mvc 5 display pdf in view : Online convert pdf to html Library control component .net azure web page mvc doc-3-pdf-67a5de9fa89738da0c6835ef457b5878-original98-part352

31.3 Lenz’s Law 
945
produce a field directed out of the page. Hence, the induced current must be 
directed counterclockwise when the bar moves to the right. (Use the right-hand 
rule to verify this direction.) If the bar is moving to the left as in Figure 31.11b, the 
external magnetic flux through the area enclosed by the loop decreases with time. 
Because the field is directed into the page, the direction of the induced current 
must be clockwise if it is to produce a field that also is directed into the page. In 
either case, the induced current attempts to maintain the original flux through the 
area enclosed by the current loop.
Let’s examine this situation using energy considerations. Suppose the bar is 
given a slight push to the right. In the preceding analysis, we found that this motion 
sets up a counterclockwise current in the loop. What happens if we assume the cur-
rent is clockwise such that the direction of the magnetic force exerted on the bar is 
to the right? This force would accelerate the rod and increase its velocity, which in 
turn would cause the area enclosed by the loop to increase more rapidly. The result 
would be an increase in the induced current, which would cause an increase in the 
force, which would produce an increase in the current, and so on. In effect, the sys-
tem would acquire energy with no input of energy. This behavior is clearly inconsis-
tent with all experience and violates the law of conservation of energy. Therefore, 
the current must be counterclockwise.
uick Quiz 31.3  Figure 31.12 shows a circular loop of wire falling toward a wire 
carrying a current to the left. What is the direction of the induced current in 
the loop of wire? (a) clockwise (b) counterclockwise (c) zero (d)impossible to 
determine
B
in
S
v
S
I
R
a
b
I
R
v
S
As the conducting bar slides to the 
right, the magnetic flux due to the 
external magnetic field into the 
page through the area enclosed by 
the loop increases in time.
B
in
S
By Lenz’s law, the 
induced current 
must be 
counterclockwise 
to produce a 
counteracting 
magnetic field 
directed out of 
the page.
Figure 31.11 
(a) Lenz’s law  
can be used to determine the 
direction of the induced current.  
(b) When the bar moves to the 
left, the induced current must  
be clockwise. Why?
I
v
S
Figure 31.12 
(Quick Quiz 31.3)
Conceptual Example 31.5   Application of Lenz’s Law
A magnet is placed near a metal loop as shown in Figure 31.13a (page 946).
(A)  Find the direction of the induced current in the loop when the magnet is pushed toward the loop.
As the magnet moves to the right toward the loop, the external magnetic flux through the loop increases with time. 
To counteract this increase in flux due to a field toward the right, the induced current produces its own magnetic 
field to the left as illustrated in Figure 31.13b; hence, the induced current is in the direction shown. Knowing that like  
Solution
continued
Online convert pdf to html - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
convert pdf to html5 open source; convert pdf to web
Online convert pdf to html - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
convert pdf to url link; convert pdf form to web form
946
chapter 31 Faraday’s Law
Conceptual Example 31.6   A Loop Moving Through a Magnetic Field
A rectangular metallic loop of dimensions , and w and resistance R moves with constant speed v to the right as in Fig-
ure 31.14a. The loop passes through a uniform magnetic field B
S
directed into the page and extending a distance 3w 
along the x axis. Define x as the position of the right side of the loop along the x axis.
(A)  Plot the magnetic flux through the area enclosed by the loop as a function of x.
Figure 31.14b shows the flux through the area enclosed by the loop as a function of x. Before the loop enters the field, 
the flux through the loop is zero. As the loop enters the field, the flux increases linearly with position until the left 
edge of the loop is just inside the field. Finally, the flux through the loop decreases linearly to zero as the loop leaves 
the field.
(B) Plot the induced motional emf in the loop as a function of x.
Before the loop enters the field, no motional emf is induced in it because no field is present (Fig. 31.14c). As the right 
side of the loop enters the field, the magnetic flux directed into the page increases. Hence, according to Lenz’s law, 
the induced current is counterclockwise because it must produce its own magnetic field directed out of the page. The 
motional emf 2B,v (from Eq. 31.5) arises from the magnetic force experienced by charges in the right side of the 
loop. When the loop is entirely in the field, the change in magnetic flux through the loop is zero; hence, the motional 
emf vanishes. That happens because once the left side of the loop enters the field, the motional emf induced in it 
Solution
Solution
magnetic poles repel each other, we conclude that the left face of the current loop acts like a north pole and the right 
face acts like a south pole.
(B)  Find the direction of the induced current in the loop when the magnet is pulled away from the loop.
If the magnet moves to the left as in Figure 31.13c, its flux through the area enclosed by the loop decreases in time. 
Now the induced current in the loop is in the direction shown in Figure 31.13d because this current direction pro-
duces a magnetic field in the same direction as the external field. In this case, the left face of the loop is a south pole 
and the right face is a north pole.
Solution
Figure 31.13 
(Conceptual Example 31.5) A moving bar magnet induces a current in a conducting loop.
a
b
When the magnet is moved 
toward the stationary 
conducting loop, a current is 
induced in the direction 
shown. The magnetic field lines 
are due to the bar magnet.
This induced current 
produces its own magnetic 
field directed to the left 
that counteracts the 
increasing external flux.
I
S
N
I
S
N
v
S
c
d
When the magnet is moved 
away from the stationary 
conducting loop, a current is 
induced in the direction shown.
This induced current 
produces a magnetic field 
directed to the right and so 
counteracts the decreasing 
external flux.
S
N
S
N
I
v
S
I
▸ 31.5 
continued
Online Convert PDF to HTML5 files. Best free online PDF html
Online PDF to HTML5 Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF file to HTML. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button
convert fillable pdf to html; batch convert pdf to html
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF Demo▶: Convert PDF to Word; Convert PDF to Tiff; Convert PDF to HTML; Convert
embed pdf to website; attach pdf to html
31.4 Induced emf and electric Fields 
947
cancels the motional emf present in the right side 
of the loop. As the right side of the loop leaves the 
field, the flux through the loop begins to decrease, 
a clockwise current is induced, and the induced 
emf is B,v. As soon as the left side leaves the field, 
the emf decreases to zero.
(C)  Plot the external applied force necessary to 
counter the magnetic force and keep v constant as 
a function of x.
The external force that must be applied to the loop 
to maintain this motion is plotted in Figure 31.14d. 
Before the loop enters the field, no magnetic force 
acts on it; hence, the applied force must be zero if v 
is constant. When the right side of the loop enters 
the field, the applied force necessary to maintain 
constant speed must be equal in magnitude and 
opposite in direction to the magnetic force exerted 
on that side, so that the loop is a particle in equi-
librium. When the loop is entirely in the field, the 
flux through the loop is not changing with time. Hence, the net emf induced in the loop is zero and the current also 
is zero. Therefore, no external force is needed to maintain the motion. Finally, as the right side leaves the field, the 
applied force must be equal in magnitude and opposite in direction to the magnetic force acting on the left side of 
the loop.
From this analysis, we conclude that power is supplied only when the loop is either entering or leaving the field. 
Furthermore, this example shows that the motional emf induced in the loop can be zero even when there is motion 
through the field! A motional emf is induced only when the magnetic flux through the loop changes in time.
Solution
a
c
b
d
0
w
34w
F
x
R
0
w
34w
3w
w
0
x
x
x
Bv
e
B
v
S
B
in
S
x
-Bv
Bw
B
2
2
v
Figure 31.14 
(Conceptual Example 31.6) (a) A conducting rectan-
gular loop of width w and length , moving with a velocity v
S
through 
a uniform magnetic field extending a distance 3w. (b) Magnetic flux 
through the area enclosed by the loop as a function of loop position. 
(c)Induced emf as a function of loop position. (d) Applied force 
required for constant velocity as a function of loop position.
31.4 Induced emf and Electric Fields
We have seen that a changing magnetic flux induces an emf and a current in a 
conducting loop. In our study of electricity, we related a current to an electric field 
that applies electric forces on charged particles. In the same way, we can relate an 
induced current in a conducting loop to an electric field by claiming that an elec-
tric field is created in the conductor as a result of the changing magnetic flux.
We also noted in our study of electricity that the existence of an electric field is 
independent of the presence of any test charges. This independence suggests that 
even in the absence of a conducting loop, a changing magnetic field generates an 
electric field in empty space.
This induced electric field is nonconservative, unlike the electrostatic field pro-
duced by stationary charges. To illustrate this point, consider a conducting loop 
of radius r situated in a uniform magnetic field that is perpendicular to the plane 
of the loop as in Figure 31.15. If the magnetic field changes with time, an emf 
e
5 2dF
B
/dt is, according to Faraday’s law (Eq. 31.1), induced in the loop. The 
induction of a current in the loop implies the presence of an induced electric field 
E
S
, which must be tangent to the loop because that is the direction in which the 
charges in the wire move in response to the electric force. The work done by the 
electric field in moving a charge q once around the loop is equal to q
e
. Because  
the electric force acting on the charge is qE
S
, the work done by the electric field in 
B
in
S
r
E
S
E
S
E
S
E
S
If     changes in time, an electric 
field is induced in a direction 
tangent to the circumference of 
the loop.
B
S
Figure 31.15 
A conducting loop 
of radius r in a uniform magnetic 
field perpendicular to the plane 
of the loop.
▸ 31.6 
continued
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF Demo▶: Convert PDF to Word; Convert PDF to Tiff; Convert PDF to HTML; Convert
how to convert pdf to html code; converting pdf to html code
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF Demo▶: Convert PDF to Word; Convert PDF to Tiff; Convert PDF to HTML; Convert
convert pdf to html online for; pdf to web converter
948
chapter 31 Faraday’s Law
moving the charge once around the loop is qE(2pr), where 2pr is the circumference 
of the loop. These two expressions for the work done must be equal; therefore,
q
e
qE(2pr)
E5
e
2pr
Using this result along with Equation 31.1 and that F
B
BA 5 Bpr2 for a circular 
loop, the induced electric field can be expressed as
E52
1
2pr
dF
B
dt
52
r
2
dB
dt
(31.8)
If the time variation of the magnetic field is specified, the induced electric field 
can be calculated from Equation 31.8.
The emf for any closed path can be expressed as the line integral of  E
S
?ds
S
over that path: 
e
5r E
S
?ds
S
. In more general cases, E may not be constant and the 
path may not be a circle. Hence, Faraday’s law of induction, 
e
52dF
B
/dt, can be 
written in the general form
C
E
S
?ds
S
52
dF
B
dt
(31.9)
The induced electric field E
S
in Equation 31.9 is a nonconservative field that is gen-
erated by a changing magnetic field. The field E
S
that satisfies Equation 31.9 can-
not possibly be an electrostatic field because were the field electrostatic and hence 
conservative, the line integral of  E
S
?ds
S
over a closed loop would be zero (Section 
25.1), which would be in contradiction to Equation 31.9.
Faraday’s law in general form 
Example 31.7   Electric Field Induced by a Changing Magnetic Field in a Solenoid
A long solenoid of radius R has n turns of wire per unit length and carries a time-
varying current that varies sinusoidally as I 5 I
max
cos vt, where I
max
is the maximum 
current and v is the angular frequency of the alternating current source (Fig. 31.16).
(A)  Determine the magnitude of the induced electric field outside the solenoid at a 
distance r . R from its long central axis.
Conceptualize  Figure 31.16 shows the physical situation. As the current in the coil 
changes, imagine a changing magnetic field at all points in space as well as an 
induced electric field.
Categorize In this analysis problem, because the current varies in time, the magnetic 
field is changing, leading to an induced electric field as opposed to the electrostatic 
electric fields due to stationary electric charges.
Analyze  First consider an external point and take the path for the line integral to be 
a circle of radius r centered on the solenoid as illustrated in Figure 31.16.
Solution
Path of integration
R
I
I
r
Figure 31.16 
(Example 31.7) 
A long solenoid carrying a  
time-varying current given by  
I 5 I
max
cos vt. An electric field 
is induced both inside and out-
side the solenoid.
Evaluate the right side of Equation 31.9, noting  
that the magnetic field B
S
inside the solenoid is per-
pendicular to the circle bounded by the path  
of integration:
(1)   2
dF
B
dt
52
d
dt
1
BpR2
2
52pR2 
dB
dt
Evaluate the magnetic field inside the solenoid from 
Equation 30.17:
(2)   B 5 m
0
nI 5 m
0
nI
max
cos vt
Pitfall Prevention 31.1
induced Electric Fields The 
changing magnetic field does not 
need to exist at the location of the 
induced electric field. In Figure 
31.15, even a loop outside the 
region of magnetic field experi-
ences an induced electric field.
VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
Resize converted Tiff image using VB.NET. Convert PDF file to Tiff and jpeg in ASPX webpage online. Online source code for VB.NET class.
convert pdf to html code; converting pdf to html format
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
NET library to batch convert PDF files to jpg image files. Turn multiple pages PDF into single jpg files respectively online.
export pdf to html; changing pdf to html
31.5 Generators and Motors 
949
Substitute Equation (2) into Equation (1):
(3)   2
dF
B
dt
52pR2m
0
nI
max
d
dt
1
cos vt
2
5pR2m
0
nI
max
v sin vt
Evaluate the left side of Equation 31.9, noting 
that the magnitude of E
S
is constant on the path 
of integration and E
S
is tangent to it:
(4)   
C
E
S
?ds
S
5E
1
2pr
2
Substitute Equations (3) and (4) into  
Equation 31.9:
E(2pr) 5 pR2m
0
nI
max
v sin vt
Solve for the magnitude of the electric field:
E 5 
m
0
nI
max
vR2
2r
sin v (for r . R)
Finalize  This result shows that the amplitude of the electric field outside the solenoid falls off as 1/r and varies sinu-
soidally with time. It is proportional to the current I as well as to the frequency v, consistent with the fact that a larger 
value of v means more change in magnetic flux per unit time. As we will learn in Chapter 34, the time-varying elec-
tric field creates an additional contribution to the magnetic field. The magnetic field can be somewhat stronger than 
we first stated, both inside and outside the solenoid. The correction to the magnetic field is small if the angular fre-
quency v is small. At high frequencies, however, a new phenomenon can dominate: The electric and magnetic fields, 
each re-creating the other, constitute an electromagnetic wave radiated by the solenoid as we will study in Chapter 34.
(B)  What is the magnitude of the induced electric field inside the solenoid, a distance r from its axis?
Analyze  For an interior point (r , R), the magnetic flux through an integration loop is given by F
B
Bpr2.
Solution
Evaluate the right side of Equation 31.9:
(5)   2
dF
B
dt
52
d
dt
1
Bpr2
2
52pr2 
dB
dt
Substitute Equation (2) into Equation (5):
(6)   2
dF
B
dt
52pr2m
0
nI
max
d
dt
1
cos vt
2
5pr2m
0
nI
max
v sin vt
Substitute Equations (4) and (6) into  
Equation 31.9:
E(2pr) 5 pr2m
0
nI
max
v sin vt
Solve for the magnitude of the electric field:
E 5 
m
0
nI
max
v
2
r sin v (for r , R)
Finalize  This result shows that the amplitude of the electric field induced inside the solenoid by the changing mag-
netic flux through the solenoid increases linearly with r and varies sinusoidally with time. As with the field outside the 
solenoid, the field inside is proportional to the current I and the frequency v.
31.5 Generators and Motors
Electric generators are devices that take in energy by work and transfer it out by elec-
trical transmission. To understand how they operate, let us consider the alternating-
current (AC) generator. In its simplest form, it consists of a loop of wire rotated by 
some external means in a magnetic field (Fig. 31.17a, page 950).
In commercial power plants, the energy required to rotate the loop can be 
derived from a variety of sources. For example, in a hydroelectric plant, falling 
water directed against the blades of a turbine produces the rotary motion; in a coal-
fired plant, the energy released by burning coal is used to convert water to steam, 
and this steam is directed against the turbine blades.
▸ 31.7 
continued
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
Create editable Word file online without email. PDF to Word converter control is a professional and mature .NET solution which aims to convert PDF document to
convert pdf to web link; convert pdf to html code for email
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, Zero Footprint AJAX Document Image
View, Convert, Edit, Sign Documents and Images. Online Demo See the HTML5 Viewer SDK for .NET in powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
convert pdf to web page; pdf to html
950
chapter 31 Faraday’s Law
As a loop rotates in a magnetic field, the magnetic flux through the area 
enclosed by the loop changes with time, and this change induces an emf and a cur-
rent in the loop according to Faraday’s law. The ends of the loop are connected to 
slip rings that rotate with the loop. Connections from these slip rings, which act as 
output terminals of the generator, to the external circuit are made by stationary 
metallic brushes in contact with the slip rings.
Instead of a single turn, suppose a coil with N turns (a more practical situation), 
with the same area A, rotates in a magnetic field with a constant angular speed v. If 
u is the angle between the magnetic field and the normal to the plane of the coil as 
in Figure 31.18, the magnetic flux through the coil at any time t is
F
B
BA cos u 5 BA cos vt
where we have used the relationship u 5 vt between angular position and angular 
speed (see Eq. 10.3). (We have set the clock so that t 5 0 when u 5 0.) Hence, the 
induced emf in the coil is
e
52N 
dF
B
dt
52NBA 
d
dt
1
cos vt
2
5NBAv sin vt 
(31.10)
This result shows that the emf varies sinusoidally with time as plotted in Figure 
31.17b. Equation 31.10 shows that the maximum emf has the value
e
max
NBA
(31.11)
which occurs when vt 5 908 or 2708. In other words, 
e
e
max
when the magnetic 
field is in the plane of the coil and the time rate of change of flux is a maximum. 
Furthermore, the emf is zero when vt 5 0 or 1808, that is, when B
S
is perpendicular 
to the plane of the coil and the time rate of change of flux is zero.
The frequency for commercial generators in the United States and Canada is 
60Hz, whereas in some European countries it is 50 Hz. (Recall that v 5 2pf, where 
f is the frequency in hertz.)
uick Quiz 31.4  In an AC generator, a coil with N turns of wire spins in a mag-
netic field. Of the following choices, which does not cause an increase in the 
emf generated in the coil? (a) replacing the coil wire with one of lower resis-
tance (b) spinning the coil faster (c) increasing the magnetic field (d)increasing 
the number of turns of wire on the coil
B
S
Normal
u
Figure 31.18 
A cutaway view of 
a loop enclosing an area A and 
containing N turns, rotating with 
constant angular speed v in a mag-
netic field. The emf induced in the 
loop varies sinusoidally in time.
a
b
An emf is induced in a loop 
that rotates in a magnetic field.
Slip rings
N
Brushes
External
circuit
e
max
t
e
Figure 31.17 
(a) Schematic dia-
gram of an AC generator. (b) The 
alternating emf induced in the 
loop plotted as a function of time.
31.5 Generators and Motors 
951
The direct-current (DC) generator is illustrated in Figure 31.19a. Such genera-
tors are used, for instance, in older cars to charge the storage batteries. The compo-
nents are essentially the same as those of the AC generator except that the contacts 
to the rotating coil are made using a split ring called a commutator.
In this configuration, the output voltage always has the same polarity and pul-
sates with time as shown in Figure 31.19b. We can understand why by noting that 
the contacts to the split ring reverse their roles every half cycle. At the same time, 
the polarity of the induced emf reverses; hence, the polarity of the split ring (which 
is the same as the polarity of the output voltage) remains the same.
A pulsating DC current is not suitable for most applications. To obtain a steadier 
DC current, commercial DC generators use many coils and commutators distrib-
uted so that the sinusoidal pulses from the various coils are out of phase. When 
these pulses are superimposed, the DC output is almost free of fluctuations.
motor is a device into which energy is transferred by electrical transmission 
while energy is transferred out by work. A motor is essentially a generator operating 
Example 31.8   emf Induced in a Generator
The coil in an AC generator consists of 8 turns of wire, each of area A 5 0.090 0 m2, and the total resistance of the wire 
is 12.0 V. The coil rotates in a 0.500-T magnetic field at a constant frequency of 60.0 Hz.
(A)  Find the maximum induced emf in the coil.
Conceptualize  Study Figure 31.17 to make sure you understand the operation of an AC generator.
Categorize  We evaluate parameters using equations developed in this section, so we categorize this example as a sub-
stitution problem.
Solution
Substitute numerical values:
e
max
5 8(0.500 T)(0.090 0 m2)(2p)(60.0 Hz) 5  136 V
Use Equation 31.11 to find the maximum induced emf:
e
max
NBAv 5 NBA(2pf)
(B)  What is the maximum induced current in the coil when the output terminals are connected to a low-resistance 
conductor?
Solution
Use Equation 27.7 and the result to part (A):
I
max
5
e
max
R
5
136 V
12.0 V
5 11.3 A
a
b
Commutator
N
Brush
t
e
Figure 31.19 
(a) Schematic  
diagram of a DC generator.  
(b) The magnitude of the emf  
varies in time, but the polarity 
never changes.
952
chapter 31 Faraday’s Law
in reverse. Instead of generating a current by rotating a coil, a current is supplied 
to the coil by a battery, and the torque acting on the current-carrying coil (Section 
29.5) causes it to rotate.
Useful mechanical work can be done by attaching the rotating coil of a motor to 
some external device. As the coil rotates in a magnetic field, however, the changing 
magnetic flux induces an emf in the coil; consistent with Lenz’s law, this induced 
emf always acts to reduce the current in the coil. The back emf increases in mag-
nitude as the rotational speed of the coil increases. (The phrase back emf is used 
to indicate an emf that tends to reduce the supplied current.) Because the voltage 
available to supply current equals the difference between the supply voltage and 
the back emf, the current in the rotating coil is limited by the back emf.
When a motor is turned on, there is initially no back emf, and the current is 
very large because it is limited only by the resistance of the coil. As the coil begins 
to rotate, the induced back emf opposes the applied voltage and the current in 
the coil decreases. If the mechanical load increases, the motor slows down, which 
causes the back emf to decrease. This reduction in the back emf increases the cur-
rent in the coil and therefore also increases the power needed from the external 
voltage source. For this reason, the power requirements for running a motor are 
greater for heavy loads than for light ones. If the motor is allowed to run under 
no mechanical load, the back emf reduces the current to a value just large enough 
to overcome energy losses due to internal energy and friction. If a very heavy load 
jams the motor so that it cannot rotate, the lack of a back emf can lead to danger-
ously high current in the motor’s wire. This dangerous situation is explored in the 
What If? section of Example 31.9.
A modern application of motors in automobiles is seen in the development of 
hybrid drive systems. In these automobiles, a gasoline engine and an electric motor 
are combined to increase the fuel economy of the vehicle and reduce its emissions. 
Figure 31.20 shows the engine compartment of a Toyota Prius, one of the hybrids 
available in the United States. In this automobile, power to the wheels can come 
from either the gasoline engine or the electric motor. In normal driving, the elec-
tric motor accelerates the vehicle from rest until it is moving at a speed of about 
15 mi/h (24 km/h). During this acceleration period, the engine is not running, 
so gasoline is not used and there is no emission. At higher speeds, the motor and 
engine work together so that the engine always operates at or near its most efficient 
speed. The result is a significantly higher gasoline mileage than that obtained by a 
traditional gasoline-powered automobile. When a hybrid vehicle brakes, the motor 
acts as a generator and returns some of the vehicle’s kinetic energy back to the 
battery as stored energy. In a normal vehicle, this kinetic energy is not recovered 
because it is transformed to internal energy in the brakes and roadway.
Example 31.9   The Induced Current in a Motor
A motor contains a coil with a total resistance of 10 V and is supplied by a voltage of 120 V. When the motor is running 
at its maximum speed, the back emf is 70 V.
(A)  Find the current in the coil at the instant the motor is turned on.
Conceptualize  Think about the motor just after it is turned on. It has not yet moved, so there is no back emf gener-
ated. As a result, the current in the motor is high. After the motor begins to turn, a back emf is generated and the 
current decreases.
Categorize  We need to combine our new understanding about motors with the relationship between current, voltage, 
and resistance in this substitution problem.
Solution
Figure 31.20 
The engine 
compartment of a Toyota Prius, a 
hybrid vehicle.
J
o
h
n
W
.
J
e
w
e
t
t
,
J
r
.
31.6 eddy currents 
953
31.6 Eddy Currents
As we have seen, an emf and a current are induced in a circuit by a changing mag-
netic flux. In the same manner, circulating currents called eddy currents are 
induced in bulk pieces of metal moving through a magnetic field. This phenom-
enon can be demonstrated by allowing a flat copper or aluminum plate attached at 
the end of a rigid bar to swing back and forth through a magnetic field (Fig. 31.21). 
As the plate enters the field, the changing magnetic flux induces an emf in the 
plate, which in turn causes the free electrons in the plate to move, producing the 
swirling eddy currents. According to Lenz’s law, the direction of the eddy currents 
is such that they create magnetic fields that oppose the change that causes the cur-
rents. For this reason, the eddy currents must produce effective magnetic poles on 
the plate, which are repelled by the poles of the magnet; this situation gives rise to a 
repulsive force that opposes the motion of the plate. (If the opposite were true, the 
plate would accelerate and its energy would increase after each swing, in violation 
of the law of conservation of energy.)
As indicated in Figure 31.22a (page 954), with B
S
directed into the page, the 
induced eddy current is counterclockwise as the swinging plate enters the field 
at position 1 because the flux due to the external magnetic field into the page 
through the plate is increasing. Hence, by Lenz’s law, the induced current must 
provide its own magnetic field out of the page. The opposite is true as the plate 
As the plate enters or leaves the 
field, the changing magnetic flux 
induces an emf, which causes 
eddy currents in the plate.
S
v
S
Pivot
N
Figure 31.21 
Formation of eddy 
currents in a conducting plate 
moving through a magnetic field.
Evaluate the current in the coil from Equation 27.7 with 
no back emf generated:
I5
e
R
5
120 V
10 V
5
12 A
(B)  Find the current in the coil when the motor has reached maximum speed.
Solution
Evaluate the current in the coil with the maximum back 
emf generated:
I5
e
2
e
back
R
5
120 V270 V
10 V
5
50 V
10 V
5
5.0 A
The current drawn by the motor when operating at its maximum speed is significantly less than that drawn before it 
begins to turn.
Suppose this motor is in a circular saw. When you are operating the saw, the blade becomes jammed in 
a piece of wood and the motor cannot turn. By what percentage does the power input to the motor increase when it 
is jammed?
Answer  You may have everyday experiences with motors becoming warm when they are prevented from turning. That 
is due to the increased power input to the motor. The higher rate of energy transfer results in an increase in the inter-
nal energy of the coil, an undesirable effect.
What iF?
Substitute numerical values:
P
jammed
P
not jammed
5
1
12 A
22
1
5.0 A
22
55.76
Set up the ratio of power input to the motor when 
jammed, using the current calculated in part (A), to  
that when it is not jammed, part (B):
P
jammed
P
not jammed
5
I
A
2R
I
B
2R
5
I
A
2
I
B
2
That represents a 476% increase in the input power! Such a high power input can cause the coil to become so hot that 
it is damaged.
▸ 31.9 
continued
954
chapter 31 Faraday’s Law
leaves the field at position 2, where the current is clockwise. Because the induced 
eddy current always produces a magnetic retarding force F
S
B
when the plate enters 
or leaves the field, the swinging plate eventually comes to rest.
If slots are cut in the plate as shown in Figure 31.22b, the eddy currents and the 
corresponding retarding force are greatly reduced. We can understand this reduc-
tion in force by realizing that the cuts in the plate prevent the formation of any 
large current loops.
The braking systems on many subway and rapid-transit cars make use of elec-
tromagnetic induction and eddy currents. An electromagnet attached to the train 
is positioned near the steel rails. (An electromagnet is essentially a solenoid with 
an iron core.) The braking action occurs when a large current is passed through 
the electromagnet. The relative motion of the magnet and rails induces eddy cur-
rents in the rails, and the direction of these currents produces a drag force on the 
moving train. Because the eddy currents decrease steadily in magnitude as the 
train slows down, the braking effect is quite smooth. As a safety measure, some 
power tools use eddy currents to stop rapidly spinning blades once the device is 
turned off.
Eddy currents are often undesirable because they represent a transformation of 
mechanical energy to internal energy. To reduce this energy loss, conducting parts 
are often laminated; that is, they are built up in thin layers separated by a noncon-
ducting material such as lacquer or a metal oxide. This layered structure prevents 
large current loops and effectively confines the currents to small loops in individ-
ual layers. Such a laminated structure is used in transformer cores (see Section 
33.8) and motors to minimize eddy currents and thereby increase the efficiency of 
these devices.
uick Quiz 31.5  In an equal-arm balance from the early 20th century (Fig. 
31.23), an aluminum sheet hangs from one of the arms and passes between the 
poles of a magnet, causing the oscillations of the balance to decay rapidly. In 
the absence of such magnetic braking, the oscillation might continue for a long 
time, and the experimenter would have to wait to take a reading. Why do the 
oscillations decay? (a) because the aluminum sheet is attracted to the magnet 
Pivot
1
2
v
S
v
S
F
B
S
F
B
S
B
in
S
b
Pivot
1
2
When slots are cut in the 
conducting plate, the eddy 
currents are reduced and the 
plate swings more freely 
through the magnetic field.
As the conducting plate enters 
the field, the eddy currents 
are counterclockwise.
As the plate leaves 
the field, the currents 
are clockwise.
v
S
v
S
F
B
S
F
B
S
B
in
S
a
Figure 31.22 
When a con-
ducting plate swings through a 
magnetic field, eddy currents are 
induced and the magnetic force 
F
S
B
on the plate opposes its veloc-
ity, causing it to eventually come 
to rest.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested