26.3 combinations of capacitors 
785
Substituting this result into Equation 26.9, we have
Q
C
eq
5
Q
1
C
1
1
Q
2
C
2
Canceling the charges because they are all the same gives
1
C
eq
5
1
C
1
1
1
C
2
1
series combination
2
When this analysis is applied to three or more capacitors connected in series, the 
relationship for the equivalent capacitance is
1
C
eq
5
1
C
1
1
1
C
2
1
1
C
3
1
c
1
series combination
2
(26.10)
This expression shows that (1) the inverse of the equivalent capacitance is the alge-
braic sum of the inverses of the individual capacitances and (2) the equivalent 
capacitance of a series combination is always less than any individual capacitance 
in the combination.
uick Quiz 26.3  Two capacitors are identical. They can be connected in series or 
in parallel. If you want the smallest equivalent capacitance for the combination, 
how should you connect them? (a) in series (b) in parallel (c)either way because 
both combinations have the same capacitance
WW Equivalent capacitance for 
capacitors in series
Example 26.3   Equivalent Capacitance
Find the equivalent capacitance between a and b for the 
combination of capacitors shown in Figure 26.9a. All 
capacitances are in microfarads.
Conceptualize  Study Figure 26.9a carefully and make 
sure you understand how the capacitors are connected. 
Verify that there are only series and parallel connec-
tions between capacitors.
Categorize  Figure 26.9a shows that the circuit contains 
both series and parallel connections, so we use the 
rules for series and parallel combinations discussed in 
this section.
Analyze  Using Equations 26.8 and 26.10, we reduce the combination step by step as indicated in the figure. As you 
follow along below, notice that in each step we replace the combination of two capacitors in the circuit diagram with a 
single capacitor having the equivalent capacitance.
SoluTIoN
4.0
4.0
8.0
8.0
b
a
4.0
b
a
2.0
6.0
b
a
4.0
8.0
b
a
2.0
6.0
3.0
1.0
a
b
c
d
Figure 26.9 
(Example 26.3) To find the equivalent capacitance 
of the capacitors in (a), we reduce the various combinations in 
steps as indicated in (b), (c), and (d), using the series and parallel 
rules described in the text. All capacitances are in microfarads.
The 1.0-mF and 3.0-mF capacitors (upper red-brown 
circle in Fig. 26.9a) are in parallel. Find the equivalent 
capacitance from Equation 26.8:
C
eq
C
1
C
2
5 4.0 mF
The 2.0-mF and 6.0-mF capacitors (lower red-brown 
circle in Fig. 26.9a) are also in parallel:
C
eq
C
1
C
2
5 8.0 mF 
The circuit now looks like Figure 26.9b. The two 4.0-mF 
capacitors (upper green circle in Fig. 26.9b) are in series. 
Find the equivalent capacitance from Equation26.10:
1
C
eq
5
1
C
1
1
1
C
2
5
1
4.0 mF
1
1
4.0 mF
5
1
2.0 mF
C
eq
52.0 mF
continued
Pdf to html conversion - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
to html; add pdf to website html
Pdf to html conversion - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
conversion pdf to html; how to convert pdf file to html
786
chapter 26 capacitance and Dielectrics
26.4 Energy Stored in a Charged Capacitor
Because positive and negative charges are separated in the system of two conduc-
tors in a capacitor, electric potential energy is stored in the system. Many of those 
who work with electronic equipment have at some time verified that a capacitor can 
store energy. If the plates of a charged capacitor are connected by a conductor such 
as a wire, charge moves between each plate and its connecting wire until the capaci-
tor is uncharged. The discharge can often be observed as a visible spark. If you 
accidentally touch the opposite plates of a charged capacitor, your fingers act as a 
pathway for discharge and the result is an electric shock. The degree of shock you 
receive depends on the capacitance and the voltage applied to the capacitor. Such 
a shock could be dangerous if high voltages are present as in the power supply of a 
home theater system. Because the charges can be stored in a capacitor even when 
the system is turned off, unplugging the system does not make it safe to open the 
case and touch the components inside.
Figure 26.10a shows a battery connected to a single parallel-plate capacitor with 
a switch in the circuit. Let us identify the circuit as a system. When the switch is 
closed (Fig. 26.10b), the battery establishes an electric field in the wires and charges 
Finalize  This final value is that of the single equivalent capacitor shown in Figure 26.9d. For further practice in treat-
ing circuits with combinations of capacitors, imagine a battery is connected between points a and b in Figure 26.9a so 
that a potential difference DV is established across the combination. Can you find the voltage across and the charge on 
each capacitor?
V
V
+
+
+
+
+
+
Electric
field in
wire
Electric field 
between plates
Chemical potential
energy in the
battery is reduced.
Electrons move 
from the wire to 
the plate.
Electrons move 
from the plate 
to the wire, 
leaving the 
plate positively 
charged.
Separation 
of charges 
represents 
potential 
energy.
+
-
+
-
E
S
a
b
Electric
field in
wire
With the switch 
open, the capacitor 
remains uncharged.
Figure 26.10 
(a) A circuit con-
sisting of a capacitor, a battery, 
and a switch. (b)When the switch 
is closed, the battery establishes 
an electric field in the wire and 
the capacitor becomes charged.
▸ 26.3 
continued
The two 8.0-mF capacitors (lower green circle in Fig. 
26.9b) are also in series. Find the equivalent capacitance 
from Equation 26.10:
1
C
eq
5
1
C
1
1
1
C
2
5
1
8.0 mF
1
1
8.0 mF
5
1
4.0 mF
C
eq
54.0 mF
The circuit now looks like Figure 26.9c. The 2.0-mF and 
4.0-mF capacitors are in parallel:
C
eq
C
1
C
2
5   6.0 mF 
Online Convert PDF to HTML5 files. Best free online PDF html
This Visual C#.NET PDF to HTML conversion control component makes it extremely easy for C# developers to convert and transform a multi-page PDF document and
convert fillable pdf to html; convert pdf to html email
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
C#.NET PDF to HTML Conversion. Using provided C# code example, fast conversion from PDF to HTML can be achieved. C#.NET PDF to SVG Conversion.
embed pdf into html; best pdf to html converter
26.4 energy Stored in a charged capacitor 
787
flow between the wires and the capacitor. As that occurs, there is a transformation 
of energy within the system. Before the switch is closed, energy is stored as chemi-
cal potential energy in the battery. This energy is transformed during the chemical 
reaction that occurs within the battery when it is operating in an electric circuit. 
When the switch is closed, some of the chemical potential energy in the battery is 
transformed to electric potential energy associated with the separation of positive 
and negative charges on the plates.
To calculate the energy stored in the capacitor, we shall assume a charging pro-
cess that is different from the actual process described in Section 26.1 but that gives 
the same final result. This assumption is justified because the energy in the final 
configuration does not depend on the actual charge-transfer process.3 Imagine the 
plates are disconnected from the battery and you transfer the charge mechanically 
through the space between the plates as follows. You grab a small amount of posi-
tive charge on one plate and apply a force that causes this positive charge to move 
over to the other plate. Therefore, you do work on the charge as it is transferred 
from one plate to the other. At first, no work is required to transfer a small amount 
of charge dq from one plate to the other,4 but once this charge has been trans-
ferred, a small potential difference exists between the plates. Therefore, work must 
be done to move additional charge through this potential difference. As more and 
more charge is transferred from one plate to the other, the potential difference 
increases in proportion and more work is required. The overall process is described 
by the nonisolated system model for energy. Equation 8.2 reduces to W 5 DU
E
; the 
work done on the system by the external agent appears as an increase in electric 
potential energy in the system.
Suppose q is the charge on the capacitor at some instant during the charging pro-
cess. At the same instant, the potential difference across the capacitor is DV5 q/C. 
This relationship is graphed in Figure 26.11. From Section 25.1, we know that the 
work necessary to transfer an increment of charge dq from the plate carrying charge 
2q to the plate carrying charge q (which is at the higher electric potential) is
dW5DV dq5
q
C
dq 
The work required to transfer the charge dq is the area of the tan rectangle in Fig-
ure 26.11. Because 1 V 5 1 J/C, the unit for the area is the joule. The total work 
required to charge the capacitor from q 5 0 to some final charge q 5 Q is
W
3
Q
0
q
C
dq5
1
C
3
Q
0
q dq5
Q
2
2C
The work done in charging the capacitor appears as electric potential energy U
E
stored in the capacitor. Using Equation 26.1, we can express the potential energy 
stored in a charged capacitor as
U
E
5
Q
2
2C
5
1
2
Q DV5
1
2
C
1
DV
22
(26.11)
Because the curve in Figure 26.11 is a straight line, the total area under the curve is 
that of a triangle of base Q and height DV.
Equation 26.11 applies to any capacitor, regardless of its geometry. For a given 
capacitance, the stored energy increases as the charge and the potential difference 
increase. In practice, there is a limit to the maximum energy (or charge) that can 
be stored because, at a sufficiently large value of DV, discharge ultimately occurs 
WW Energy stored in a charged 
capacitor
3This discussion is similar to that of state variables in thermodynamics. The change in a state variable such as tem-
perature is independent of the path followed between the initial and final states. The potential energy of a capacitor 
(or any system) is also a state variable, so its change does not depend on the process followed to charge the capacitor.
4We shall use lowercase q for the time-varying charge on the capacitor while it is charging to distinguish it from 
uppercase Q, which is the total charge on the capacitor after it is completely charged.
V
dq
q
Q
The work required to move charge 
dq through the potential 
difference ∆V across the capacitor 
plates is given approximately by 
the area of the shaded rectangle.
Figure 26.11 
A plot of potential 
difference versus charge for a 
capacitor is a straight line having 
slope 1/C.
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
XDoc.PDF SDK for .NET. RasterEdge XDoc.PDF for .NET is a professional .NET PDF solution that provides complete and advanced PDF document processing features.
converter pdf to html; convert pdf to website
VB.NET PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file
Conversion of PDF to Html5. For how to convert PDF to HTML document in VB.NET application, a simple and easy VB.NET sample code is given on this page for you
convert pdf to html code; convert pdf to html online for
788
chapter 26 capacitance and Dielectrics
Example 26.4   Rewiring Two Charged Capacitors
Two capacitors C
1
and C
2
(where C
1
C
2
) are charged to the 
same initial potential difference DV
i
. The charged capacitors 
are removed from the battery, and their plates are connected 
with opposite polarity as in Figure 26.12a. The switches S
1
and S
2
are then closed as in Figure 26.12b.
(A)  Find the final potential difference DV
f
between a and b 
after the switches are closed.
Conceptualize  Figure 26.12 helps us understand the initial 
and final configurations of the system. When the switches 
are closed, the charge on the system will redistribute 
between the capacitors until both capacitors have the same 
potential difference. Because C
1
C
2
, more charge exists 
on C
1
than on C
2
, so the final configuration will have positive charge on the left plates as shown in Figure 26.12b.
Categorize  In Figure 26.12b, it might appear as if the capacitors are connected in parallel, but there is no battery in 
this circuit to apply a voltage across the combination. Therefore, we cannot categorize this problem as one in which 
capacitors are connected in parallel. We can categorize it as a problem involving an isolated system for electric charge. 
The left-hand plates of the capacitors form an isolated system because they are not connected to the right-hand plates 
by conductors.
SoluTIoN
between the plates. For this reason, capacitors are usually labeled with a maximum 
operating voltage.
We can consider the energy in a capacitor to be stored in the electric field cre-
ated between the plates as the capacitor is charged. This description is reason-
able because the electric field is proportional to the charge on the capacitor. For 
 parallel-plate capacitor, the potential difference is related to the electric field 
through the relationship DV 5 Ed. Furthermore, its capacitance is C 5 P
0
A/d (Eq. 
26.3). Substituting these expressions into Equation 26.11 gives
U
E
5
1
2
a
P
0
A
d
b
1
Ed
22
5
1
2
1
P
0
Ad
2
E2  
(26.12)
Because the volume occupied by the electric field is Ad, the energy per unit volume  
u
E
U
E
/Ad, known as the energy density, is
u
E
5
1
2
P
0
E2 
(26.13)
Although Equation 26.13 was derived for a parallel-plate capacitor, the expression 
is generally valid regardless of the source of the electric field. That is, the energy 
density in any electric field is proportional to the square of the magnitude of the 
electric field at a given point.
uick Quiz 26.4  You have three capacitors and a battery. In which of the follow-
ing combinations of the three capacitors is the maximum possible energy stored 
when the combination is attached to the battery? (a) series (b) parallel (c) no 
difference because both combinations store the same amount of energy
Energy density in 
an electric field
+
-
Q
1i
+
b
a
-
C
1
Q
2i
-
+
C
2
S
1
S
2
+
b
a
-
S
1
S
2
Q
1f
C
1
Q
2f
C
2
a
b
Figure 26.12 
(Example 26.4) (a) Two capacitors are 
charged to the same initial potential difference and con-
nected together with plates of opposite sign to be in contact 
when the switches are closed. (b) When the switches are 
closed, the charges redistribute.
Analyze  Write an expression for the total charge on the 
left-hand plates of the system before the switches are 
closed, noting that a negative sign for Q
2i
is necessary 
because the charge on the left plate of capacitor C
2
is 
negative:
(1)   Q
i
Q
1i
Q
2i
C
1
DV
i
C
2
DV
i
5 (C
1
C
2
)DV
i
Pitfall Prevention 26.4
Not a New Kind of Energy  
The energy given by Equation 
26.12 is not a new kind of energy. 
The equation describes familiar 
electric potential energy associ-
ated with a system of separated 
source charges. Equation 26.12 
provides a new interpretation, or a 
new way of modeling the energy. 
Furthermore, Equation 26.13 cor-
rectly describes the energy density 
associated with any electric field, 
regardless of the source.
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
CSV Document Conversion. RasterEdge Windows Viewer SDK provides how to convert TIFF: Convert to PDF. Convert to Various Images. PDF Document Conversion.
convert pdf to html; embed pdf to website
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
And detailed C# demo codes for these conversions are offered below. C# Demo Codes for Word Conversions. Word to PDF Conversion. PDF to Word Conversion.
convert pdf to url link; embed pdf into website
26.4 energy Stored in a charged capacitor 
789
One device in which capacitors have an important role is the portable defibrillator 
(see the chapter-opening photo on page 777). When cardiac fibrillation (random 
contractions) occurs, the heart produces a rapid, irregular pattern of beats. A fast dis-
charge of energy through the heart can return the organ to its normal beat pattern. 
Emergency medical teams use portable defibrillators that contain batteries capable 
of charging a capacitor to a high voltage. (The circuitry actually permits the capacitor 
to be charged to a much higher voltage than that of the battery.) Up to 360 J is stored 
Because the system is isolated, the initial and 
final charges on the system must be the same. 
Use this condition and Equations (1) and (2) to 
solve for DV
f
:
Q
f
5Q
i
  
1
C
1
1C
2
2
DV
f
5
1
C
1
2C
2
2
DV
i
(3)   DV
f
a
C
1
2C
2
C
1
1C
2
b
DV
i
(B)  Find the total energy stored in the capacitors before and after the switches are closed and determine the ratio of 
the final energy to the initial energy.
SoluTIoN
Divide Equation (5) by Equation (4) to obtain the 
ratio of the energies stored in the system:
U
f
U
i
5
1
2
1
C
1
2C
2
221
DV
i
22
/
1
C
1
1C
2
2
1
2
1C
1
1C
2
21DV
i
22
(6)   
U
f
U
i
5
a
C
1
2C
2
C
1
1C
2
b
2
Use the results of part (A) to rewrite this expres-
sion in terms of DV
i
:
(5)   U
f
5
1
2
1
C
1
1C
2
2
ca
C
1
2C
2
C
1
1C
2
b DV
i
d
2
5
1
2
1
C
1
2C
2
221
DV
i
22
C
1
1C
2
Write an expression for the total energy stored in 
the capacitors after the switches are closed:
U
f
5
1
2
C
1
1
DV
f
22
1
1
2
C
2
1
DV
f
22
5
1
2
1
C
1
1C
2
21
DV
f
22
Use Equation 26.11 to find an expression for the 
total energy stored in the capacitors before the 
switches are closed:
(4)   U
i
5
1
2
C
1
1
DV
i
22
1
1
2
C
2
1
DV
i
22
5
1
2
1
C
1
1C
2
21
DV
i
22
Finalize  The ratio of energies is less than unity, indicating that the final energy is less than the initial energy. At first, 
you might think the law of energy conservation has been violated, but that is not the case. The “missing” energy is 
transferred out of the system by the mechanism of electromagnetic waves (T
ER
in Eq. 8.2), as we shall see in Chapter 34. 
Therefore, this system is isolated for electric charge, but nonisolated for energy.
What if the two capacitors have the same capacitance? What would you expect to happen when the 
switches are closed?
Answer  Because both capacitors have the same initial potential difference applied to them, the charges on the identical 
capacitors have the same magnitude. When the capacitors with opposite polarities are connected together, the equal- 
magnitude charges should cancel each other, leaving the capacitors uncharged.
Let’s test our results to see if that is the case mathematically. In Equation (1), because the capacitances are equal, 
the initial charge Q
i
on the system of left-hand plates is zero. Equation (3) shows that DV
f
5 0, which is consistent with 
uncharged capacitors. Finally, Equation (5) shows that U
f
5 0, which is also consistent with uncharged capacitors.
WhaT IF?
After the switches are closed, the charges on 
the individual capacitors change to new values 
Q
1 
and Q
2f  
such that the potential difference 
is again the same across both capacitors, with 
a value of DV
f
. Write an expression for the total 
charge on the left-hand plates of the system  
after the switches are closed:
(2)   Q
f
Q
1f
Q
2f
C
1
DV
f
C
2
DV
f
5 (C
1
C
2
)DV
f
▸ 26.4 
continued
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
And detailed C# demo codes for these conversions are offered below. C# Demo Codes for PowerPoint Conversions. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
convert pdf form to web form; convert pdf to html5
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
As RasterEdge VB.NET PDF to Word converter library has its own PDF decoder, it can finish high-fidelity PDF to Word conversion without depending on other third
how to convert pdf to html; how to convert pdf into html
790
chapter 26 capacitance and Dielectrics
in the electric field of a large capacitor in a defibrillator when it is fully charged. The 
stored energy is released through the heart by conducting electrodes, called paddles, 
which are placed on both sides of the victim’s chest. The defibrillator can deliver 
the energy to a patient in about 2 ms (roughly equivalent to 3 000 times the power 
delivered to a 60-W lightbulb!). The paramedics must wait between applications of 
the energy because of the time interval necessary for the capacitors to become fully 
charged. In this application and others (e.g., camera flash units and lasers used for 
fusion experiments), capacitors serve as energy reservoirs that can be slowly charged 
and then quickly discharged to provide large amounts of energy in a short pulse.
26.5 Capacitors with Dielectrics
dielectric is a nonconducting material such as rubber, glass, or waxed paper. We 
can perform the following experiment to illustrate the effect of a dielectric in a 
capacitor. Consider a parallel-plate capacitor that without a dielectric has a charge 
Q
0
and a capacitance C
0
. The potential difference across the capacitor is DV
0
Q
0
/C
0
. Figure 26.13a illustrates this situation. The potential difference is measured 
by a device called a voltmeter. Notice that no battery is shown in the figure; also, we 
must assume no charge can flow through an ideal voltmeter. Hence, there is no 
path by which charge can flow and alter the charge on the capacitor. If a dielectric 
is now inserted between the plates as in Figure 26.13b, the voltmeter indicates that 
the voltage between the plates decreases to a value DV. The voltages with and with-
out the dielectric are related by a factor k as follows:
DV5
DV
0
k
Because DV , DV
0
, we see that k . 1. The dimensionless factor k is called the dielec-
tric constant of the material. The dielectric constant varies from one material to 
another. In this section, we analyze this change in capacitance in terms of electrical 
parameters such as electric charge, electric field, and potential difference; Section 
26.7 describes the microscopic origin of these changes.
Because the charge Q
0
on the capacitor does not change, the capacitance must 
change to the value
C5
Q
0
DV
5
Q
0
DV
0
/k
5k 
Q
0
DV
0
C5kC
0
(26.14)
Capacitance of a capacitor 
filled with a material of 
dielectric constant k
Pitfall Prevention 26.5
Is the Capacitor Connected  
to a Battery? For problems in 
which a capacitor is modified 
(by insertion of a dielectric, for 
example), you must note whether 
modifications to the capacitor are 
being made while the capacitor is 
connected to a battery or after it 
is disconnected. If the capacitor 
remains connected to the battery, 
the voltage across the capacitor 
necessarily remains the same. If 
you disconnect the capacitor from 
the battery before making any 
modifications to the capacitor, 
the capacitor is an isolated system 
for electric charge and its charge 
remains the same.
C
0
Q
0
-
+
C
Q
0
Dielectric
V
V
0
-
+
The potential 
difference across the 
charged capacitor is 
initially ∆V
0
.
After the dielectric is inserted between 
the plates, the charge remains the same, 
but the potential difference decreases 
and the capacitance increases.
a
b
Figure 26.13 
A charged capaci-
tor (a) before and (b) after  
insertion of a dielectric between 
the plates.
26.5 capacitors with Dielectrics 
791
That is, the capacitance increases by the factor k when the dielectric completely fills 
the region between the plates.5 Because C
0
5 P
0
A/d (Eq. 26.3) for a parallel-plate 
capacitor, we can express the capacitance of a parallel-plate capacitor filled with a 
dielectric as
C5k 
P
0
A
d
(26.15)
From Equation 26.15, it would appear that the capacitance could be made very 
large by inserting a dielectric between the plates and decreasing d. In practice, the 
lowest value of d is limited by the electric discharge that could occur through the 
dielectric medium separating the plates. For any given separation d, the maximum 
voltage that can be applied to a capacitor without causing a discharge depends on 
the dielectric strength (maximum electric field) of the dielectric. If the magnitude 
of the electric field in the dielectric exceeds the dielectric strength, the insulating 
properties break down and the dielectric begins to conduct.
Physical capacitors have a specification called by a variety of names, including 
working voltage, breakdown voltage, and rated voltage. This parameter represents the 
largest voltage that can be applied to the capacitor without exceeding the dielectric 
strength of the dielectric material in the capacitor. Consequently, when selecting 
a capacitor for a given application, you must consider its capacitance as well as the 
expected voltage across the capacitor in the circuit, making sure the expected volt-
age is smaller than the rated voltage of the capacitor.
Insulating materials have values of k greater than unity and dielectric strengths 
greater than that of air as Table 26.1 indicates. Therefore, a dielectric provides the 
following advantages:
• An increase in capacitance
• An increase in maximum operating voltage
• Possible mechanical support between the plates, which allows the plates to be 
close together without touching, thereby decreasing d and increasing C
Table 26.1
Approximate Dielectric Constants and Dielectric Strengths  
of Various Materials at Room Temperature
Material 
Dielectric Constant k 
Dielectric Strengtha (106 V/m)
Air (dry) 
1.000 59 
3
Bakelite 
4.9 
24
Fused quartz 
3.78 
8
Mylar 
3.2 
7
Neoprene rubber 
6.7 
12
Nylon 
3.4 
14
Paper 
3.7 
16
Paraffin-impregnated paper 
3.5 
11
Polystyrene 
2.56 
24
Polyvinyl chloride 
3.4 
40
Porcelain 
12
Pyrex glass 
5.6 
14
Silicone oil 
2.5 
15
Strontium titanate 
233 
8
Teflon 
2.1 
60
Vacuum 
1.000 00 
Water 
80 
aThe dielectric strength equals the maximum electric field that can exist in a dielectric without electrical breakdown. 
These values depend strongly on the presence of impurities and flaws in the materials.
5 If the dielectric is introduced while the potential difference is held constant by a battery, the charge increases to 
a value Q 5 kQ
0
. The additional charge comes from the wires attached to the capacitor, and the capacitance again 
increases by the factor k.
792
chapter 26 capacitance and Dielectrics
Types of Capacitors
Many capacitors are built into integrated circuit chips, but some electrical devices 
still use stand-alone capacitors. Commercial capacitors are often made from metal-
lic foil interlaced with thin sheets of either paraffin-impregnated paper or Mylar 
as the dielectric material. These alternate layers of metallic foil and dielectric are 
rolled into a cylinder to form a small package (Fig. 26.14a). High-voltage capacitors 
commonly consist of a number of interwoven metallic plates immersed in silicone 
oil (Fig. 26.14b). Small capacitors are often constructed from ceramic materials.
Often, an electrolytic capacitor is used to store large amounts of charge at relatively 
low voltages. This device, shown in Figure 26.14c, consists of a metallic foil in con-
tact with an electrolyte, a solution that conducts electricity by virtue of the motion of 
ions contained in the solution. When a voltage is applied between the foil and the 
electrolyte, a thin layer of metal oxide (an insulator) is formed on the foil, and this 
layer serves as the dielectric. Very large values of capacitance can be obtained in 
an electrolytic capacitor because the dielectric layer is very thin and therefore the 
plate separation is very small.
Electrolytic capacitors are not reversible as are many other capacitors. They 
have a polarity, which is indicated by positive and negative signs marked on the 
device. When electrolytic capacitors are used in circuits, the polarity must be cor-
rect. If the polarity of the applied voltage is the opposite of what is intended, the 
oxide layer is removed and the capacitor conducts electricity instead of storing 
charge.
Variable capacitors (typically 10 to 500 pF) usually consist of two interwoven sets 
of metallic plates, one fixed and the other movable, and contain air as the dielec-
tric (Fig. 26.15). These types of capacitors are often used in radio tuning circuits.
uick Quiz 26.5  If you have ever tried to hang a picture or a mirror, you know it 
can be difficult to locate a wooden stud in which to anchor your nail or screw. A 
carpenter’s stud finder is a capacitor with its plates arranged side by side instead 
of facing each other as shown in Figure 26.16. When the device is moved over a 
stud, does the capacitance (a) increase or (b)decrease?
Plates
Electrolyte
Case
Metallic foil + oxide layer
Contacts
Metal foil
Paper
An electrolytic 
capacitor
Oil
a
b
c
A tubular capacitor 
whose plates are 
separated by paper 
and then rolled into 
a cylinder
A high-voltage 
capacitor consisting 
of many parallel 
plates separated by 
insulating oil
Figure 26.14 
Three commercial capacitor designs.
When one set of metal plates is 
rotated so as to lie between a fixed 
set of plates, the capacitance of the 
device changes.
Figure 26.15 
A variable capacitor. 
.
C
e
n
g
a
g
e
L
e
a
r
n
i
n
g
/
G
e
o
r
g
e
S
e
m
p
l
e
Capacitor
plates
Stud 
finder
Wallboard
Stud
a
b
The materials between the 
plates of the capacitor are 
the wallboard and air.
When the capacitor moves across 
a stud in the wall, the materials 
between the plates are the 
wallboard and the wood stud. 
The change in the dielectric 
constant causes a signal light to 
illuminate.
Figure 26.16 
(Quick Quiz 26.5)  
A stud finder.
Example 26.5   Energy Stored Before and After 
A parallel-plate capacitor is charged with a battery to a charge Q
0
. The battery is then removed, and a slab of material 
that has a dielectric constant k is inserted between the plates. Identify the system as the capacitor and the dielectric. 
Find the energy stored in the system before and after the dielectric is inserted.
AM
26.6 electric Dipole in an electric Field 
793
Conceptualize  Think about what happens when the dielectric is inserted between the plates. Because the battery has 
been removed, the charge on the capacitor must remain the same. We know from our earlier discussion, however, that 
the capacitance must change. Therefore, we expect a change in the energy of the system.
Categorize  Because we expect the energy of the system to change, we model it as a nonisolated system for energy involv-
ing a capacitor and a dielectric. 
SoluTIoN
Use Equation 26.14 to replace the capacitance C:
U5
Q
0
2
2kC
0
5
U
0
k
Find the energy stored in the capacitor after the dielec-
tric is inserted between the plates:
U5
Q
0
2
2C
Analyze  From Equation 26.11, find the energy stored in 
the absence of the dielectric:
U
0
5
Q
0
2
2C
0
Finalize  Because k . 1, the final energy is less than the initial energy. We can account for the decrease in energy 
of the system by performing an experiment and noting that the dielectric, when inserted, is pulled into the device. 
To keep the dielectric from accelerating, an external agent must do negative work on the dielectric. Equation 8.2 
becomes DU 5 W, where both sides of the equation are negative.
26.6 Electric Dipole in an Electric Field
We have discussed the effect on the capacitance of placing a dielectric between the 
plates of a capacitor. In Section 26.7, we shall describe the microscopic origin of 
this effect. Before we can do so, however, let’s expand the discussion of the electric 
dipole introduced in Section 23.4 (see Example 23.6). The electric dipole consists 
of two charges of equal magnitude and opposite sign separated by a distance 2a as 
shown in Figure 26.17. The electric dipole moment of this configuration is defined 
as the vector p
S
directed from 2q toward 1q along the line joining the charges and 
having magnitude
p ; 2aq 
(26.16)
Now suppose an electric dipole is placed in a uniform electric field E
S
and makes 
an angle u with the field as shown in Figure 26.18. We identify E
S
as the field external 
to the dipole, established by some other charge distribution, to distinguish it from 
the field due to the dipole, which we discussed in Section 23.4.
Each of the charges is modeled as a particle in an electric field. The electric 
forces acting on the two charges are equal in magnitude (F 5 qE) and opposite in 
direction as shown in Figure 26.18. Therefore, the net force on the dipole is zero. 
The two forces produce a net torque on the dipole, however; the dipole is there-
fore described by the rigid object under a net torque model. As a result, the dipole 
rotates in the direction that brings the dipole moment vector into greater alignment 
with the field. The torque due to the force on the positive charge about an axis 
through O in Figure 26.18 has magnitude Fa sin u, where a sin u is the moment arm 
of F about O. This force tends to produce a clockwise rotation. The torque about O 
on the negative charge is also of magnitude Fa sin u; here again, the force tends to 
produce a clockwise rotation. Therefore, the magnitude of the net torque about O is
t 5 2Fa sin u 
Because F 5 qE and p 5 2aq, we can express t as
t 5 2aqE sin u 5 pE sin u 
(26.17)
+q
-q
2a
p
S
+
-
The electric dipole moment 
is directed from -q toward +q.
S
Figure 26.17 
An electric dipole 
consists of two charges of equal 
magnitude and opposite sign 
separated by a distance of 2a.
q
-q
O
-
+
u
E
S
-F
S
F
S
p
S
The dipole moment p is at an 
angle u to the field, causing the 
dipole to experience a torque.
S
Figure 26.18 
An electric dipole 
in a uniform external electric field.
▸ 26.5 
continued
794
chapter 26 capacitance and Dielectrics
Based on this expression, it is convenient to express the torque in vector form as the 
cross product of the vectors p
S
and E
S
:
t
S
5p
S
E
S
(26.18)
We can also model the system of the dipole and the external electric field as an 
isolated system for energy. Let’s determine the potential energy of the system as a 
function of the dipole’s orientation with respect to the field. To do so, recognize 
that work must be done by an external agent to rotate the dipole through an angle 
so as to cause the dipole moment vector to become less aligned with the field. The 
work done is then stored as electric potential energy in the system. Notice that this 
potential energy is associated with a rotational configuration of the system. Previ-
ously, we have seen potential energies associated with translational configurations: 
an object with mass was moved in a gravitational field, a charge was moved in an 
electric field, or a spring was extended. The work dW required to rotate the dipole 
through an angle du is dW 5 t du (see Eq. 10.25). Because t 5 pE sin u and the work 
results in an increase in the electric potential energy U, we find that for a rotation 
from u
i
to u
f
, the change in potential energy of the system is
U
f
2U
i
5
3
u
f
u
i
du5
3
u
f
u
i
pE sin u du5pE 
3
u
f
u
i
sin u d
5pE
3
2cos u
4u
f
u
i
5pE
1
cos u
i
2cos u
f
2
The term that contains cos u
i
is a constant that depends on the initial orientation of 
the dipole. It is convenient to choose a reference angle of u
i
5 908 so that cos u
i
5 
cos 908 5 0. Furthermore, let’s choose U
i
5 0 at u
i
5 908 as our reference value of 
potential energy. Hence, we can express a general value of U
E
U
 
as
U
E
52pE cos u 
(26.19)
We can write this expression for the potential energy of a dipole in an electric field 
as the dot product of the vectors p
S
and E
S
:
U
E
52p
S
?E
S
(26.20)
To develop a conceptual understanding of Equation 26.19, compare it with the 
expression for the potential energy of the system of an object in the Earth’s gravi-
tational field, U
g
mgy (Eq. 7.19). First, both expressions contain a parameter of 
the entity placed in the field: mass for the object, dipole moment for the dipole. 
Second, both expressions contain the field, g for the object, E for the dipole. Finally, 
both expressions contain a configuration description: translational position y for 
the object, rotational position u for the dipole. In both cases, once the configura-
tion is changed, the system tends to return to the original configuration when the 
object is released: the object of mass m falls toward the ground, and the dipole 
begins to rotate back toward the configuration in which it is aligned with the field.
Molecules are said to be polarized when a separation exists between the average 
position of the negative charges and the average position of the positive charges 
in the molecule. In some molecules such as water, this condition is always present; 
such molecules are called polar molecules. Molecules that do not possess a perma-
nent polarization are called nonpolar molecules.
We can understand the permanent polarization of water by inspecting the geom-
etry of the water molecule. The oxygen atom in the water molecule is bonded to the 
hydrogen atoms such that an angle of 1058 is formed between the two bonds (Fig. 
26.19). The center of the negative charge distribution is near the oxygen atom, and 
the center of the positive charge distribution lies at a point midway along the line 
joining the hydrogen atoms (the point labeled 3 in Fig. 26.19). We can model the 
water molecule and other polar molecules as dipoles because the average positions 
of the positive and negative charges act as point charges. As a result, we can apply 
our discussion of dipoles to the behavior of polar molecules.
Torque on an electric dipole 
in an external electric field
Potential energy of the 
system of an electric dipole 
in an external electric field
O
H
H
105°
-
+
+
The center of the positive charge 
distribution is at the point    .
Figure 26.19 
The water mol-
ecule, H
2
O, has a permanent 
polarization resulting from its 
nonlinear geometry. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested