28.3 Kirchhoff’s rules 
845
Example 28.6   A Single-Loop Circuit
A single-loop circuit contains two resistors and two batteries as shown in Figure 28.14. 
(Neglect the internal resistances of the batteries.) Find the current in the circuit.
Conceptualize  Figure 28.14 shows the polarities of the batteries and a guess at the 
direction of the current. The 12-V battery is the stronger of the two, so the current 
should be counterclockwise. Therefore, we expect our guess for the direction of the 
current to be wrong, but we will continue and see how this incorrect guess is repre-
sented by our final answer.
Categorize  We do not need Kirchhoff’s rules to analyze this simple circuit, but let’s 
use them anyway simply to see how they are applied. There are no junctions in this 
single-loop circuit; therefore, the current is the same in all elements.
Analyze  Let’s assume the current is clockwise as shown in Figure 28.14. Traversing the circuit in the clockwise direc-
tion, starting at a, we see that a S b represents a potential difference of 1
e
1
b S c represents a potential difference of 
2IR
1
c S d represents a potential difference of 2
e
2
, and d S a represents a potential difference of 2IR
2
.
SolutIon
I
c
a
b
d
- +
-
+
e
= 6.0 V
R
= 8.0 
R
= 10 
e
= 12 V
Figure 28.14 
(Example 28.6) 
A series circuit containing two 
batteries and two resistors, 
where the polarities of the bat-
teries are in opposition.
Solve for I and use the values given in Figure 28.14:
(1)   I5
e
1
2
e
2
R
1
1R
2
5
6.0 V212 V
8.0 V110 V
5
20.33 A
Apply Kirchhoff’s loop rule to the single loop in the 
circuit:
o
DV 5 0   S   
e
1
IR
1
e
2
IR
2
5 0
Finalize  The negative sign for I indicates that the direction of the current is opposite the assumed direction. The 
emfs in the numerator subtract because the batteries in Figure 28.14 have opposite polarities. The resistances in the 
denominator add because the two resistors are in series.
What if the polarity of the 12.0-V battery were reversed? How would that affect the circuit?
Answer  Although we could repeat the Kirchhoff’s rules calculation, let’s instead examine Equation (1) and modify it 
accordingly. Because the polarities of the two batteries are now in the same direction, the signs of 
e
1
and 
e
2
are the 
same and Equation (1) becomes
I5
e
1
1
e
2
R
1
1R
2
5
6.0 V112 V
8.0 V110 V
51.0 A
What IF?
Example 28.7   A Multiloop Circuit
Find the currents I
1
I
2
, and I
3
in the circuit shown in Figure 28.15 on page 846.
the circuit as are needed to obtain, in combination with the equations from the junc-
tion rule, as many equations as there are unknowns. To apply this rule, you must 
choose a direction in which to travel around the loop (either clockwise or counter-
clockwise) and correctly identify the change in potential as you cross each element. 
Be careful with signs!
Solve the equations simultaneously for the unknown quantities.
4. Finalize. Check your numerical answers for consistency. Do not be alarmed if any 
of the resulting currents have a negative value. That only means you have guessed the 
direction of that current incorrectly, but its magnitude will be correct.
continued
▸ Problem-Solving Strategy continued
How to convert pdf to html - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
best pdf to html converter; convert pdf to html code for email
How to convert pdf to html - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
embed pdf to website; convert pdf into html file
846
chapter 28 Direct-current circuits
Conceptualize  Imagine physically rearranging the circuit 
while keeping it electrically the same. Can you rearrange it 
so that it consists of simple series or parallel combinations 
of resistors? You should find that you cannot. (If the 10.0-V 
battery were removed and replaced by a wire from b to the 
6.0-V resistor, the circuit would consist of only series and 
parallel combinations.)
Categorize  We cannot simplify the circuit by the rules 
associated with combining resistances in series and in par-
allel. Therefore, this problem is one in which we must use 
Kirchhoff’s rules.
Analyze  We arbitrarily choose the directions of the currents as labeled in Figure 28.15.
SolutIon
Figure 28.15 
(Example 
28.7) A circuit containing 
different branches.
14.0 V
e
b
4.0 
10.0 V
6.0 
f
I
2
c
I
3
I
1
2.0 
d
a
+
-
-
+
Use Equation (1) to find I
3
:
I
3
I
1
I
2
5 2.0 A 2 3.0 A 5 
21.0 A
Apply Kirchhoff’s junction rule to junction c:
(1)   I
1
I
2
I
3
5 0
We now have one equation with three unknowns: I
1
I
2
and I
3
. There are three loops in the circuit: abcdabefcb, 
and aefda. We need only two loop equations to deter-
mine the unknown currents. (The third equation would 
give no new information.) Let’s choose to traverse these 
loops in the clockwise direction. Apply Kirchhoff’s loop 
rule to loops abcda and befcb:
abcda: (2)   10.0 V 2 (6.0 V)I
1
2 (2.0 V)I
3
5 0
befcb: 2(4.0 V)I
2
2 14.0 V 1 (6.0 V)I
1
2 10.0 V 5 0
(3)   224.0 V 1 (6.0 V)I
1
2 (4.0 V)I
2
5 0
Solve Equation (1) for I
3
and substitute into Equation(2):
10.0 V 2 (6.0 V)I
1
2 (2.0 V)(I
1
I
2
) 5 0
(4)   10.0 V 2 (8.0 V)I
1
2 (2.0 V)I
2
5 0
Multiply each term in Equation (3) by 4 and each term 
in Equation (4) by 3:
(5)   296.0 V 1 (24.0 V)I
1
2 (16.0 V)I
2
5 0
(6)   30.0 V 2 (24.0 V)I
1
2 (6.0 V)I
2
5 0
Add Equation (6) to Equation (5) to eliminate I
1
and 
find I
2
:
266.0 V 2 (22.0 V)I
2
5 0
I
2
23.0 A
Use this value of I
2
in Equation (3) to find I
1
:
224.0 V 1 (6.0 V)I
1
2 (4.0 V)(23.0 A) 5 0
224.0 V 1 (6.0 V)I
1
1 12.0 V 5 0
I
1
2.0 A
Finalize  Because our values for I
2
and I
3
are negative, the directions of these currents are opposite those indicated in 
Figure 28.15. The numerical values for the currents are correct. Despite the incorrect direction, we must continue to 
use these negative values in subsequent calculations because our equations were established with our original choice 
of direction. What would have happened had we left the current directions as labeled in Figure 28.15 but traversed the 
loops in the opposite direction?
28.4 
R
C
Circuits
So far, we have analyzed direct-current circuits in which the current is constant. In 
DC circuits containing capacitors, the current is always in the same direction but 
may vary in magnitude at different times. A circuit containing a series combination 
of a resistor and a capacitor is called an RC circuit.
▸ 28.7 
continued
Online Convert PDF to HTML5 files. Best free online PDF html
PDF to HTML converter library control is a 100% clean .NET document image solution, which is designed to help .NET developers convert PDF to HTML webpage using
converting pdf to html code; convert pdf to html link
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
PDF from RTF. Create PDF from Text. PDF Export. Convert PDF to Word (.docx). Convert PDF to Tiff. Convert PDF to HTML. Convert PDF to
convert pdf form to html form; convert pdf to web form
28.4 RC circuits 
847
Charging a Capacitor
Figure 28.16 shows a simple series RC circuit. Let’s assume the capacitor in this cir-
cuit is initially uncharged. There is no current while the switch is open (Fig. 28.16a). 
If the switch is thrown to position a at t 5 0 (Fig. 28.16b), however, charge begins to 
flow, setting up a current in the circuit, and the capacitor begins to charge.3 Notice 
that during charging, charges do not jump across the capacitor plates because the 
gap between the plates represents an open circuit. Instead, charge is transferred 
between each plate and its connecting wires due to the electric field established in 
the wires by the battery until the capacitor is fully charged. As the plates are being 
charged, the potential difference across the capacitor increases. The value of the 
maximum charge on the plates depends on the voltage of the battery. Once the 
maximum charge is reached, the current in the circuit is zero because the potential 
difference across the capacitor matches that supplied by the battery.
To analyze this circuit quantitatively, let’s apply Kirchhoff’s loop rule to the cir-
cuit after the switch is thrown to position a. Traversing the loop in Figure 28.16b 
clockwise gives
e
2
q
C
2iR50 
(28.11)
where q/C is the potential difference across the capacitor and iR is the potential 
difference across the resistor. We have used the sign conventions discussed earlier 
for the signs on 
e
and iR. The capacitor is traversed in the direction from the posi-
tive plate to the negative plate, which represents a decrease in potential. Therefore, 
we use a negative sign for this potential difference in Equation 28.11. Note that  
lowercase q and i are instantaneous values that depend on time (as opposed to 
steady-state values) as the capacitor is being charged.
We can use Equation 28.11 to find the initial current I
i
in the circuit and the 
maximum charge Q
max
on the capacitor. At the instant the switch is thrown to posi-
tion a (t 5 0), the charge on the capacitor is zero. Equation 28.11 shows that the 
initial current I
i
in the circuit is a maximum and is given by
I
i
5
e
R
1current at t502 
(28.12)
At this time, the potential difference from the battery terminals appears entirely 
across the resistor. Later, when the capacitor is charged to its maximum value Q
max
charges cease to flow, the current in the circuit is zero, and the potential difference 
from the battery terminals appears entirely across the capacitor. Substituting i 5 0 
into Equation 28.11 gives the maximum charge on the capacitor:
Q
max
5C
e
(maximum charge) 
(28.13)
To determine analytical expressions for the time dependence of the charge and 
current, we must solve Equation 28.11, a single equation containing two variables q 
and i. The current in all parts of the series circuit must be the same. Therefore, the 
current in the resistance R must be the same as the current between each capacitor 
plate and the wire connected to it. This current is equal to the time rate of change 
of the charge on the capacitor plates. Therefore, we substitute i 5 dq/dt into Equa-
tion 28.11 and rearrange the equation:
dq
dt
5
e
R
2
q
RC
To find an expression for q, we solve this separable differential equation as follows. 
First combine the terms on the right-hand side:
dq
dt
5
C
e
RC
2
q
RC
5 2
q2C
e
RC
3In previous discussions of capacitors, we assumed a steady-state situation, in which no current was present in any 
branch of the circuit containing a capacitor. Now we are considering the case before the steady-state condition is real-
ized; in this situation, charges are moving and a current exists in the wires connected to the capacitor.
R
C
b
a
e
R
i
C
b
a
e
R
i
C
b
a
+
-
+
-
e
+
-
+
-
+
-
When the switch is thrown 
to position a, the capacitor 
begins to charge up. 
When the switch is thrown 
to position b, the capacitor 
discharges.
a
b
c
Figure 28.16 
A capacitor in 
series with a resistor, switch, and 
battery.
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF to MS Office Word in VB.NET. VB.NET Tutorial for How to Convert PDF to Word (.docx) Document in VB.NET. Best
convert pdf into web page; convert pdf to webpage
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
C# PDF - Convert PDF to JPEG in C#.NET. C#.NET PDF to JPEG Converting & Conversion Control. Convert PDF to JPEG Using C#.NET. Add necessary references:
best website to convert pdf to word; convert pdf to web
848
chapter 28 Direct-current circuits
Multiply this equation by dt and divide by q 2 C
e
:
dq
q2C
e
52
1
RC
dt 
Integrate this expression, using q 5 0 at t 5 0:
3
q
0
dq
q2C
e
5 2
1
RC
3
t
0
dt 
ln a
q2C
e
2C
e
b 5 5 2
t
RC
From the definition of the natural logarithm, we can write this expression as
q(t) 5 C
e
(1 2 e2t/RC) 5 Q
max
(1 2 e2t/RC
(28.14)
where e is the base of the natural logarithm and we have made the substitution 
from Equation 28.13.
We can find an expression for the charging current by differentiating Equation 
28.14 with respect to time. Using i 5 dq/dt, we find that
i
1
t
2
5
e
R
e2t/RC 
(28.15)
Plots of capacitor charge and circuit current versus time are shown in Figure 28.17. 
Notice that the charge is zero at t 5 0 and approaches the maximum value C
e
as  
t S `. The current has its maximum value I
i
e
/R at t 5 0 and decays exponen-
tially to zero as t S `. The quantity RC, which appears in the exponents of Equa-
tions 28.14 and 28.15, is called the time constant t of the circuit:
t 5 RC 
(28.16)
The time constant represents the time interval during which the current decreases 
to 1/e of its initial value; that is, after a time interval t, the current decreases to i 5 
e21I
i
5 0.368I
i
. After a time interval 2t, the current decreases to i 5 e22I
i
5 0.135I
i
and so forth. Likewise, in a time interval t, the charge increases from zero to  
C
e
[1 2 e21] 5 0.632C
e
.
Charge as a function of time 
for a capacitor being 
charged
Current as a function of time 
for a capacitor being 
charged
q
t
C
0.632C
=RC
e
e
i
t
0.368I
i
I
i
I
i
=
R
e
The charge approaches 
its maximum value C
e
as t approaches infinity.
The current has its maximum
value I
i
e
/R at t = 0 and 
decays to zero exponentially 
as t approaches infinity.
After a time interval equal to 
one time constant t has passed, 
the charge is 63.2% of the 
maximum value C
e
.
After a time interval equal 
to one time constant t has 
passed, the current is 36.8% 
of its initial value.
a
b
Figure 28.17 
(a) Plot of capacitor charge versus time for the circuit shown in Figure 28.16b. (b)Plot 
of current versus time for the circuit shown in Figure 28.16b.
VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF to TIFF Using VB in VB.NET. Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF in Visual Basic Class.
convert pdf to html5 open source; convert pdf into webpage
C# PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in C#.net, ASP
PDFDocument pdf = new PDFDocument(@"C:\input.pdf"); pdf.ConvertToVectorImages( ContextType.SVG, @"C:\demoOutput Description: Convert to html/svg files and
convert pdf to html format; create html email from pdf
28.4 RC circuits 
849
The following dimensional analysis shows that t has units of time:
3
t
4
5
3
RC
4
5 ca
DV
I
ba
Q
DV
bd 5 c
Q
Q/Dt
d5
3
Dt
4
5T 
Because t 5 RC has units of time, the combination t/RC is dimensionless, as it must 
be to be an exponent of e in Equations 28.14 and 28.15.
The energy supplied by the battery during the time interval required to fully 
charge the capacitor is Q
max
e
C
e
2. After the capacitor is fully charged, the 
energy stored in the capacitor is 
1
2
Q
max
e
1
2
C
e
2, which is only half the energy out-
put of the battery. It is left as a problem (Problem 68) to show that the remaining 
half of the energy supplied by the battery appears as internal energy in the resistor.
Discharging a Capacitor
Imagine that the capacitor in Figure 28.16b is completely charged. An initial poten-
tial difference Q
i
/C exists across the capacitor, and there is zero potential differ-
ence across the resistor because i 5 0. If the switch is now thrown to position b at  
t 5 0 (Fig. 28.16c), the capacitor begins to discharge through the resistor. At some 
time t during the discharge, the current in the circuit is i and the charge on the 
capacitor is q. The circuit in Figure 28.16c is the same as the circuit in Figure 28.16b 
except for the absence of the battery. Therefore, we eliminate the emf 
e
from Equa-
tion 28.11 to obtain the appropriate loop equation for the circuit in Figure 28.16c:
2
q
C
2iR50 
(28.17)
When we substitute i 5 dq/dt into this expression, it becomes
2R 
dq
dt
5
q
C
dq
q
52
1
RC
dt 
Integrating this expression using q 5 Q
i
at t 5 0 gives
3
q
Q
i
dq
q
52
1
RC
3
t
0
dt 
ln a
q
Q
i
b52
t
RC
q
1
t
2
5Q
i
e
2t/RC
(28.18)
Differentiating Equation 28.18 with respect to time gives the instantaneous current 
as a function of time:
i
1
t
2
52
Q
i
RC
e2t/RC 
(28.19)
where Q
i
/RC 5 I
i
is the initial current. The negative sign indicates that as the 
capacitor discharges, the current direction is opposite its direction when the capaci-
tor was being charged. (Compare the current directions in Figs. 28.16b and 28.16c.) 
Both the charge on the capacitor and the current decay exponentially at a rate 
characterized by the time constant t 5 RC.
uick Quiz 28.5  Consider the circuit in Figure 28.18 and assume the battery has 
no internal resistance. (i) Just after the switch is closed, what is the current in the 
battery? (a) 0 (b) 
e
/2R (c) 2
e
/R (d) 
e
/R (e) impossible to determine (ii) After a 
very long time, what is the current in the battery? Choose from the same choices.
WW Charge as a function of time 
for a discharging capacitor
WW Current as a function of time 
for a discharging capacitor
C
R
R
e
-
+
Figure 28.18 
(Quick Quiz 28.5) 
How does the current vary after 
the switch is closed?
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to TIFF in C#.NET. Online C# Tutorial for How to Convert PDF File to Tiff Image File with .NET XDoc.PDF Control in C#.NET Class.
convert pdf to html code c#; pdf to html
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to Word in C#.NET. C#.NET DLLs and Demo Code: Convert PDF to Word Document in C#.NET Project. Add necessary references:
convert pdf to html file; best pdf to html converter online
850
chapter 28 Direct-current circuits
Example 28.9   Charging a Capacitor in an 
R
C
Circuit
An uncharged capacitor and a resistor are connected in series to a battery as shown in Figure 28.16, where 
e
5 12.0 V, 
C 5 5.00 mF, and R 5 8.00 3 105 V. The switch is thrown to position a. Find the time constant of the circuit, the maxi-
mum charge on the capacitor, the maximum current in the circuit, and the charge and current as functions of time.
Conceptualize  Study Figure 28.16 and imagine throwing the switch to position a as shown in Figure 28.16b. Upon 
doing so, the capacitor begins to charge.
Categorize  We evaluate our results using equations developed in this section, so we categorize this example as a sub-
stitution problem.
SolutIon
Evaluate the time constant of the circuit from 
Equation28.16:
t 5 RC 5 (8.00 3 105 V)(5.00 3 1026 F) 5 
4.00 s
Evaluate the maximum charge on the capacitor from 
Equation 28.13:
Q
max
C
e
5 (5.00 mF)(12.0 V) 5 
60.0 mC
Evaluate the maximum current in the circuit from Equa-
tion 28.12:
I
i
5
e
R
5
12.0 V
8.003105 V
5
15.0 mA 
Use these values in Equations 28.14 and 28.15 to find the 
charge and current as functions of time:
(1)   q
1
t
2
5
60.0
1
12e2t/4.00
2
(2)   i
1
t
2
5
15.0e2t/4.00
Example 28.10   Discharging a Capacitor in an 
R
C
Circuit
Consider a capacitor of capacitance C that is being discharged through a resistor of resistance R as shown in Figure 
28.16c.
(A)  After how many time constants is the charge on the capacitor one-fourth its initial value?
Conceptualize  Study Figure 28.16 and imagine throwing the switch to position b as shown in Figure 28.16c. Upon 
doing so, the capacitor begins to discharge.
Categorize  We categorize the example as one involving a discharging capacitor and use the appropriate equations.
SolutIon
In Equations (1) and (2), q is in microcoulombs, i is in microamperes, and t is in seconds.
Conceptual Example 28.8   Intermittent Windshield Wipers
Many automobiles are equipped with windshield wipers that can operate intermittently during a light rainfall.  
How does the operation of such wipers depend on the charging and discharging of a capacitor?
The wipers are part of an RC circuit whose time constant can be varied by selecting different values of R through a mul-
tiposition switch. As the voltage across the capacitor increases, the capacitor reaches a point at which it discharges and 
triggers the wipers. The circuit then begins another charging cycle. The time interval between the individual sweeps 
of the wipers is determined by the value of the time constant.
SolutIon
28.4 RC circuits 
851
Example 28.11   Energy Delivered to a Resistor 
A 5.00-mF capacitor is charged to a potential difference of 800 V and then discharged through a resistor. How much 
energy is delivered to the resistor in the time interval required to fully discharge the capacitor?
Conceptualize  In Example 28.10, we considered the energy decrease in a discharging capacitor to a value of one-
fourth the initial energy. In this example, the capacitor fully discharges.
Categorize  We solve this example using two approaches. The first approach is to model the circuit as an isolated sys-
tem for energy. Because energy in an isolated system is conserved, the initial electric potential energy U
E
stored in the 
AM
SolutIon
Analyze  Substitute q(t) 5 Q
i
/4 into Equation 28.18:
Q
i
4
5Q
i
e2t/RC 
1
4
5e2t/RC
Take the logarithm of both sides of the equation and 
solve for t:
2ln 452
t
RC
t 5 RC ln 4 5 1.39RC 5 
1.39t
Use Equations 26.11 and 28.18 to express the energy 
stored in the capacitor at any time t:
(1)   U
1
t
2
5
q2
2C
5
Q
i
2
2C
e22t/RC
Substitute U
1
t
2
5
1
4
1
Q
i
2/2C2 into Equation (1):
1
4
Q
i
2
2C
5
Q
i
2
2C
e22t/RC 
1
4
5e22t/RC 
Take the logarithm of both sides of the equation and 
solve for t:
2ln 452
2t
RC
t5
1
2
RC ln 450.693RC5
0.693t
(B)  The energy stored in the capacitor decreases with time as the capacitor discharges. After how many time con-
stants is this stored energy one-fourth its initial value?
SolutIon
Finalize  Notice that because the energy depends on the square of the charge, the energy in the capacitor drops more 
rapidly than the charge on the capacitor.
What if you want to describe the circuit in terms of the time interval required for the charge to fall to 
one-half its original value rather than by the time constant t? That would give a parameter for the circuit called its half-
life t
1/2
. How is the half-life related to the time constant?
Answer  In one half-life, the charge falls from Q
i
to Q
i
/2. Therefore, from Equation 28.18,
Q
i
2
5Q
i
e2t
1/2
/RC   S   1
2
5e2t
1/2
/RC
which leads to
t
1/2
5 0.693t
The concept of half-life will be important to us when we study nuclear decay in Chapter 44. The radioactive decay of 
an unstable sample behaves in a mathematically similar manner to a discharging capacitor in an RC circuit.
What IF?
▸ 28.10 
continued
continued
852
chapter 28 Direct-current circuits
capacitor is transformed into internal energy E
int
E
R
in the resistor. The second approach is to model the resistor 
as a nonisolated system for energy. Energy enters the resistor by electrical transmission from the capacitor, causing an 
increase in the resistor’s internal energy.
Analyze  We begin with the isolated system approach.
Substitute numerical values:
E
R
5
1
2
1
5.0031026 F
21
800 V
22
5
1.60 J
Use Equation 26.11 for the electric potential energy in 
the capacitor:
E
R
5
1
2
C
e
2 
Substitute the initial and final values of the energies:
(0 2 U
E
) 1 (E
int
2 0) 5 0   S   E
R
U
E
Write the appropriate reduction of the conservation of 
energy equation, Equation 8.2:
DU 1 DE
int
5 0
The second approach, which is more difficult but perhaps more instructive, is to note that as the capacitor discharges 
through the resistor, the rate at which energy is delivered to the resistor by electrical transmission is i2R, where i is the 
instantaneous current given by Equation 28.19.
Substitute the value of the integral, which is 
RC/2 (see Problem 44):
E
R
5
e
2
R
a
RC
2
b
51
2
C
e
2
Substitute for the current from Equation 28.19:
E
R
5
3
`
0
a2
Q
i
RC
e2t/RCb
2
R dt5
Q
i
2
RC2
3
`
0
e22t/RC dt5
e
2
R
3
`
0
e22t/RC dt 
Substitute for the power delivered to the 
resistor:
E
R
5
3
`
0
i2R dt 
Evaluate the energy delivered to the resistor by 
integrating the power over all time because it 
takes an infinite time interval for the capacitor 
to completely discharge:
P5
dE
dt
  E
R
5
3
`
0
P dt 
Finalize  This result agrees with that obtained using the isolated system approach, as it must. We can use this second 
approach to find the total energy delivered to the resistor at any time after the switch is closed by simply replacing the 
upper limit in the integral with that specific value of t.
28.5 Household Wiring and Electrical Safety
Many considerations are important in the design of an electrical system of a home 
that will provide adequate electrical service for the occupants while maximizing 
their safety. We discuss some aspects of a home electrical system in this section.
Household Wiring
Household circuits represent a practical application of some of the ideas presented 
in this chapter. In our world of electrical appliances, it is useful to understand the 
power requirements and limitations of conventional electrical systems and the 
safety measures that prevent accidents.
In a conventional installation, the utility company distributes electric power to 
individual homes by means of a pair of wires, with each home connected in paral-
▸ 28.11 
continued
28.5 household Wiring and electrical Safety 
853
lel to these wires. One wire is called the live wire4 as illustrated in Figure 28.19, and 
the other is called the neutral wire. The neutral wire is grounded; that is, its electric 
potential is taken to be zero. The potential difference between the live and neutral 
wires is approximately 120 V. This voltage alternates in time, and the potential of 
the live wire oscillates relative to ground. Much of what we have learned so far for 
the constant-emf situation (direct current) can also be applied to the alternating 
current that power companies supply to businesses and households. (Alternating 
voltage and current are discussed in Chapter 33.)
To record a household’s energy consumption, a meter is connected in series with 
the live wire entering the house. After the meter, the wire splits so that there are 
several separate circuits in parallel distributed throughout the house. Each circuit 
contains a circuit breaker (or, in older installations, a fuse). A circuit breaker is a 
special switch that opens if the current exceeds the rated value for the circuit breaker. 
The wire and circuit breaker for each circuit are carefully selected to meet the cur-
rent requirements for that circuit. If a circuit is to carry currents as large as 30 A, a 
heavy wire and an appropriate circuit breaker must be selected to handle this cur-
rent. A circuit used to power only lamps and small appliances often requires only 
20 A. Each circuit has its own circuit breaker to provide protection for that part of 
the entire electrical system of the house.
As an example, consider a circuit in which a toaster oven, a microwave oven, 
and a coffee maker are connected (corresponding to R
1
R
2
, and R
3
in Fig. 28.19). 
We can calculate the current in each appliance by using the expression P 5 I DV. 
The toaster oven, rated at 1 000 W, draws a current of 1 000 W/120 V 5 8.33 A. 
The microwave oven, rated at 1 300 W, draws 10.8 A, and the coffee maker, rated 
at 800 W, draws 6.67 A. When the three appliances are operated simultaneously, 
they draw a total current of 25.8 A. Therefore, the circuit must be wired to handle 
at least this much current. If the rating of the circuit breaker protecting the circuit 
is too small—say, 20 A—the breaker will be tripped when the third appliance is 
turned on, preventing all three appliances from operating. To avoid this situation, 
the toaster oven and coffee maker can be operated on one 20-A circuit and the 
microwave oven on a separate 20-A circuit.
Many heavy-duty appliances such as electric ranges and clothes dryers require 
240 V for their operation. The power company supplies this voltage by provid-
ing a third wire that is 120 V below ground potential (Fig. 28.20). The poten-
tial difference between this live wire and the other live wire (which is 120 V 
above ground potential) is 240 V. An appliance that operates from a 240-V line 
requires half as much current compared with operating it at 120 V; therefore, 
smaller wires can be used in the higher-voltage circuit without overheating.
Electrical Safety
When the live wire of an electrical outlet is connected directly to ground, the circuit 
is completed and a short-circuit condition exists. A short circuit occurs when almost 
zero resistance exists between two points at different potentials, and the result is 
a very large current. When that happens accidentally, a properly operating circuit 
breaker opens the circuit and no damage is done. A person in contact with ground, 
however, can be electrocuted by touching the live wire of a frayed cord or other 
exposed conductor. An exceptionally effective (and dangerous!) ground contact is 
made when the person either touches a water pipe (normally at ground potential) or 
stands on the ground with wet feet. The latter situation represents effective ground 
contact because normal, nondistilled water is a conductor due to the large number 
of ions associated with impurities. This situation should be avoided at all cost.
R
1
Live
120 V
Neutral
0 V
R
2
Circuit
breaker
Electrical
meter
R
3
W
The electrical meter measures 
the power in watts.
Figure 28.19 
Wiring diagram 
for a household circuit. The 
resistances represent appliances 
or other electrical devices that 
operate with an applied voltage 
of 120 V.
+120 V
-120 V 
b
Figure 28.20 
(a) An outlet for 
connection to a 240-V supply.  
(b) The connections for each of 
the openings in a 240-V outlet.
.
C
e
n
g
a
g
e
L
e
a
r
n
i
n
g
/
G
e
o
r
g
e
S
e
m
p
l
e
a
4Live wire is a common expression for a conductor whose electric potential is above or below ground potential.
854
chapter 28 Direct-current circuits
Electric shock can result in fatal burns or can cause the muscles of vital organs 
such as the heart to malfunction. The degree of damage to the body depends 
on the magnitude of the current, the length of time it acts, the part of the body 
touched by the live wire, and the part of the body in which the current exists. Cur-
rents of 5mA or less cause a sensation of shock, but ordinarily do little or no dam-
age. If the current is larger than about 10 mA, the muscles contract and the person 
may be unable to release the live wire. If the body carries a current of about 100 
mA for only a few seconds, the result can be fatal. Such a large current paralyzes 
the respiratory muscles and prevents breathing. In some cases, currents of approxi-
mately 1 A can produce serious (and sometimes fatal) burns. In practice, no con-
tact with live wires is regarded as safe whenever the voltage is greater than 24 V.
Many 120-V outlets are designed to accept a three-pronged power cord. (This 
feature is required in all new electrical installations.) One of these prongs is the 
live wire at a nominal potential of 120 V. The second is the neutral wire, nominally 
at 0V, which carries current to ground. Figure 28.21a shows a connection to an 
electric drill with only these two wires. If the live wire accidentally makes contact 
with the casing of the electric drill (which can occur if the wire insulation wears 
off), current can be carried to ground by way of the person, resulting in an electric 
shock. The third wire in a three-pronged power cord, the round prong, is a safety 
ground wire that normally carries no current. It is both grounded and connected 
directly to the casing of the appliance. If the live wire is accidentally shorted to the 
casing in this situation, most of the current takes the low-resistance path through 
the appliance to ground as shown in Figure 28.21b.
Special power outlets called ground-fault circuit interrupters, or GFCIs, are used 
in kitchens, bathrooms, basements, exterior outlets, and other hazardous areas of 
homes. These devices are designed to protect persons from electric shock by sens-
ing small currents (, 5 mA) leaking to ground. (The principle of their operation 
In the situation shown, the live wire has come into contact 
with the drill case. As a result, the person holding the drill acts 
as a current path to ground and receives an electric shock.
In this situation, the drill case remains at ground 
potential and no current exists in the person.
“Ouch!”
Motor
“Hot”
Circuit
breaker
120 V 
“Neutral”
Ground
I
I
Wall
outlet
Motor
“Hot”
Circuit
breaker
120 V 
“Neutral”
Ground
“Ground”
I
I
3-wire
outlet
I
I
I
a
b
Figure 28.21 
(a) A diagram 
of the circuit for an electric drill 
with only two connecting wires. 
The normal current path is  
from the live wire through the 
motor connections and back to 
ground through the neutral wire. 
(b) This shock can be avoided 
by connecting the drill case to 
ground through a third ground 
wire. The wire colors represent 
electrical standards in the United 
States: the “hot” wire is black,  
the ground wire is green, and the 
neutral wire is white (shown as 
gray in the figure).
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested