30.4 the Magnetic Field of a Solenoid 
915
30.4 The Magnetic Field of a Solenoid
solenoid is a long wire wound in the form of a helix. With this configuration, a 
reasonably uniform magnetic field can be produced in the space surrounded by the 
turns of wire—which we shall call the interior of the solenoid—when the solenoid 
carries a current. When the turns are closely spaced, each can be approximated as 
a circular loop; the net magnetic field is the vector sum of the fields resulting from 
all the turns.
Figure 30.16 shows the magnetic field lines surrounding a loosely wound sole-
noid. The field lines in the interior are nearly parallel to one another, are uni-
formly distributed, and are close together, indicating that the field in this space is 
strong and almost uniform.
If the turns are closely spaced and the solenoid is of finite length, the external 
magnetic field lines are as shown in Figure 30.17a. This field line distribution is 
similar to that surrounding a bar magnet (Fig. 30.17b). Hence, one end of the sole-
noid behaves like the north pole of a magnet and the opposite end behaves like the 
south pole. As the length of the solenoid increases, the interior field becomes more 
uniform and the exterior field becomes weaker. An ideal solenoid is approached 
when the turns are closely spaced and the length is much greater than the radius of 
the turns. Figure 30.18 (page 916) shows a longitudinal cross section of part of such 
a solenoid carrying a current I. In this case, the external field is close to zero and 
the interior field is uniform over a great volume.
Consider the amperian loop (loop 1) perpendicular to the page in Figure 
30.18 (page 916), surrounding the ideal solenoid. This loop encloses a small  
Exterior
Interior
Figure 30.16 
The magnetic field 
lines for a loosely wound solenoid.
Figure 30.17 
(a) Magnetic field lines for a tightly wound solenoid of finite length, carrying a steady 
current. The field in the interior space is strong and nearly uniform. (b)The magnetic field pattern of 
a bar magnet, displayed with small iron filings on a sheet of paper.
a
S
N
The magnetic field lines 
resemble those of a bar 
magnet, meaning that the 
solenoid effectively has 
north and south poles.
b
H
e
n
r
y
L
e
a
p
a
n
d
J
i
m
L
e
h
m
a
n
they work their way counterclockwise around the toroid. 
Therefore, there is a counterclockwise current around the 
toroid, so that a current passes through amperian loop 2! 
This current is small, but not zero. As a result, the toroid 
acts as a current loop and produces a weak external field of 
the form shown in Figure 30.6. The reason r B
S
?ds
S
50 
for amperian loop 1 of radius r , b or r . c is that the field 
lines are perpendicular to ds
S
, not because B
S
50.
▸ 30.6 
continued
How to convert pdf file to html document - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
convert pdf to url online; convert pdf into html file
How to convert pdf file to html document - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
convert fillable pdf to html; convert pdf to url link
916
chapter 30 Sources of the Magnetic Field
current as the charges in the wire move coil by coil along the length of the sole-
noid. Therefore, there is a nonzero magnetic field outside the solenoid. It is a 
weak field, with circular field lines, like those due to a line of current as in Fig-
ure 30.9. For an ideal solenoid, this weak field is the only field external to the 
solenoid. 
We can use Ampère’s law to obtain a quantitative expression for the interior 
magnetic field in an ideal solenoid. Because the solenoid is ideal, B
S
in the inte-
rior space is uniform and parallel to the axis and the magnetic field lines in the 
exterior space form circles around the solenoid. The planes of these circles are 
perpendicular to the page. Consider the rectangular path (loop 2) of length , 
and width w shown in Figure 30.18. Let’s apply Ampère’s law to this path by evalu-
ating the integral of B
S
?ds
S
over each side of the rectangle. The contribution 
along side 3 is zero because the external magnetic field lines are perpendicular 
to the path in this region. The contributions from sides 2 and 4 are both zero, 
again because B
S
is perpendicular to ds
S
along these paths, both inside and out-
side the solenoid. Side 1 gives a contribution to the integral because along this 
path B
S
is uniform and parallel to ds
S
. The integral over the closed rectangular 
path is therefore
C
B
S
?ds
S
5
3
path 1
B
S
?ds
S
5B
3
path 1
ds5B,
The right side of Ampère’s law involves the total current I through the area 
bounded by the path of integration. In this case, the total current through the 
rectangular path equals the current through each turn multiplied by the number 
of turns. If N is the number of turns in the length ,, the total current through the 
rectangle is NI. Therefore, Ampère’s law applied to this path gives
C
B
S
?ds
S
5B,5m
0
NI
B5m
0
N
,
I5m
0
nI 
(30.17)
where n 5 N/, is the number of turns per unit length.
We also could obtain this result by reconsidering the magnetic field of a toroid 
(see Example 30.6). If the radius r of the torus in Figure 30.15 containing N turns is 
much greater than the toroid’s cross-sectional radius a, a short section of the toroid 
approximates a solenoid for which n 5 N/2pr. In this limit, Equation 30.16 agrees 
with Equation 30.17.
Equation 30.17 is valid only for points near the center (that is, far from the ends) of 
a very long solenoid. As you might expect, the field near each end is smaller than the 
value given by Equation 30.17. As the length of a solenoid increases, the magnitude of 
the field at the end approaches half the magnitude at the center (see Problem 69).
uick Quiz 30.5  Consider a solenoid that is very long compared with its radius. 
Of the following choices, what is the most effective way to increase the magnetic 
field in the interior of the solenoid? (a) double its length, keeping the number 
of turns per unit length constant (b) reduce its radius by half, keeping the num-
ber of turns per unit length constant (c) overwrap the entire solenoid with an 
additional layer of current-carrying wire
30.5 Gauss’s Law in Magnetism
The flux associated with a magnetic field is defined in a manner similar to that 
used to define electric flux (see Eq. 24.3). Consider an element of area dA on an 
Magnetic field inside  
a solenoid
Ampère’s law applied to the 
circular path whose plane is 
perpendicular to the page can be 
used to show that there is a weak 
field outside the solenoid.
Ampère’s law applied to the 
rectangular dashed path can be 
used to calculate the 
magnitude of the interior field.
3
2
4
1
w
Loop 1
Loop 2
B
S
Figure 30.18 
Cross-sectional view 
of an ideal solenoid, where the inte-
rior magnetic field is uniform and 
the exterior field is close to zero.
Online Convert PDF to HTML5 files. Best free online PDF html
component makes it extremely easy for C# developers to convert and transform a multi-page PDF document and save each PDF page as a separate HTML file in .NET
convert pdf to website; how to convert pdf file to html document
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
All object data. File attachment. Hidden layer content. Convert smooth lines to curves. VB.NET Demo Code to Optimize An Exist PDF File in Visual C#.NET Project.
convert pdf to html5; pdf to web converter
30.5 Gauss’s Law in Magnetism 
917
arbitrarily shaped surface as shown in Figure 30.19. If the magnetic field at this 
element is B
S
, the magnetic flux through the element is B
S
?dA
S
, where dA
S
is a vec-
tor that is perpendicular to the surface and has a magnitude equal to the area dA. 
Therefore, the total magnetic flux F
B
through the surface is
F
B
;
3
B
S
?dA
S
(30.18)
Consider the special case of a plane of area A in a uniform field B
S
that makes an 
angle u with dA
S
. The magnetic flux through the plane in this case is
F
B
5BA cos u 
(30.19)
If the magnetic field is parallel to the plane as in Figure 30.20a, then u 5 908 and the 
flux through the plane is zero. If the field is perpendicular to the plane as in Figure 
30.20b, then u 5 0 and the flux through the plane is BA (the maximum value).
The unit of magnetic flux is T ? m2, which is defined as a weber (Wb); 1 Wb 5  
1 T ? m2.
WWDefinition of magnetic flux
Figure 30.20 
Magnetic flux 
through a plane lying in a mag-
netic field.
a
d
The flux through the plane is 
zero when the magnetic field is 
parallel to the plane surface.
A
S
B
S
b
dA
S
B
S
The flux through the plane is a 
maximum when the magnetic 
field is perpendicular to the plane.
Example 30.7   Magnetic Flux Through a Rectangular Loop
A rectangular loop of width a and length b is located near a long wire carrying a 
current I (Fig. 30.21). The distance between the wire and the closest side of the 
loop is c. The wire is parallel to the long side of the loop. Find the total magnetic 
flux through the loop due to the current in the wire.
Conceptualize  As we saw in Section 30.3, the magnetic field lines due to the wire 
will be circles, many of which will pass through the rectangular loop. We know that 
the magnetic field is a function of distance r from a long 
wire. Therefore, the magnetic field varies over the area of 
the rectangular loop.
Categorize  Because the magnetic field varies over the 
area of the loop, we must integrate over this area to find 
the total flux. That identifies this as an analysis problem.
SoLuTIon
continued
b
r
I
c
a
dr
Figure 30.21 
(Example 
30.7) The magnetic field 
due to the wire carrying 
a current I is not uniform 
over the rectangular loop.
Analyze  Noting that B
S
is parallel to dA
S
at any point 
within the loop, find the magnetic flux through the rect-
angular area using Equation 30.18 and incorporate Equa-
tion 30.14 for the magnetic field:
F
B
5
3
B
S
?dA
S
5
3
B dA
3
m
0
I
2pr
dA
B
S
u
d
A 
S
Figure 30.19 
The magnetic  
flux through an area element dA  
is B
S
?dA
S
5B dA cos u, where  
dA
S
is a vector perpendicular to 
the surface.
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
All object data. File attachment. Hidden layer content. Convert smooth lines to curves. Flatten visible layers. C#.NET DLLs: Compress PDF Document.
how to convert pdf into html; convert pdf to web pages
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
VB.NET Demo code to Append PDF Document. In addition, VB.NET users can append a PDF file to the end of a current PDF document and combine to a single PDF file.
pdf to html converter online; how to change pdf to html
918
chapter 30 Sources of the Magnetic Field
In Chapter 24, we found that the electric flux through a closed surface surround-
ing a net charge is proportional to that charge (Gauss’s law). In other words, the 
number of electric field lines leaving the surface depends only on the net charge 
within it. This behavior exists because electric field lines originate and terminate 
on electric charges.
The situation is quite different for magnetic fields, which are continuous and 
form closed loops. In other words, as illustrated by the magnetic field lines of a cur-
rent in Figure 30.9 and of a bar magnet in Figure 30.22, magnetic field lines do not 
begin or end at any point. For any closed surface such as the one outlined by the 
dashed line in Figure 30.22, the number of lines entering the surface equals the 
number leaving the surface; therefore, the net magnetic flux is zero. In contrast, 
for a closed surface surrounding one charge of an electric dipole (Fig. 30.23), the 
net electric flux is not zero.
Gauss’s law in magnetism states that
the net magnetic flux through any closed surface is always zero:
C
B
S
?dA
S
50 
(30.20)
Gauss’s law in magnetism 
Integrate from r 5 c to r 5 a 1 c:
F
B
5
m
0
Ib
2p
3
a1c
c
dr
r
5
m
0
Ib
2p
ln r`
a1c
c
5
m
0
Ib
2p
ln a
a1c
c
b5
m
0
Ib
2p
ln a11
a
c
b
Express the area element (the tan strip in Fig. 30.21) as 
dA 5 b dr and substitute:
F
B
5
3
m
0
I
2pr
b dr5
m
0
Ib
2p
3
dr
r
Finalize  Notice how the flux depends on the size of the loop. Increasing either a or b increases the flux as expected. 
If c becomes large such that the loop is very far from the wire, the flux approaches zero, also as expected. If c goes 
to zero, the flux becomes infinite. In principle, this infinite value occurs because the field becomes infinite at r 5 0 
(assuming an infinitesimally thin wire). That will not happen in reality because the thickness of the wire prevents the 
left edge of the loop from reaching r 5 0.
N
S
The net magnetic flux 
through a closed surface 
surrounding one of the 
poles or any other 
closed surface is zero.
Figure 30.22 
The magnetic field lines of a bar mag-
net form closed loops. (The dashed line represents 
the intersection of a closed surface with the page.)
+
-
The electric flux 
through a closed 
surface surrounding 
one of the charges 
is not zero.
Figure 30.23 
The electric field lines surrounding 
an electric dipole begin on the positive charge and 
terminate on the negative charge.
▸ 30.7 
continued
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Separate source PDF document file by defined page range in VB.NET class application. Divide PDF file into multiple files by outputting PDF file size.
converting pdf into html; embed pdf into web page
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
C#.NET PDF to HTML Conversion. If you want to transform and convert PDF document to HTML file format, this article should be read.
convert fillable pdf to html form; conversion pdf to html
30.6 Magnetism in Matter 
919
This statement represents that isolated magnetic poles (monopoles) have never 
been detected and perhaps do not exist. Nonetheless, scientists continue the search 
because certain theories that are otherwise successful in explaining fundamental 
physical behavior suggest the possible existence of magnetic monopoles.
30.6 Magnetism in Matter
The magnetic field produced by a current in a coil of wire gives us a hint as to 
what causes certain materials to exhibit strong magnetic properties. Earlier we 
found that a solenoid like the one shown in Figure 30.17a has a north pole and a 
south pole. In general, any current loop has a magnetic field and therefore has a 
magnetic dipole moment, including the atomic-level current loops described in 
some models of the atom.
The Magnetic Moments of Atoms
Let’s begin our discussion with a classical model of the atom in which electrons 
move in circular orbits around the much more massive nucleus. In this model, an 
orbiting electron constitutes a tiny current loop (because it is a moving charge), 
and the magnetic moment of the electron is associated with this orbital motion. 
Although this model has many deficiencies, some of its predictions are in good 
agreement with the correct theory, which is expressed in terms of quantum 
physics.
In our classical model, we assume an electron is a particle in uniform circular 
motion: it moves with constant speed v in a circular orbit of radius r about the 
nucleus as in Figure 30.24. The current I associated with this orbiting electron is its 
charge e divided by its period T. Using Equation 4.15 from the particle in uniform 
circular motion model, T 5 2pr/v, gives
I5
e
T
5
ev
2pr
The magnitude of the magnetic moment associated with this current loop is given 
by m 5 IA, where A 5 pr2 is the area enclosed by the orbit. Therefore,
m5IA5
a
ev
2pr
b
pr5
1
2
evr 
(30.21)
Because the magnitude of the orbital angular momentum of the electron is given 
by L 5 m
e
vr (Eq. 11.12 with f 5 908), the magnetic moment can be written as
m5a
e
2m
e
bL 
(30.22)
This result demonstrates that the magnetic moment of the electron is proportional 
to its orbital angular momentum. Because the electron is negatively charged, the 
vectors m
S
and L
S
point in opposite directions. Both vectors are perpendicular to the 
plane of the orbit as indicated in Figure 30.24.
A fundamental outcome of quantum physics is that orbital angular momentum 
is quantized and is equal to multiples of " 5 h/2p 5 1.05 3 10234 J ? s, where h is 
Planck’s constant (see Chapter 40). The smallest nonzero value of the electron’s 
magnetic moment resulting from its orbital motion is
m5"2
e
2m
e
(30.23)
We shall see in Chapter 42 how expressions such as Equation 30.23 arise.
Because all substances contain electrons, you may wonder why most substances 
are not magnetic. The main reason is that, in most substances, the magnetic 
WWorbital magnetic moment
The electron has an angular 
momentum    
in one direction 
and a magnetic moment    
in 
the opposite direction.
r
I
m
S
m
S
L
S
L
S
e
-
Figure 30.24 
An electron mov-
ing in the direction of the gray 
arrow in a circular orbit of radius 
r. Because the electron carries 
a negative charge, the direction 
of the current due to its motion 
about the nucleus is opposite the 
direction of that motion.
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
Using this PDF document concatenating library SDK, C# developers can easily merge and append one PDF document to another PDF document file, and choose to
convert pdf to web link; embed pdf into html
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
In order to convert PDF document to Word file using VB.NET programming code, you have to integrate following assemblies into your VB.NET class application by
convert pdf to web page; how to change pdf to html format
920
chapter 30 Sources of the Magnetic Field
moment of one electron in an atom is canceled by that of another electron orbiting 
in the opposite direction. The net result is that, for most materials, the magnetic 
effect produced by the orbital motion of the electrons is either zero or very small.
In addition to its orbital magnetic moment, an electron (as well as protons, neu-
trons, and other particles) has an intrinsic property called spin that also contrib-
utes to its magnetic moment. Classically, the electron might be viewed as spinning 
about its axis as shown in Figure 30.25, but you should be very careful with the clas-
sical interpretation. The magnitude of the angular momentum S
S
associated with 
spin is on the same order of magnitude as the magnitude of the angular momen-
tum L
S
due to the orbital motion. The magnitude of the spin angular momentum 
of an electron predicted by quantum theory is
5
"3
2
U
The magnetic moment characteristically associated with the spin of an electron has 
the value
m
spin
5
eU
2m
e
(30.24)
This combination of constants is called the Bohr magneton m
B
:
m
B
5
eU
2m
e
59.27310
224
J/T 
(30.25)
Therefore, atomic magnetic moments can be expressed as multiples of the Bohr 
magneton. (Note that 1 J/T 5 1 A ? m2.)
In atoms containing many electrons, the electrons usually pair up with their 
spins opposite each other; therefore, the spin magnetic moments cancel. Atoms 
containing an odd number of electrons, however, must have at least one unpaired 
electron and therefore some spin magnetic moment. The total magnetic moment 
of an atom is the vector sum of the orbital and spin magnetic moments, and a few 
examples are given in Table 30.1. Notice that helium and neon have zero moments 
because their individual spin and orbital moments cancel.
The nucleus of an atom also has a magnetic moment associated with its constitu-
ent protons and neutrons. The magnetic moment of a proton or neutron, however, 
is much smaller than that of an electron and can usually be neglected. We can 
understand this smaller value by inspecting Equation 30.25 and replacing the mass 
of the electron with the mass of a proton or a neutron. Because the masses of the 
proton and neutron are much greater than that of the electron, their magnetic 
moments are on the order of 103 times smaller than that of the electron.
Ferromagnetism
A small number of crystalline substances exhibit strong magnetic effects called fer-
romagnetism. Some examples of ferromagnetic substances are iron, cobalt, nickel, 
gadolinium, and dysprosium. These substances contain permanent atomic mag-
netic moments that tend to align parallel to each other even in a weak external 
magnetic field. Once the moments are aligned, the substance remains magnetized 
after the external field is removed. This permanent alignment is due to a strong 
coupling between neighboring moments, a coupling that can be understood only 
in quantum-mechanical terms.
All ferromagnetic materials are made up of microscopic regions called domains, 
regions within which all magnetic moments are aligned. These domains have vol-
umes of about 10212 to 1028 m3 and contain 1017 to 1021 atoms. The boundaries 
between the various domains having different orientations are called domain walls. 
In an unmagnetized sample, the magnetic moments in the domains are randomly 
Pitfall Prevention 30.3
The Electron Does not Spin The 
electron is not physically spinning. 
It has an intrinsic angular momen-
tum as if it were spinning, but the 
notion of rotation for a point 
particle is meaningless. Rotation 
applies only to a rigid object, with 
an extent in space, as in Chapter 
10. Spin angular momentum is 
actually a relativistic effect.
spin
S
S
m
S
Figure 30.25 
Classical model of 
a spinning electron. We can adopt 
this model to remind ourselves 
that electrons have an intrinsic 
angular momentum. The model 
should not be pushed too far, 
however; it gives an incorrect mag-
nitude for the magnetic moment, 
incorrect quantum numbers, and 
too many degrees of freedom.
Table 30.1
Magnetic 
Moments of Some Atoms 
and Ions
Magnetic
Moment
Atom or Ion 
(10224 J/T)
9.27
He 
0
Ne 
0
Ce31 
19.8
Yb31 
37.1
30.6 Magnetism in Matter 
921
oriented so that the net magnetic moment is zero as in Figure 30.26a. When the sam-
ple is placed in an external magnetic field B
S
, the size of those domains with mag-
netic moments aligned with the field grows, which results in a magnetized sample as 
in Figure 30.26b. As the external field becomes very strong as in Figure 30.26c, the 
domains in which the magnetic moments are not aligned with the field become very 
small. When the external field is removed, the sample may retain a net magnetiza-
tion in the direction of the original field. At ordinary temperatures, thermal agita-
tion is not sufficient to disrupt this preferred orientation of magnetic moments.
When the temperature of a ferromagnetic substance reaches or exceeds a critical 
temperature called the Curie temperature, the substance loses its residual magne-
tization. Below the Curie temperature, the magnetic moments are aligned and the 
substance is ferromagnetic. Above the Curie temperature, the thermal agitation 
is great enough to cause a random orientation of the moments and the substance 
becomes paramagnetic. Curie temperatures for several ferromagnetic substances 
are given in Table 30.2.
Paramagnetism
Paramagnetic substances have a weak magnetism resulting from the presence of 
atoms (or ions) that have permanent magnetic moments. These moments inter-
act only weakly with one another and are randomly oriented in the absence of an 
external magnetic field. When a paramagnetic substance is placed in an external 
magnetic field, its atomic moments tend to line up with the field. This alignment 
process, however, must compete with thermal motion, which tends to randomize 
the magnetic moment orientations.
Diamagnetism
When an external magnetic field is applied to a diamagnetic substance, a weak 
magnetic moment is induced in the direction opposite the applied field, causing 
diamagnetic substances to be weakly repelled by a magnet. Although diamagne-
tism is present in all matter, its effects are much smaller than those of paramagnet-
ism or ferromagnetism and are evident only when those other effects do not exist.
We can attain some understanding of diamagnetism by considering a classical 
model of two atomic electrons orbiting the nucleus in opposite directions but with 
the same speed. The electrons remain in their circular orbits because of the attractive 
electrostatic force exerted by the positively charged nucleus. Because the magnetic  
moments of the two electrons are equal in magnitude and opposite in direction, 
they cancel each other and the magnetic moment of the atom is zero. When an 
external magnetic field is applied, the electrons experience an additional mag-
netic force qv
S
B
S
. This added magnetic force combines with the electrostatic  
force to increase the orbital speed of the electron whose magnetic moment is anti-
parallel to the field and to decrease the speed of the electron whose magnetic 
moment is parallel to the field. As a result, the two magnetic moments of the elec-
trons no longer cancel and the substance acquires a net magnetic moment that is 
opposite the applied field.
a
c
b
In an unmagnetized substance, 
the atomic magnetic dipoles are 
randomly oriented. 
B
S
B
S
dA
S
B
S
When an external field    
is 
applied, the domains with 
components of magnetic moment 
in the same direction as    
grow 
larger, giving the sample a net 
magnetization.
B
S
B
S
As the field is made even stronger, 
the domains with magnetic 
moment vectors not aligned with 
the external field become very 
small.
Figure 30.26 
Orientation of 
magnetic dipoles before and after 
a magnetic field is applied to a fer-
romagnetic substance.
Table 30.2
Curie Temperatures 
for Several Ferromagnetic Substances
Substance 
T
Curie
(K)
Iron 
1 043
Cobalt 
1 394
Nickel 
631
Gadolinium 
317
Fe
2
O
3
893
922
chapter 30 Sources of the Magnetic Field
As you recall from Chapter 27, a superconductor is a substance in which the elec-
trical resistance is zero below some critical temperature. Certain types of supercon-
ductors also exhibit perfect diamagnetism in the superconducting state. As a result, 
an applied magnetic field is expelled by the superconductor so that the field is zero 
in its interior. This phenomenon is known as the Meissner effect. If a permanent 
magnet is brought near a superconductor, the two objects repel each other. This 
repulsion is illustrated in Figure 30.27, which shows a small permanent magnet levi-
tated above a superconductor maintained at 77 K.
Figure 30.27 
An illustration of 
the Meissner effect, shown by this 
magnet suspended above a cooled 
ceramic superconductor disk, has 
become our most visual image of 
high-temperature superconductivity. 
Superconductivity is the loss of all 
resistance to electrical current and is 
a key to more-efficient energy use. 
In the Meissner effect, the small 
magnet at the top induces currents 
in the superconducting disk below, 
which is cooled to -321°F (77 K). 
The currents create a repulsive 
magnetic force on the magnet 
causing it to levitate above the 
superconducting disk.
C
o
u
r
t
e
s
y
A
r
g
o
n
n
e
N
a
t
i
o
n
a
l
L
a
b
o
r
a
t
o
r
y
Liquid oxygen, a 
paramagnetic material, 
is attracted to the poles 
of a magnet.
.
C
e
n
g
a
g
e
L
e
a
r
n
i
n
g
/
L
e
o
n
L
e
w
a
n
d
o
w
s
k
i
The levitation force is exerted on 
the diamagnetic water molecules 
in the frog’s body. 
C
o
u
r
t
e
s
y
o
f
D
r
.
A
n
d
r
e
G
e
i
m
,
M
a
n
c
h
e
s
t
e
r
U
n
i
v
e
r
s
i
t
y
(Left) Paramagnetism. (Right) Diamagnetism: a frog is levitated in a 16-T magnetic field at the 
Nijmegen High Field Magnet Laboratory in the Netherlands.
Summary
The magnetic flux F
B
through a surface is defined by the surface integral
F
B
;
3
B
S
?dA
S
(30.18)
Definition
Concepts and Principles
The Biot–Savart law says that the magnetic field dB
S
at  
a point P due to a length element ds
S
that carries a steady 
current I is
dB
S
5
m
0
4p
I ds
S
3r^ 
r2
(30.1)
where m
0
is the permeability of free space, r is the distance 
from the element to the point P, and r^ is a unit vector 
pointing from ds
S
toward point P. We find the total field 
at P by integrating this expression over the entire current 
distribution.
The magnetic force per unit length between 
two parallel wires separated by a distance a and 
carrying currents I
1
and I
2
has a magnitude
F
B
,
5
m
0
I
1
I
2
2pa
(30.12)
The force is attractive if the currents are in the 
same direction and repulsive if they are in oppo-
site directions.
Objective Questions 
923
1. (i) What happens to the magnitude of the magnetic 
field inside a long solenoid if the current is doubled? 
(a) It becomes four times larger. (b) It becomes twice 
as large. (c) It is unchanged. (d) It becomes one-half as 
large. (e)It becomes one-fourth as large. (ii) What hap-
pens to the field if instead the length of the solenoid 
is doubled, with the number of turns remaining the 
same? Choose from the same possibilities as in part (i). 
(iii) What happens to the field if the number of turns is 
doubled, with the length remaining the same? Choose 
from the same possibilities as in part (i). (iv) What hap-
pens to the field if the radius is doubled? Choose from 
the same possibilities as in part (i).
2. In Figure 30.7, assume I
1
5 2.00 A and I
2
5 6.00 A. 
What is the relationship between the magnitude F
1
of 
the force exerted on wire 1 and the magnitude F
2
of 
the force exerted on wire 2? (a) F
1
5 6F
2
(b) F
1
5 3F
2
(c) F
1
F
2
(d)F
1
1
3
F
2
(e) F
1
1
6
F
2
3. Answer each question yes or no. (a) Is it possible for 
each of three stationary charged particles to exert a 
force of attraction on the other two? (b) Is it possible 
for each of three stationary charged particles to repel 
both of the other particles? (c) Is it possible for each of 
three current-carrying metal wires to attract the other 
two wires? (d) Is it possible for each of three current- 
carrying metal wires to repel the other two wires? 
André-Marie Ampère’s experiments on electromagne-
tism are models of logical precision and included obser-
vation of the phenomena referred to in this question.
4. Two long, parallel wires each carry the same current I in 
the same direction (Fig. OQ30.4). Is the total magnetic 
field at the point P midway between the wires (a) zero, 
(b)directed into the page, (c) directed out of the page, 
(d)directed to the left, or (e)directed to the right?
I
I
P
Figure oQ30.4
5. Two long, straight wires cross each other at a right 
angle, and each carries the same current I (Fig. 
OQ30.5). Which of the following statements is true 
regarding the total magnetic field due to the two wires 
at the various points in the figure? More than one 
statement may be correct. (a) The field is strongest at 
points B and D. (b) The field is strong est at points A 
and C. (c) The field is out of the page at point B and 
Ampère’s law says that the 
line integral of B
S
?ds
S
around 
any closed path equals m
0
I
where I is the total steady 
current through any surface 
bounded by the closed path:
C
B
S
?ds
S
5m
0
I 
(30.13)
Gauss’s law of magnetism 
states that the net magnetic 
flux through any closed sur-
face is zero:
C
B
S
?dA
S
50 
(30.20)
The magnitude of the magnetic field at a distance r from a long, straight 
wire carrying an electric current I is
B5
m
0
I
2pr
(30.14)
The field lines are circles concentric with the wire.
The magnitudes of the fields inside a toroid and solenoid are
B5
m
0
NI
2pr
1
toroid
2
(30.16)
B5m
0
N
,
I5m
0
nI
1
solenoid
2
(30.17)
where N is the total number of turns.
Substances can be classified into one of three categories that describe their 
magnetic behavior. Diamagnetic substances are those in which the magnetic 
moment is weak and opposite the applied magnetic field. Paramagnetic sub-
stances are those in which the magnetic moment is weak and in the same direc-
tion as the applied magnetic field. In ferromagnetic substances, interactions 
between atoms cause magnetic moments to align and create a strong magneti-
zation that remains after the external field is removed.
Objective Questions
1. 
denotes answer available in Student Solutions Manual/Study Guide
I
I
B
A
C
D
Figure oQ30.5
924
chapter 30 Sources of the Magnetic Field
ment may be correct. (a) In region I, the magnetic 
field is into the page and is never zero. (b) In region II, 
the field is into the page and can be zero. (c) In region 
III, it is possible for the field to be zero. (d) In region I, 
the magnetic field is out of the page and is never zero. 
(e) There are no points where the field is zero.
10. Consider the two parallel wires carrying currents in 
opposite directions in Figure OQ30.9. Due to the mag-
netic interaction between the wires, does the lower 
wire experience a magnetic force that is (a) upward, 
(b) downward, (c)to the left, (d) to the right, or  
(e) into the paper?
11. What creates a magnetic field? More than one answer 
may be correct. (a) a stationary object with electric 
charge (b)a moving object with electric charge (c) a 
stationary conductor carrying electric current (d) a 
difference in electric potential (e) a charged capacitor 
disconnected from a battery and at rest Note: In Chap-
ter 34, we will see that a changing electric field also 
creates a magnetic field.
12. A long solenoid with closely spaced turns carries 
electric current. Does each turn of wire exert (a) an 
attractive force on the next adjacent turn, (b) a repul-
sive force on the next adjacent turn, (c) zero force on 
the next adjacent turn, or (d) either an attractive or 
a repulsive force on the next turn, depending on the 
direction of current in the solenoid?
13. A uniform magnetic field is directed along the x axis. 
For what orientation of a flat, rectangular coil is the 
flux through the rectangle a maximum? (a) It is a max-
imum in the xy plane. (b) It is a maximum in the xz 
plane. (c) It is a maximum in the yz plane. (d) The flux 
has the same nonzero value for all these orientations. 
(e) The flux is zero in all cases.
14. Rank the magnitudes of the following magnetic fields 
from largest to smallest, noting any cases of equality. 
(a) the field 2 cm away from a long, straight wire carry-
ing a current of 3A (b) the field at the center of a flat, 
compact, circular coil, 2 cm in radius, with 10 turns, 
carrying a current of 0.3A (c) the field at the center  
of a solenoid 2 cm in radius and 200 cm long, with  
1 000 turns, carrying a current of 0.3 A (d) the field at 
the center of a long, straight, metal bar, 2 cm in radius, 
carrying a current of 300 A (e) a field of 1 mT
15. Solenoid A has length L and N turns, solenoid B has 
length 2L and N turns, and solenoid C has length L/2 
and 2N turns. If each solenoid carries the same cur-
rent, rank the magnitudes of the magnetic fields in the 
centers of the solenoids from largest to smallest.
into the page at point D. (d) The field is out of the page 
at point C and out of the page at point D. (e) The field 
has the same magnitude at all four points.
6. A long, vertical, metallic wire carries downward elec-
tric current. (i) What is the direction of the magnetic 
field it creates at a point 2 cm horizontally east of the 
center of the wire? (a) north (b) south (c) east (d) west 
(e) up (ii) What would be the direction of the field if 
the current consisted of positive charges moving down-
ward instead of electrons moving upward? Choose 
from the same possibilities as in part (i).
7. Suppose you are facing a tall makeup mirror on a verti-
cal wall. Fluorescent tubes framing the mirror carry a 
clockwise electric current. (i) What is the direction of 
the magnetic field created by that current at the center 
of the mirror? (a)left (b) right (c) horizontally toward 
you (d)horizontally away from you (e) no direction 
because the field has zero magnitude (ii) What is the 
direction of the field the current creates at a point on 
the wall outside the frame to the right? Choose from 
the same possibilities as in part (i).
8. A long, straight wire carries a current I (Fig. OQ30.8). 
Which of the following statements is true regarding 
the magnetic field due to the wire? More than one 
statement may be correct. (a)The magnitude is pro-
portional to I/r, and the direction is out of the page at 
P. (b) The magnitude is proportional to I/r2, and the 
direction is out of the page at P. (c) The magnitude is 
proportional to I/r, and the direction is into the page 
at P. (d) The magnitude is proportional to I/r2, and 
the direction is into the page at P. (e)The magnitude 
is proportional to I, but does not depend on r.
I
P
r
Figure oQ30.8
9. Two long, parallel wires carry currents of 20.0 A and 
10.0A in opposite directions (Fig. OQ30.9). Which of 
the following statements is true? More than one state-
Conceptual Questions
1. 
denotes answer available in Student Solutions Manual/Study Guide
1. Is the magnetic field created by a current loop uni-
form? Explain.
2. One pole of a magnet attracts a nail. Will the other 
pole of the magnet attract the nail? Explain. Also 
explain how a magnet sticks to a refrigerator door.
3. Compare Ampère’s law with the Biot–Savart law. Which 
is more generally useful for calculating B
S
for a current- 
carrying conductor?
4. A hollow copper tube carries a current along its length. 
Why is B 5 0 inside the tube? Is B nonzero outside the 
tube?
I
20.0 A
10.0 A
III
II
Figure oQ30.9 
Objective Questions 9 and 10.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested