We wish to show that 
the ensuing motion of the block is simple harmonic. 
(a)Consider the system of the block, the spring, and the 
electric field. Is this system isolated or nonisolated?  
(b) What kinds of potential energy exist within this sys-
tem? (c)Call the initial configuration of the system that 
existing just as the block is released from rest. The final 
configuration is when the block momentarily comes to 
rest again. What is the value of x when the block comes 
to rest momentarily? (d) At some value of  we will call  
x 5 x
0
, the block has zero net force on it. What analysis 
model describes the particle in this situation? (e)What 
is the value of x
0
? (f)Define a new coordinate system x9 
such that x9 5 x 2 x
0
. Show that x9 satisfies a differential 
equation for simple harmonic motion. (g) Find the 
period of the simple harmonic motion. (h) How does 
the period depend on the electric field magnitude?
11. An insulating rod having linear 
charge density l5 40.0 mC/m and 
linear mass density m 5 0.100 kg/m 
is released from rest in a uniform 
electric field E 5 100 V/m directed 
perpendicular to the rod (Fig. 
P25.11). (a)Determine the speed of 
the rod after it has traveled 2.00m. 
(b) What If? How does your answer 
to part (a) change if the electric field is not perpen-
dicular to the rod? Explain.
Section 25.3  Electric Potential and Potential Energy  
Due to Point Charges
Note: Unless stated otherwise, assume the reference level 
of potential is V 5 0 at r 5 `.
12. (a) Calculate the electric potential 0.250 cm from an 
electron. (b) What is the electric potential difference 
between two points that are 0.250 cm and 0.750 cm 
from an electron? (c) How would the answers change if 
the electron were replaced with a proton?
13. Two point charges are on the y axis. A 4.50-mC charge 
is located at y 5 1.25 cm, and a 22.24-mC charge is 
located at y 5 21.80 cm. Find the total electric poten-
tial at (a) the origin and (b) the point whose coordi-
nates are (1.50 cm,0).
k
m, Q
x = 0
E
S
+
Figure P25.10
GP
Q/C
lm
E
S
E
S
Figure P25.11
Q/C
Q/C
d
d
d
Q
Q
2Q
+
+
+
Figure P25.15
14. The two charges in Figure 
P25.14 are separated by d 5 
2.00cm. Find the electric 
potential at (a) point A and 
(b)point B, which is half-
way between the charges.
15. Three positive charges are 
located at the corners of an 
equilateral triangle as in 
Figure P25.15. Find an expression 
for the electric potential at the cen-
ter of the triangle.
16. Two point charges Q
1
5 15.00 nC 
and Q
2
5 23.00 nC are separated 
by 35.0 cm. (a) What is the elec-
tric potential at a point midway 
between the charges? (b) What is 
the potential energy of the pair of 
charges? What is the significance of the algebraic sign 
of your answer?
17. Two particles, with 
charges of 20.0 nC and 
220.0 nC, are placed at 
the points with coordi-
nates (0, 4.00 cm) and 
(0, 24.00 cm) as shown 
in Figure P25.17. A par-
ticle with charge 10.0 nC  
is located at the origin. 
(a) Find the electric 
potential energy of the 
configuration of the 
three fixed charges.  
(b) A fourth particle, 
with a mass of 2.00 3 
10213 kg and a charge of  
40.0 nC, is released from 
rest at the point (3.00 cm,  
0). Find its speed after it has moved freely to a very 
large distance away.
18. The two charges in Figure P25.18 are separated by a dis-
tance d 5 2.00 cm, and Q 5 15.00 nC. Find (a)the elec-
tric potential at A, (b)the electric potential at B, and  
(c) the electric potential difference between B and A.
Q
d
d
2Q
+
+
A
B
Figure P25.18
19. Given two particles with 2.00-mC charges as shown in 
Figure P25.19 and a particle with charge q 5 1.28 3 
10218 C at the origin, (a) what is the net force exerted 
S
Q/C
M
W
27.0 nC
-15.0 nC
60.0°
d
d
d
A
B
+
-
Figure P25.14
20.0 nC
10.0 nC
–20.0 nC
40.0 nC
4.00 cm
3.00 cm
4.00 cm
-
+
+
+
Figure P25.17
problems 
771
electric potential energy of 
the system as the particle 
at the lower left corner in 
Figure P25.27 is brought 
to this position from infi-
nitely far away. Assume the 
other three particles in Fig-
ure P25.27 remain fixed in 
position.
28. Three particles with equal posi-
tive charges q are at the corners 
of an equilateral triangle of side a 
as shown in Figure P25.28. (a) At 
what point, if any, in the plane of 
the particles is the electric poten-
tial zero? (b) What is the electric 
potential at the position of one of 
the particles due to the other two 
particles in the triangle?
29. Five particles with equal negative charges 2q are 
placed symmetrically around a circle of radius R. Cal-
culate the electric potential at the center of the circle.
30. Review. A light, unstressed spring has length d. Two 
identical particles, each with charge q, are connected 
to the opposite ends of the spring. The particles are 
held stationary a distance d apart and then released at 
the same moment. The system then oscillates on a fric-
tionless, horizontal table. The spring has a bit of inter-
nal kinetic friction, so the oscillation is damped. The 
particles eventually stop vibrating when the distance 
between them is 3d. Assume the system of the spring 
and two charged particles is isolated. Find the increase 
in internal energy that appears in the spring during 
the oscillations.
31. Review. Two insulating spheres have radii 0.300 cm 
and 0.500 cm, masses 0.100 kg and 0.700 kg, and uni-
formly distributed charges 22.00 mC and 3.00 mC. 
They are released from rest when their centers are 
separated by 1.00 m. (a) How fast will each be moving 
when they collide? (b) What If? If the spheres were 
conductors, would the speeds be greater or less than 
those calculated in part (a)? Explain.
32. Review. Two insulating spheres have radii r
1
and r
2
masses m
1
and m
2
, and uniformly distributed charges 
2q
1
and q
2
. They are released from rest when their cen-
ters are separated by a distance d. (a) How fast is each 
moving when they collide? (b) What If? If the spheres 
were conductors, would their speeds be greater or less 
than those calculated in part (a)? Explain.
33. How much work is required to assemble eight identical 
charged particles, each of magnitude q, at the corners 
of a cube of side s?
34. Four identical particles, each having charge q and mass 
m, are released from rest at the vertices of a square of 
side L. How fast is each particle moving when their dis-
tance from the center of the square doubles?
35. In 1911, Ernest Rutherford and his assistants Geiger 
and Marsden conducted an experiment in which they 
S
S
S
AMT
Q/C
S
Q/C
S
S
AMT
by the two 2.00-mC charges on the charge q? (b) What 
is the electric field at the origin due to the two 2.00-mC 
particles? (c)What is the electric potential at the ori-
gin due to the two 2.00-mC particles?
2.00
y
q
0
x = 0.800 m
x = -0.800 m
x
mC
mC
2.00
+
+
+
Figure P25.19
20. At a certain distance from a charged particle, the mag-
nitude of the electric field is 500 V/m and the electric 
potential is 23.00 kV. (a) What is the distance to the 
particle? (b) What is the magnitude of the charge?
21. Four point charges each having charge Q are located at 
the corners of a square having sides of length a. Find 
expressions for (a) the total electric potential at the 
center of the square due to the four charges and  
(b) the work required to bring a fifth charge q from 
infinity to the center of the square.
22. The three charged particles in 
Figure P25.22 are at the vertices 
of an isosceles triangle (where d 5  
2.00cm). Taking q5 7.00 mC, 
calculate the electric potential at 
point A, the midpoint of the base.
23. A particle with charge 1q is at 
the origin. A particle with charge 
22q is at x 5 2.00 m on the x axis.  
(a) For what finite value(s) of x 
is the electric field zero? (b) For 
what finite value(s) of x is the electric potential zero?
24. Show that the amount of work required to assemble 
four identical charged particles of magnitude Q at the 
corners of a square of side s is 5.41k
e
Q2/s.
25. Two particles each with charge 12.00mC are located 
on the x axis. One is at x 5 1.00 m, and the other is at  
x 5 21.00m. (a) Determine the electric potential on 
the y axis at y5 0.500 m. (b) Calculate the change in 
electric potential energy of the system as a third 
charged particle of 23.00mC is brought from infinitely 
far away to a position on the y axis at y 5 0.500 m.
26. Two charged particles of equal mag-
nitude are located along the y axis 
equal distances above and below the 
x axis as shown in Figure P25.26. 
(a) Plot a graph of the electric 
potential at points along the x axis 
over the interval 23a , x, 3a. You 
should plot the potential in units 
of k
e
Q/a. (b)Let the charge of the 
particle located at y 5 2a be nega-
tive. Plot the potential along the y 
axis over the interval 24a , y , 4a.
27. Four identical charged particles (q 5 110.0 mC) are 
located on the corners of a rectangle as shown in Fig-
ure P25.27. The dimensions of the rectangle are L 5 
60.0 cm and W 5 15.0 cm. Calculate the change in 
M
S
d
A
2d
q
-q
-q
+
-
-
Figure P25.22
M
S
a
a
x
y
Q
Q
+
+
Figure P25.26
S
W
+
+
+
q
q
a
a
a
q
Figure P25.28
+
+
+
+
q
q
q
q
y
x
L
W
Figure P25.27
772
chapter 25 electric potential
about E
S
at B. (c)Represent what the electric field looks 
like by drawing at least eight field lines.
41. The electric potential inside a charged spherical con-
ductor of radius R is given by V 5 k
e
Q/R, and the 
potential outside is given by V 5 k
e
Q/r. Using E
r
2dV/dr, derive the electric field (a) inside and (b) out-
side this charge distribution.
42. It is shown in Example 25.7 that the potential at a point 
P a distance a above one end of a uniformly charged 
rod of length , lying along the x axis is
V5k
e
Q
,
ln 
a
,1"a1,2
a
b
Use this result to derive an expression for the y compo-
nent of the electric field at P.
Section 25.5  Electric Potential Due  
to Continuous Charge Distributions
43. Consider a ring of radius R with the total charge Q 
spread uniformly over its perimeter. What is the poten-
tial difference between the point at the center of the ring 
and a point on its axis a distance 2R from the center?
44. A uniformly charged insulating rod of 
length 14.0 cm is bent into the shape 
of a semicircle as shown in Figure 
P25.44. The rod has a total charge of 
27.50 mC. Find the electric potential 
at O, the center of the semicircle.
45. A rod of length L (Fig. P25.45) lies 
along the x axis with its left end at the 
origin. It has a nonuniform charge 
S
S
S
O
Figure P25.44
W
S
scattered alpha particles (nuclei of helium atoms) from 
thin sheets of gold. An alpha particle, having charge 
12e and mass 6.643 10227 kg, is a product of certain 
radioactive decays. The results of the experiment led 
Rutherford to the idea that most of an atom’s mass is 
in a very small nucleus, with electrons in orbit around 
it. (This is the planetary model of the atom, which we’ll 
study in Chapter 42.) Assume an alpha particle, ini-
tially very far from a stationary gold nucleus, is fired 
with a velocity of 2.00 3 107 m/s directly toward the 
nucleus (charge 179e). What is the smallest distance 
between the alpha particle and the nucleus before the 
alpha particle reverses direction? Assume the gold 
nucleus remains stationary.
Section 25.4  obtaining the Value of the Electric Field  
from the Electric Potential
36. Figure P25.36 repre-
sents a graph of the 
electric potential in a 
region of space versus 
position x, where the 
electric field is paral-
lel to the x  axis. Draw 
a graph of the x  compo-
nent of the electric field 
versus x in this region.
37. The potential in a region between x 5 0 and x 5 6.00 m  
is V 5 a 1 bx, where a 5 10.0 V and b 5 27.00 V/m. 
Determine (a) the potential at x 5 0, 3.00 m, and 6.00 m  
and (b)the magnitude and direction of the electric 
field at x 5 0, 3.00 m, and 6.00 m.
38. An electric field in a region of space is parallel to the 
x axis. The electric potential varies with position as 
shown in Figure P25.38. Graph the x  component of the 
electric field versus position in this region of space.
x (cm)
V (V)
1
20
30
10
-20
-10
-30
0
2
3
4
5
Figure P25.38
39. Over a certain region of space, the electric potential is 
V 5 5x 2 3x2y 1 2yz2. (a) Find the expressions for the 
xy, and z components of the electric field over this 
region. (b) What is the magnitude of the field at the 
point P that has coordinates (1.00, 0, 22.00) m?
40. Figure P25.40 shows several equipotential lines, each 
labeled by its potential in volts. The distance between 
the lines of the square grid represents 1.00 cm. (a) Is 
the magnitude of the field larger at A or at B? Explain 
how you can tell. (b) Explain what you can determine 
x (cm)
V (V)
1
0
20
10
2
3
4
Figure P25.36
W
W
Q/C
B
0
2
4
6
Numerical values are in volts.
8
A
Figure P25.40
b
B
y
x
L
d
A
Figure P25.45 
Problems 45 and 46.
problems 
773
dielectric strength of air. Any more charge leaks off in 
sparks as shown in Figure P25.52. Assume the dome has 
a diameter of 30.0 cm and is surrounded by dry air with 
a “breakdown” electric field of 3.00 3 106 V/m. (a) What 
is the maximum potential of the dome? (b) What is the 
maximum charge on the dome?
additional Problems
53. Why is the following situation impossible? In the Bohr model 
of the hydrogen atom, an electron moves in a circular 
orbit about a proton. The model states that the electron 
can exist only in certain allowed orbits around the pro-
ton: those whose radius r satisfies r 5 n2(0.052 9 nm), 
where n5 1, 2, 3, . . . . For one of the possible allowed 
states of the atom, the electric potential energy of the 
system is 213.6eV.
54. Review. In fair weather, the electric field in the air at 
a particular location immediately above the Earth’s 
surface is 120 N/C directed downward. (a) What is the 
surface charge density on the ground? Is it positive or 
negative? (b) Imagine the surface charge density is 
uniform over the planet. What then is the charge of 
the whole surface of the Earth? (c) What is the Earth’s 
electric potential due to this charge? (d) What is the 
difference in potential between the head and the feet 
of a person 1.75 m tall? (Ignore any charges in the 
atmosphere.) (e) Imagine the Moon, with 27.3% of the 
radius of the Earth, had a charge 27.3% as large, with 
the same sign. Find the electric force the Earth would 
then exert on the Moon. (f) State how the answer to 
part (e) compares with the gravitational force the 
Earth exerts on the Moon.
55. Review. From a large distance away, a particle of mass 
2.00g and charge 15.0 mC is fired at 21.0i
^
m/s straight 
toward a second particle, originally stationary but free 
to move, with mass 5.00 g and charge 8.50 mC. Both 
particles are constrained to move only along the x axis. 
(a) At the instant of closest approach, both particles 
will be moving at the same velocity. Find this velocity. 
(b) Find the distance of closest approach. After the 
interaction, the particles will move far apart again. At 
this time, find the velocity of (c)the 2.00-g particle 
and (d) the 5.00-g particle.
56. Review. From a large distance away, a particle of mass m
1
and positive charge q
1
is fired at speed v in the positive 
x direction straight toward a second particle, originally 
stationary but free to move, with mass m
2
and positive 
charge q
2
. Both particles are constrained to move only 
along the x axis. (a)At the instant of closest approach, 
both particles will be moving at the same velocity. Find 
this velocity. (b)Find the distance of closest approach. 
After the interaction, the particles will move far apart 
again. At this time, find the velocity of (c)the particle of 
mass m
1
and (d) the particle of mass m
2
.
57. The liquid-drop model of the atomic nucleus suggests 
high-energy oscillations of certain nuclei can split  
the nucleus into two unequal fragments plus a few  
Q/C
S
M
density l 5 ax, where a is a positive constant. (a) What 
are the units of a? (b) Calculate the electric potential 
atA.
46. For the arrangement described in Problem 45, calcu-
late the electric potential at point B, which lies on the 
perpendicular bisector of the rod a distance b above 
the x axis.
47. A wire having a uniform linear charge density l is bent 
into the shape shown in Figure P25.47. Find the elec-
tric potential at point O.
2R
2R
O
R
Figure P25.47
Section 25.6  Electric Potential Due to a Charged Conductor
48. The electric field magnitude on the surface of an 
irregularly shaped conductor varies from 56.0 kN/C to 
28.0kN/C. Can you evaluate the electric potential on the 
conductor? If so, find its value. If not, explain why not.
49. How many electrons should be removed from an ini-
tially uncharged spherical conductor of radius 0.300 m 
to produce a potential of 7.50 kV at the surface?
50. A spherical conductor has a radius of 14.0 cm and a 
charge of 26.0 mC. Calculate the electric field and the 
electric potential at (a) r 5 10.0 cm, (b) r 5 20.0 cm, 
and (c) r 5 14.0 cm from the center.
51. Electric charge can accumulate on an airplane in flight. 
You may have observed needle-shaped metal extensions 
on the wing tips and tail of an airplane. Their purpose 
is to allow charge to leak off before much of it accu-
mulates. The electric field around the needle is much 
larger than the field around the body of the airplane 
and can become large enough to produce dielectric 
breakdown of the air, discharging the airplane. To 
model this process, assume two charged spherical con-
ductors are connected by a long conducting wire and 
a 1.20-mC charge is placed on the combination. One 
sphere, representing the body of the airplane, has a 
radius of 6.00 cm; the other, representing the tip of the 
needle, has a radius of 2.00 cm. (a) What is the electric 
potential of each sphere? (b) What is the electric field 
at the surface of each sphere?
Section 25.8  applications of Electrostatics
52. Lightning can be studied 
with a Van de Graaff gen-
erator, which consists of a 
spherical dome on which 
charge is continuously 
deposited by a moving 
belt. Charge can be added 
until the electric field at 
the surface of the dome 
becomes equal to the 
S
W
S
M
Figure P25.52
D
a
v
i
d
E
v
i
s
o
n
/
S
h
u
t
t
e
r
s
t
o
c
k
.
c
o
m
M
774
chapter 25 electric potential
neutrons. The fission products acquire kinetic energy 
from their mutual Coulomb repulsion. Assume the 
charge is distributed uniformly throughout the volume 
of each spherical fragment and, immediately before sep-
arating, each fragment is at rest and their surfaces are 
in contact. The electrons surrounding the nucleus can 
be ignored. Calculate the electric potential energy (in 
electron volts) of two spherical fragments from a ura-
nium nucleus having the following charges and radii: 
38e  and 5.50 3 10215 m, and 54e  and 6.20 3 10215 m.
58. On a dry winter day, you scuff your leather-soled shoes 
across a carpet and get a shock when you extend the 
tip of one finger toward a metal doorknob. In a dark 
room, you see a spark perhaps 5 mm long. Make order-
of-magnitude estimates of (a) your electric potential 
and (b) the charge on your body before you touch the 
doorknob. Explain your reasoning.
59. The electric potential immediately outside a charged 
conducting sphere is 200 V, and 10.0 cm farther 
from the center of the sphere the potential is 150 V. 
Determine (a) the radius of the sphere and (b) the 
charge on it. The electric potential immediately out-
side another charged conducting sphere is 210 V, and  
10.0 cm farther from the center the magnitude of the 
electric field is 400 V/m. Determine (c)the radius of 
the sphere and (d) its charge on it. (e) Are the answers 
to parts (c) and (d) unique?
60. (a) Use the exact result from Example 25.4 to find the 
electric potential created by the dipole described in 
the example at the point (3a, 0). (b) Explain how this 
answer compares with the result of the approximate 
expression that is valid when x is much greater than a.
61. Calculate the work that must be done on charges 
brought from infinity to charge a spherical shell of 
radius R 5 0.100m to a total charge Q 5 125 mC.
62. Calculate the work that must be done on charges 
brought from infinity to charge a spherical shell of 
radius R to a total charge Q.
63. The electric potential everywhere on the xy plane is
V5
36
"
1
x11
22
1y2
2
45
"x21
1
y22
22
where V is in volts and x and y are in meters. Determine 
the position and charge on each of the particles that 
create this potential.
64. Why is the following situ-
ation impossible? You set 
up an apparatus in your 
laboratory as follows. 
The x axis is the symme-
try axis of a stationary, 
uniformly charged ring 
of radius R 5 0.500 m 
and charge Q 5 50.0 mC 
(Fig. P25.64). You place 
a particle with charge 
Q/C
S
S
v
S
R
Q
x
x
Q
+
Figure P25.64
Q5 50.0 mC and mass m 5 0.100kg at the center of the 
ring and arrange for it to be constrained to move only 
along the x axis. When it is displaced slightly, the par-
ticle is repelled by the ring and accelerates along the x 
axis. The particle moves faster than you expected and 
strikes the opposite wall of your laboratory at 40.0 m/s.
65. From Gauss’s law, the electric field set up by a uniform 
line of charge is
E
S
5a
l
2pP
0
r
r^
where r^ is a unit vector pointing radially away from 
the line and l is the linear charge density along the 
line. Derive an expression for the potential difference 
between r 5 r
1
and r5 r
2
.
66. A uniformly charged filament lies along the x axis 
between x 5 a 5 1.00 m and x 5 a 1 , 5 3.00 m as 
shown in Figure P25.66. The total charge on the fila-
ment is 1.60nC. Calculate successive approximations 
for the electric potential at the origin by modeling the 
filament as (a) a single charged particle at x 5 2.00 m, 
(b) two 0.800-nC charged particles at x 5 1.5 m and  
x 5 2.5 m, and (c) four 0.400-nC charged particles at  
x 5 1.25 m, x 5 1.75 m, x 5 2.25 m, and x 5 2.75 m.  
(d) Explain how the results compare with the potential 
given by the exact expression
V5
k
e
Q
,
ln a
,1a
a
b
y
a
P
x
Figure P25.66
67. The thin, uniformly charged rod 
shown in Figure P25.67 has a lin-
ear charge density l. Find an 
expression for the electric poten-
tial at P.
68. A Geiger–Mueller tube is a radia-
tion detector that consists of a 
closed, hollow, metal cylinder 
(the cathode) of inner radius r
a
and a coaxial cylindrical wire (the 
anode) of radius r
b
(Fig. P25.68a). 
The charge per unit length on the anode is l, and the 
charge per unit length on the cathode is 2l. A gas fills 
the space between the electrodes. When the tube is in 
use (Fig. P25.68b) and a high-energy elementary par-
ticle passes through this space, it can ionize an atom 
of the gas. The strong electric field makes the result-
ing ion and electron accelerate in opposite directions. 
They strike other molecules of the gas to ionize them, 
producing an avalanche of electrical discharge. The 
S
Q/C
b
a
L
x
P
y
Figure P25.67
S
S
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested