29.5 torque on a current Loop in a Uniform Magnetic Field 
885
29.5  Torque on a Current Loop in a Uniform 
Magnetic Field
In Section 29.4, we showed how a magnetic force is exerted on a current-carrying 
conductor placed in a magnetic field. With that as a starting point, we now show 
that a torque is exerted on a current loop placed in a magnetic field.
Consider a rectangular loop carrying a current I in the presence of a uniform 
magnetic field directed parallel to the plane of the loop as shown in Figure 29.21a. 
No magnetic forces act on sides y and c because these wires are parallel to the 
field; hence, L
S
B
S
50 for these sides. Magnetic forces do, however, act on sides 
x and v because these sides are oriented perpendicular to the field. The magni-
tude of these forces is, from Equation 29.10,
F
2
F
4
IaB
b
a
I
I
I
I
B
S
v
y
x
c
Sides 
x
and 
v
are 
perpendicular to the magnetic 
field and experience forces.
a
No magnetic forces act on 
sides 
y
and 
c
because 
these sides are parallel to B.
S
O
b
2
B
S
v
x
F
2
S
F
4
S
b
The magnetic forces F
2
and F
4
exerted on sides 
x
and 
v
create a torque that tends to 
rotate the loop clockwise.
S
S
Figure 29.21 
(a) Overhead view 
of a rectangular current loop in a 
uniform magnetic field. (b) Edge 
view of the loop sighting down 
sides x and v. The purple dot in 
the left circle represents current 
in wire x coming toward you; the 
purple cross in the right circle 
represents current in wire v mov-
ing away from you.
Substitute Equation (2) into Equation (1) and 
integrate over the angle u from 0 to p:
F
S
2
52
3
p
0
IRB sin u du k
^
52IRB 
3
p
0
sin u du k
^
52IRB
3
2cos u
4
p
0
k
^
5IRB
1
cos p2cos 0
2
k
^
5IRB
1
2121
2
k
^
5
22IRB k
^
Finalize  Two very important general statements follow from this example. First, the force on the curved portion is the 
same in magnitude as the force on a straight wire between the same two points. In general, the magnetic force on a 
curved current-carrying wire in a uniform magnetic field is equal to that on a straight wire connecting the endpoints 
and carrying the same current. Furthermore, F
S
1
F
S
2
50 is also a general result: the net magnetic force acting on  
any closed current loop in a uniform magnetic field is zero.
From the geometry in Figure 29.20, write an 
expression for ds:
(2)   ds5R du
To find the magnetic force on the curved part, 
first write an expression for the magnetic force 
dF
S
2
on the element ds
S
in Figure 29.20:
(1)   dF
S
2
5Ids
S
B
S
52IB sin u ds k
^
▸ 29.4 
continued
How to convert pdf into html - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
embed pdf to website; convert pdf to url online
How to convert pdf into html - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
how to convert pdf to html; adding pdf to html page
886
chapter 29 Magnetic Fields
The direction of F
S
2
, the magnetic force exerted on wire x, is out of the page in the 
view shown in Figure 29.20a and that of F
S
4
, the magnetic force exerted on wire v, 
is into the page in the same view. If we view the loop from side c and sight along 
sides x and v, we see the view shown in Figure 29.21b, and the two magnetic forces 
F
S
2
and F
S
4
are directed as shown. Notice that the two forces point in opposite direc-
tions but are not directed along the same line of action. If the loop is pivoted so that 
it can rotate about point O, these two forces produce about O a torque that rotates 
the loop clockwise. The magnitude of this torque t
max
is
t
max
5F
2
b
2
1F
4
b
2
5
1
IaB
2
b
2
1
1
IaB
2
b
2
5IabB 
where the moment arm about O is b/2 for each force. Because the area enclosed by 
the loop is A 5 ab, we can express the maximum torque as
t
max
5IAB 
(29.13)
This maximum-torque result is valid only when the magnetic field is parallel to 
the plane of the loop. The sense of the rotation is clockwise when viewed from 
side c as indicated in Figure 29.21b. If the current direction were reversed, 
the force directions would also reverse and the rotational tendency would be 
counterclockwise.
Now suppose the uniform magnetic field makes an angle u , 908 with a line 
perpendicular to the plane of the loop as in Figure 29.22. For convenience, let’s 
assume B
S
is perpendicular to sides x and v. In this case, the magnetic forces F
S
1
and F
S
3
exerted on sides y and c cancel each other and produce no torque because 
they act along the same line. The magnetic forces F
S
2
and F
S
4
acting on sides x and 
v, however, produce a torque about any point. Referring to the edge view shown  
in Figure 29.22, we see that the moment arm of F
S
2
about the point O is equal to 
(b/2) sin u. Likewise, the moment arm of F
S
4
about O is also equal to (b/2) sin u. 
Because F
2
F
4
IaB, the magnitude of the net torque about O is
t5F
2
b
2
sin u1F
4
b
2
sin u 
5IaB
a
b
2
sin u
b
1IaB
a
b
2
sin u
b
5IabB sin u
IAB sin u
where A 5 ab is the area of the loop. This result shows that the torque has its maxi-
mum value IAB when the field is perpendicular to the normal to the plane of the 
loop (u 5 908) as discussed with regard to Figure 29.21 and is zero when the field is 
parallel to the normal to the plane of the loop (u 5 0).
O
b
2
– sin 
b
2
x
v
u
u
u
F
2
S
F
4
S
B
S
A
S
When the normal to the loop 
makes an angle u with the 
magnetic field, the moment arm 
for the torque is (b/2) sin u.
Figure 29.22 
An edge view 
of the loop in Figure 29.21 
with the normal to the loop 
at an angle u with respect to 
the magnetic field.
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Parameters: Name, Description, Valid Value. value, The char wil be added into PDF page, 0
convert pdf form to html form; convert pdf into html code
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
with specified zoom value and save it into stream The magnification of the original PDF page size Description: Convert to DOCX/TIFF with specified resolution and
change pdf to html format; convert pdf to website
29.5 torque on a current Loop in a Uniform Magnetic Field 
887
(1) Curl your 
fingers in the 
direction of the 
current around 
the loop.
(2) Your thumb 
points in the 
direction of A  
and m. 
I
m
S
S
S
A
S
Figure 29.23 
Right-hand rule for determining the direction 
of the vector A
S
for a current loop. The direction of the mag-
netic moment m
S
is the same as the direction of A
S
.
A convenient vector expression for the torque exerted on a loop placed in a uni-
form magnetic field B
S
is
t
S
5IA
S
B
S
(29.14)
where A
S
, the vector shown in Figure 29.22, is perpendicular to the plane of the 
loop and has a magnitude equal to the area of the loop. To determine the direc-
tion of A
S
, use the right-hand rule described in Figure 29.23. When you curl the 
fingers of your right hand in the direction of the current in the loop, your thumb 
points in the direction of A
S
. Figure 29.22 shows that the loop tends to rotate in 
the direction of decreasing values of u (that is, such that the area vector A
S
rotates 
toward the direction of the magnetic field).
The product IA
S
is defined to be the magnetic dipole moment m
S
(often simply 
called the “magnetic moment”) of the loop:
m
S
;IA
S
(29.15)
The SI unit of magnetic dipole moment is the ampere-meter2 (A ? m2). If a coil of 
wire contains N loops of the same area, the magnetic moment of the coil is
m
S
coil
5NIA
S
(29.16)
Using Equation 29.15, we can express the torque exerted on a current-carrying 
loop in a magnetic field B
S
as
t
S
5m
S
B
S
(29.17)
This result is analogous to Equation 26.18, t
S
5p
S
3E
S
, for the torque exerted on 
an electric dipole in the presence of an electric field E
S
, where p
S
is the electric 
dipole moment.
Although we obtained the torque for a particular orientation of B
S
with respect 
to the loop, the equation t
S
5m
S
B
S
is valid for any orientation. Furthermore, 
although we derived the torque expression for a rectangular loop, the result is valid 
for a loop of any shape. The torque on an N-turn coil is given by Equation 29.17 by 
using Equation 29.16 for the magnetic moment.
In Section 26.6, we found that the potential energy of a system of an electric 
dipole in an electric field is given by U
E
52p
S
?E
S
. This energy depends on the 
orientation of the dipole in the electric field. Likewise, the potential energy of a 
system of a magnetic dipole in a magnetic field depends on the orientation of the 
dipole in the magnetic field and is given by
U
B
52m
S
?B
S
(29.18)
WW Torque on a current loop in a 
magnetic field
WW Magnetic dipole moment  
of a current loop
WW Torque on a magnetic 
moment in a magnetic field
Potential energy of a system 
of a magnetic moment in 
W a magnetic field
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
with specified zoom value and save it into stream The magnification of the original PDF page size Description: Convert to DOCX/TIFF with specified resolution and
embed pdf into webpage; convert pdf to html format
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Merge several images into PDF. Insert images into PDF form field.
how to add pdf to website; convert pdf to html file
888
chapter 29 Magnetic Fields
This expression shows that the system has its lowest energy U
min
5 2mB when  
m
S
points in the same direction as B
S
. The system has its highest energy U
max
5 1mB 
when m
S
points in the direction opposite B
S
.
Imagine the loop in Figure 29.22 is pivoted at point O on sides y and c, so that 
it is free to rotate. If the loop carries current and the magnetic field is turned on, 
the loop is modeled as a rigid object under a net torque, with the torque given by 
Equation 29.17. The torque on the current loop causes the loop to rotate; this effect 
is exploited practically in a motor. Energy enters the motor by electrical transmis-
sion, and the rotating coil can do work on some device external to the motor. For 
example, the motor in a car’s electrical window system does work on the windows, 
applying a force on them and moving them up or down through some displace-
ment. We will discuss motors in more detail in Section 31.5.
uick Quiz 29.4  (i) Rank the magnitudes of the torques acting on the rectangu-
lar loops (a), (b), and (c) shown edge-on in Figure 29.24 from highest to lowest. 
All loops are identical and carry the same current. (ii) Rank the magnitudes of 
the net forces acting on the rectangular loops shown in Figure 29.24 from high-
est to lowest.
c
a
b
Figure 29.24 
(Quick Quiz 
29.4) Which current loop (seen 
edge-on) experiences the great-
est torque, (a), (b), or (c)? Which 
experiences the greatest net 
force?
Example 29.5   The Magnetic Dipole Moment of a Coil
A rectangular coil of dimensions 5.40 cm 3 8.50 cm consists of 25 turns of wire and carries a current of 15.0 mA.  
A 0.350-T magnetic field is applied parallel to the plane of the coil.
(A)  Calculate the magnitude of the magnetic dipole moment of the coil.
Conceptualize  The magnetic moment of the coil is independent of any magnetic field in which the loop resides, so it 
depends only on the geometry of the loop and the current it carries.
Categorize  We evaluate quantities based on equations developed in this section, so we categorize this example as a 
substitution problem.
SoluTion
Use Equation 29.16 to calculate the magnetic moment 
associated with a coil consisting of N turns:
m
coil
NIA 5 (25)(15.0 3 1023 A)(0.054 0 m)(0.085 0 m)
1.7231023 A
#
m2
(B)  What is the magnitude of the torque acting on the loop?
SoluTion
Use Equation 29.17, noting that B
S
is perpendicular to m
S
coil
:
t 5 m
coil
B 5 (1.72 3 1023 A ? m2)(0.350 T)
6.0231024 N
#
m
Online Convert PDF to HTML5 files. Best free online PDF html
Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF file to HTML. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button or drag-and-drop your pdf file into the drop area.
converting pdf to html format; convert pdf into html
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
project. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Add file. Insert images into PDF form field in VB.NET. An
pdf to html converters; how to convert pdf to html code
29.5 orque on a urrent Loop in a Uniform Magnetic Field
889
Figure 29.25
(Example 29.6) (a) The dimensions of a rectangular current loop. 
(b)Edge view of the loop sighting down sides  and 
. (c) An edge view of the loop  
in (b) rotated through an angle with respect to the horizontal when it is placed in a 
magnetic field.
Analyze Evaluate the magnetic torque on 
the loop about side  from Equation 29.17:
52m sin 9082u
52IAB cos  k52IabB cos  k
Evaluate the gravitational torque on the 
loop, noting that the gravitational force can 
be modeled to act at the center of the loop:
mg
sin  k
From the rigid body in equilibrium model, 
add the torques and set the net torque 
equal to zero:
52IabB cos 
mg
sin  k
Solve for 
IabB cos u5mg
sin tan 
u5
IaB
mg
u5tan
IaB
mg
Substitute numerical values:
u5tan
3.50 A
21
0.200 m
21
0.010 0 T
0.050 0 kg
21
9.80 m
1.64
Finalize The angle is relatively small, so the loop still hangs almost vertically. If the current  or the magnetic field  is 
increased, however, the angle increases as the magnetic torque becomes stronger.
Example 29.6   Rotating a Coil
Consider the loop of wire in Figure 29.25a. Imagine it is pivoted along side , which is parallel to the  axis and fas
tened so that side  remains fixed and the rest of the loop hangs vertically in the gravitational field of the Earth but 
can rotate around side  (Fig. 29.25b). The mass of the loop is 50.0 g, and the sides are of lengths 
0.200 m and 
0.100 m. The loop carries a current of 3.50 A and is immersed in a vertical uniform magnetic field of magnitude 
0.010 0 T in the positive  direction (Fig. 29.25c). What angle does the plane of the loop make with the vertical?
Conceptualize In the edge view of 
Figure 29.25b, notice that the mag
netic moment of the loop is to the left. 
Therefore, when the loop is in the 
magnetic field, the magnetic torque 
on the loop causes it to rotate in a 
clockwise direction around side 
which we choose as the rotation axis. 
Imagine the loop making this clock
wise rotation so that the plane of the 
loop is at some angle  to the vertical 
as in Figure 29.25c. The gravitational 
force on the loop exerts a torque that 
would cause a rotation in the counter
clockwise direction if the magnetic 
field were turned off.
Categorize At some angle of the loop, 
the two torques described in the Conceptualize step are equal in magnitude and the loop is at rest. We therefore 
model the loop as a rigid object in equilibrium.
Solu ion
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Divide PDF File into Two Using C#. This is an C# example of splitting a PDF to two new PDF files. Split PDF Document into Multiple PDF Files in C#.
add pdf to website html; convert pdf link to html
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Split PDF file into two or multiple files in ASP.NET webpage online. Support to break a large PDF file into smaller files in .NET WinForms.
convert pdf to html5; convert url pdf to word
890
chapter 29 Magnetic Fields
===+=====++2.50 V
===+=====++1.50 V
I
I
c
a
V
H
I
I
c
a
V
H
v
d
S
v
d
S
B
S
B
S
qE
H
S
qE
H
S
qv
d
S
B
S
×
qv
d
S
B
S
×
+
-
+ + + + + + +
- - - - - - -
+ + + + + + +
- - - - - - -
When the charge carriers are 
negative, the upper edge of the 
conductor becomes negatively 
charged and c is at a lower 
electric potential than a.
The charge carriers are no longer 
deflected when the edges become 
sufficiently charged that there is a 
balance between the electric force and 
the magnetic force.
When the charge carriers are 
positive, the upper edge of the 
conductor becomes positively 
charged and c is at a higher 
potential than a.
a
b
Figure 29.27 
The sign of the Hall voltage depends on the sign of the charge carriers.
y
x
z
a
t
d
c
I
F
B
S
F
B
S
v
d
S
v
d
S
B
S
When I is in the x direction and 
B in the y direction, both positive 
and negative charge carriers are 
deflected upward in the 
magnetic field.
S
B
S
+
-
Figure 29.26 
To observe the 
Hall effect, a magnetic field is 
applied to a current-carrying con-
ductor. The Hall voltage is mea-
sured between points a and c.
29.6 The Hall Effect
When a current-carrying conductor is placed in a magnetic field, a potential dif-
ference is generated in a direction perpendicular to both the current and the 
magnetic field. This phenomenon, first observed by Edwin Hall (1855–1938) in 
1879, is known as the Hall effect. The arrangement for observing the Hall effect 
consists of a flat conductor carrying a current I in the x direction as shown in Fig-
ure 29.26. A uniform magnetic field B
S
is applied in the y direction. If the charge 
carriers are electrons moving in the negative x direction with a drift velocity v
S
d
they experience an upward magnetic force F
S
B
5qv
S
d
B
S
, are deflected upward, 
and accumulate at the upper edge of the flat conductor, leaving an excess of 
positive charge at the lower edge (Fig. 29.27a). This accumulation of charge at 
the edges establishes an electric field in the conductor and increases until the 
electric force on carriers remaining in the bulk of the conductor balances the 
magnetic force acting on the carriers. The electrons can now be described by 
the particle in equilibrium model, and they are no longer deflected upward. A 
sensitive voltmeter connected across the sample as shown in Figure 29.27 can 
measure the potential difference, known as the Hall voltage DV
H
, generated 
across the conductor.
If the charge carriers are positive and hence move in the positive x direction 
(for rightward current) as shown in Figures 29.26 and 29.27b, they also experience  
an upward magnetic force qv
S
d
B
S
, which produces a buildup of positive charge 
on the upper edge and leaves an excess of negative charge on the lower edge. 
Hence, the sign of the Hall voltage generated in the sample is opposite the sign of 
the Hall voltage resulting from the deflection of electrons. The sign of the charge 
carriers can therefore be determined from measuring the polarity of the Hall 
voltage.
In deriving an expression for the Hall voltage, first note that the magnetic force 
exerted on the carriers has magnitude qv
d
B. In equilibrium, this force is balanced 
by the electric force qE
H
, where E
H
is the magnitude of the electric field due to the 
charge separation (sometimes referred to as the Hall field). Therefore,
qv
d
B 5 qE
H
E
H
v
d
B
If d is the width of the conductor, the Hall voltage is
DV
H
E
H
d 5 v
d
Bd 
(29.19)
29.6 the hall effect 
891
Therefore, the measured Hall voltage gives a value for the drift speed of the charge 
carriers if d and B are known.
We can obtain the charge-carrier density n by measuring the current in the sam-
ple. From Equation 27.4, we can express the drift speed as
v
d
5
I
nqA
(29.20)
where A is the cross-sectional area of the conductor. Substituting Equation 29.20 
into Equation 29.19 gives
DV
H
5
IBd
nqA
(29.21)
Because A 5 td, where t is the thickness of the conductor, we can also express Equa-
tion 29.21 as
DV
H
5
IB
nqt
5
R
H
IB
t
(29.22)
where R
H
5 1/nq is called the Hall coefficient. This relationship shows that a prop-
erly calibrated conductor can be used to measure the magnitude of an unknown 
magnetic field.
Because all quantities in Equation 29.22 other than nq can be measured, a 
value for the Hall coefficient is readily obtainable. The sign and magnitude of R
H
give the sign of the charge carriers and their number density. In most metals, the 
charge carriers are electrons and the charge-carrier density determined from Hall-
effect measurements is in good agreement with calculated values for such metals as 
lithium (Li), sodium (Na), copper (Cu), and silver (Ag), whose atoms each give up 
one electron to act as a current carrier. In this case, n is approximately equal to the 
number of conducting electrons per unit volume. This classical model, however, is 
not valid for metals such as iron (Fe), bismuth (Bi), and cadmium (Cd) or for semi-
conductors. These discrepancies can be explained only by using a model based on 
the quantum nature of solids.
WWThe hall voltage
Example 29.7   The Hall Effect for Copper
A rectangular copper strip 1.5 cm wide and 0.10 cm thick carries a current of 5.0 A. Find the Hall voltage for a 1.2-T 
magnetic field applied in a direction perpendicular to the strip.
Conceptualize  Study Figures 29.26 and 29.27 carefully and make sure you understand that a Hall voltage is developed 
between the top and bottom edges of the strip.
Categorize  We evaluate the Hall voltage using an equation developed in this section, so we categorize this example as 
a substitution problem.
SoluTion
Assuming one electron per atom is avail-
able for conduction, find the charge-
carrier density in terms of the molar mass 
M and density r of copper:
n5
N
A
V
5
N
A
r
M
Substitute this result into Equation 29.22:
DV
H
5
IB
nqt
5
MIB
N
A
rqt
Substitute numerical values:
DV
H
5
1
0.063 5 kg/mol
21
5.0 A
21
1.2 T
2
1
6.0231023 mol21
21
8 920 kg/m3
21
1.60310219 C
21
0.001 0 m
2
0.44 mV
continued
892
chapter 29 Magnetic Fields
Such an extremely small Hall voltage is expected in good conductors. (Notice that the width of the conductor is not 
needed in this calculation.)
What if the strip has the same dimensions but is made of a semiconductor? Will the Hall voltage be 
smaller or larger?
Answer  In semiconductors, n is much smaller than it is in metals that contribute one electron per atom to the cur-
rent; hence, the Hall voltage is usually larger because it varies as the inverse of n. Currents on the order of 0.1 mA 
are generally used for such materials. Consider a piece of silicon that has the same dimensions as the copper strip in 
this example and whose value for n is 1.0 3 1020 electrons/m3. Taking B 5 1.2 T and I 5 0.10 mA, we find that DV
H
 
7.5 mV. A potential difference of this magnitude is readily measured.
WhaT iF?
▸ 29.7 
continued
Summary
The magnetic dipole moment m
S
of a loop carrying a current I is
m
S
;IA
S
(29.15)
where the area vector A
S
is perpendicular to the plane of the loop and 
0
A
S
0
is equal to the area of the loop. The SI unit 
of m
S
is A ? m2.
Definition
Concepts and Principles
If a charged particle moves in a uniform magnetic field so that its initial velocity is perpendicular to the field, the 
particle moves in a circle, the plane of which is perpendicular to the magnetic field. The radius of the circular path is
r5
mv
qB
(29.3)
where m is the mass of the particle and q is its charge. The angular speed of the charged particle is
v5
qB
m
(29.4)
If a straight conductor of length L carries a current 
I, the force exerted on that conductor when it is placed 
in a uniform magnetic field B
S
is
F
S
B
5IL
S
B
S
(29.10)
where the direction of L
S
is in the direction of the cur-
rent and 
0
L
S
0
5L.
The torque t
S
on a current loop placed in a uniform 
magnetic field B
S
is
t
S
5m
S
B
S
(29.17)
If an arbitrarily shaped wire carrying a current I is 
placed in a magnetic field, the magnetic force exerted 
on a very small segment ds
S
is
dF
S
B
5I ds
S
B
S
(29.11)
To determine the total magnetic force on the wire, one 
must integrate Equation 29.11 over the wire, keeping  
in mind that both B
S
and ds
S
may vary at each point.
The potential energy of the system of a magnetic 
dipole in a magnetic field is
U
B
52m
S
?B
S
(29.18)
Objective Questions 
893
Objective Questions 3, 4, and 6 in Chapter 11 can be 
assigned with this chapter as review for the vector product.
1. A spatially uniform magnetic field cannot exert a 
magnetic force on a particle in which of the following 
circumstances? There may be more than one correct 
statement. (a) The particle is charged. (b) The particle 
moves perpendicular to the magnetic field. (c) The 
particle moves parallel to the magnetic field. (d) The 
magnitude of the magnetic field changes with time.  
(e) The particle is at rest.
2. Rank the magnitudes of the forces exerted on the 
following particles from largest to smallest. In your 
ranking, display any cases of equality. (a) an electron 
moving at 1Mm/s perpendicular to a 1-mT magnetic 
field (b) an electron moving at 1 Mm/s parallel to a 
1-mT magnetic field (c) an electron moving at 2 Mm/s 
perpendicular to a 1-mT magnetic field (d) a proton 
moving at 1 Mm/s perpendicular to a 1-mT magnetic 
field (e) a proton moving at 1 Mm/s at a 458 angle to a 
1-mT magnetic field
3. A particle with electric charge is fired into a region 
of space where the electric field is zero. It moves in 
a straight line. Can you conclude that the magnetic 
field in that region is zero? (a) Yes, you can. (b) No; 
the field might be perpendicular to the particle’s 
velocity. (c) No; the field might be parallel to the par-
ticle’s velocity. (d) No; the particle might need to have 
charge of the opposite sign to have a force exerted 
on it. (e) No; an observation of an object with electric 
charge gives no information about a magnetic field.
4. A proton moving horizontally enters a region where a 
uniform magnetic field is directed perpendicular to 
the proton’s velocity as shown in Figure OQ29.4. After 
the proton enters the field, does it (a) deflect down-
ward, with its speed remaining constant; (b) deflect 
upward, moving in a semicircular path with constant 
speed, and exit the field moving to the left; (c) continue 
to move in the horizontal direction with constant veloc-
ity; (d) move in a circular orbit and become trapped by 
the field; or (e) deflect out of the plane of the paper?
Objective Questions
1. 
denotes answer available in Student Solutions Manual/Study Guide
Analysis Models for Problem Solving
Particle in a Field (Magnetic) A source (to be discussed in Chapter 30) establishes a 
magnetic field B
S
throughout space. When a particle with charge q and moving with velocity 
v
S
is placed in that field, it experiences a magnetic force given by
F
S
B
5qv
S
3
B
S
(29.1)
The direction of this magnetic force is perpendicular both to the velocity of the particle and 
to the magnetic field. The magnitude of this force is
F
B
5
0
q
0
vB sin 
(29.2)
where u is the smaller angle between v
S
and B
S
. The SI unit of B
S
is the tesla (T), where 1 T 5 1 N/A · m.
z
x
y
B
S
S
F
q×
B
S
q
v
S
S
5. At a certain instant, a proton is moving in the positive 
x direction through a magnetic field in the negative z 
direction. What is the direction of the magnetic force 
exerted on the proton? (a) positive z direction (b) neg-
ative z direction (c) positive y direction (d) negative y 
direction (e) The force is zero.
6. A thin copper rod 1.00 m long has a mass of 50.0 g. 
What is the minimum current in the rod that would 
allow it to levitate above the ground in a magnetic field 
of magnitude 0.100 T? (a) 1.20 A (b) 2.40 A (c) 4.90 A 
(d) 9.80 A (e) none of those answers
7. Electron A is fired horizontally with speed 1.00 Mm/s 
into a region where a vertical magnetic field exists. 
Electron B is fired along the same path with speed  
2.00 Mm/s. (i)Which electron has a larger magnetic 
force exerted on it? (a) A does. (b) B does. (c) The forces 
have the same nonzero magnitude. (d) The forces are 
both zero. (ii) Which electron has a path that curves 
more sharply? (a) A does. (b)B does. (c) The particles 
follow the same curved path. (d) The particles continue 
to go straight.
8. Classify each of the following statements as a charac-
teristic (a) of electric forces only, (b) of magnetic forces 
only, (c) of both electric and magnetic forces, or (d) of  
neither electric nor magnetic forces. (i) The force is 
proportional to the magnitude of the field exerting 
it. (ii) The force is proportional to the magnitude of 
the charge of the object on which the force is exerted. 
(iii) The force exerted on a negatively charged object is 
opposite in direction to the force on a positive charge. 
(iv) The force exerted on a stationary charged object 
is nonzero. (v) The force exerted on a moving charged 
+
v
S
Figure oQ29.4
894
chapter 29 Magnetic Fields
circle (b) a parabola (c) a straight line (d) a more com-
plicated trajectory
12. Answer each question yes or no. Assume the motions 
and currents mentioned are along the x axis and fields 
are in the y direction. (a) Does an electric field exert 
a force on a stationary charged object? (b) Does a 
magnetic field do so? (c) Does an electric field exert a 
force on a moving charged object? (d) Does a magnetic 
field do so? (e) Does an electric field exert a force on a 
straight current-carrying wire? (f) Does a magnetic field 
do so? (g) Does an electric field exert a force on a beam 
of moving electrons? (h) Does a magnetic field do so?
13. A magnetic field exerts a torque on each of the current-
carrying single loops of wire shown in Figure OQ29.13. 
The loops lie in the xy plane, each carrying the same 
magnitude current, and the uniform magnetic field 
points in the positive x direction. Rank the loops by 
the magnitude of the torque exerted on them by the 
field from largest to smallest.
(m)
(m)
A
B
C
4
3
2
1
5
4
3
2
1
6
B
S
Figure oQ29.13
object is zero. (vi) The force exerted on a charged 
object is proportional to its speed. (vii) The force 
exerted on a charged object cannot alter the object’s 
speed. (viii) The magnitude of the force depends on 
the charged object’s direction of motion.
9. An electron moves horizontally across the Earth’s 
equator at a speed of 2.50 3 106 m/s and in a direction  
35.08 N of E. At this point, the Earth’s magnetic field 
has a direction due north, is parallel to the surface, and 
has a value of 3.003 1025 T. What is the force acting 
on the electron due to its interaction with the Earth’s 
magnetic field? (a)6.883 10218N due west (b) 6.88 3  
10218 N toward the Earth’s surface (c) 9.83 3 10218 N 
toward the Earth’s surface (d)9.833 10218 N away 
from the Earth’s surface (e)4.00 3 10218 N away from 
the Earth’s surface
10. A charged particle is traveling through a uniform mag-
netic field. Which of the following statements are true 
of the magnetic field? There may be more than one 
correct statement. (a) It exerts a force on the particle 
parallel to the field. (b) It exerts a force on the particle 
along the direction of its motion. (c) It increases the 
kinetic energy of the particle. (d) It exerts a force that 
is perpendicular to the direction of motion. (e) It does 
not change the magnitude of the momentum of the 
particle.
11. In the velocity selector shown in Figure 29.13, electrons 
with speed v 5 E/B follow a straight path. Electrons 
moving significantly faster than this speed through the 
same selector will move along what kind of path? (a) a 
Conceptual Questions
1. 
denotes answer available in Student Solutions Manual/Study Guide
1. Can a constant magnetic field set into motion an elec-
tron initially at rest? Explain your answer.
2. Explain why it is not possible to determine the charge 
and the mass of a charged particle separately by mea-
suring accelerations produced by electric and mag-
netic forces on the particle.
3. Is it possible to orient a current loop in a uniform mag-
netic field such that the loop does not tend to rotate? 
Explain.
4. How can the motion of a moving charged particle be 
used to distinguish between a magnetic field and an 
electric field? Give a specific example to justify your 
argument.
5. How can a current loop be used to determine the pres-
ence of a magnetic field in a given region of space?
6. Charged particles from outer space, called cosmic rays, 
strike the Earth more frequently near the poles than 
near the equator. Why?
7. Two charged particles are projected in the same direc-
tion into a magnetic field perpendicular to their 
velocities. If the particles are deflected in opposite 
directions, what can you say about them?
Problems
The problems found in this  
chapter may be assigned 
online in Enhanced WebAssign
1.
 straightforward; 
2. 
intermediate;  
3. 
challenging
1.
full solution available in the Student 
Solutions Manual/Study Guide
AMT
Analysis Model tutorial available in 
Enhanced WebAssign
GP
Guided Problem
M
Master It tutorial available in Enhanced 
WebAssign
W
Watch It video solution available in 
Enhanced WebAssign
BIO
Q/C
S
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested