problems 
55
56. A package is dropped at time t 5 0 from a helicopter 
that is descending steadily at a speed v
i
. (a) What is the 
speed of the package in terms of v
i
g, and t? (b) What 
vertical distance d is it from the helicopter in terms of 
g and t? (c) What are the answers to parts (a) and (b) if 
the helicopter is rising steadily at the same speed?
Section 2.8 Kinematic Equations Derived from Calculus
57. Automotive engineers refer to the time rate of change 
of acceleration as the “jerk.” Assume an object moves in 
one dimension such that its jerk J is constant. (a) Deter-
mine expressions for its acceleration a
x
(t), velocity v
x
(t), 
and position x(t), given that its initial acceleration, 
velocity, and position are a
xi
v
xi
, and x
i
, respectively.  
(b) Show that a
x
2 5 a
xi
2 1 2J(v
x
v
xi
).
58. A student drives a 
moped along a straight 
road as described 
by the  velocity–time 
graph in Figure P2.58. 
Sketch this graph 
in the middle of a 
sheet of graph paper. 
(a)Directly above your 
graph, sketch a graph 
of the position versus 
time, aligning the time coordinates of the two graphs. 
(b) Sketch a graph of the acceleration versus time 
directly below the velocity–time graph, again align-
ing the time coordinates. On each graph, show the 
numerical values of x and a
x
for all points of inflection. 
(c)What is the acceleration at 5 6.00 s? (d)Find the 
position (relative to the starting point) at 5 6.00 s.  
(e) What is the moped’s final position at 5 9.00 s?
59. The speed of a bullet as it travels down the barrel of a 
rifle toward the opening is given by
5 (25.00 3 107)t1 (3.00 3 105)t
where v is in meters per second and t is in seconds. 
The acceleration of the bullet just as it leaves the 
barrel is zero. (a) Determine the acceleration and 
position of the bullet as functions of time when the 
bullet is in the barrel. (b)Determine the time inter-
val over which the bullet is accelerated. (c) Find the 
speed at which the bullet leaves the barrel. (d) What 
is the length of the barrel?
Additional Problems
60. A certain automobile manufacturer claims that its 
deluxe sports car will accelerate from rest to a speed 
of 42.0 m/s in 8.00 s. (a) Determine the average accel-
eration of the car. (b) Assume that the car moves with 
constant acceleration. Find the distance the car travels 
in the first 8.00 s. (c) What is the speed of the car 10.0 s 
after it begins its motion if it can continue to move with 
the same acceleration?
61. The froghopper Philaenus spumarius is supposedly the 
best jumper in the animal kingdom. To start a jump, 
this insect can accelerate at 4.00 km/s2 over a dis-
tance of 2.00 mm as it straightens its specially adapted  
S
S
v
x
(m/s)
4
8
0
-4
2
4
6
t (s)
8 10
-8
Figure P2.58
BIO
points. (d) Does the change in speed of the downward-
moving rock agree with the magnitude of the speed 
change of the rock moving upward between the same 
elevations? (e) Explain physically why it does or does 
not agree.
47. Why is the following situa-
tion impossible? Emily chal-
lenges David to catch a  
$1 bill as follows. She 
holds the bill vertically 
as shown in Figure P2.47, 
with the center of the bill 
between but not touching 
David’s index finger and 
thumb. Without warning, 
Emily releases the bill. 
David catches the bill without moving his hand down-
ward. David’s reaction time is equal to the average 
human reaction time.
48. A baseball is hit so that it travels straight upward after 
being struck by the bat. A fan observes that it takes  
3.00 s for the ball to reach its maximum height. Find  
(a) the ball’s initial velocity and (b) the height it reaches.
49. It is possible to shoot an arrow at a speed as high as  
100 m/s. (a) If friction can be ignored, how high would 
an arrow launched at this speed rise if shot straight up? 
(b) How long would the arrow be in the air?
50. The height of a helicopter above the ground is given 
by h 5 3.00t3, where h is in meters and t is in seconds. 
At t 5 2.00 s, the helicopter releases a small mailbag. 
How long after its release does the mailbag reach the 
ground?
51. A ball is thrown directly downward with an initial 
speed of 8.00 m/s from a height of 30.0 m. After what 
time interval does it strike the ground?
52. A ball is thrown upward from the ground with an ini-
tial speed of 25 m/s; at the same instant, another ball 
is dropped from a building 15 m high. After how long 
will the balls be at the same height above the ground?
53. A student throws a set of keys vertically upward to her 
sorority sister, who is in a window 4.00 m above. The 
second student catches the keys 1.50 s later. (a) With 
what initial velocity were the keys thrown? (b) What was 
the velocity of the keys just before they were caught?
54. At time t 5 0, a student throws a set of keys vertically 
upward to her sorority sister, who is in a window at 
distance h above. The second student catches the keys 
at time t. (a)With what initial velocity were the keys 
thrown? (b) What was the velocity of the keys just 
before they were caught?
55. A daring ranch hand sitting on a tree limb wishes 
to drop vertically onto a horse galloping under the 
tree. The constant speed of the horse is 10.0 m/s, and 
the distance from the limb to the level of the saddle 
is 3.00 m. (a) What must be the horizontal distance 
between the saddle and limb when the ranch hand 
makes his move? (b) For what time interval is he in 
the air?
Figure P2.47
©
C
e
n
g
a
g
e
L
e
a
r
n
i
n
g
/
G
e
o
r
g
e
S
e
m
p
l
e
W
W
M
M
S
AMT
Convert pdf to url online - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
to html; changing pdf to html
Convert pdf to url online - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
create html email from pdf; convert pdf into web page
56
chapter 2 Motion in One Dimension
(a) the speed of the woman just before she collided 
with the ventilator and (b) her average acceleration 
while in contact with the box. (c) Modeling her accel-
eration as constant, calculate the time interval it took 
to crush the box.
67. An elevator moves downward in a tall building at a 
constant speed of 5.00 m/s. Exactly 5.00 s after the 
top of the elevator car passes a bolt loosely attached to 
the wall of the elevator shaft, the bolt falls from rest. 
(a) At what time does the bolt hit the top of the still-
descending elevator? (b) In what way is this problem 
similar to Example 2.8? (c)Estimate the highest floor 
from which the bolt can fall if the elevator reaches 
the ground floor before the bolt hits the top of the 
elevator.
68. Why is the following situation impossible? A freight train 
is lumbering along at a constant speed of 16.0 m/s. 
Behind the freight train on the same track is a passen-
ger train traveling in the same direction at 40.0 m/s. 
When the front of the passenger train is 58.5 m from 
the back of the freight train, the engineer on the pas-
senger train recognizes the danger and hits the brakes 
of his train, causing the train to move with accelera-
tion 23.00 m/s2. Because of the engineer’s action, the 
trains do not collide.
69. The Acela is an electric train on the Washington–New 
York–Boston run, carrying passengers at 170 mi/h.  
A velocity–time graph for the Acela is shown in Fig-
ure P2.69. (a) Describe the train’s motion in each suc-
cessive time interval. (b) Find the train’s peak posi-
tive acceleration in the motion graphed. (c) Find the 
train’s displacement in miles between 5 0 and 5 
200 s.
–50
0
50
100
150
200
–100
0
50 100 0 150 200 250 300 350 400
–50
(mi/h)
(s)
Figure P2.69 
Velocity–time graph for the Acela.
70. Two objects move with initial velocity 28.00 m/s, final 
velocity 16.0 m/s, and constant accelerations. (a) The 
first object has displacement 20.0 m. Find its accelera-
tion. (b)The second object travels a total distance of 
22.0 m. Find its acceleration.
71. At t 5 0, one athlete in a race running on a long, 
straight track with a constant speed v
1
is a distance d
1
behind a second athlete running with a constant speed 
v
2
. (a) Under what circumstances is the first athlete 
able to overtake the second athlete? (b) Find the time t 
at which the first athlete overtakes the second athlete, 
in terms of d
1
v
1
, and v
2
. (c) At what minimum dis-
tance d
2
from the leading athlete must the finish line 
Q/C
Q/C
S
Q/C
“jumping legs.” Assume the acceleration is constant. 
(a) Find the upward velocity with which the insect takes 
off. (b) In what time interval does it reach this velocity? 
(c) How high would the insect jump if air resistance 
were negligible? The actual height it reaches is about 
70 cm, so air resistance must be a noticeable force on 
the leaping froghopper.
62. An object is at x 5 0 at t 5 0 and moves along the x 
axis according to the velocity–time graph in Figure 
P2.62. (a)What is the object’s acceleration between 0 
and 4.0s? (b) What is the object’s acceleration between 
4.0 s and 9.0s? (c) What is the object’s acceleration 
between 13.0 s and 18.0 s? (d) At what time(s) is the 
object moving with the lowest speed? (e) At what time 
is the object farthest from x 5 0? (f) What is the final 
position x of the object at t 5 18.0 s? (g) Through what 
total distance has the object moved between t 5 0 and  
5 18.0 s?
v
x
(m/s)
20
5
10
t (s)
15
-10
10
0
Figure P2.62
63. An inquisitive physics student and mountain climber 
climbs a 50.0-m-high cliff that overhangs a calm pool of 
water. He throws two stones vertically downward, 1.00 s 
apart, and observes that they cause a single splash. The 
first stone has an initial speed of 2.00 m/s. (a) How long 
after release of the first stone do the two stones hit the 
water? (b) What initial velocity must the second stone 
have if the two stones are to hit the water simultane-
ously? (c) What is the speed of each stone at the instant 
the two stones hit the water?
64. In Figure 2.11b, the area under the velocity–time 
graph and between the vertical axis and time t (ver-
tical dashed line) represents the displacement. As 
shown, this area consists of a rectangle and a triangle.  
(a) Compute their areas. (b) Explain how the sum of 
the two areas compares with the expression on the 
right-hand side of Equation 2.16.
65. A ball starts from rest and accelerates at 0.500 m/s2  
while moving down an inclined plane 9.00 m long. 
When it reaches the bottom, the ball rolls up another 
plane, where it comes to rest after moving 15.0 m on 
that plane. (a) What is the speed of the ball at the bot-
tom of the first plane? (b) During what time interval 
does the ball roll down the first plane? (c) What is the 
acceleration along the second plane? (d) What is the 
ball’s speed 8.00 m along the second plane?
66. A woman is reported to have fallen 144 ft from the 17th 
floor of a building, landing on a metal ventilator box 
that she crushed to a depth of 18.0 in. She suffered 
only minor injuries. Ignoring air resistance, calculate 
M
S
Q/C
VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net
PDF editing APIs, VB.NET users will be able to add a url to specified area on PDF page and edit hyperlinks within the document. This online tutorial will give
online pdf to html converter; convert pdf to html form
C# PDF url edit Library: insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.
Help to extract and search url in PDF file. By using specific PDF editing APIs, C# users will be able to This online C# tutorial is mainly about how to edit PDF
convert pdf fillable form to html; best pdf to html converter online
problems 
57
Time (s) 
Height (m) 
Time (s) 
Height (m)
0.00 
5.00 
2.75 
7.62
0.25 
5.75 
3.00 
7.25
0.50 
6.40 
3.25 
6.77
0.75 
6.94 
3.50 
6.20
1.00 
7.38 
3.75 
5.52
1.25 
7.72 
4.00 
4.73
1.50 
7.96 
4.25 
3.85
1.75 
8.10 
4.50 
2.86
2.00 
8.13 
4.75 
1.77
2.25 
8.07 
5.00 
0.58
2.50 
7.90
77. A motorist drives along a straight road at a constant 
speed of 15.0 m/s. Just as she passes a parked motor-
cycle police officer, the officer starts to accelerate at  
2.00 m/s2 to overtake her. Assuming that the officer 
maintains this acceleration, (a) determine the time 
interval required for the police officer to reach the 
motorist. Find (b) the speed and (c) the total displace-
ment of the officer as he overtakes the motorist.
78. A commuter train travels between two downtown sta-
tions. Because the stations are only 1.00 km apart, 
the train never reaches its maximum possible cruis-
ing speed. During rush hour the engineer minimizes 
the time interval ∆t between two stations by acceler-
ating at a rate a
1
5 0.100 m/s2 for a time interval Dt
1
and then immediately braking with acceleration a
2
 
20.500 m/s for a time interval Dt
2
. Find the minimum 
time interval of travel Dt and the time interval Dt
1
79. Liz rushes down onto a subway platform to find her 
train already departing. She stops and watches the cars 
go by. Each car is 8.60 m long. The first moves past her 
in 1.50 s and the second in 1.10 s. Find the constant 
acceleration of the train.
80. A hard rubber ball, released at chest height, falls to the 
pavement and bounces back to nearly the same height. 
When it is in contact with the pavement, the lower side 
of the ball is temporarily flattened. Suppose the maxi-
mum depth of the dent is on the order of 1 cm. Find 
the order of magnitude of the maximum acceleration 
of the ball while it is in contact with the pavement. 
State your assumptions, the quantities you estimate, 
and the values you estimate for them.
Challenge Problems
81. A blue car of length 4.52 m is moving north on a road-
way that intersects another perpendicular roadway (Fig. 
P2.81, page 58). The width of the intersection from near 
edge to far edge is 28.0 m. The blue car has a constant 
acceleration of magnitude 2.10 m/s2 directed south. 
The time interval required for the nose of the blue car 
to move from the near (south) edge of the intersection 
to the north edge of the intersection is 3.10 s. (a) How 
far is the nose of the blue car from the south edge of 
the intersection when it stops? (b) For what time inter-
val is any part of the blue car within the boundaries of 
the intersection? (c) A red car is at rest on the perpen-
dicular intersecting roadway. As the nose of the blue car 
Q/C
be located so that the trailing athlete can at least tie for 
first place? Express d
2
in terms of d
1
v
1
, and v
2
by using 
the result of part (b).
72. A catapult launches a test rocket vertically upward from 
a well, giving the rocket an initial speed of 80.0 m/s at 
ground level. The engines then fire, and the rocket 
accelerates upward at 4.00 m/s2 until it reaches an 
altitude of 1 000m. At that point, its engines fail and 
the rocket goes into free fall, with an acceleration of  
29.80 m/s2. (a)For what time interval is the rocket in 
motion above the ground? (b) What is its maximum 
altitude? (c) What is its velocity just before it hits the 
ground? (You will need to consider the motion while 
the engine is operating and the free-fall motion 
separately.)
73. Kathy tests her new sports car by racing with Stan, 
an experienced racer. Both start from rest, but Kathy 
leaves the starting line 1.00 s after Stan does. Stan 
moves with a constant acceleration of 3.50 m/s2, while 
Kathy maintains an acceleration of 4.90 m/s2. Find  
(a) the time at which Kathy overtakes Stan, (b) the 
distance she travels before she catches him, and  
(c) the speeds of both cars at the instant Kathy over-
takes Stan.
74. Two students are on a balcony a distance h above the 
street. One student throws a ball vertically downward 
at a speed v
i
; at the same time, the other student throws 
a ball vertically upward at the same speed. Answer the 
following symbolically in terms of v
i
gh, and t.  
(a) What is the time interval between when the first 
ball strikes the ground and the second ball strikes the 
ground? (b) Find the velocity of each ball as it strikes 
the ground. (c) How far apart are the balls at a time t 
after they are thrown and before they strike the 
ground?
75. Two objects, A and B, are con-
nected by hinges to a rigid 
rod that has a length L. The 
objects slide along perpen-
dicular guide rails as shown in 
Figure P2.75. Assume object A 
slides to the left with a constant 
speed v. (a) Find the velocity v
B
of object B as a function of the 
angle u. (b) Describe v
B
relative 
to v. Is v
B
always smaller than v, larger than v, or the 
same as v, or does it have some other relationship?
76. Astronauts on a distant planet toss a rock into the 
air. With the aid of a camera that takes pictures at a 
steady rate, they record the rock’s height as a func-
tion of time as given in the following table. (a) Find 
the rock’s average velocity in the time interval between 
each measurement and the next. (b) Using these aver-
age velocities to approximate instantaneous velocities 
at the midpoints of the time intervals, make a graph of 
velocity as a function of time. (c) Does the rock move 
with constant acceleration? If so, plot a straight line of 
best fit on the graph and calculate its slope to find the 
acceleration.
AMT
M
S
L
x
O
y
u
B
A
x
y
v
S
Figure P2.75
S
Q/C
Q/C
C#: How to Open a File from a URL (HTTP, FTP) in HTML5 Viewer
svg, C#.NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET How to Open a File from a URL (HTTP, FTP) and Show
how to convert pdf into html code; convert pdf to html code c#
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
NET extract PDF pages, VB.NET comment annotate PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET convert PDF to SVG. Able to load PDF document from file formats and url.
conversion pdf to html; convert pdf to web pages
58
chapter 2 Motion in One Dimension
ahead at the 6.00-s mark, and by how much? (d)What 
is the maximum distance by which Healan is behind 
Laura, and at what time does that occur?
84. Two thin rods are fastened 
to the inside of a circular 
ring as shown in Figure 
P2.84. One rod of length D 
is vertical, and the other of 
length L makes an angle u 
with the horizontal. The two 
rods and the ring lie in a ver-
tical plane. Two small beads 
are free to slide without fric-
tion along the rods. (a) If the 
two beads are released from 
rest simultaneously from the 
positions shown, use your intuition and guess which 
bead reaches the bottom first. (b)Find an expression 
for the time interval required for the red bead to fall 
from point A to point C in terms of g and D. (c)Find 
an expression for the time interval required for the 
blue bead to slide from point B to point C in terms of 
gL, and u. (d) Show that the two time intervals found 
in parts (b) and (c) are equal. Hint: What is the angle 
between the chords of the circle A B and B C? (e)Do 
these results surprise you? Was your intuitive guess in 
part (a) correct? This problem was inspired by an arti-
cle by Thomas B. Greenslade, Jr., “Galileo’s Paradox,” 
Phys. Teach. 46, 294 (May 2008).
85. A man drops a rock into a well. (a) The man hears the 
sound of the splash 2.40 s after he releases the rock 
from rest. The speed of sound in air (at the ambient 
temperature) is 336 m/s. How far below the top of 
the well is the surface of the water? (b) What If? If 
the travel time for the sound is ignored, what percent-
age error is introduced when the depth of the well is 
calculated?
A
C
B
u
D
L
Figure P2.84
enters the intersection, the red car starts from rest and 
accelerates east at 5.60 m/s2. What is the minimum dis-
tance from the near (west) edge of the intersection at 
which the nose of the red car can begin its motion if it 
is to enter the intersection after the blue car has entirely 
left the intersection? (d) If the red car begins its motion 
at the position given by the answer to part (c), with what 
speed does it enter the intersection?
28.0 m
a
R
v
B
a
B
E
N
S
W
Figure P2.81
82. Review. As soon as a traffic light turns green, a car 
speeds up from rest to 50.0 mi/h with constant accel-
eration 9.00mi/h/s. In the adjoining bicycle lane, a 
cyclist speeds up from rest to 20.0 mi/h with constant 
acceleration 13.0mi/h/s. Each vehicle maintains con-
stant velocity after reaching its cruising speed. (a) For  
what time interval is the bicycle ahead of the car?  
(b) By what maximum distance does the bicycle lead 
the car?
83. In a women’s 100-m race, accelerating uniformly, 
Laura takes 2.00 s and Healan 3.00 s to attain their 
maximum speeds, which they each maintain for the 
rest of the race. They cross the finish line simultane-
ously, both setting a world record of 10.4 s. (a) What is 
the acceleration of each sprinter? (b)What are their 
respective maximum speeds? (c) Which sprinter is 
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
csv to PDF, C#.NET convert PDF to svg, C#.NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images Able to load PDF document from file formats and url in ASP
convert pdf form to html; convert pdf to web link
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
PDF to Text. Convert PDF to JPEG. Convert PDF to Png to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete
convert fillable pdf to html; convert pdf to html email
59
A signpost in Saint Petersburg, 
Florida, shows the distance 
and direction to several cities. 
Quantities that are defined by 
both a magnitude and a direction 
are called vector quantities. 
(Raymond A. Serway)
In our study of physics, we often need to work with physical quantities that have both 
numerical and directional properties. As noted in Section 2.1, quantities of this nature are 
vector quantities. This chapter is primarily concerned with general properties of vector 
quantities. We discuss the addition and subtraction of vector quantities, together with some 
common applications to physical situations.
Vector quantities are used throughout this text. Therefore, it is imperative that you mas-
ter the techniques discussed in this chapter.
3.1 Coordinate Systems
Many aspects of physics involve a description of a location in space. In Chapter 2, for 
example, we saw that the mathematical description of an object’s motion requires 
a method for describing the object’s position at various times. In two dimensions, 
this description is accomplished with the use of the Cartesian coordinate system, 
in which perpendicular axes intersect at a point defined as the origin O (Fig. 3.1). 
Cartesian coordinates are also called rectangular coordinates.
Sometimes it is more convenient to represent a point in a plane by its plane polar 
coordinates (r, u) as shown in Figure 3.2a (page 60). In this polar coordinate system, r is 
the distance from the origin to the point having Cartesian coordinates (x, y) and u 
is the angle between a fixed axis and a line drawn from the origin to the point. The 
fixed axis is often the positive x axis, and u is usually measured counterclockwise 
3.1 Coordinate Systems
3.2 Vector and Scalar Quantities
3.3 Some Properties of Vectors
3.4 Components of a Vector and 
Unit Vectors
Vectors
c h a p p t t e r 
3
y
x
Q
(–3, 4)
(5, 3)
(x, y)
P
5
10
5
10
O
Figure 3.1 
Designation of points 
in a Cartesian coordinate system. 
Every point is labeled with coordi-
nates (x, y).
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Able to render and convert PDF document to/from supported document package offers robust APIs for editing PDF document hyperlink (url), which provide
embed pdf into website; online convert pdf to html
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to
Convert PDF to Png, Gif, Bitmap PDF. Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit
convert pdf into webpage; convert pdf to html with
60
chapter 3 Vectors
Example 3.1   Polar Coordinates
The Cartesian coordinates of a point in the xy plane are (xy) 5 (23.50, 22.50) m as shown in Figure 3.3. Find the 
polar coordinates of this point.
Conceptualize  The drawing in Figure 3.3 helps us conceptualize the problem. We wish to find r and u.  We expect r to 
be a few meters and u to be larger than 180°.
Categorize Based on the statement of the problem and 
the Conceptualize step, we recognize that we are simply 
converting from Cartesian coordinates to polar coordi-
nates. We therefore categorize this example as a substitu-
tion problem. Substitution problems generally do not have 
an extensive Analyze step other than the substitution of 
numbers into a given equation. Similarly, the Finalize step 
SolutIon
from it. From the right triangle in Figure 3.2b, we find that sin u 5 y/r and that cos 
u 5 x/r. (A review of trigonometric functions is given in Appendix B.4.) Therefore, 
starting with the plane polar coordinates of any point, we can obtain the Cartesian 
coordinates by using the equations
x5r cos u 
(3.1)
y5r sin u 
(3.2)
Furthermore, if we know the Cartesian coordinates, the definitions of trigonom-
etry tell us that
tan u5
y
x
(3.3)
r5"x
2
1y
2
(3.4)
Equation 3.4 is the familiar Pythagorean theorem.
These four expressions relating the coordinates (xy) to the coordinates (r, u) 
apply only when u is defined as shown in Figure 3.2a—in other words, when posi-
tive u is an angle measured counterclockwise from the positive x axis. (Some sci-
entific calculators perform conversions between Cartesian and polar coordinates 
based on these standard conventions.) If the reference axis for the polar angle 
u is chosen to be one other than the positive x axis or if the sense of increasing 
u is chosen differently, the expressions relating the two sets of coordinates will 
change.
Cartesian coordinates 
in terms of polar  
coordinates
Polar coordinates in terms 
of Cartesian coordinates
Figure 3.2 
(a) The plane polar coordinates of a point are represented by the distance r and the 
angle u, where u is measured counterclockwise from the positive x axis. (b) The right triangle used to 
relate (xy) to (r, u).
O
(x, y)
y
x
r
u
a
x
r
y
sin  =
y
r
cos  =
x
r
tan  =
x
y
u
u
u
u
b
Figure 3.3 
(Example 3.1) 
Finding polar coordinates when 
Cartesian coordinates are given.
(–3.50, –2.50)
(m)
r
(m)
u
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, Zero Footprint AJAX Document Image
View, Convert, Edit, Sign Documents and Images. Open file from URL (HTTP.FTP are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to convert pdf to html email; convert pdf form to web form
VB.NET Image: VB Code to Download and Save Image from Web URL
Apart from image downloading from web URL, RasterEdge .NET Imaging SDK still dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
embed pdf into html; convert pdf to html for online
3.2 Vector and Scalar Quantities 
61
consists primarily of checking the units and making sure that the answer is reasonable and consistent with our expec-
tations. Therefore, for substitution problems, we will not label Analyze or Finalize steps.
Use Equation 3.4 to find r:
r5"x
2
1y
2
5"
1
23.50 m
22
1
1
22.50 m
22
5  4.30 m
Use Equation 3.3 to find u:
tan u5
y
x
5
22.50 m
23.50 m
50.714
u5  2168
3.2 Vector and Scalar Quantities
We now formally describe the difference between scalar quantities and vector quan-
tities. When you want to know the temperature outside so that you will know how 
to dress, the only information you need is a number and the unit “degrees C” or 
“degrees F.” Temperature is therefore an example of a scalar quantity:
scalar quantity is completely specified by a single value with an appropriate 
unit and has no direction.
Other examples of scalar quantities are volume, mass, speed, time, and time inter-
vals. Some scalars are always positive, such as mass and speed. Others, such as 
temperature, can have either positive or negative values. The rules of ordinary 
arithmetic are used to manipulate scalar quantities.
If you are preparing to pilot a small plane and need to know the wind velocity, 
you must know both the speed of the wind and its direction. Because direction is 
important for its complete specification, velocity is a vector quantity:
vector quantity is completely specified by a number with an appropriate 
unit (the magnitude of the vector) plus a direction.
Another example of a vector quantity is displacement, as you know from Chapter 
2. Suppose a particle moves from some point A to some point B along a straight 
path as shown in Figure 3.4. We represent this displacement by drawing an arrow 
from A to B, with the tip of the arrow pointing away from the starting point. The 
direction of the arrowhead represents the direction of the displacement, and the 
length of the arrow represents the magnitude of the displacement. If the particle 
travels along some other path from A to B such as shown by the broken line in 
Figure 3.4, its displacement is still the arrow drawn from A to B. Displacement 
depends only on the initial and final positions, so the displacement vector is inde-
pendent of the path taken by the particle between these two points.
In this text, we use a boldface letter with an arrow over the letter, such as A
S
, to 
represent a vector. Another common notation for vectors with which you should be 
familiar is a simple boldface character: A. The magnitude of the vector A
S
is writ-
ten either A or 
0
A
S
0
. The magnitude of a vector has physical units, such as meters for 
displacement or meters per second for velocity. The magnitude of a vector is always 
a positive number.
Notice that you must use the signs of x and y to find that the point lies in the third quadrant of the coordinate system. That 
is, u 5 216°, not 35.5°, whose tangent is also 0.714. Both answers agree with our expectations in the Conceptualize step.
A
B
Figure 3.4 
As a particle moves 
from A to B along an arbitrary 
path represented by the broken 
line, its displacement is a vec-
tor quantity shown by the arrow 
drawn from A to B.
▸ 3.1 
continued
62
chapter 3 Vectors
uick Quiz 3.1  Which of the following are vector quantities and which are scalar 
quantities? (a) your age (b) acceleration (c) velocity (d) speed (e) mass
3.3 Some Properties of Vectors
In this section, we shall investigate general properties of vectors representing physi-
cal quantities. We also discuss how to add and subtract vectors using both algebraic 
and geometric methods.
Equality of Two Vectors
For many purposes, two vectors A
S
and B
S
may be defined to be equal if they have 
the same magnitude and if they point in the same direction. That is, A
S
B
S
only if  
A 5 B and if A
S
and B
S
point in the same direction along parallel lines. For exam-
ple, all the vectors in Figure 3.5 are equal even though they have different starting 
points. This property allows us to move a vector to a position parallel to itself in a 
diagram without affecting the vector.
Adding Vectors
The rules for adding vectors are conveniently described by a graphical method. 
To add vector B
S
to vector A
S
, first draw vector A
S
on graph paper, with its magni-
tude represented by a convenient length scale, and then draw vector B
S
to the same 
scale, with its tail starting from the tip of A
S
, as shown in Figure 3.6. The resultant 
vector R
S
A
S
B
S
is the vector drawn from the tail of A
S
to the tip of B
S
.
A geometric construction can also be used to add more than two vectors as  
shown in Figure 3.7 for the case of four vectors. The resultant vector R
S
A
S
B
S
 
C
S
D
S
is the vector that completes the polygon. In other words, R
S
is the vector 
drawn from the tail of the first vector to the tip of the last vector. This technique for 
adding vectors is often called the “head to tail method.”
When two vectors are added, the sum is independent of the order of the addi-
tion. (This fact may seem trivial, but as you will see in Chapter 11, the order is 
important when vectors are multiplied. Procedures for multiplying vectors are dis-
cussed in Chapters 7 and 11.) This property, which can be seen from the geometric 
construction in Figure 3.8, is known as the commutative law of addition:
A
S
B
S
B
S
A
S
(3.5)
Commutative law of addition 
O
y
x
Figure 3.5 
These four vectors 
are equal because they have equal 
lengths and point in the same 
direction.
A
S
B
S
C
S
D
S
A
S
B
S
C
S
D
S
R
S
5
1
1
1
Figure 3.7 
Geometric construc-
tion for summing four vectors. The  
resultant vector R
S
is by definition 
the one that completes the polygon.
A
S
B
S
B
S
A
S
A
S
B
S
B
S
R
S
5
5
1
1
Draw    , 
then add    .
A
S
B
S
A
S
Draw    , 
then add    .
A
S
B
S
Figure 3.8 
This construction 
shows that A
S
B
S
B
S
A
S
or, in 
other words, that vector addition is 
commutative.
Pitfall Prevention 3.1
Vector Addition Versus  
Scalar Addition Notice that 
A
S
B
S
C
S
is very different 
from A 1 5 C. The first equa-
tion is a vector sum, which must 
be handled carefully, such as  
with the graphical method. The 
second equation is a simple alge-
braic addition of numbers that  
is handled with the normal rules 
of arithmetic.
Figure 3.6 
When vector B
S
is 
added to vector A
S
, the resultant R
S
is 
the vector that runs from the tail of 
A
S
to the tip of B
S
.
5
1
A
S
R
S
A
S
B
S
B
S
3.3 Some properties of Vectors 
63
When three or more vectors are added, their sum is independent of the way in 
which the individual vectors are grouped together. A geometric proof of this rule 
for three vectors is given in Figure 3.9. This property is called the associative law of 
addition:
A
S
1
1
B
S
C
S
2
5
1
A
S
B
S
2
C
S
(3.6)
In summary, a vector quantity has both magnitude and direction and also obeys 
the laws of vector addition as described in Figures 3.6 to 3.9. When two or more 
vectors are added together, they must all have the same units and they must all 
be the same type of quantity. It would be meaningless to add a velocity vector (for 
example, 60 km/h to the east) to a displacement vector (for example, 200 km to the 
north) because these vectors represent different physical quantities. The same rule 
also applies to scalars. For example, it would be meaningless to add time intervals 
to temperatures.
Negative of a Vector
The negative of the vector A
S
is defined as the vector that when added to A
S
gives 
zero for the vector sum. That is, A
S
1
1
2A
S
2
50. The vectors A
S
and 2A
S
have the 
same magnitude but point in opposite directions.
Subtracting Vectors
The operation of vector subtraction makes use of the definition of the negative of a 
vector. We define the operation A
S
B
S
as vector 2B
S
added to vector A
S
:
A
S
B
S
A
S
1
1
2B
S
2
(3.7)
The geometric construction for subtracting two vectors in this way is illustrated in 
Figure 3.10a.
Another way of looking at vector subtraction is to notice that the difference 
A
S
B
S
between two vectors A
S
and B
S
is what you have to add to the second vector  
WWAssociative law of addition
Add    and   ; 
then add the
result to   .
A
S
A
S
A
S
A
S
B
S
B
S
B
S
B
S
B
S
1
C
S
C
S
C
S
Add    and   ; 
then add     to 
the result.
A
S
B
S
C
S
1
C
S
A
S
B
S
1
1
C
S
)
(
A
S
B
S
1
1
C
S
)
(
Figure 3.9 
Geometric construc-
tions for verifying the associative 
law of addition.
2
A
S
A
S
A
S
B
S
B
S
B
S
B
S
2
A
S
B
S
C
S
5
2
A
S
B
S
We would draw
here if we were 
adding it to   .
Adding 2   to   
is equivalent to 
subtracting    
from   . 
B
S
A
S
A
S
B
S
a
b
A
S
B
S
Vector                    is 
the vector we must 
add to    to obtain   .
A
S
B
S
C
S
5
2
Figure 3.10 
(a) Subtracting 
vector B
S
from vector A
S
. The vec-
tor 2B
S
is equal in magnitude to 
vector B
S
and points in the oppo-
site direction. (b)A second way of 
looking at vector subtraction.
64
chapter 3 Vectors
Example 3.2   A Vacation Trip
A car travels 20.0 km due north and then 35.0 km 
in a direction 60.0° west of north as shown in Fig-
ure 3.11a. Find the magnitude and direction of 
the car’s resultant displacement.
Conceptualize  The vectors A
S
and B
S
drawn in 
Figure 3.11a help us conceptualize the problem. 
The resultant vector R
S
has also been drawn. We 
expect its magnitude to be a few tens of kilome-
ters. The angle b that the resultant vector makes 
with the y axis is expected to be less than 60°, the 
angle that vector B
S
makes with the y axis.
Categorize  We can categorize this example as a simple analysis problem in vector addition. The displacement R
S
is the 
resultant when the two individual displacements A
S
and B
S
are added. We can further categorize it as a problem about 
the analysis of triangles, so we appeal to our expertise in geometry and trigonometry.
Analyze  In this example, we show two ways to analyze the problem of finding the resultant of two vectors. The first way is 
to solve the problem geometrically, using graph paper and a protractor to measure the magnitude of R
S
and its direction 
in Figure 3.11a. (In fact, even when you know you are going to be carrying out a calculation, you should sketch the vectors 
to check your results.) With an ordinary ruler and protractor, a large diagram typically gives answers to two-digit but not to 
three-digit precision. Try using these tools on R
S
in Figure 3.11a and compare to the trigonometric analysis below!
The second way to solve the problem is to analyze it using algebra and trigonometry. The magnitude of R
S
can be 
obtained from the law of cosines as applied to the triangle in Figure 3.11a (see Appendix B.4).
SolutIon
Use R2 5 A2 1 B2 2 2AB cos u from the law of cosines to 
find R:
R5"A
2
1B
2
22AB cos u
to obtain the first. In this case, as Figure 3.10b shows, the vector A
S
B
S
points 
from the tip of the second vector to the tip of the first.
Multiplying a Vector by a Scalar
If vector A
S
is multiplied by a positive scalar quantity m, the product m
A
S
is a vector 
that has the same direction as A
S
and magnitude mA. If vector A
S
is multiplied by  
a negative scalar quantity 2m, the product 2mA
S
is directed opposite A
S
. For exam-
ple, the vector 5A
S
is five times as long as A
S
and points in the same direction as A
S
 
the vector 2
1
3
A
S
is one-third the length of A
S
and points in the direction oppo-
site A
S
.
uick Quiz 3.2 The magnitudes of two vectors A
S
and B
S
are A 5 12 units and  
B 5 8 units. Which pair of numbers represents the largest and smallest possible 
values for the magnitude of the resultant vector R
S
A
S
B
S
(a)14.4units,  
4 units (b) 12 units, 8 units (c) 20 units, 4 units (d) none of these answers
uick Quiz 3.3 If vector B
S
is added to vector A
S
, which two of the following 
choices must be true for the resultant vector to be equal to zero? (a) A
S
and  
B
S
are parallel and in the same direction. (b) A
S
and B
S
are parallel and in 
opposite directions. (c) A
S
and B
S
have the same magnitude. (d) A
S
and B
S
are perpendicular.
(km)
40
20
60.0
(km)
0
(km)
20
(km)
0
220
220
40
b
b
u
E
N
S
W
A
S
B
S
R
S
A
S
B
S
R
S
a
b
Figure 3.11 
(Example 3.2) (a) Graphical method for finding the resul-
tant displacement vector R
S
A
S
B
S
. (b) Adding the vectors in reverse 
order 
1
B
S
A
S
2
gives the same result for R
S
.
Substitute numerical values, noting that  
u 5 180° 2 60° 5 120°:
R5"
1
20.0 km
22
1
1
35.0 km
22
22
1
20.0 km
21
35.0 km
2
cos 1208
  48.2 km
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested