30.1 the Biot–Savart Law 
905
in terms of the current that produces the field. That expression is based on the fol-
lowing experimental observations for the magnetic field dB
S
at a point P associated 
with a length element ds
S
of a wire carrying a steady current I (Fig. 30.1):
• The vector dB
S
is perpendicular both to ds
S
(which points in the direction of 
the current) and to the unit vector r^ directed from ds
S
toward P.
• The magnitude of dB
S
is inversely proportional to r2, where r is the distance 
from ds
S
to P.
• The magnitude of dB
S
is proportional to the current and to the magnitude  
ds of the length element ds
S
.
• The magnitude of dB
S
is proportional to sin u, where u is the angle between 
the vectors ds
S
and r^.
These observations are summarized in the mathematical expression known 
today as the Biot–Savart law:
dB
S
5
m
0
4p
I ds
S
3r^
r2
(30.1)
where m
0
is a constant called the permeability of free space:
m
0
54p31027 T
#
m/A 
(30.2)
Notice that the field dB
S
in Equation 30.1 is the field created at a point by the 
current in only a small length element ds
S
of the conductor. To find the total mag-
netic field B
S
created at some point by a current of finite size, we must sum up 
contributions from all current elements I ds
S
that make up the current. That is, we 
must evaluate B
S
by integrating Equation 30.1:
B
S
5
m
0
I
4p
3
ds
S
3r
^
r2
(30.3)
where the integral is taken over the entire current distribution. This expres-
sion must be handled with special care because the integrand is a cross product 
and therefore a vector quantity. We shall see one case of such an integration in 
Example30.1.
Although the Biot–Savart law was discussed for a current-carrying wire, it is also 
valid for a current consisting of charges flowing through space such as the particle 
beam in an accelerator. In that case, ds
S
represents the length of a small segment of 
space in which the charges flow.
Interesting similarities and differences exist between Equation 30.1 for the 
magnetic field due to a current element and Equation 23.9 for the electric field 
due to a point charge. The magnitude of the magnetic field varies as the inverse 
square of the distance from the source, as does the electric field due to a point 
charge. The directions of the two fields are quite different, however. The electric 
field created by a point charge is radial, but the magnetic field created by a cur-
rent element is perpendicular to both the length element ds
S
and the unit vector r^ 
as described by the cross product in Equation 30.1. Hence, if the conductor lies in 
the plane of the page as shown in Figure 30.1, dB
S
points out of the page at P and 
into the page at P9.
Another difference between electric and magnetic fields is related to the 
source of the field. An electric field is established by an isolated electric charge. 
The Biot–Savart law gives the magnetic field of an isolated current element at 
some point, but such an isolated current element cannot exist the way an iso-
lated electric charge can. A current element must be part of an extended current 
distribution because a complete circuit is needed for charges to flow. Therefore, 
WWBiot–Savart law
WWPermeability of free space
Pitfall Prevention 30.1
The Biot–Savart Law The mag-
netic field described by the Biot–
Savart law is the field due to a given 
current-carrying conductor. Do 
not confuse this field with any 
external field that may be applied 
to the conductor from some other 
source.
P
d
r
d
P
d
r
ˆ
r
ˆ
u
B
in
S
B
out
S
s
S
I
The direction of the field 
is out of the page at P.
The direction of the field 
is into the page at P
′.
Figure 30.1 
The magnetic  
field dB
S
at a point due to the cur-
rent I through a length element 
ds
S
is given by the Biot–Savart law. 
Convert pdf to website html - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
how to convert pdf to html email; convert from pdf to html
Convert pdf to website html - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
convert pdf to html online; online pdf to html converter
906
chapter 30 Sources of the Magnetic Field
the Biot–Savart law (Eq.30.1) is only the first step in a calculation of a magnetic 
field; it must be followed by an integration over the current distribution as in 
Equation 30.3.
uick Quiz 30.1  Consider the magnetic field due to the current in the wire 
shown in Figure 30.2. Rank the points AB, and C in terms of magnitude of the 
magnetic field that is due to the current in just the length element ds
S
shown 
from greatest to least.
A
C
B
s
S
d
d
dd
I
Figure 30.2 
(Quick Quiz 30.1) 
Where is the magnetic field due to 
the current element the greatest?
Example 30.1   Magnetic Field Surrounding a Thin, Straight Conductor
Consider a thin, straight wire of finite length carrying a constant cur-
rent I and placed along the x axis as shown in Figure 30.3. Determine 
the magnitude and direction of the magnetic field at point P due to 
this current.
Conceptualize  From the Biot–Savart law, we expect that the magnitude 
of the field is proportional to the current in the wire and decreases as 
the distance a from the wire to point P increases. We also expect the 
field to depend on the angles u
1
and u
2
in Figure 30.3b. We place the ori-
gin at O and let point P be along the positive y axis, with k
^
being a unit 
vector pointing out of the page.
Categorize  We are asked to find the magnetic field due to a simple 
current distribution, so this example is a typical problem for which 
the Biot–Savart law is appropriate. We must find the field contribution 
from a small element of current and then integrate over the current 
distribution.
Analyze  Let’s start by considering a length element ds
S
located a dis-
tance r from P. The direction of the magnetic field at point P due to  
the current in this element is out of the page because ds
S
3r
^
is out of 
the page. In fact, because all the current elements I ds
S
lie in the plane 
of the page, they all produce a magnetic field directed out of the page at point P. Therefore, the direction of the mag-
netic field at point P is out of the page and we need only find the magnitude of the field. 
SoLuTIon
a
b
O
x
r
ˆ
r
a
P
∣ ∣
dx
x
P
y
x
y
u
u
1
u
2
I
s
S
d
s
S
d
Figure 30.3 
(Example 30.1) (a) A thin, 
straight wire carrying a current I. (b) The angles 
u
1
and u
2
used for determining the net field.
Evaluate the cross product in the Biot–Savart law:
ds
S
3r
^
5 0ds
S
3r
^
0k
^
5
c
dx sin 
a
p
2
2u
bd
k
^
5 1dx cos u2k
^
Substitute into Equation 30.1:
(1)   dB
S
5
1
dB
2
k
^
5
m
0
I
4p
dx cos u
r2
k
^
From the geometry in Figure 30.3a, express r in 
terms of u:
(2)   r5
a
cos u
Notice that tan u 5 2x/a from the right triangle in 
Figure 30.3a (the negative sign is necessary because 
ds
S
is located at a negative value of x) and solve for x:
x52a tan u
Find the differential dx:
(3)   dx52a sec2 u du5 5 2
a du
cos2 u
Substitute Equations (2) and (3) into the expression 
for the z component of the field from Equation (1):
(4)   dB52
m
0
I
4p
a
a du
cos2 u
ba
cos2 u
a2
b cos u5 5 2
m
0
I
4pa
cos u du
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on DotNetNuke Site
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor.dll. Set Website: Click Site->Settings, set website running port and .NET Framework Version.
convert pdf to html file; how to convert pdf to html
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment within SharePoint Site
PDF pages, VB.NET comment annotate PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET convert PDF to SVG. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor.dll. Now you can visit this website.
convert pdf to url; best pdf to html converter
30.1 the Biot–Savart Law 
907
Finalize  We can use this result to find the magnitude of the magnetic field of any straight current- carrying wire if we 
know the geometry and hence the angles u
1
and u
2
. Consider the special case of an infinitely long, straight wire. If the 
wire in Figure 30.3b becomes infinitely long, we see that u
1
5 p/2 and u
2
5 2p/2 for length elements ranging between 
positions x 5 2` and x 5 1`. Because (sin u
1
2 sin u
2
) 5 [sin p/2 2 sin (2p/2)] 5 2, Equation 30.4 becomes
B5
m
0
I
2pa
(30.5)
Equations 30.4 and 30.5 both show that the magnitude of the magnetic field is proportional to the current and 
decreases with increasing distance from the wire, as expected. Equation 30.5 has the same mathematical form as the 
expression for the magnitude of the electric field due to a long charged wire (see Eq. 24.7).
Integrate Equation (4) over all length elements on 
the wire, where the subtending angles range from 
u
1
to u
2
as defined in Figure 30.3b:
B5 2
m
0
I
4pa
3
u
2
u
1
cos u du5
m
0
I
4pa
1
sin u
1
2sin u
2
2
(30.4)
Example 30.2   Magnetic Field Due to a Curved Wire Segment
Calculate the magnetic field at point O for the current-carrying wire segment 
shown in Figure 30.4. The wire consists of two straight portions and a circular arc 
of radius a, which subtends an angle u.
Conceptualize  The magnetic field at O due to the current in the straight seg-
ments AA9 and CC9 is zero because ds
S
is parallel to r^ along these paths, which 
means that ds
S
3r
^
50 for these paths. Therefore, we expect the magnetic field 
at O to be due only to the current in the curved portion of the wire.
Categorize  Because we can ignore segments AA9 and CC9, this example is catego-
rized as an application of the Biot–Savart law to the curved wire segment AC.
Analyze  Each length element ds
S
along path AC is at the same distance a from O, and the current in each contributes a  
field element dB
S
directed into the page at O. Furthermore, at every point on ACds
S
is perpendicular to r^; hence, 
0
ds
S
3r
^0
5ds.
SoLuTIon
s
S
d
O
A
r
ˆ
C
I
a
a
a
u
IIIII
I
C
A
Figure 30.4 
(Example 30.2) The 
length of the curved segment AC is s.
continued
From Equation 30.1, find the magnitude of the field at O 
due to the current in an element of length ds:
dB5
m
0
4p
I ds
a2
Integrate this expression over the curved path AC, noting 
that I and a are constants:
5
m
0
I
4pa2
3
ds5
m
0
I
4pa2
s
From the geometry, note that s 5 au and substitute:
B5
m
0
I
4pa2
1
au
2
5
m
0
I
4pa
(30.6)
Finalize  Equation 30.6 gives the magnitude of the magnetic field at O. The direction of B
S
is into the page at O 
because ds
S
3r
^
is into the page for every length element.
What if you were asked to find the magnetic field at the center of a circular wire loop of radius R that 
carries a current I? Can this question be answered at this point in our understanding of the source of magnetic 
fields?
WhaT IF?
▸ 30.1 
continued
C# PDF: C# Code to Create Mobile PDF Viewer; C#.NET Mobile PDF
compatible with most mobile browsers; Convert mobile device package, activated C#.NET mobile PDF document viewer Start a Website project in Visual Studio 2005
best website to convert pdf to word; embed pdf into website
C# Image: How to Integrate Web Document and Image Viewer
RasterEdgeImagingDeveloperGuide8.0.pdf: from this user manual, you can your existing one from where the website is ready Next, add the following HTML into your
convert pdf into web page; embed pdf into webpage
908
chapter 30 Sources of the Magnetic Field
Answer Yes, it can. The straight wires in Figure 30.4 do not contribute to the magnetic field. The only contribution is 
from the curved segment. As the angle u increases, the curved segment becomes a full circle when u 5 2p. Therefore, 
you can find the magnetic field at the center of a wire loop by letting u 5 2p in Equation 30.6:
B5
m
0
I
4pa
2p5
m
0
I
2a
This result is a limiting case of a more general result discussed in Example 30.3.
Example 30.3   Magnetic Field on the Axis of a Circular Current Loop
Consider a circular wire loop of radius a located in the yz 
plane and carrying a steady current I as in Figure 30.5. Cal-
culate the magnetic field at an axial point P a distance x 
from the center of the loop.
Conceptualize  Compare this problem to Example 23.8 for 
the electric field due to a ring of charge. Figure 30.5 shows 
the magnetic field contribution dB
S
at P due to a single cur-
rent element at the top of the ring. This field vector can be 
resolved into components dB
x
parallel to the axis of the ring 
and dB
perpendicular to the axis. Think about the mag-
netic field contributions from a current element at the bot-
tom of the loop. Because of the symmetry of the situation, 
the perpendicular components of the field due to elements 
at the top and bottom of the ring cancel. This cancellation 
occurs for all pairs of segments around the ring, so we can ignore the perpendicular component of the field and focus 
solely on the parallel components, which simply add.
Categorize  We are asked to find the magnetic field due to a simple current distribution, so this example is a typical 
problem for which the Biot–Savart law is appropriate.
Analyze  In this situation, every length element ds
S
is perpendicular to the vector r^ at the location of the element. 
Therefore, for any element, 
0
ds
S
3r^
0
5
1
ds
21
1
2
sin 9085ds. Furthermore, all length elements around the loop are at 
the same distance r from P, where r2 5 a2 1 x2.
SoLuTIon
O
a
d
y
z
I
ˆ
r
r
x
P
x
dB
x
dB
d
u
u
B
S
s
S
Figure 30.5 
(Example 30.3) Geometry for calculating the 
magnetic field at a point P lying on the axis of a current loop. 
By symmetry, the total field B
S
is along this axis.
Use Equation 30.1 to find the magnitude of dB
S
due to the current in any length element ds
S
:
dB 5
m
0
I
4p
0
ds
S
3r^
0
r2
5
m
0
I
4p
ds
1
a2 1x2
2
Find the x component of the field element:
dB
x
5
m
0
I
4p
ds
1
a1x2
2
cos u
Integrate over the entire loop:
B
x
5
C
dB
x
5
m
0
I
4p
C
ds cos u
a1x2
From the geometry, evaluate cos u:
cos u5
a
1
a1x2
21/2
Substitute this expression for cos u into the inte-
gral and note that x and a are both constant:
B
x
5
m
0
I
4p
C
ds
a1x2
c
a
1
a1x2
21/2
d
5
m
0
I
4p
a
1
a1x2
23/2
C
ds
Integrate around the loop:
B
x
5
m
0
I
4p
a
1
a1x2
23/2
1
2pa
2
5
m
0
Ia2
2
1
a1x2
23/2
(30.7)
▸ 30.2 
continued
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Able to render and convert PDF document to/from supported offers robust APIs for editing PDF document hyperlink provide quick access to the website or other
convert pdf to html; converting pdf to html format
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Our website offers PDF to Raster Images Conversion Control developers are able to load target PDF document from local file or stream and convert it into
create html email from pdf; convert pdf to html code
30.2 the Magnetic Force Between two parallel conductors 
909
Finalize  To find the magnetic field at the center of the loop, set x 5 0 in Equation 30.7. At this special point,
5
m
0
I
2a
1
at x50
2
(30.8)
which is consistent with the result of the What If? feature of Example 30.2.
The pattern of magnetic field lines for a circular current loop is shown in Fig-
ure 30.6a. For clarity, the lines are drawn for only the plane that contains the axis 
of the loop. The field-line pattern is axially symmetric and looks like the pattern 
around a bar magnet, which is shown in Figure 30.6b.
What if we consider points on the x axis very far from the loop? How 
does the magnetic field behave at these distant points?
Answer In this case, in which x .. a, we can neglect the term a2 in the denomi-
nator of Equation 30.7 and obtain
<
m
0
Ia2
2x
3
(for x .. a
(30.9)
The magnitude of the magnetic moment m of the loop is defined as the product of current and loop area (see Eq. 
29.15): m 5 I(pa2) for our circular loop. We can express Equation 30.9 as
B<
m
0
2p
m
x3
(30.10)
This result is similar in form to the expression for the electric field due to an electric dipole, E 5 k
e
(p/y3) (see Example 
23.6), where p 5 2aq is the electric dipole moment as defined in Equation 26.16.
WhaT IF?
a
b
S
N
I
S
N
Figure 30.6 
(Example 30.3) 
(a)Magnetic field lines surround-
ing a current loop. (b) Magnetic 
field lines surrounding a bar mag-
net. Notice the similarity between 
this line pattern and that of a cur-
rent loop.
30.2  The Magnetic Force Between Two  
Parallel Conductors
In Chapter 29, we described the magnetic force that acts on a current-carrying con-
ductor placed in an external magnetic field. Because a current in a conductor sets up 
its own magnetic field, it is easy to understand that two current-carrying conductors 
exert magnetic forces on each other. One wire establishes the magnetic field and 
the other wire is modeled as a collection of particles in a magnetic field. Such forces 
between wires can be used as the basis for defining the ampere and the coulomb.
Consider two long, straight, parallel wires separated by a distance a and carry-
ing currents I
1
and I
2
in the same direction as in Figure 30.7. Let’s determine the 
force exerted on one wire due to the magnetic field set up by the other wire. Wire 
2, which carries a current I
2
and is identified arbitrarily as the source wire, creates a 
magnetic field B
S
2
at the location of wire 1, the test wire. The magnitude of this mag-
netic field is the same at all points on wire 1. The direction of B
S
2
is perpendicular to  
wire 1 as shown in Figure 30.7. According to Equation 29.10, the magnetic force  
on a length , of wire 1 is F
S
1
5I
1
<
S
B
S
2
. Because <
S
is perpendicular to B
S
2
in this 
situation, the magnitude of F
S
1
is F
1
I
1
,B
2
. Because the magnitude of B
S
2
is given 
by Equation 30.5,
F
1
5I
1
,B
2
5I
1
,
a
m
0
I
2
2pa
b
5
m
0
I
1
I
2
2pa
(30.11)
The direction of F
S
1
is toward wire 2 because <
S
B
S
2
is in that direction. When the 
field set up at wire 2 by wire 1 is calculated, the force F
S
2
acting on wire 2 is found  
to be equal in magnitude and opposite in direction to F
S
1
, which is what we  
expect because Newton’s third law must be obeyed. When the currents are in oppo-
site directions (that is, when one of the currents is reversed in Fig. 30.7), the forces 
B
2
S
2
1
I
1
I
2
a
F
1
S
The field B
2
due to the current in 
wire 2 exerts a magnetic force of 
magnitude F
1
I
1
B
2
on wire 1.
S
Figure 30.7 
Two parallel wires 
that each carry a steady current 
exert a magnetic force on each 
other. The force is attractive if the 
currents are parallel (as shown) 
and repulsive if the currents are 
antiparallel.
▸ 30.3 
continued
C# Image: Tutorial for Document Viewing & Displaying in ASP.NET
Following are detailed steps for website configuration Controls to Viewer. Add two HTML buttons, btnFitToWidth & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
adding pdf to html page; convert pdf to html5 open source
VB.NET Word: How to Create Word Online Web Viewer in VB.NET
NET project reference; Copy package folder "RasterEdge_Imaging_Files" to your created VB.NET website Application; Add reference
convert pdf to web page online; convert pdf to web form
910
chapter 30 Sources of the Magnetic Field
are reversed and the wires repel each other. Hence, parallel conductors carrying 
currents in the same direction attract each other, and parallel conductors carrying 
currents in opposite directions repel each other.
Because the magnitudes of the forces are the same on both wires, we denote the 
magnitude of the magnetic force between the wires as simply F
B
. We can rewrite 
this magnitude in terms of the force per unit length:
F
B
,
5
m
0
I
1
I
2
2pa
(30.12)
The force between two parallel wires is used to define the ampere as follows:
When the magnitude of the force per unit length between two long, parallel 
wires that carry identical currents and are separated by 1 m is 2 3 1027 N/m, 
the current in each wire is defined to be 1 A.
The value 2 3 1027 N/m is obtained from Equation 30.12 with I
1
I
2
5 1 A and  
a 5 1 m. Because this definition is based on a force, a mechanical measurement 
can be used to standardize the ampere. For instance, the National Institute of 
Standards and Technology uses an instrument called a current balance for primary 
current measurements. The results are then used to standardize other, more con-
ventional instruments such as ammeters.
The SI unit of charge, the coulomb, is defined in terms of the ampere: When a 
conductor carries a steady current of 1 A, the quantity of charge that flows through 
a cross section of the conductor in 1 s is 1 C.
In deriving Equations 30.11 and 30.12, we assumed both wires are long com-
pared with their separation distance. In fact, only one wire needs to be long. The 
equations accurately describe the forces exerted on each other by a long wire and a 
straight, parallel wire of limited length ,.
uick Quiz 30.2  A loose spiral spring carrying no current is hung from a ceiling. 
When a switch is thrown so that a current exists in the spring, do the coils  
(a) move closer together, (b) move farther apart, or (c) not move at all?
Definition of the ampere 
Example 30.4   Suspending a Wire 
Two infinitely long, parallel wires are lying on the ground 
a distance a 5 1.00 cm apart as shown in Figure 30.8a. A 
third wire, of length L 5 10.0 m and mass 400 g, carries 
a current of I
1
5 100 A and is levitated above the first 
two wires, at a horizontal position midway between them. 
The infinitely long wires carry equal currents I
2
in the 
same direction, but in the direction opposite that in the 
levitated wire. What current must the infinitely long wires 
carry so that the three wires form an equilateral triangle?
Conceptualize  Because the current in the short wire is 
opposite those in the long wires, the short wire is repelled 
from both of the others. Imagine the currents in the long 
wires in Figure 30.8a are increased. The repulsive force 
becomes stronger, and the levitated wire rises to the point at which the wire is once again levitated in equilibrium at a 
higher position. Figure 30.8b shows the desired situation with the three wires forming an equilateral triangle.
Categorize  Because the levitated wire is subject to forces but does not accelerate, it is modeled as a particle in equilibrium.
AM
SoLuTIon
a
b
I
1
I
1
I
2
I
2
a
L
I
2
a
a
a
u
F
g
S
F
B,R
S
F
B,L
S
I
2
Figure 30.8 
(Example 30.4) (a) Two current-carrying wires lie 
on the ground and suspend a third wire in the air by magnetic 
forces. (b) End view. In the situation described in the example, the 
three wires form an equilateral triangle. The two magnetic forces 
on the levitated wire are F
S
B,L
, the force due to the left-hand wire 
on the ground, and F
S
B,R
, the force due to the right-hand wire. The 
gravitational force F
S
g
on the levitated wire is also shown.
VB.NET Word: VB Code to Create Word Mobile Viewer with .NET Doc
Directly convert your Android, iOS or Windows mobile device prorgam, please link to see: PDF Document Mobile Begin a website project with Visual Basic language
how to add pdf to website; online convert pdf to html
C# TIFF: C#.NET Mobile TIFF Viewer, TIFF Reader for Mobile
most mobile browsers like iOS and Android; Convert your mobile Viewer in C#.NET. As creating PDF and Word Create a website project in Visual Studio 2005 and name
convert pdf form to html form; how to convert pdf to html code
30.3 ampère’s Law 
911
Analyze  The horizontal components of the magnetic forces on the levitated wire cancel. The vertical components are 
both positive and add together. Choose the z axis to be upward through the top wire in Figure 30.8b and in the plane 
of the page.
Find the total magnetic force in the upward direction on 
the levitated wire:
F
S
B
52a
m
0
I
1
I
2
2pa
,b cos u k
^
5
m
0
I
1
I
2
pa
, cos u k
^
Find the gravitational force on the levitated wire:
F
S
g
52mgk
^
Apply the particle in equilibrium model by adding the 
forces and setting the net force equal to zero:
a
F
S
F
S
B
F
S
g
5
m
0
I
1
I
2
pa
, cos u k
^
2mgk
^
50
Solve for the current in the wires on the ground:
I
2
5
mgpa
m
0
I
1
, cos u
Substitute numerical values:
I
2
5
1
0.400 kg
21
9.80 m/s2
2
p
1
0.010 0 m
2
1
4p31027 T
#
m/A
21
100 A
21
10.0 m
2
cos 30.08
113 A
Finalize  The currents in all wires are on the order of 102 A. Such large currents would require specialized equip-
ment. Therefore, this situation would be difficult to establish in practice. Is the equilibrium of wire 1 stable or 
unstable?
30.3 Ampère’s Law
Looking back, we can see that the result of Example 30.1 is important because a 
current in the form of a long, straight wire occurs often. Figure 30.9 is a perspec-
tive view of the magnetic field surrounding a long, straight, current-carrying wire. 
Because of the wire’s symmetry, the magnetic field lines are circles concentric with 
the wire and lie in planes perpendicular to the wire. The magnitude of B
S
is con-
stant on any circle of radius a and is given by Equation 30.5. A convenient rule for 
determining the direction of B
S
is to grasp the wire with the right hand, positioning 
the thumb along the direction of the current. The four fingers wrap in the direc-
tion of the magnetic field.
Figure 30.9 also shows that the magnetic field line has no beginning and no 
end. Rather, it forms a closed loop. That is a major difference between magnetic 
field lines and electric field lines, which begin on positive charges and end on 
negative charges. We will explore this feature of magnetic field lines further in 
Section30.5.
Oersted’s 1819 discovery about deflected compass needles demonstrates that a 
current-carrying conductor produces a magnetic field. Figure 30.10a (page 912) 
shows how this effect can be demonstrated in the classroom. Several compass nee-
dles are placed in a horizontal plane near a long, vertical wire. When no current is 
present in the wire, all the needles point in the same direction (that of the horizon-
tal component of the Earth’s magnetic field) as expected. When the wire carries a 
strong, steady current, the needles all deflect in a direction tangent to the circle as 
in Figure 30.10b. These observations demonstrate that the direction of the mag-
netic field produced by the current in the wire is consistent with the right-hand 
rule described in Figure 30.9. When the current is reversed, the needles in Figure 
30.10b also reverse.
Now let’s evaluate the product B
S
?ds
S
for a small length element ds
S
on the cir-
cular path defined by the compass needles and sum the products for all elements 
a
I
B
S
Figure 30.9 
The right-hand rule 
for determining the direction of 
the magnetic field surrounding a 
long, straight wire carrying a cur-
rent. Notice that the magnetic field 
lines form circles around the wire.
▸ 30.4 
continued
912
chapter 30 Sources of the Magnetic Field
over the closed circular path.1 Along this path, the vectors ds
S
and B
S
are parallel at 
each point (see Fig. 30.10b), so B
S
?ds
S
5B ds. Furthermore, the magnitude of B
S
is 
constant on this circle and is given by Equation 30.5. Therefore, the sum of the prod-
ucts B ds over the closed path, which is equivalent to the line integral of B
S
?ds
S
, is
C
B
S
?ds
S
5B 
C
ds 5
m
0
I
2pr
12pr2 5m
0
I
where r ds 5 2pr is the circumference of the circular path of radius r. Although 
this result was calculated for the special case of a circular path surrounding a wire 
of infinite length, it holds for a closed path of any shape (an amperian loop) sur-
rounding a current that exists in an unbroken circuit. The general case, known as 
Ampère’s law, can be stated as follows:
The line integral of B
S
?ds
S
around any closed path equals m
0
I, where I is the 
total steady current passing through any surface bounded by the closed path:
C
B
S
?ds
S
5m
0
I 
(30.13)
Ampère’s law describes the creation of magnetic fields by all continuous current 
configurations, but at our mathematical level it is useful only for calculating the 
magnetic field of current configurations having a high degree of symmetry. Its use 
is similar to that of Gauss’s law in calculating electric fields for highly symmetric 
charge distributions.
uick Quiz 30.3  Rank the 
magnitudes of r B
S
?ds
S
for 
the closed paths a through  
d in Figure 30.11 from great-
est to least.
ampère’s law 
Andre-Marie Ampère
French Physicist (1775–1836)
Ampère is credited with the discovery of 
electromagnetism, which is the relation-
ship between electric currents and mag-
netic fields. Ampère’s genius, particularly 
in mathematics, became evident by the 
time he was 12 years old; his personal 
life, however, was filled with tragedy. His 
father, a wealthy city official, was guillo-
tined during the French Revolution, and 
his wife died young, in 1803. Ampère 
died at the age of 61 of pneumonia.
©
i
S
t
o
c
k
p
h
o
t
o
.
c
o
m
/
H
u
l
t
o
n
A
r
c
h
i
v
e
1You may wonder why we would choose to evaluate this scalar product. The origin of Ampère’s law is in 19th-century 
science, in which a “magnetic charge” (the supposed analog to an isolated electric charge) was imagined to be moved 
around a circular field line. The work done on the charge was related to B
S
?ds
S
, just as the work done moving an 
electric charge in an electric field is related to E
S
?ds
S
. Therefore, Ampère’s law, a valid and useful principle, arose 
from an erroneous and abandoned work calculation!
Pitfall Prevention 30.2
avoiding Problems with 
Signs When using Ampère’s law, 
apply the following right-hand 
rule. Point your thumb in the 
direction of the current through 
the amperian loop. Your curled 
fingers then point in the direction 
that you should integrate when tra-
versing the loop to avoid having to 
define the current as negative.
Figure 30.10 
(a) and (b) Compasses show the effects of the current in a nearby wire. (c) Circular 
magnetic field lines surrounding a current-carrying conductor, displayed with iron filings.
a
b
When no current is present in the 
wire, all compass needles point in 
the same direction (toward the 
Earth’s north pole).
When the wire carries a strong 
current, the compass needles 
deflect in a direction tangent to 
the circle, which is the direction 
of the magnetic field created by 
the current.
ds
S
B
S
=
0
I
©
R
i
c
h
a
r
d
M
e
g
n
a
,
F
u
n
d
a
m
e
n
t
a
l
P
h
o
t
o
g
r
a
p
h
s
,
N
e
w
Y
o
r
k
c
1 A 
5 A 
b
a
d
c
2 A 
Figure 30.11 
(Quick 
Quiz 30.3) Four closed 
paths around three 
current-carrying wires.
30.3 ampère’s Law 
913
uick Quiz 30.4  Rank the magnitudes of r B
S
?ds
S
for the closed paths a through 
d in Figure 30.12 from greatest to least.
a
b
c
d
Figure 30.12 
(Quick Quiz 
30.4) Several closed paths near a 
single current-carrying wire.
Example 30.5   The Magnetic Field Created by a Long Current-Carrying Wire
A long, straight wire of radius R carries a steady current I that is uniformly dis-
tributed through the cross section of the wire (Fig. 30.13). Calculate the mag-
netic field a distance r from the center of the wire in the regions r $ R and  
r , R.
Conceptualize  Study Figure 30.13 to understand the structure of the wire and the 
current in the wire. The current creates magnetic fields everywhere, both inside 
and outside the wire. Based on our discussions about long, straight wires, we expect 
the magnetic field lines to be circles centered on the central axis of the wire.
Categorize  Because the wire has a high degree of symmetry, we categorize this 
example as an Ampère’s law problem. For the r $ R case, we should arrive at the 
same result as was obtained in Example 30.1, where we applied the Biot–Savart 
law to the same situation.
Analyze  For the magnetic field exterior to the wire, let us choose for our path 
of integration circle 1 in Figure 30.13. From symmetry, B
S
must be constant in 
magnitude and parallel to ds
S
at every point on this circle.
SoLuTIon
2
R
r
1
ds
S
I
Figure 30.13 
(Example 30.5) A 
long, straight wire of radius R car-
rying a steady current I uniformly 
distributed across the cross section 
of the wire. The magnetic field at 
any point can be calculated from 
Ampère’s law using a circular path of 
radius r, concentric with the wire.
Note that the total current passing through the plane of 
the circle is I and apply Ampère’s law:
C
B
S
?ds
S
5B 
C
ds5B
1
2pr
2
5m
0
I
Solve for B:
B 5 
m
0
I
2pr
(for r $ R) 
(30.14)
continued
Now consider the interior of the wire, where r , R. Here the current I9 passing through the plane of circle 2 is less 
than the total current I.
Apply Ampère’s law to circle 2:
C
B
S
?ds
S
5B
1
2pr
2
5m
0
Ir5m
0
a
r2
R2
Ib
Solve for I9:
Ir5
r2
R2
I
Set the ratio of the current I9 enclosed by circle 2 to the 
entire current I equal to the ratio of the area pr2 enclosed 
by circle 2 to the cross-sectional area pR2 of the wire:
Ir
I
5
pr2
pR2
Solve for B:
B 5 
a
m
0
I
2pR2
b
    (for r , R
(30.15)
914
chapter 30 Sources of the Magnetic Field
Finalize  The magnetic field exterior to the wire is identi-
cal in form to Equation 30.5. As is often the case in highly 
symmetric situations, it is much easier to use Ampère’s law 
than the Biot–Savart law (Example 30.1). The magnetic 
field interior to the wire is similar in form to the expression 
for the electric field inside a uniformly charged sphere (see 
Example 24.3). The magnitude of the magnetic field versus 
r for this configuration is plotted in Figure 30.14. Inside the 
wire, B S 0 as r S 0. Furthermore, Equations 30.14 and 30.15 give the same value of the magnetic field at r 5 R, dem-
onstrating that the magnetic field is continuous at the surface of the wire.
R
r
 
B
 1/
Figure 30.14 
(Example 30.5) 
Magnitude of the magnetic field 
versus r for the wire shown in Fig-
ure 30.13. The field is proportional 
to r inside the wire and varies as 1/r 
outside the wire.
Example 30.6   The Magnetic Field Created by a Toroid
A device called a toroid (Fig. 30.15) is often used to create an almost 
uniform magnetic field in some enclosed area. The device consists of 
a conducting wire wrapped around a ring (a torus) made of a noncon-
ducting material. For a toroid having N closely spaced turns of wire, 
calculate the magnetic field in the region occupied by the torus, a 
distance r from the center.
Conceptualize  Study Figure 30.15 carefully to understand how the 
wire is wrapped around the torus. The torus could be a solid mate-
rial or it could be air, with a stiff wire wrapped into the shape shown 
in Figure 30.15 to form an empty toroid. Imagine each turn of the 
wire to be a circular loop as in Example 30.3. The magnetic field 
at the center of the loop is perpendicular to the plane of the loop. 
Therefore, the magnetic field lines of the collection of loops will form 
circles within the toroid such as suggested by loop 1 in Figure 30.15.
Categorize  Because the toroid has a high degree of symmetry, we cat-
egorize this example as an Ampère’s law problem.
Analyze  Consider the circular amperian loop (loop 1) of radius r in 
the plane of Figure 30.15. By symmetry, the magnitude of the field is 
constant on this circle and tangent to it, so B
S
?ds
S
5B ds. Furthermore, the wire passes through the loop N times, so 
the total current through the loop is NI.
SoLuTIon
c
a
I
I
r
b
Loop 1
Loop 2
B
S
ds
S
Figure 30.15 
(Example 30.6) A toroid consist-
ing of many turns of wire. If the turns are closely 
spaced, the magnetic field in the interior of the 
toroid is tangent to the dashed circle (loop 1) and 
varies as 1/r. The dimension a is the cross-sectional 
radius of the torus. The field outside the toroid is 
very small and can be described by using the ampe-
rian loop (loop 2) at the right side, perpendicular 
to the page.
Finalize  This result shows that B varies as 1/r and hence 
is nonuniform in the region occupied by the torus. If, how-
ever, r is very large compared with the cross-sectional 
radius a of the torus, the field is approximately uniform 
inside the torus.
For an ideal toroid, in which the turns are closely 
spaced, the external magnetic field is close to zero, but it 
is not exactly zero. In Figure 30.15, imagine the radius r 
of amperian loop 1 to be either smaller than b or larger 
than c. In either case, the loop encloses zero net current, 
so r B
S
?ds
S
50. You might think this result proves that 
B
S
50, but it does not. Consider the amperian loop (loop 
2) on the right side of the toroid in Figure 30.15. The 
plane of this loop is perpendicular to the page, and the 
toroid passes through the loop. As charges enter the toroid 
as indicated by the current directions in Figure 30.15, 
Apply Ampère’s law to loop 1:
C
B
S
?ds
S
5B 
C
ds5B
1
2pr
2
5m
0
NI
Solve for B:
B 5 
m
0
NI
2pr
(30.16)
▸ 30.5 
continued
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested