27.2 resistance 
815
continued
(B)  If a potential difference of 10 V is maintained across a 1.0-m length of the Nichrome wire, what is the current in 
the wire?
SolutIoN
Analyze  Use Equation 27.7 to find the current:
I5
DV
R
5
DV
1
R/,
2
,
5
10 V
1
3.1 V/m
21
1.0 m
2
5 3.2 A
Finalize  Because of its high resistivity and resistance to oxidation, Nichrome is often used for heating elements in 
toasters, irons, and electric heaters.
What if the wire were composed of copper instead of Nichrome?  How would the values of the resistance 
per unit length and the current change?
Answer Table 27.2 shows us that copper has a resistivity two orders of magnitude smaller than that for Nichrome. 
Therefore, we expect the answer to part (A) to be smaller and the answer to part (B) to be larger. Calculations show 
that a copper wire of the same radius would have a resistance per unit length of only 0.053 V/m. A 1.0-m length of cop-
per wire of the same radius would carry a current of 190 A with an applied potential difference of 10 V.
What IF?
Example 27.3   The Radial Resistance of a Coaxial Cable
Coaxial cables are used extensively for cable television and other electronic appli-
cations. A coaxial cable consists of two concentric cylindrical conductors. The 
region between the conductors is completely filled with polyethylene plastic as 
shown in Figure 27.8a. Current leakage through the plastic, in the radial direc-
tion, is unwanted. (The cable is designed to conduct current along its length, but 
that is not the current being considered here.) The radius of the inner conductor 
is a 5 0.500 cm, the radius of the outer conductor is b 5 1.75 cm, and the length 
is L 5 15.0 cm. The resistivity of the plastic is 1.0 3 1013 V ? m. Calculate the resis-
tance of the plastic between the two conductors.
Conceptualize  Imagine two currents as suggested in the text of the problem. The 
desired current is along the cable, carried within the conductors. The undesired 
current corresponds to leakage through the plastic, and its direction is radial.
Categorize  Because the resistivity and the geometry of the plastic are known, we 
categorize this problem as one in which we find the resistance of the plastic from 
these parameters. Equation 27.10, however, represents the resistance of a block 
of material. We have a more complicated geometry in this situation. Because the 
area through which the charges pass depends on the radial position, we must use 
integral calculus to determine the answer.
Analyze  We divide the plastic into concentric cylindrical shells of infinitesimal 
thickness dr (Fig. 27.8b). Any charge passing from the inner to the outer conduc-
tor must move radially through this shell. Use a differential form of Equation 
27.10, replacing , with dr for the length variable: dR 5 r dr/A, where dR is the 
resistance of a shell of plastic of thickness dr and surface area A.  
SolutIoN
L
Outer
conductor
Inner
conductor
Polyethylene
a
b
Current
direction
End view
dr
r
a
b
Figure 27.8 
(Example 27.3) A 
coaxial cable. (a) Polyethylene plastic 
fills the gap between the two conduc-
tors. (b) End view, showing current 
leakage.
▸ 27.2 
continued
Write an expression for the resistance of our hollow 
cylindrical shell of plastic representing the area as the 
surface area of the shell:
dR5
dr
A
5
r
2prL
dr
How to change pdf to html format - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
how to convert pdf file to html document; converting pdf to html email
How to change pdf to html format - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
convert pdf to html for online; how to change pdf to html format
816
chapter 27 current and resistance
27.3 A Model for Electrical Conduction
In this section, we describe a structural model of electrical conduction in metals 
that was first proposed by Paul Drude (1863–1906) in 1900. (See Section 21.1 for a 
review of structural models.) This model leads to Ohm’s law and shows that resistiv-
ity can be related to the motion of electrons in metals. Although the Drude model 
described here has limitations, it introduces concepts that are applied in more elab-
orate treatments.
Following the outline of structural models from Section 21.1, the Drude model 
for electrical conduction has the following properties:
1. Physical components: 
Consider a conductor as a regular array of atoms plus a collection of free elec-
trons, which are sometimes called conduction electrons. We identify the system 
as the combination of the atoms and the conduction electrons. The conduc-
tion electrons, although bound to their respective atoms when the atoms are 
not part of a solid, become free when the atoms condense into a solid.
2. Behavior of the components: 
(a) In the absence of an electric field, the conduction electrons move in 
random directions through the conductor (Fig. 27.3a). The situation is 
similar to the motion of gas molecules confined in a vessel. In fact, some 
scientists refer to conduction electrons in a metal as an electron gas.
(b) When an electric field is applied to the system, the free electrons drift 
slowly in a direction opposite that of the electric field (Fig. 27.3b), with 
an average drift speed v
d
that is much smaller (typically 1024 m/s) than 
their average speed v
avg
between collisions (typically 106 m/s).
(c) The electron’s motion after a collision is independent of its motion 
before the collision. The excess energy acquired by the electrons due to 
Suppose the coaxial cable is enlarged to 
twice the overall diameter with two possible choices:  
(1) the ratio b/a is held fixed, or (2) the difference b 2 a 
is held fixed. For which choice does the leakage current 
between the inner and outer conductors increase when 
the voltage is applied between them?
Answer  For the current to increase, the resistance must 
decrease. For choice (1), in which b/a is held fixed, Equa-
What IF?
tion (1) shows that the resistance is unaffected. For choice 
(2), we do not have an equation involving the difference 
b2 a to inspect. Looking at Figure 27.8b, however, we see 
that increasing b and a while holding the difference con-
stant results in charge flowing through the same thick-
ness of plastic but through a larger area perpendicular to 
the flow. This larger area results in lower resistance and 
a higher current.
Substitute the values given:
R5
1.031013 V
#
m
2p
1
0.150 m
2
ln a
1.75 cm
0.500 cm
b5 1.33 3 1013 V
Integrate this expression from r 5 a to r 5 b:
(1)   R5
3
dR5
r
2pL
3
b
a
dr
r
5
r
2pL
ln a
b
a
b
Finalize  Let’s compare this resistance to that of the inner copper conductor of the cable along the 15.0-cm length.
Use Equation 27.10 to find the resistance of the 
copper cylinder:
R
Cu
5r 
,
A
5
1
1.731028 V
#
m
2
c
0.150 m
p
1
5.0031023 m
22
d
5 3.2 3 1025 V
This resistance is 18 orders of magnitude smaller than the radial resistance. Therefore, almost all the current corre-
sponds to charge moving along the length of the cable, with a very small fraction leaking in the radial direction.
▸ 27.3 
continued
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
An attempt to load a program with an incorrect format", please check your configure as follows: You can also directly change PDF to Gif image file in C# program
convert pdf into html code; change pdf to html
VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
NET control to batch convert PDF documents to Tiff format in Visual Basic. Qualified Tiff files are exported with high resolution in VB.NET.
convert pdf to html5 open source; adding pdf to html page
27.3 a Model for electrical conduction 
817
the work done on them by the electric field is transferred to the atoms 
of the conductor when the electrons and atoms collide.
With regard to property 2(c) above, the energy transferred to the atoms causes the 
internal energy of the system and, therefore, the temperature of the conductor to 
increase.
We are now in a position to derive an expression for the drift velocity, using sev-
eral of our analysis models. When a free electron of mass m
e
and charge q (5 2e) is 
subjected to an electric field E
S
, it is described by the particle in a field model and 
experiences a force F
S
5qE
S
. The electron is a particle under a net force, and its 
acceleration can be found from Newton’s second law, gF
S
5ma
S
:
a
S
5
a
F
S
m
5
qE
S
m
e
(27.11)
Because the electric field is uniform, the electron’s acceleration is constant, so the 
electron can be modeled as a particle under constant acceleration. If v
S
i
is the elec-
tron’s initial velocity the instant after a collision (which occurs at a time defined as 
t5 0), the velocity of the electron at a very short time t later (immediately before 
the next collision occurs) is, from Equation 4.8,
v
S
f
v
S
i
1a
S
tv
S
i
1
qE
S
m
e
t 
(27.12)
Let’s now take the average value of v
S
f
for all the electrons in the wire over all pos-
sible collision times t and all possible values of v
S
i
. Assuming the initial velocities are 
randomly distributed over all possible directions (property 2(a) above), the aver-
age value of v
S
i
is zero. The average value of the second term of Equation 27.12 is 
1
qE
S
/m
e
2
t, where t is the  average time interval between successive collisions. Because the 
average value of v
S
f
is equal to the drift velocity,
v
S
f,avg
v
S
d
5
qE
S
m
e
(27.13)
The value of t depends on the size of the metal atoms and the number of electrons 
per unit volume. We can relate this expression for drift velocity in Equation 27.13 
to the current in the conductor. Substituting the magnitude of the velocity from 
Equation 27.13 into Equation 27.4, the average current in the conductor is given by
I
avg
5nq 
a
qE
m
e
t
b
A5
nq2E
m
e
tA 
(27.14)
Because the current density J is the current divided by the area A,
J5
nq
2
E
m
e
where n is the number of electrons per unit volume. Comparing this expression 
with Ohm’s law, J 5 sE, we obtain the following relationships for conductivity and 
resistivity of a conductor:
s5
nq2t
m
e
(27.15)
r5
1
s
5
m
e
nq
2
t
(27.16)
According to this classical model, conductivity and resistivity do not depend on the 
strength of the electric field. This feature is characteristic of a conductor obeying 
Ohm’s law.
WW Drift velocity in terms of 
microscopic quantities
WW Current density in terms of 
microscopic quantities
WW Conductivity in terms of 
microscopic quantities
WW Resistivity in terms of micro-
scopic quantities
How to C#: File Format Support
PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. HTML Document Viewer for Azure, C# HTML Document Viewer VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET
pdf to web converter; how to convert pdf to html code
How to C#: File Format Support
Convert Jpeg to PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. PDF in C#, C# convert PDF to HTML, C# convert
changing pdf to html; convert pdf to html code for email
818
chapter 27 current and resistance
The model shows that the resistivity can be calculated from a knowledge of the 
density of the electrons, their charge and mass, and the average time interval t 
between collisions. This time interval is related to the average distance between col-
lisions /
avg
(the mean free path) and the average speed v
avg
through the expression3
t5
,
avg
v
avg
(27.17)
Although this structural model of conduction is consistent with Ohm’s law, it 
does not correctly predict the values of resistivity or the behavior of the resistivity 
with temperature. For example, the results of classical calculations for v
avg
using the 
ideal gas model for the electrons are about a factor of ten smaller than the actual 
values, which results in incorrect predictions of values of resistivity from Equation 
27.16. Furthermore, according to Equations 27.16 and 27.17, the resistivity is pre-
dicted to vary with temperature as does v
avg
, which, according to an ideal-gas model 
(Chapter 21, Eq. 21.43), is proportional to "T
. This behavior is in disagreement 
with the experimentally observed linear dependence of resistivity with temperature 
for pure metals. (See Section 27.4.) Because of these incorrect predictions, we must 
modify our structural model. We shall call the model that we have developed so far 
the classical model for electrical conduction. To account for the incorrect predic-
tions of the classical model, we develop it further into a quantum mechanical model, 
which we shall describe briefly.
We discussed two important simplification models in earlier chapters, the par-
ticle model and the wave model. Although we discussed these two simplification 
models separately, quantum physics tells us that this separation is not so clear-cut. 
As we shall discuss in detail in Chapter 40, particles have wave-like properties. The 
predictions of some models can only be matched to experimental results if the 
model includes the wave-like behavior of particles. The structural model for electri-
cal conduction in metals is one of these cases.
Let us imagine that the electrons moving through the metal have wave-like prop-
erties. If the array of atoms in a conductor is regularly spaced (that is, periodic), 
the wave-like character of the electrons makes it possible for them to move freely 
through the conductor and a collision with an atom is unlikely. For an idealized 
conductor, no collisions would occur, the mean free path would be infinite, and the 
resistivity would be zero. Electrons are scattered only if the atomic arrangement is 
irregular (not periodic), as a result of structural defects or impurities, for example. 
At low temperatures, the resistivity of metals is dominated by scattering caused by 
collisions between the electrons and impurities. At high temperatures, the resistiv-
ity is dominated by scattering caused by collisions between the electrons and the 
atoms of the conductor, which are continuously displaced as a result of thermal agi-
tation, destroying the perfect periodicity. The thermal motion of the atoms makes 
the structure irregular (compared with an atomic array at rest), thereby reducing 
the electron’s mean free path.
Although it is beyond the scope of this text to show this modification in detail, 
the classical model modified with the wave-like character of the electrons results 
in predictions of resistivity values that are in agreement with measured values and 
predicts a linear temperature dependence. Quantum notions had to be introduced 
in Chapter 21 to understand the temperature behavior of molar specific heats of 
gases. Here we have another case in which quantum physics is necessary for the 
model to agree with experiment. Although classical physics can explain a tremen-
dous range of phenomena, we continue to see hints that quantum physics must be 
incorporated into our models. We shall study quantum physics in detail in Chapters 
40 through 46.
3Recall that the average speed of a group of particles depends on the temperature of the group (Chapter 21) and is 
not the same as the drift speed v
d
.
C#: How to Determine the Display Format for Web Doucment Viewing
and _pptViewer are corresponding to setting PDF, Word, Excel the default setting of our XDoc.HTML Viewer, which on C#.NET web viewer, please change value to 0
best website to convert pdf to word; convert pdf into html
C# PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in C#.net, ASP
pdf = new PDFDocument(@"C:\input.pdf"); pdf.ConvertToVectorImages(ContextType.SVG Description: Convert to html/svg files and targetType, The target image format.
convert pdf to html open source; how to convert pdf to html email
27.5 Superconductors 
819
T
0
T
0
r
r
As T approaches absolute zero, 
the resistivity approaches a 
nonzero value.
Figure 27.9 
Resistivity versus 
temperature for a metal such as 
copper. The curve is linear over 
a wide range of temperatures, 
and r increases with increasing 
temperature. 
0.10
0.05
4.4
4.2
4.0
4.1
4.3
(K)
0.15
T
c
0.00
( )
The resistance drops 
discontinuously to zero at T
c
which is 4.15 K for mercury.
Figure 27.10 
Resistance versus 
temperature for a sample of mer-
cury (Hg). The graph follows that 
of a normal metal above the criti-
cal temperature T
c
.
27.4 Resistance and Temperature
Over a limited temperature range, the resistivity of a conductor varies approxi-
mately linearly with temperature according to the expression
r 5 r
0
[1 1 a(T 2 T
0
)] 
(27.18)
where r is the resistivity at some temperature T (in degrees Celsius), r
0
is the resis-
tivity at some reference temperature T
0
(usually taken to be 20°C), and a is the 
temperature coefficient of resistivity. From Equation 27.18, the temperature coef-
ficient of resistivity can be expressed as
a5
1
r
0
Dr
DT
(27.19)
where Dr 5 r 2 r
0
is the change in resistivity in the temperature interval DT 5  
T 2 T
0
.
The temperature coefficients of resistivity for various materials are given in Table 
27.2. Notice that the unit for a is degrees Celsius21 [(°C)21]. Because resistance is 
proportional to resistivity (Eq. 27.10), the variation of resistance of a sample is
R 5 R
0
[1 1 a(T 2 T
0
)] 
(27.20)
where R
0
is the resistance at temperature T
0
. Use of this property enables precise 
temperature measurements through careful monitoring of the resistance of a 
probe made from a particular material.
For some metals such as copper, resistivity is nearly proportional to temperature 
as shown in Figure 27.9. A nonlinear region always exists at very low temperatures, 
however, and the resistivity usually reaches some finite value as the temperature 
approaches absolute zero. This residual resistivity near absolute zero is caused pri-
marily by the collision of electrons with impurities and imperfections in the metal. 
In contrast, high-temperature resistivity (the linear region) is predominantly char-
acterized by collisions between electrons and metal atoms.
Notice that three of the a values in Table 27.2 are negative, indicating that the 
resistivity of these materials decreases with increasing temperature. This behavior is 
indicative of a class of materials called semiconductors, first introduced in Section 23.2, 
and is due to an increase in the density of charge carriers at higher temperatures.
Because the charge carriers in a semiconductor are often associated with impu-
rity atoms (as we discuss in more detail in Chapter 43), the resistivity of these mate-
rials is very sensitive to the type and concentration of such impurities.
uick Quiz 27.4  When does an incandescent lightbulb carry more current,  
(a) immediately after it is turned on and the glow of the metal filament is increas-
ing or (b)after it has been on for a few milliseconds and the glow is steady?
WW Variation of r with 
temperature
WW temperature coefficient  
of resistivity
27.5 Superconductors
There is a class of metals and compounds whose resistance decreases to zero when 
they are below a certain temperature T
c
, known as the critical temperature. These 
materials are known as superconductors. The resistance–temperature graph for a 
superconductor follows that of a normal metal at temperatures above T
c
(Fig. 27.10). 
When the temperature is at or below T
c
, the resistivity drops suddenly to zero. This 
phenomenon was discovered in 1911 by Dutch physicist Heike Kamerlingh-Onnes 
(1853–1926) as he worked with mercury, which is a superconductor below 4.2 K. 
Measurements have shown that the resistivities of superconductors below their T
c
values are less than 4 3 10225 V ? m, or approximately 1017 times smaller than the 
resistivity of copper. In practice, these resistivities are considered to be zero.
VB.NET Image: Tutorial for Converting Image and Document in VB.NET
you integrate these functions into your VB.NET project, you are able to convert image to byte array or stream and convert Word or PDF document to image format.
convert pdf into html file; convert pdf to html with
C# PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.
Description: Convert the PDF page to bitmap with specified format and save it on the disk. Parameters: Name, Description, Valid Value.
convert pdf table to html; convert pdf to html format
820
chapter 27 current and resistance
Today, thousands of superconductors are known, and as Table 27.3 illustrates, 
the critical temperatures of recently discovered superconductors are substantially 
higher than initially thought possible. Two kinds of superconductors are recog-
nized. The more recently identified ones are essentially ceramics with high criti-
cal temperatures, whereas superconducting materials such as those observed by 
Kamerlingh-Onnes are metals. If a room-temperature superconductor is ever iden-
tified, its effect on technology could be tremendous.
The value of T
c
is sensitive to chemical composition, pressure, and molecular 
structure. Copper, silver, and gold, which are excellent conductors, do not exhibit 
superconductivity.
One truly remarkable feature of superconductors is that once a current is set up 
in them, it persists without any applied potential difference (because R 5 0). Steady cur-
rents have been observed to persist in superconducting loops for several years with 
no apparent decay!
An important and useful application of superconductivity is in the development 
of superconducting magnets, in which the magnitudes of the magnetic field are 
approximately ten times greater than those produced by the best normal elec-
tromagnets. Such superconducting magnets are being considered as a means of 
storing energy. Superconducting magnets are currently used in medical magnetic 
resonance imaging, or MRI, units, which produce high-quality images of internal 
organs without the need for excessive exposure of patients to x-rays or other harm-
ful radiation.
27.6 Electrical Power
In typical electric circuits, energy T
ET
is transferred by electrical transmission from 
a source such as a battery to some device such as a lightbulb or a radio receiver. 
Let’s determine an expression that will allow us to calculate the rate of this energy 
transfer. First, consider the simple circuit in Figure 27.11, where energy is delivered 
to a resistor. (Resistors are designated by the circuit symbol 
.) Because the 
connecting wires also have resistance, some energy is delivered to the wires and 
some to the resistor. Unless noted otherwise, we shall assume the resistance of the 
wires is small compared with the resistance of the circuit element so that the energy 
delivered to the wires is negligible.
Imagine following a positive quantity of charge Q moving clockwise around the 
circuit in Figure 27.11 from point a through the battery and resistor back to point a. 
We identify the entire circuit as our system. As the charge moves from a to b through 
the battery, the electric potential energy of the system increases by an amount Q DV 
Table 27.3
Critical Temperatures 
for Various Superconductors
Material 
T
(K)
HgBa
2
Ca
2
Cu
3
O
8
134
Tl—Ba—Ca—Cu—O 
125
Bi—Sr—Ca—Cu—O 
105
YBa
2
Cu
3
O
7
92
Nb
3
Ge 
23.2
Nb
3
Sn 
18.05
Nb 
9.46
Pb 
7.18
Hg 
4.15
Sn 
3.72
Al 
1.19
Zn 
0.88
A small permanent magnet levi-
tated above a disk of the super-
conductor YBa
2
Cu
3
O
7
, which is in 
liquid nitrogen at 77 K.
C
o
u
r
t
e
s
y
o
f
I
B
M
R
e
s
e
a
r
c
h
L
a
b
o
r
a
t
o
r
y
b
a
c
d
R
I
V
-
+
The direction of the 
effective flow of positive 
charge is clockwise.
Figure 27.11 
A circuit consist-
ing of a resistor of resistance R 
and a battery having a potential 
difference DV across its terminals.
27.6 electrical power 
821
while the chemical potential energy in the battery decreases by the same amount. 
(Recall from Eq. 25.3 that DU 5 q DV.) As the charge moves from c to d through the 
resistor, however, the electric potential energy of the system decreases due to colli-
sions of electrons with atoms in the resistor. In this process, the electric potential 
energy is transformed to internal energy corresponding to increased vibrational 
motion of the atoms in the resistor. Because the resistance of the interconnect-
ing wires is neglected, no energy transformation occurs for paths bc and da. When 
the charge returns to point a, the net result is that some of the chemical potential 
energy in the battery has been delivered to the resistor and resides in the resistor as 
internal energy E
int
associated with molecular vibration.
The resistor is normally in contact with air, so its increased temperature results 
in a transfer of energy by heat Q into the air. In addition, the resistor emits thermal 
radiation T
ER
, representing another means of escape for the energy. After some 
time interval has passed, the resistor reaches a constant temperature. At this time, 
the input of energy from the battery is balanced by the output of energy from the 
resistor by heat and radiation, and the resistor is a nonisolated system in steady 
state. Some electrical devices include heat sinks4 connected to parts of the circuit 
to prevent these parts from reaching dangerously high temperatures. Heat sinks 
are pieces of metal with many fins. Because the metal’s high thermal conductivity 
provides a rapid transfer of energy by heat away from the hot component and the 
large number of fins provides a large surface area in contact with the air, energy 
can transfer by radiation and into the air by heat at a high rate.
Let’s now investigate the rate at which the electric potential energy of the system 
decreases as the charge Q passes through the resistor:
dU
dt
5
d
dt
1
Q DV
2
5
dQ
dt
DV5I DV 
where I is the current in the circuit. The system regains this potential energy when 
the charge passes through the battery, at the expense of chemical energy in the bat-
tery. The rate at which the potential energy of the system decreases as the charge 
passes through the resistor is equal to the rate at which the system gains inter-
nal energy in the resistor. Therefore, the power P, representing the rate at which 
energy is delivered to the resistor, is
P 5 I DV 
(27.21)
We derived this result by considering a battery delivering energy to a resistor. Equa-
tion 27.21, however, can be used to calculate the power delivered by a voltage source 
to any device carrying a current I and having a potential difference DV between its 
terminals.
Using Equation 27.21 and DV 5 IR for a resistor, we can express the power deliv-
ered to the resistor in the alternative forms
P5I
2
R5
1
DV
22
R
(27.22)
When I is expressed in amperes, DV in volts, and R in ohms, the SI unit of power is 
the watt, as it was in Chapter 8 in our discussion of mechanical power. The process 
by which energy is transformed to internal energy in a conductor of resistance R is 
often called joule heating;5 this transformation is also often referred to as an I2R loss.
4This usage is another misuse of the word heat that is ingrained in our common language.
5It is commonly called joule heating even though the process of heat does not occur when energy delivered to a resistor 
appears as internal energy. It is another example of incorrect usage of the word heat that has become entrenched in 
our language.
Pitfall Prevention 27.5
Charges Do Not Move all the Way 
around a Circuit in a Short time  
In terms of understanding the 
energy transfer in a circuit, it is 
useful to imagine a charge mov-
ing all the way around the circuit 
even though it would take hours 
to do so.
Pitfall Prevention 27.6
Misconceptions about Current  
Several common misconceptions 
are associated with current in a 
circuit like that in Figure 27.11. 
One is that current comes out 
of one terminal of the battery 
and is then “used up” as it passes 
through the resistor, leaving 
current in only one part of the 
circuit. The current is actually 
the same everywhere in the circuit. 
A related misconception has the 
current coming out of the resis-
tor being smaller than that going 
in because some of the current 
is “used up.” Yet another miscon-
ception has current coming out 
of both terminals of the battery, 
in opposite directions, and then 
“clashing” in the resistor, deliver-
ing the energy in this manner. 
That is not the case; charges flow 
in the same rotational sense at all 
points in the circuit.
Pitfall Prevention 27.7
Energy Is Not “Dissipated” In 
some books, you may see Equation 
27.22 described as the power “dissi-
pated in” a resistor, suggesting that 
energy disappears. Instead, we say 
energy is “delivered to” a resistor. 
822
chapter 27 current and resistance
When transporting energy by electricity through power lines (Fig. 27.12), you 
should not assume the lines have zero resistance. Real power lines do indeed have 
resistance, and power is delivered to the resistance of these wires. Utility companies 
seek to minimize the energy transformed to internal energy in the lines and maxi-
mize the energy delivered to the consumer. Because P 5 I DV, the same amount of 
energy can be transported either at high currents and low potential differences or at 
low currents and high potential differences. Utility companies choose to transport 
energy at low currents and high potential differences primarily for economic rea-
sons. Copper wire is very expensive, so it is cheaper to use high-resistance wire (that 
is, wire having a small cross-sectional area; see Eq. 27.10). Therefore, in the expres-
sion for the power delivered to a resistor, P 5 I2R, the resistance of the wire is fixed 
at a relatively high value for economic considerations. The I2R loss can be reduced 
by keeping the current I as low as possible, which means transferring the energy 
at a high voltage. In some instances, power is transported at potential differences 
as great as 765 kV. At the destination of the energy, the potential difference is usu-
ally reduced to 4 kV by a device called a transformer. Another transformer drops the 
potential difference to 240 V for use in your home. Of course, each time the poten-
tial difference decreases, the current increases by the same factor and the power 
remains the same. We shall discuss transformers in greater detail in Chapter33.
uick Quiz 27.5  For the two lightbulbs shown in Figure 27.13, rank the current 
values at points a through f from greatest to least.
Example 27.4   Power in an Electric Heater
An electric heater is constructed by applying a potential difference of 120 V across a Nichrome wire that has a total 
resistance of 8.00 V. Find the current carried by the wire and the power rating of the heater.
Conceptualize  As discussed in Example 27.2, Nichrome wire has high resistivity and is often used for heating elements 
in toasters, irons, and electric heaters. Therefore, we expect the power delivered to the wire to be relatively high.
Categorize  We evaluate the power from Equation 27.22, so we categorize this example as a substitution problem.
SolutIoN
Find the power rating using the expression P 5 I2R 
from Equation 27.22:
P5I2R5
1
15.0 A
221
8.00 V
2
51.803103 W5  1.80 kW
Use Equation 27.7 to find the current in the wire:
I5
DV
R
5
120 V
8.00 V
 15.0 A
What if the heater were accidentally connected to a 240-V supply? (That is difficult to do because the 
shape and orientation of the metal contacts in 240-V plugs are different from those in 120-V plugs.) How would that 
affect the current carried by the heater and the power rating of the heater, assuming the resistance remains constant?
Answer  If the applied potential difference were doubled, Equation 27.7 shows that the current would double. Accord-
ing to Equation 27.22, P 5 (DV)2/R, the power would be four times larger.
What IF?
30 W
60 W
a
b
c
d
e
f
+
-
Figure 27.13 
(Quick Quiz 27.5) 
Two lightbulbs connected across 
the same potential difference.
Figure 27.12 
These power lines 
transfer energy from the electric 
company to homes and businesses. 
The energy is transferred at a very 
high voltage, possibly hundreds of 
thousands of volts in some cases. 
Even though it makes power lines 
very dangerous, the high voltage 
results in less loss of energy due to 
resistance in the wires.
L
e
s
t
e
r
L
e
f
k
o
w
i
t
z
/
T
a
x
i
/
G
e
t
t
y
I
m
a
g
e
s
Summary 
823
Example 27.5   Linking Electricity and Thermodynamics 
An immersion heater must increase the temperature of 1.50 kg of water from 10.0°C to 50.0°C in 10.0 min while oper-
ating at 110 V.
(A)  What is the required resistance of the heater?
Conceptualize  An immersion heater is a resistor that is inserted into a container of water. As energy is delivered to the 
immersion heater, raising its temperature, energy leaves the surface of the resistor by heat, going into the water. When 
the immersion heater reaches a constant temperature, the rate of energy delivered to the resistance by electrical trans-
mission (T
ET
) is equal to the rate of energy delivered by heat (Q) to the water.
Categorize  This example allows us to link our new understanding of power in electricity with our experience with 
specific heat in thermodynamics (Chapter 20). The water is a nonisolated system. Its internal energy is rising because 
of energy transferred into the water by heat from the resistor, so Equation 8.2 reduces to DE
int
Q. In our model, we 
assume the energy that enters the water from the heater remains in the water.
Analyze  To simplify the analysis, let’s ignore the initial period during which the temperature of the resistor increases 
and also ignore any variation of resistance with temperature. Therefore, we imagine a constant rate of energy transfer 
for the entire 10.0 min.
AM
SolutIoN
Substitute the values given in the statement of the 
problem:
R5
1
110 V
221
600 s
2
1
1.50 kg
21
4 186 J/kg
#
8C
21
50.08C210.08C
2
 28.9 V
Use Equation 20.4, Q 5 mc DT, to relate the energy 
input by heat to the resulting temperature change  
of the water and solve for the resistance:
1
DV
22
R
5
mc DT
Dt
  R5
1
DV
22
Dt
mc DT
Set the rate of energy delivered to the resistor equal 
to the rate of energy Q entering the water by heat:
P5
1
DV
22
R
5
Q
Dt
(B)  Estimate the cost of heating the water.
SolutIoN
Find the cost knowing that energy is purchased at 
an estimated price of 11. per kilowatt-hour:
Cost 5 (0.069 8 kWh)($0.11/kWh) 5 $0.008 5   0.8.
Multiply the power by the time interval to find the 
amount of energy transferred to the resistor:
T
ET
5P Dt5
1
DV
22
R
Dt5
1
110 V
22
28.9 V
1
10.0 min
2
a
1 h
60.0 min
b
5 69.8 Wh 5 0.069 8 kWh
Finalize  The cost to heat the water is very low, less than one cent. In reality, the cost is higher because some energy 
is transferred from the water into the surroundings by heat and electromagnetic radiation while its temperature is 
increasing. If you have electrical devices in your home with power ratings on them, use this power rating and an 
approximate time interval of use to estimate the cost for one use of the device.
Summary
The electric current I in a conductor is defined as
I;
dQ
dt
(27.2)
where dQ is the charge that passes through a cross sec-
tion of the conductor in a time interval dt. The SI unit 
of current is the ampere (A), where 1 A 5 1 C/s.
Definitions
continued
824
chapter 27 current and resistance
The current density J 
in a conductor is the cur-
rent per unit area:
J;
I
A
(27.5)
For a uniform block 
of material of cross- 
sectional area A and 
length ,, the resistance 
over the length , is
R5r 
,
A
(27.10)
where r is the resistivity 
of the material.
The resistance R of a conductor is defined as
R;
DV
I
(27.7)
where DV is the potential difference across the conductor and I is the current it car-
ries. The SI unit of resistance is volts per ampere, which is defined to be 1 ohm (V); 
that is, 1 V 5 1 V/A.
In a classical model of electrical conduction in metals, the electrons are treated as 
molecules of a gas. In the absence of an electric field, the average velocity of the elec-
trons is zero. When an electric field is applied, the electrons move (on average) with 
drift velocity v
S
d
that is opposite the electric field. The drift velocity is given by
v
S
d
5
qE
S
m
e
(27.13)
where q is the electron’s charge, m
e
is the mass of the electron, and t is the average 
time interval between electron–atom collisions. According to this model, the resistiv-
ity of the metal is
r5
m
e
nq2t
(27.16)
where n is the number of free electrons per unit volume.
Concepts and Principles
The average current in a conductor 
is related to the motion of the charge 
carriers through the relationship
I
avg
nqv
d
A 
(27.4)
where n is the density of charge carri-
ers, q is the charge on each carrier, v
d
is the drift speed, and A is the cross-
sectional area of the conductor.
The resistivity of a conductor 
varies approximately linearly with 
temperature according to the 
expression
r 5 r
0
[1 1 a(T 2 T
0
)] (27.18)
where r
0
is the resistivity at some 
reference temperature T
0
and a 
is the temperature coefficient of 
resistivity.
The current density in an ohmic conductor is proportional to the 
electric field according to the expression
J 5 sE 
(27.6)
The proportionality constant s is called the conductivity of the material 
of which the conductor is made. The inverse of s is known as resistivity 
r (that is, r 5 1/s). Equation 27.6 is known as Ohm’s law, and a mate-
rial is said to obey this law if the ratio of its current density to its applied 
electric field is a constant that is independent of the applied field.
If a potential difference DV is maintained across a circuit element, the 
power, or rate at which energy is supplied to the element, is
P 5 I  DV 
(27.21)
Because the potential difference across a resistor is given by DV 5 IR, we 
can express the power delivered to a resistor as
P5I2R5
1
DV
22
R
(27.22)
The energy delivered to a resistor by electrical transmission T
ET
appears in 
the form of internal energy E
int
in the resistor.
2. Two wires A and B with circular cross sections are 
made of the same metal and have equal lengths, but 
the resistance of wire A is three times greater than that 
of wire B. (i) What is the ratio of the cross-sectional 
1. Car batteries are often rated in ampere-hours. Does 
this information designate the amount of (a) current, 
(b)power, (c) energy, (d) charge, or (e) potential the 
battery can supply?
Objective Questions
1. 
denotes answer available in Student Solutions Manual/Study Guide
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested