pdf js asp net mvc : Embed pdf into webpage SDK Library API .net asp.net winforms sharepoint legalguide7-part674

Sheriff 
someone appointed each year by the Crown to be a 
county's senior officer. Each county in the UK has a 
sheriff. To be eligible for the office the person must 
own some land in the county. The areas of the law 
which come within the sheriff's jurisdiction are largely 
dealt with by the under-sheriff. 
Shoplifting 
stealing goods from a shop. 
Shorthold tenancy 
a tenancy under which the law allows the landlord to 
repossess the house. 
Sine die 
indefinitely. If a case has been adjourned sine die no 
date has been set for it to be continued. (This term is 
Latin.) 
Slander 
saying something untrue about a person or doing 
something, such as making a gesture, which 
damages their reputation. 
Small claims court 
a section of the county court which deals with small 
claims. There is a simplified way of making a claim in 
the county court in a civil case where the claim is for 
no more than £5000 (or £1000 in personal injury 
cases). Neither side can claim costs. 
Smuggling 
importing or exporting goods illegally to avoid a ban 
on them or to avoid the duties on them. 
Sold note 
a note that shows details of investments which have 
been sold, including the sale price and any charges 
taken. Stockbrokers produce sold notes for their 
clients. 
Soliciting 
a prostitute attempting to get clients in a street or 
other public place. 
Solicitor 
a person who can deal with legal matters for the 
public and give advice on legal matters. All solicitors 
are listed on the roll of solicitors kept by the Law 
Society. 
Some solicitors can appear for their clients in some 
of the lower courts. 
Solicitor General 
the assistant of the Attorney General. They both 
advise the Government. 
Embed pdf into webpage - SDK Library API:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
www.rasteredge.com
Embed pdf into webpage - SDK Library API:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
www.rasteredge.com
Special resolution 
a resolution which must be approved by holders of at 
least 75% of the shares with voting rights. (Some 
types of share give their owners the right to vote at 
shareholder meetings, but there are other types 
which do not.) 
Specific performance 
a court order to complete a contract. The courts may 
order a person who has failed to fulfil an obligation 
under a contract to complete it. 
Spent conviction 
a conviction which, after the passage of a stated time 
period, does not have to be disclosed (revealed) to a 
court. 
Squatter 
a person who occupies land illegally. 
Stalking 
the name given to a form of harassment where a 
person is made to feel alarmed or distressed by 
another person's actions. The prosecution has to 
prove that a reasonable person would have known 
that the behaviour would create distress or fear. The 
harassment must have happened on at least two 
occasions. 
Stamp duty 
a tax on the transfer documents for certain types of 
transaction. Examples are buying shares, patent 
rights and properties. 
Statement of claim 
the claimant's written statement setting out the claim 
in a civil case. (This term has not been used since 
April 1999.) 
Status 
how the law regards a person, such as whether the 
person is a minor or a bankrupt and so on. 
Statute 
an Act of Parliament. 
Statute book 
all the existing statutes in a country. 
Statute law 
the law created by Acts of Parliament. 
Statute of limitation 
a statute which sets out the time limits within which a 
court action must take place. 
Statutory accounts 
company accounts which have been filed with the 
Registrar of Companies. The accounts have to 
disclose (show) the information required by the 
Companies Acts. 
Statutory audit 
an audit required by law. Certain companies have to 
have their accounts audited by suitably qualified 
accountants. 
Statutory books 
books of account which companies must keep by law 
to show and explain all their transactions. 
Statutory demand 
a written demand for payment of a debt of more than 
£750. 
Statutory instrument 
a power delegated by Parliament. Parliament can 
delegate its power to make and amend law to a 
person or organisation. A statutory instrument is one 
of these powers and is used by government ministers 
to amend legislation. 
Stay of execution 
the suspension of the carrying out of a court order. 
Stipendiary magistrate 
a magistrate who gets a salary. 
Stockbroker 
a person who buys and sells stocks and shares for 
clients. 
Subduct 
to withdraw. 
Subject to contract 
an agreement which is not binding until a contract 
has been signed. 
Sub judice 
describes something being dealt with by a court 
which cannot be discussed outside the court. (This 
term is Latin.) 
Subpoena 
a writ requiring the person it is addressed to to attend 
at a specific place (such as a court) on a specific 
date and at a stated time. 
Subrogation 
substituting one person for another including all 
rights and responsibilities. 
Subscribers 
the people who set up a limited company. 
Subsidiarity 
subsidiary activities. Member countries of the 
European Community agreed that activities could be 
done by the individual member countries unless they 
could not do them adequately alone. The European 
Community therefore should only do subsidiary 
activities and this is called subsidiarity. 
Subsidiary 
a company controlled by another company. The 
control is normally a result of having more than 50% 
of the voting rights. 
Sue 
to start legal proceedings in the civil court against 
someone. 
Suicide 
the act of killing oneself intentionally. 
Sui generis 
describes something that belongs in a particular 
category or is the only one of its class. (This term is 
Latin.) 
Sui juris 
describes someone who can enter into a contract 
without any restriction. (This term is Latin.) 
Suit 
proceedings brought by one person against another 
in a civil court. 
Summary judgement 
obtaining judgement without a trial. In an action in 
the High Court to recover damages or a debt, if the 
claimant ('plaintiff' before April 1999) swears an 
affidavit that it is believed that there is no defence to 
the claim, the claimant ('plaintiff' before April 1999) 
can obtain summary judgement. 
Summary offence 
an offence that can only be tried by magistrates. 
Most minor offences are summary offences. 
Summary proceedings 
a trial by magistrates, where the defendant has the 
right to choose which court should hear the case, but 
has agreed to be tried in the magistrates' court. 
Summary trial 
a trial by magistrates. 
Summing up 
the judge's summary of a case. At the end of a trial 
by jury the judge explains points of law in the case to 
the jury, explains the jury's role and summarises the 
evidence. 
Summons 
an order by a court that a person attend at a 
particular court at a stated time on a particular date. 
Superior courts 
the higher courts in English law, which include the 
High Court, the Court of Appeal, the Crown Court 
and the House of Lords. Their decisions act as 
precedents for the lower courts to follow. 
Supervision order 
a court order that a child should be supervised by a 
probation officer or a local authority. 
Supra 
above (see above or before in the document). (This 
word is Latin.) 
Supreme Court 
the highest court below the House of Lords. The full 
name is the Supreme Court of Judicature. It is 
divided into: 
the Crown Court; 
the High Court of Justice; and 
the Court of Appeal. 
Surcharge 
a penalty charged if tax is paid late. It is also an extra 
charge banks make if customers do not keep to the 
agreements they made with the bank. 
Surety 
someone who takes responsibility for someone else's 
debts or promises, and guarantees that they will be 
paid or undertaken (done). It is also the name for the 
money put up as security that someone will appear 
in court. If they do not appear in court the money will 
be forfeited. 
Suspended sentence 
a sentence that is postponed until the offender is 
convicted of another offence. 
SWIFT payment 
a payment from one bank account to another using 
the SWIFT system. SWIFT stands for Society for 
Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunications 
and it is an international system for paying by credit 
transfer. 
Tangible asset 
an asset which can be physically touched. 
Tangible property 
property that physically exists. 
Tax 
money raised by the Government to pay for the 
services it provides. Some taxes are called indirect 
because they are part of the price we pay for goods 
and services, such as VAT. Other tax is called direct 
because the individual taxpayer pays it. Income tax 
and corporation tax are examples of direct taxes. 
Taxable supply 
a term for supplying goods and services on which 
value added tax can be charged. This applies even if 
the tax rate is 0% at present, because it can be 
increased if the Government chooses to. 
Taxation 
the levying of taxes. 
Taxation of costs 
the scrutiny of and, if necessary, the lowering of a 
solicitor's bill to a client. The scrutiny is done by a 
court officer. 
Tax avoidance 
reducing tax bills by using legal means. 
Tax evasion 
breaking the law to reduce tax bills, such as by 
concealing income. 
Tax point 
the date when value added tax arises on goods or 
services supplied (or made available) to a customer. 
The tax point should be displayed on invoices. It is 
not necessarily the same as the date of the invoice. 
Teeming and lading 
a term used to describe attempts to hide the loss of 
cash received from one customer by using cash from 
other customers to replace it. This fraud can carry on 
by using cash from other customers in the same 
Way 
Tenant 
a person or organisation granted a lease. 
Tender 
supplying a price for a job. If an organisation asks 
firms to send in tenders for supplying something, 
they are asking for firm written offers to do the work 
to an agreed standard and at a stated price. 
Tenure 
how a piece of land is held by the owner (for 
instance freehold or leasehold). 
Term 
any of the clauses which form part of a contract. 
Terra 
land. (This word is Latin.) 
Terrorism 
using violence for political purposes. 
Testament 
a will dealing with personal property. 
Testamentum 
another name for a will. 
Testator 
a person who makes a will. 
Testify 
to give evidence. 
Testimony 
the evidence a witness gives in court. 
Theft 
taking someone else's property dishonestly, with the 
intention of never returning it. 
Threatening behaviour 
using threats, abuse or insults against another 
person. 
Timeshare 
an arrangement where people can buy a share in 
part of a property for a period of time in each year. 
They can use their part of the accommodation each 
year for the period that is theirs. 
Title 
the right to own something. 
Title deeds 
the documents which prove who owns a property 
and under what terms. 
Toll 
a payment in return for being allowed to travel over a 
road, bridge and so on. 
Tort 
doing something which harms someone else. It 
may result in a claim for damages. (This word is Old 
French.) 
Tortfeasor 
someone who commits a tort. 
Trademark 
a mark which is registered at trademark registries 
and which is used on products produced by the 
owner. It is illegal for anyone else to display the 
mark. 
Transcript 
the official record of a court case. 
Transferable securities 
securities, such as debentures, which can have their 
ownership changed. 
Transferee 
the person something is transferred to. 
Transferor 
the person who transfers something to someone 
else. 
Treason 
the crime of betraying your country such as 
helping your country's enemies in wartime. 
Treasure trove 
treasure found in a hiding place and whose 
owner cannot be traced. It belongs to the Crown 
but the finder and the landowner may get a 
reward. 
Treasury 
the government department which administers 
(manages) the country's finances. 
Treasury bill 
an unconditional promise by the Treasury to repay 
money it has borrowed for the short term (up to 
one year), to pay for government spending. 
Treasury Solicitor 
the person who gives legal advice to the Treasury. 
Trespassing 
going on land without the owner's permission. 
Trial 
an examination of the evidence in a case and the law 
which applies. 
Tribunal 
is:
 •
a body set up to act like a court, but outside the 
normal court system;
a forum to hear disputes and with the authority 
to settle them; 
a body given power by statute to discipline 
members of a profession who do not keep to 
the high standards of behaviour demanded of 
members of the profession; or 
a body set up by the members of an 
association to police the members' actions. 
Trust 
a financial arrangement under which property is held 
by named people for someone else. 
Trust corporation 
a company which acts as a trustee and holds a 
trust's assets. 
Trust deed 
a legal document which is used to: 
create a trust; 
change a trust; or 
control a trust. 
Trustee 
a person who holds property and looks after it on 
behalf of someone else. 
Trustee in bankruptcy 
a person who administers (manages) a bankrupt 
person's estate and pays any available money to the 
creditors. 
Uberrimae fidei 
of the utmost good faith. In certain contracts (such as 
insurance policies) one party must disclose (reveal) 
any material facts to the other party. If they are not 
disclosed the contract can be cancelled or become 
unenforceable. (This term is Latin.) 
Ultra vires 
beyond one's powers. If an organisation does 
something ultra vires, what it has done is invalid. 
Underlease 
the lease of a property by a tenant of the property to 
someone else. 
Undertaking 
a promise which can be enforced by law such as a 
promise made by one of the parties or by their 
counsel during legal proceedings. 
Unfair contract terms 
prevents a party to a contract unfairly limiting their 
liability. The Unfair Contract Terms Act 1977 was 
passed to control unfair exclusion clauses. In 
particular, in a case where someone had been killed 
or injured because of someone else's negligence the 
act prevented a contract limiting the negligent 
person's liability. 
Unfair dismissal 
sacking an employee unfairly. When an employee 
has been dismissed it is the employer's responsibility 
to prove that the dismissal was fair. If an industrial 
tribunal finds that the dismissal was unfair it can 
insist on compensation or reinstatement. 
Unit trust 
a trust which manages investments. People can 
invest in unit trusts by buying units. The managers of 
the trust use the money people invest to buy 
investments. The fund manager values the fund's 
assets from time to time and puts a new price on the 
fund's units. 
Unlawful wounding 
wounding someone without the justification of self 
defence or without power given by the law. 
Unliquidated damages 
the amount of damages decided by a court because 
the parties to a contract had not agreed in advance 
how much the damages would be for breaking the 
terms of the contract. 
Unreasonable behaviour 
behaviour by a married person that justifies the other 
partner in the marriage living apart. 
Unreasonable 
behaviour 
Unregistered company 
a company which is not registered under the 
Companies Acts. 
Unregistered land 
land which is not recorded in the registers at HM 
Land Registry. 
Unsecured creditor 
someone who has lent money without getting any 
security for the loan. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested