28.1 electromotive Force 
835
(A)  Find the current in the circuit and the terminal voltage of the battery.
Conceptualize  Study Figure 28.1a, which shows a circuit consistent with the problem statement. The battery delivers 
energy to the load resistor.
Categorize  This example involves simple calculations from this section, so we categorize it as a substitution problem.
SolutIon
Use Equation 28.3 to find the current in the circuit:
I5
e
R1r
5
12.0 V
3.00 V10.050 0 V
5
3.93 A
Use Equation 28.1 to find the terminal voltage:
D5
e
2Ir512.0 V213.93 A210.050 0 V2 2 5
11.8 V
To check this result, calculate the voltage across the load 
resistance R:
DV5IR5
1
3.93 A
21
3.00 V
2
5 11.8 V
(B)  Calculate the power delivered to the load resistor, the power delivered to the internal resistance of the battery, 
and the power delivered by the battery.
SolutIon
Use Equation 27.22 to find the power delivered to the 
load resistor:
P
R
I2R 5 (3.93 A)2(3.00 V) 5 
46.3 W
Find the power delivered to the internal resistance:
P
r
I2r 5 (3.93 A)2(0.050 0 V) 5 
0.772 W
Find the power delivered by the battery by adding these 
quantities:
P 5 P
R
P
r
5 46.3 W 1 0.772 W 5 
47.1 W
As a battery ages, its internal resistance increases. Suppose the internal resistance of this battery rises to 
2.00 V toward the end of its useful life. How does that alter the battery’s ability to deliver energy?
Answer  Let’s connect the same 3.00-V load resistor to the battery.
What IF?
Find the new current in the battery:
I5
e
R1r
5
12.0 V
3.00 V12.00 V
52.40 A 
Find the new terminal voltage:
DV 5 
e
Ir 5 12.0 V 2 (2.40 A)(2.00 V) 5 7.2 V
Find the new powers delivered to the load resistor and 
internal resistance:
P
R
I2R 5 (2.40 A)2(3.00 V) 5 17.3 W
P
r
I2r 5 (2.40 A)2(2.00 V) 5 11.5 W
In this situation, the terminal voltage is only 60% of the emf. Notice that 40% of the power from the battery is deliv-
ered to the internal resistance when r is 2.00 V. When r is 0.050 0 V as in part (B), this percentage is only 1.6%. Conse-
quently, even though the emf remains fixed, the increasing internal resistance of the battery significantly reduces the 
battery’s ability to deliver energy to an external load.
Example 28.2   Matching the Load
Find the load resistance R for which the maximum power is delivered to the load resistance in Figure 28.1a.
Conceptualize  Think about varying the load resistance in Figure 28.1a and the effect on the power delivered to the 
load resistance. When R is large, there is very little current, so the power I2R delivered to the load resistor is small. 
SolutIon
continued
▸ 28.1 
continued
Converting pdf to html code - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
converter pdf to html; convert pdf to html code online
Converting pdf to html code - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
convert pdf to website html; convert pdf into html
836
chapter 28 Direct-current circuits
Solve for R:
R 5
r
Differentiate the power with respect to the load resis-
tance R and set the derivative equal to zero to maximize 
the power:
dP
dR
5
d
dR
c
e
2R
1
R1r
22
d 5
d
dR
3
e
2R1R1
r
2224
50
[
e
2(R 1 r)22] 1 [
e
2R(22)(R 1 r)23] 5 0
e
21R1
r2
1
R1r
23
2
2
e
2R
1
R1r
23
5
e
21r2
R2
1
R1r
23
50
Analyze  Find the power delivered to the load resistance 
using Equation 27.22, with I given by Equation 28.3:
(1)   P5I2R5
e
2R
1
R1r
22
Finalize  To check this result, let’s plot P versus R as in Figure 28.2. The graph shows that P reaches a maximum value 
at R 5 r. Equation (1) shows that this maximum value is P
max
e
2/4r.
28.2 Resistors in Series and Parallel
When two or more resistors are connected together as are the incandescent light-
bulbs in Figure 28.3a, they are said to be in a series combination. Figure 28.3b is 
the circuit diagram for the lightbulbs, shown as resistors, and the battery. What if 
you wanted to replace the series combination with a single resistor that would draw 
the same current from the battery? What would be its value? In a series connection, 
if an amount of charge Q exits resistor R
1
, charge Q must also enter the second 
resistor R
2
. Otherwise, charge would accumulate on the wire between the resistors. 
Therefore, the same amount of charge passes through both resistors in a given time 
interval and the currents are the same in both resistors:
I 5 I
1
I
2
where I is the current leaving the battery, I
1
is the current in resistor R
1
, and I
2
is the 
current in resistor R
2
.
The potential difference applied across the series combination of resistors divides 
between the resistors. In Figure 28.3b, because the voltage drop1 from a to b equals 
I
1
R
1
and the voltage drop from b to c equals I
2
R
2
, the voltage drop from a to c is
DV 5 DV
1
1 DV
I
1
R
1
I
2
R
2
The potential difference across the battery is also applied to the equivalent resis-
tance R
eq
in Figure 28.3c:
DV 5 IR
eq
1The term voltage drop is synonymous with a decrease in electric potential across a resistor. It is often used by individu-
als working with electric circuits.
When R is small, let's say R ,, r, the current is large and 
the power delivered to the internal resistance is I2r .. 
I2R. Therefore, the power delivered to the load resistor 
is small compared to that delivered to the internal resis-
tance. For some intermediate value of the resistance R, 
the power must maximize.
Categorize  We categorize this example as an analysis 
problem because we must undertake a procedure to maxi-
mize the power. The circuit is the same as that in Exam-
ple 28.1. The load resistance R in this case, however, is a 
variable.
▸ 28.2 
continued
r
2r
3r
R
P
max
P
Figure 28.2 
(Example 
28.2) Graph of the power 
P delivered by a battery to 
a load resistor of resistance 
R as a function of R.
VB.NET PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file
For how to convert PDF to HTML document in VB a series of demo code directly for converting MicroSoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint document to PDF file in
convert pdf to html with images; convert pdf to html form
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
Free C#.NET SDK library and components for converting PDF file in .NET Windows applications, ASP.NET web Able to export PDF document to HTML file.
export pdf to html; pdf to html conversion
28.2 resistors in Series and parallel 
837
where the equivalent resistance has the same effect on the circuit as the series com-
bination because it results in the same current I in the battery. Combining these 
equations for DV gives
IR
eq
I
1
R
1
I
2
R
2
   R
eq
R
1
R
2
(28.5)
where we have canceled the currents II
1
, and I
2
because they are all the same. We 
see that we can replace the two resistors in series with a single equivalent resistance 
whose value is the sum of the individual resistances.
The equivalent resistance of three or more resistors connected in series is
R
eq
R
1
R
2
R
3
1  
? ? ?
(28.6)
This relationship indicates that the equivalent resistance of a series combination 
of resistors is the numerical sum of the individual resistances and is always greater 
than any individual resistance.
Looking back at Equation 28.3, we see that the denominator of the right-hand 
side is the simple algebraic sum of the external and internal resistances. That is 
consistent with the internal and external resistances being in series in Figure 28.1a.
If the filament of one lightbulb in Figure 28.3 were to fail, the circuit would no 
longer be complete (resulting in an open-circuit condition) and the second light-
bulb would also go out. This fact is a general feature of a series circuit: if one device 
in the series creates an open circuit, all devices are inoperative.
uick Quiz 28.2  With the switch in the circuit of Figure 28.4a closed, there is no 
current in R
2
because the current has an alternate zero-resistance path through 
the switch. There is current in R
1
, and this current is measured with the amme-
ter (a device for measuring current) at the bottom of the circuit. If the switch is 
opened (Fig. 28.4b), there is current in R
2
. What happens to the reading on the 
ammeter when the switch is opened? (a) The reading goes up. (b) The reading 
goes down. (c) The reading does not change.
WW the equivalent resistance of a 
series combination of resistors
+
-
V
1
I
1
I
2
V
2
V
1
V
2
V
+ -
+
-
a
b
c
+
=
R
1
R
2
V
I
I
I
R
1
R
2
I
a
b
c
c
a
R
eq
R
R
2
V
A pictorial representation 
of two resistors connected 
in series to a battery
A circuit diagram showing 
the two resistors connected 
in series to a battery
A circuit diagram showing 
the equivalent resistance of 
the resistors in series
Figure 28.3 
Two lightbulbs with resistances R
1
and R
2
connected in series. All three diagrams are equivalent.
Pitfall Prevention 28.2
lightbulbs Don’t Burn We will 
describe the end of the life of an 
incandescent lightbulb by saying 
the filament fails rather than by say-
ing the lightbulb “burns out.” The 
word burn suggests a combustion 
process, which is not what occurs 
in a lightbulb. The failure of a 
lightbulb results from the slow 
sublimation of tungsten from the 
very hot filament over the life of 
the lightbulb. The filament even-
tually becomes very thin because 
of this process. The mechanical 
stress from a sudden temperature 
increase when the lightbulb is 
turned on causes the thin fila-
ment to break.
Pitfall Prevention 28.3
local and Global Changes A local 
change in one part of a circuit 
may result in a global change 
throughout the circuit. For exam-
ple, if a single resistor is changed 
in a circuit containing several 
resistors and batteries, the cur-
rents in all resistors and batteries, 
the terminal voltages of all bat-
teries, and the voltages across all 
resistors may change as a result.
a
R
1
R
2
A
-
+
b
R
1
R
2
A
-
+
Figure 28.4 
(Quick 
Quiz 28.2) What hap-
pens when the switch is 
opened?
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Convert TIFF Image File
controls. Visual C#.NET demo code for converting PDF document to Tiff image file is offered. How to Convert Jpeg Images to Tiff.
convert pdf to html online for; converting pdfs to html
C# PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in C#.net, ASP
Support converting PDF document to SVG image within C# PDFDocument(@"C:\input.pdf"); pdf.ConvertToVectorImages(ContextType Description: Convert to html/svg files
how to convert pdf into html; convert pdf to url link
838
chapter 28 Direct-current circuits
Now consider two resistors in a parallel combination as shown in Figure 28.5. 
As with the series combination, what is the value of the single resistor that could 
replace the combination and draw the same current from the battery? Notice that 
both resistors are connected directly across the terminals of the battery. Therefore, 
the potential differences across the resistors are the same:
DV 5 DV
1
5 DV
2
where DV is the terminal voltage of the battery.
When charges reach point a in Figure 28.5b, they split into two parts, with some 
going toward R
1
and the rest going toward R
2
. A junction is any such point in a 
circuit where a current can split. This split results in less current in each individual 
resistor than the current leaving the battery. Because electric charge is conserved, 
the current I that enters point a must equal the total current leaving that point:
I5I
1
1I
2
5
DV
1
R
1
1
DV
2
R
2
where I
1
is the current in R
1
and I
2
is the current in R
2
.
The current in the equivalent resistance R
eq
in Figure 28.5c is
I5
DV
R
eq
where the equivalent resistance has the same effect on the circuit as the two resis-
tors in parallel; that is, the equivalent resistance draws the same current I from the 
battery. Combining these equations for I, we see that the equivalent resistance of 
two resistors in parallel is given by
DV
R
eq
5
DV
1
R
1
1
DV
2
R
2
  
1
R
eq
5
1
R
1
1
1
R
2
(28.7)
where we have canceled DV, DV
1
, and DV
2
because they are all the same.
An extension of this analysis to three or more resistors in parallel gives
1
R
eq
5
1
R
1
1
1
R
2
1
1
R
3
1
c
(28.8)
This expression shows that the inverse of the equivalent resistance of two or more 
resistors in a parallel combination is equal to the sum of the inverses of the indi-
the equivalent resistance 
of a parallel combination  
of resistors
Pitfall Prevention 28.4
Current Does not take the Path  
of least Resistance You may have 
heard the phrase “current takes the 
path of least resistance” (or similar 
wording) in reference to a parallel 
combination of current paths such 
that there are two or more paths 
for the current to take. Such word-
ing is incorrect. The current takes 
all paths. Those paths with lower 
resistance have larger  currents, 
but even very high resistance paths 
carry some of the current. In theory, 
if current has a choice between a 
zero-resistance path and a finite 
resistance path, all the current 
takes the path of zero  resistance; a 
path with zero resistance, however, 
is an idealization.
I
b
R
1
R
2
V
a
I
R
1
R
2
R
eq  
R
1
R
2
1
1
1
V
V
1
V
2
V
I
1
I
2
I
1
I
2
I
I
a
b
c
A pictorial representation 
of two resistors connected 
in parallel to a battery
+
-
+
-
+
=
A circuit diagram showing 
the two resistors connected 
in parallel to a battery
A circuit diagram showing 
the equivalent resistance of 
the resistors in parallel
Figure 28.5 
Two lightbulbs 
with resistances R
1
and R
2
con-
nected in parallel. All three 
diagrams are equivalent.
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
above versions. It's 100% managed .NET solution that supports converting each PDF page to Word document file by VB.NET code. All PDF
online convert pdf to html; convert pdf into html email
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
Using this PDF to Word converting library control, .NET developers can quickly convert PDF document to Word file using Visual C# code.
how to change pdf to html format; convert pdf to web pages
28.2 resistors in Series and parallel 
839
vidual resistances. Furthermore, the equivalent resistance is always less than the 
smallest resistance in the group.
Household circuits are always wired such that the appliances are connected in 
parallel. Each device operates independently of the others so that if one is switched 
off, the others remain on. In addition, in this type of connection, all the devices 
operate on the same voltage.
Let’s consider two examples of practical applications of series and parallel cir-
cuits. Figure 28.6 illustrates how a three-way incandescent lightbulb is constructed 
to provide three levels of light intensity.2 The socket of the lamp is equipped with 
a three-way switch for selecting different light intensities. The lightbulb contains 
two filaments. When the lamp is connected to a 120-V source, one filament receives  
100 W of power and the other receives 75 W. The three light intensities are made 
possible by applying the 120 V to one filament alone, to the other filament alone, 
or to the two filaments in parallel. When switch S
1
is closed and switch S
2
is opened, 
current exists only in the 75-W filament. When switch S
1
is open and switch S
2
is 
closed, current exists only in the 100-W filament. When both switches are closed, 
current exists in both filaments and the total power is 175 W.
If the filaments were connected in series and one of them were to break, no 
charges could pass through the lightbulb and it would not glow, regardless of the 
switch position. If, however, the filaments were connected in parallel and one of 
them (for example, the 75-W filament) were to break, the lightbulb would continue 
to glow in two of the switch positions because current exists in the other (100-W) 
filament.
As a second example, consider strings of incandescent lights that are used for 
many ornamental purposes such as decorating Christmas trees. Over the years, 
both parallel and series connections have been used for strings of lights. Because 
series-wired lightbulbs operate with less energy per bulb and at a lower tempera-
ture, they are safer than parallel-wired lightbulbs for indoor Christmas-tree use. 
If, however, the filament of a single lightbulb in a series-wired string were to fail 
(or if the lightbulb were removed from its socket), all the lights on the string would 
go out. The popularity of series-wired light strings diminished because trouble-
shooting a failed lightbulb is a tedious, time-consuming chore that involves trial-
and-error substitution of a good lightbulb in each socket along the string until the 
defective one is found.
In a parallel-wired string, each lightbulb operates at 120 V. By design, the light-
bulbs are brighter and hotter than those on a series-wired string. As a result, they 
are inherently more dangerous (more likely to start a fire, for instance), but if one 
lightbulb in a parallel-wired string fails or is removed, the rest of the lightbulbs con-
tinue to glow.
To prevent the failure of one lightbulb from causing the entire string to go out, 
a new design was developed for so-called miniature lights wired in series. When 
the filament breaks in one of these miniature lightbulbs, the break in the filament 
represents the largest resistance in the series, much larger than that of the intact 
filaments. As a result, most of the applied 120 V appears across the lightbulb with 
the broken filament. Inside the lightbulb, a small jumper loop covered by an insu-
lating material is wrapped around the filament leads. When the filament fails and 
120 V appears across the lightbulb, an arc burns the insulation on the jumper and 
connects the filament leads. This connection now completes the circuit through 
the lightbulb even though its filament is no longer active (Fig. 28.7, page 840).
When a lightbulb fails, the resistance across its terminals is reduced to almost 
zero because of the alternate jumper connection mentioned in the preceding para-
graph. All the other lightbulbs not only stay on, but they glow more brightly because 
2The three-way lightbulb and other household devices actually operate on alternating current (AC), to be intro-
duced in Chapter 33.
120 V
S
2
S
1
100-W filament
75-W filament
Figure 28.6 
A three-way incan-
descent lightbulb.
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
text file, converted by our C# PDF to text converting library, is other editable file formats using Visual C# code, such as, PDF to HTML converter assembly
convert pdf to html for online; convert pdf to html
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
C#.NET DLLs Solution for Converting Images to PDF in C#.NET. In order to run the sample code, the following steps would be necessary. Add necessary references:
add pdf to website; convert pdf to html email
840
chapter 28 Direct-current circuits
the total resistance of the string is reduced and consequently the current in each 
remaining lightbulb increases. Each lightbulb operates at a slightly higher tempera-
ture than before. As more lightbulbs fail, the current keeps rising, the filament 
of each remaining lightbulb operates at a higher temperature, and the lifetime of 
the lightbulb is reduced. For this reason, you should check for failed (nonglow-
ing) lightbulbs in such a series-wired string and replace them as soon as possible, 
thereby maximizing the lifetimes of all the lightbulbs.
uick Quiz 28.3  With the switch in the circuit of Figure 28.8a open, there is 
no current in R
2
. There is current in R
1
, however, and it is measured with the 
ammeter at the right side of the circuit. If the switch is closed (Fig. 28.8b), there 
is current in R
2
. What happens to the reading on the ammeter when the switch 
is closed? (a) The reading increases. (b) The reading decreases. (c)The reading 
does not change.
uick Quiz 28.4  Consider the following choices: (a) increases, (b) decreases,  
(c) remains the same. From these choices, choose the best answer for the fol-
lowing situations. (i) In Figure 28.3, a third resistor is added in series with the 
first two. What happens to the current in the battery? (ii) What happens to the 
terminal voltage of the battery? (iii) In Figure 28.5, a third resistor is added in 
parallel with the first two. What happens to the current in the battery? (iv) What 
happens to the terminal voltage of the battery?
Filament
Jumper
Glass insulator
I
I
When the 
filament breaks, 
charges flow in 
the jumper 
connection.
I
When the 
filament is 
intact, charges 
flow in the 
filament.
a
b
c
.
C
e
n
g
a
g
e
L
e
a
r
n
i
n
g
/
G
e
o
r
g
e
S
e
m
p
l
e
Figure 28.7 
(a) Schematic dia-
gram of a modern “miniature” 
incandescent holiday lightbulb, 
with a jumper connection to pro-
vide a current path if the filament 
breaks. (b) A holiday lightbulb 
with a broken filament. (c) A 
Christmas-tree lightbulb.
R
1
R
2
R
1
R
2
A
A
- +
- +
a
b
Figure 28.8 
(Quick Quiz 28.3) 
What happens when the switch is 
closed?
Conceptual Example 28.3   Landscape Lights
A homeowner wishes to install low-voltage landscape lighting in his back yard. To save money, he purchases inexpen-
sive 18-gauge cable, which has a relatively high resistance per unit length. This cable consists of two side-by-side wires 
separated by insulation, like the cord on an appliance. He runs a 200-foot length of this cable from the power supply 
to the farthest point at which he plans to position a light fixture. He attaches light fixtures across the two wires on the 
cable at 10-foot intervals so that the light fixtures are in parallel. Because of the cable’s resistance, the brightness of 
the lightbulbs in the fixtures is not as desired. Which of the following problems does the homeowner have? (a) All the 
lightbulbs glow equally less brightly than they would if lower-resistance cable had been used. (b) The brightness of the 
lightbulbs decreases as you move farther from the power supply.
28.2 resistors in Series and parallel 
841
A circuit diagram for the system appears in Figure 28.9. 
The horizontal resistors with letter subscripts (such as 
R
A
) represent the resistance of the wires in the cable 
between the light fixtures, and the vertical resistors with 
number subscripts (such as R
1
) represent the resistance 
of the light fixtures themselves. Part of the terminal 
voltage of the power supply is dropped across resistors 
R
A
and R
B
. Therefore, the voltage across light fixture R
1
is less than the terminal voltage. There is a further volt-
age drop across resistors R
C
and R
D
. Consequently, the 
voltage across light fixture R
2
is smaller than that across 
R
1
. This pattern continues down the line of light fixtures, so the correct choice is (b). Each successive light fixture has 
a smaller voltage across it and glows less brightly than the one before.
SolutIon
R
A
R
C
R
2
R
1
R
B
R
D
Power
supply
-
+
Resistance of the 
light fixtures
Resistance in the 
wires of the cable
Figure 28.9 
(Conceptual Example 28.3) The circuit diagram for 
a set of landscape light fixtures connected in parallel across the 
two wires of a two-wire cable.
Example 28.4   Find the Equivalent Resistance
Four resistors are connected as shown in Figure 28.10a.
(A)  Find the equivalent resistance between points a and c.
Conceptualize  Imagine charges flowing into and through 
this combination from the left. All charges must pass from a 
to b through the first two resistors, but the charges split at b 
into two different paths when encountering the combination 
of the 6.0-V and the 3.0-V resistors.
Categorize  Because of the simple nature of the combina-
tion of resistors in Figure 28.10, we categorize this example 
as one for which we can use the rules for series and parallel 
combinations of resistors.
Analyze  The combination of resistors can be reduced in steps as shown in Figure 28.10.
SolutIon
6.0 
3.0 
c
b
I
1
I
2
4.0 
8.0 
a
c
2.0 
12.0 
b
a
14.0 
c
a
I
b
c
a
Figure 28.10 
(Exam-
ple 28.4) The original 
network of resistors 
is reduced to a single 
equivalent resistance.
The circuit of equivalent resistances now looks like Fig-
ure 28.10b. The 12.0-V and 2.0-V resistors are in series 
(green circles). Find the equivalent resistance from a to c:
R
eq
5 12.0 V 1 2.0 V 5 
14.0 V
Find the equivalent resistance between b and c of the 
6.0-V and 3.0-V resistors, which are in parallel (right-
hand red-brown circles):
1
R
eq
5
1
6.0 V
1
1
3.0 V
5
3
6.0 V
R
eq
5
6.0 V
3
52.0 V
Find the equivalent resistance between a and b of the 
8.0-V and 4.0-V resistors, which are in series (left-hand 
red-brown circles):
R
eq
5 8.0 V 1 4.0 V 5 12.0 V
This resistance is that of the single equivalent resistor in Figure 28.10c.
(B)  What is the current in each resistor if a potential difference of 42 V is maintained between a and c?
▸ 28.3 
continued
continued
842
chapter 28 Direct-current circuits
Find I
2
:
I
2
5 2I
1
5 2(1.0 A) 5 
2.0 A
Use I
1
I
2
5 3.0 A to find I
1
:
I
1
I
2
5 3.0 A   S   I
1
1 2I
1
5 3.0 A   S   I
1
1.0 A
Set the voltages across the resistors in parallel in Figure 
28.10a equal to find a relationship between the currents:
DV
1
5 DV
2
S   (6.0 V)I
1
5 (3.0 V)I
2
S   I
2
5 2I
1
Use Equation 27.7 (R 5 DV/I) and the result from part 
(A) to find the current in the 8.0-V and 4.0-V resistors:
I5
DV
ac
R
eq
5
42 V
14.0 V
5
3.0 A 
Finalize  As a final check of our results, note that DV
bc
5 (6.0 V)I
1
5 (3.0 V)I
2
5 6.0 V and DV
ab
5 (12.0 V)I 5 36 V; 
therefore, DV
ac
5 DV
ab
1 DV
bc
5 42 V, as it must.
Example 28.5   Three Resistors in Parallel
Three resistors are connected in parallel as shown in 
Figure 28.11a. A potential difference of 18.0 V is main-
tained between points a and b.
(A)  Calculate the equivalent resistance of the circuit.
Conceptualize  Figure 28.11a shows that we are dealing 
with a simple parallel combination of three resistors. 
Notice that the current I splits into three currents I
1
I
2
and I
3
in the three resistors.
Categorize  This problem can be solved with rules 
developed in this section, so we categorize it as a sub-
stitution problem. Because the three resistors are connected in parallel, we can use the rule for resistors in parallel, 
Equation 28.8, to evaluate the equivalent resistance.
SolutIon
I
1
I
2
I
3
I
a
b
18.0 V
3.00   6.00   9.00 
I
1
I
2
I
3
a
b
3.00   6.00 
9.00 
18.0 V
I
a
b
Figure 28.11 
(Example 28.5) (a) Three resistors connected in 
parallel. The voltage across each resistor is 18.0 V. (b) Another cir-
cuit with three resistors and a battery. Is it equivalent to the circuit 
in (a)?
Use Equation 28.8 to find R
eq
:
1
R
eq
5
1
3.00 V
1
1
6.00 V
1
1
9.00 V
5
11
18.0 V
R
eq
5
18.0 V
11
5
1.64 V 
(B)  Find the current in each resistor.
SolutIon
The potential difference across each resistor is 18.0 V. 
Apply the relationship DV 5 IR to find the currents:
I
1
5
DV
R
1
5
18.0 V
3.00 V
5
6.00 A
I
2
5
DV
R
2
5
18.0 V
6.00 V
5
3.00 A
I
3
5
DV
R
3
5
18.0 V
9.00 V
5
2.00 A
(C)  Calculate the power delivered to each resistor and the total power delivered to the combination of resistors.
▸ 28.4 
continued
The currents in the 8.0-V and 4.0-V resistors are the same because they are in series. In addition, they carry the same 
current that would exist in the 14.0-V equivalent resistor subject to the 42-V potential difference.
SolutIon
28.3 Kirchhoff’s rules 
843
28.3 Kirchhoff’s Rules
As we saw in the preceding section, combinations of resistors can be simplified and 
analyzed using the expression DV 5 IR and the rules for series and parallel com-
binations of resistors. Very often, however, it is not possible to reduce a circuit to a 
single loop using these rules. The procedure for analyzing more complex circuits is 
made possible by using the following two principles, called Kirchhoff’s rules.
1.  Junction rule. At any junction, the sum of the currents must equal zero:
a
junction
I50 
(28.9)
2.  Loop rule. The sum of the potential differences across all elements around 
any closed circuit loop must be zero:
a
closed loop
DV50 
(28.10)
Kirchhoff’s first rule is a statement of conservation of electric charge. All charges 
that enter a given point in a circuit must leave that point because charge cannot 
build up or disappear at a point. Currents directed into the junction are entered 
into the sum in the junction rule as 1I, whereas currents directed out of a junction 
are entered as 2I. Applying this rule to the junction in Figure 28.12a gives
I
1
I
2
I
3
5 0
Figure 28.12b represents a mechanical analog of this situation, in which water flows 
through a branched pipe having no leaks. Because water does not build up any-
where in the pipe, the flow rate into the pipe on the left equals the total flow rate 
out of the two branches on the right.
Kirchhoff’s second rule follows from the law of conservation of energy for an 
isolated system. Let’s imagine moving a charge around a closed loop of a circuit. 
When the charge returns to the starting point, the charge–circuit system must 
have the same total energy as it had before the charge was moved. The sum of the 
increases in energy as the charge passes through some circuit elements must equal 
the sum of the decreases in energy as it passes through other elements. The poten-
tial energy of the system decreases whenever the charge moves through a potential 
drop 2IR across a resistor or whenever it moves in the reverse direction through a 
Apply the relationship P 5 I2R to each resistor using the 
currents calculated in part (B):
3.00-V: P
1
I
1
2R
1
5 (6.00 A)2(3.00 V) 5 
108 W
6.00-V: P
2
I
2
2R
2
5 (3.00 A)2(6.00 V) 5 
54 W
9.00-V: P
3
I
3
2R
3
5 (2.00 A)2(9.00 V) 5 
36 W
These results show that the smallest resistor receives the most power. Summing the three quantities gives a total power 
of 198 W. W
P 5 (DV)2/R
eq
5 (18.0V)2/1.64 V 5 198 W.
What if the circuit were as shown in Figure 28.11b instead of as in Figure 28.11a? How would that affect 
the calculation?
Answer  There would be no effect on the calculation. The physical placement of the battery is not important. Only 
the electrical arrangement is important. In Figure 28.11b, the battery still maintains a potential difference of 18.0 V 
between points a and b, so the two circuits in the figure are electrically identical.
What IF?
SolutIon
I
1
I
2
I
3
Flow in
Flow out
a
b
The amount of charge flowing 
out of the branches on the right 
must equal the amount flowing 
into the single branch on the left.
The amount of water flowing out 
of the branches on the right must 
equal the amount flowing into 
the single branch on the left.
Figure 28.12 
(a) Kirchhoff’s 
junction rule. (b) A mechanical 
analog of the junction rule.
▸ 28.5 
continued
844
chapter 28 Direct-current circuits
source of emf. The potential energy increases whenever the charge passes through 
a battery from the negative terminal to the positive terminal.
When applying Kirchhoff’s second rule, imagine traveling around the loop 
and consider changes in electric potential rather than the changes in potential energy 
described in the preceding paragraph. Imagine traveling through the circuit ele-
ments in Figure 28.13 toward the right. The following sign conventions apply when 
using the second rule:
• Charges move from the high-potential end of a resistor toward the low- 
potential end, so if a resistor is traversed in the direction of the current, the 
potential difference DV across the resistor is 2IR (Fig. 28.13a).
• If a resistor is traversed in the direction opposite the current, the potential dif-
ference DV across the resistor is 1IR (Fig. 28.13b).
• If a source of emf (assumed to have zero internal resistance) is traversed in 
the direction of the emf (from negative to positive), the potential difference 
DV is 1
e
(Fig. 28.13c).
• If a source of emf (assumed to have zero internal resistance) is traversed in 
the direction opposite the emf (from positive to negative), the potential dif-
ference DV is 2
e
(Fig. 28.13d).
There are limits on the number of times you can usefully apply Kirchhoff’s rules 
in analyzing a circuit. You can use the junction rule as often as you need as long 
as you include in it a current that has not been used in a preceding junction-rule 
equation. In general, the number of times you can use the junction rule is one 
fewer than the number of junction points in the circuit. You can apply the loop rule 
as often as needed as long as a new circuit element (resistor or battery) or a new 
current appears in each new equation. In general, to solve a particular circuit prob-
lem, the number of independent equations you need to obtain from the two rules 
equals the number of unknown currents.
Complex networks containing many loops and junctions generate a great 
number of independent linear equations and a correspondingly great number of 
unknowns. Such situations can be handled formally through the use of matrix alge-
bra. Computer software can also be used to solve for the unknowns.
The following examples illustrate how to use Kirchhoff’s rules. In all cases, it is 
assumed the circuits have reached steady-state conditions; in other words, the cur-
rents in the various branches are constant. Any capacitor acts as an open branch in 
a circuit; that is, the current in the branch containing the capacitor is zero under 
steady-state conditions.
I
I
a
b
a
b
a
b
a
b
- +
+
-
= -IR
= -
e
= +IR
= +
e
e
e
b
c
d
a
In each diagram, ∆= V
V
a
and the circuit element is 
traversed from a to b, left to right.
Figure 28.13 
Rules for determin-
ing the signs of the potential differ-
ences across a resistor and a battery. 
(The battery is assumed to have no 
internal resistance.) 
Gustav Kirchhoff
German Physicist (1824–1887)
Kirchhoff, a professor at Heidelberg, 
and Robert Bunsen invented the spec-
troscope and founded the science  
of spectroscopy, which we shall study 
in Chapter 42. They discovered the 
elements cesium and rubidium and 
invented astronomical spectroscopy.
P
r
i
n
t
s
&
P
h
o
t
o
g
r
a
p
h
s
D
i
v
i
s
i
o
n
,
L
i
b
r
a
r
y
o
f
C
o
n
g
r
e
s
s
,
L
C
-
U
S
Z
6
2
-
1
3
3
7
1
5
Problem-Solving Strategy   Kirchhoff’s Rules
The following procedure is recommended for solving problems that involve circuits 
that cannot be reduced by the rules for combining resistors in series or parallel.
1. Conceptualize. Study the circuit diagram and make sure you recognize all ele-
ments in the circuit. Identify the polarity of each battery and try to imagine the 
directions in which the current would exist in the batteries.
2. Categorize. Determine whether the circuit can be reduced by means of combin-
ing series and parallel resistors. If so, use the techniques of Section 28.2. If not, apply 
Kirchhoff’s rules according to the Analyze step below.
3. Analyze. Assign labels to all known quantities and symbols to all unknown quanti-
ties. You must assign directions to the currents in each part of the circuit. Although 
the assignment of current directions is arbitrary, you must adhere rigorously to the 
directions you assign when you apply Kirchhoff’s rules.
Apply the junction rule (Kirchhoff’s first rule) to all junctions in the circuit 
except one. Now apply the loop rule (Kirchhoff’s second rule) to as many loops in 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested