Undeterred, Spatz and several welfare
parents returned to Sacramento several
weeks later. This time, the outcome was
in their favor. 
“What we won was the right to
count postsecondary education as a
welfare-to-work activity, including
bachelor’s degrees and up to a mas-
ter’s teaching credential,” Spatz
explains. “This enabled parents to
pursue higher education for their
entire five years on welfare, and to
get B.A.s in nursing and teaching and
other occupations that pay more than
a subsistence wage.”
The following year, in 1998, LIFE-
TIME launched a campaign focused on
getting homework and study time to
count as an allowable weekly work
activity. Again, LIFETIME’s advocacy
efforts proved successful. The ruling
was adopted in federal regulations
under the 2005 reauthorization
of TANF.
“This campaign came about because
CalWORKs students were having
problems meeting the 32-hour weekly
welfare work requirement,” Spatz says.
“At the time, work requirements didn’t
include unsupervised home and study
time, just study time in labs or super-
vised settings. Well, most parents did
their homework at night, after their
children were in bed.”
LIFETIME’s lobbying efforts have
helped welfare recipients in every
California county gain additional
access to education and training oppor-
tunities, as well as transportation
support for CalWORKs parents in 
welfare-to-work activities.
One of those who got help was
Melissa Johnson, a 33-year-old single
mother in Davis, Calif., who left an
abusive marriage and became a Cal-
WORKs recipient in 2002. With help
from LIFETIME, Johnson was able to
retain her welfare benefits while she
attended Woodland Community Col-
lege. She earned a nursing degree in
2008 and now works in the cancer
wing of UC-Davis Medical Center.
(Read more about Melissa Johnson on
the Web: http://biggoal.org/gi94 
This year, TANF is up for reauthor-
ization. On Feb. 25, 2010, LIFETIME
and coalitions from six states went to
Legislators and advocates
take a critical new look
at the TANF program
According to a February 2010 Government Accountability Office
report, 1.7 million families were receiving TANF benefits in 2008,
down significantly from the 4.8 million families who benefited from
AFDC in 1995. Declining poverty wasn’t the reason. A huge portion of
this caseload decline — about 87 percent, according to the report —
represented eligible families who chose not to participate in TANF
because of the program’s work requirements, time limits, and sanc-
tion and diversion policies.
“Right now, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families does far too
little to actually help needy families,” said Rep. Jim McDermott
(D-Wash.), chairman of the Subcommittee on Income Security and
Family Support, at a March 11 meeting on TANF. “When we talk
about TANF, we need to start by asking ourselves this question: ‘Do
poor children deserve our help as their parents struggle to find or
prepare themselves for employment?’ I would imagine that most of us
would answer yes, and yet only 22
percent of poor children receive
assistance from the TANF program.        
“Too many of the people who
trumpet the success of TANF are
using caseload reduction as their
measurement, not the number of 
people who rise out of poverty 
or who are able to find work,”
McDermott added.
A 2006 report from the Institute
for Women’s Policy Research details
the struggles of current and former
welfare student-parents who tried
to attend college while receiving public assistance under CalWORKs.
The report — created in collaboration with LIFETIME and titled
Resilient and Reaching for More: Benefits of Higher Education for Welfare Partici-
pants and their Children— unveils several key findings:
Most welfare recipients want to attend college but don’t know
how. Instead of learning about educational opportunities through
institutional channels, many got that information informally. 
Once welfare recipients are enrolled in college, they often cite 
resistance from caseworkers. In fact, 54 percent of those surveyedsaid
their caseworkers were a hindrance to their college success.
The positive effects of welfare recipients’ college enrollment extended
to their children’s education. Forty-two percent said their children’s
study habits improved. Eighty-eight percent said college enhanced
their ability to help their children reach their educational goals.
“Our welfare system wasn’t set up to get people out of poverty,”
says LIFETIME founder Diana Spatz. “The goal was to reduce
caseloads, promote low-wage work, reduce out-of-wedlock births
and promote marriage. These are realities that we can change by
changing policy.”
11  L
UMINA
F
OUNDATION
L
ESSONS
I
S
PRING
2010
“Our welfare
systemwasn’t
set up to get
people out 
of poverty.”
LIFETIME founder Diana Spatz
Convert pdf to html link - software SDK project:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to html link - software SDK project:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
www.rasteredge.com
12  L
UMINA
F
OUNDATION
L
ESSONS
I
S
PRING
2010
Washington, D.C., as part of a congres-
sional briefing on TANF. Welfare moms
such as Wisconsin resident Angie Grice
also were there to speak about their
experiences and make suggestions for
reforming TANF.
“I got pregnant at 16. I couldn’t stay in
school and raise my child,” Grice says.
“I tried to apply for TANF but was denied
because of my age. When I turned 18, 
I was discouraged from going to college
for more than two years because TANF
(in Wisconsin) has a community service
and job requirement of 25 work hours
and 10 hours of job searching. 
“When, as a young mother, you’re
told that to get help you must allow
yourself to be held back, something is
wrong with the system,” Grice says.
“I know many people feel help isn’t
mandatory or an obligation, but if
you’re going to help me, help me in 
the rightway. Cutting off my child-
care hours when I need them to attend
college is not a help. Not allowing
homework or study time to count
toward TANF’s work requirements
doesn’t help. Helping me means work-
ing withme, not against me, to see that
vision through.”
TANF also proved frustrating for
Renita Pitts, a recovering drug addict
and mother of five children and a
grandmother of 21. 
“My ex-husband and I worked many
low-wage jobs yet still qualified for
TANF. When he left our family after 23
years, I faced many barriers,” Pitts says.
“I was a recovering drug addict, a vic-
tim of severe domestic violence, a wel-
fare recipient, a single mother of five
and dyslexic. But TANF, especially the
five-year limit, was my biggest barrier
by far. 
“Today, I ama success story. I com-
pleted Laney College with three associ-
ate’s degrees. I transferred to UC-Berkeley
and graduated with a double bachelor’s
degree. It wasn’t easy. It took 10 years
to get my B.A. Women on welfare with
children need more time than what
TANF allows when they try to work, go
to school, and care for their kids. We’re
mothers first,” Pitts insists. “We’re not
lazy. We’re not stupid. We want to go
to college. We want it for our future
and our children’s future.”
software SDK project:C# PDF url edit Library: insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.
Empower to create clickable and active html links in .NET WinForms. Able to insert and delete PDF links. Able to embed link to specific PDF pages.
www.rasteredge.com
software SDK project:VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net
Empower to create and insert clickable and active html links to PDF document. Able to embed link to specific PDF pages in VB.NET program.
www.rasteredge.com
For many people, Dec. 31, 1999, conjures
memories of Y2K and the new millennium. To
Renita Pitts, it was the day she found her “voice.”
At the time, Pitts was a recovering drug addict
in an abusive relationship — a single welfare
mother with five children. After struggling for 13
years with an addiction to crack cocaine, Pitts
decided to forge a new path for herself and her
children. As it turns out, her path would lead to
Low-Income Families’ Empowerment through
Education (LIFETIME).
Pitts was 37 when she started at Laney College in
Oakland. On her way to class, she saw a CalWORKs
office on campus. By chance, an employee told
Pitts about an organization called LIFETIME.
“I hadn’t set foot in a college for more than 20
years,”Pitts recalls. “I was literally this lost per-
son at first.”
With the help of LIFETIME’s
founder, Diana Spatz,Pitts
says she rediscovered her
confidence. She also gained
access to the resources she
needed to pursue higher edu-
cation while on welfare. 
“You can go to college on
welfare, but your caseworker
may not tell you that at the
time you sign your welfare-to-
work contract,” Pittssays. “If it
hadn’t been for Diana and
LIFETIME, I would never have known to chal-
lenge the system or find other means of support
for child care.”
Like many welfare mothers, Pitts learned that
the regulations governing welfare can often be
obstacles to higher education access and success.  
“For me, TANF was a hindrance, not help,” says
Pitts. “Instead of working to get you out of
poverty, TANF focused on getting you into any
kind of low-paying job versus bettering yourself
through education.” 
Pitts was fortunate. Through the support serv-
ices offered by LIFETIME, she turned her college
education into a welfare reform strategy. Pitts
graduated from Laney College with three associ-
ate’s degrees — a general curriculum degree and
one each in social welfare and African American
studies. She also was awarded the Presidential
Medallion, which provides scholarships to stu-
dents with outstanding academicachievements.
Pitts’ accomplishments are all the more impressive
because she suffers from dyslexia. 
“The good things that have come my way are
because I found my voice, and that never would
have happened if it wasn’t for LIFETIME telling
me I could do it,” Pitts says.
Pitts was later hired by LIFETIME, where she used
her “voice” to speak out for other welfare mothers
struggling to get off the welfare track through
higher education. Pitts says she found herself taking
on the role of a “political activist,” meeting with
senators and governors, providing testimony on
welfare reform, even staging peaceful demonstrations.
“It was scary but empowering,” Pitts recalls. “It
was important because fed-
eral and state policymakers
are the people crunching the
numbers. They need to see
the faces behind those num-
bers. To be able to stand
before them and say, ‘Here I
am, a welfare mother with a
3.8 GPA, a recovering drug
addict and trying to do the
right thing by going back to
school. Yet, your policies are
creating a roadblock, not a
helping hand.’ ”
Ever determined, Pitts attained two bachelor’s
degrees from UC-Berkeley in 2008 — one in
social welfare and one in African American stud-
ies. Today, she has returned to where her seeds of
change first took root: Laney Community Col-
lege. Pitts works there as a math instructor.  
Pitts’s story is still a work in progress. In addi-
tion to her full-time job, she continues to volun-
teer at LIFETIME. Pitts also plans to write a book
about her welfare-to-college experiences, some-
thing she hopes will inspire her 21 grandchildren.
“My grandmother was murdered when I was 9
years old,” Pitts says. “But in the short time she
was with me, she instilled a sense of determina-
tion and to always fight for what you believe in.
There is always hope. This is the legacy I want
to leave.”
Renita Pitts’ life has changed dramatically. She went from a crack-addicted welfare mother of
five to a college math instructor with two bachelor’s degrees. As a LIFETIMEvolunteer, she also
uses her voice in the “scary but empowering” work of policy advocacy.
13  L
UMINA
F
OUNDATION
L
ESSONS
I
S
PRING
2010
‘Lost person’ found herself in college
“I found my voice, and
that never would have
happened if it wasn’t
for LIFETIME telling 
me I could do it.”
Laney College instructor Renita Pitts
software SDK project:RasterEdge .NET Document Imaging Trial Package Download Link.
Demo▶: Convert PDF to Word; Convert PDF to Tiff; Convert PDF to HTML; Convert PDF to Image; Tiff; Online Convert PDF to Html. SUPPORT:
www.rasteredge.com
software SDK project:C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
PDF Viewer provides C# users abilities to view, annotate, convert and create editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark.
www.rasteredge.com
software SDK project:VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
to Word (.docx). Convert PDF to Tiff. Convert PDF to HTML. PDF to Text. Convert PDF to JPEG. Convert PDF to Png Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image
www.rasteredge.com
software SDK project:How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
C# programmers can convert Word, Excel, PowerPoint Tiff, Jpeg, Bmp of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark
www.rasteredge.com
B
arbara Cervone believes people need to see, hear and read about what
students can do when it comes to higher education. It was a novel
idea in 2001, and it inspired Cervone to leave a prestigious job as national
director of the Annenberg Challenge grant program — at the time the
nation’s largest private investment in the public school reform — to
establish an organization appropriately called What Kids Can Do (WKCD).
Based in Providence, R.I., WKCD uses the voices and views of stu-
dents — individuals who are typically left out of conversations involv-
ing pressing higher education issues — as a way to improve college
readiness, access and success. WKCD takes a multimedia approach to
its work, employing the Internet, books, presentations, digital media,
audio slide shows and videos to share students’ stories and their
perspectives on shaping policy and advocacy.
What Kids Can Do
  !   ,
    !
     
15  L
UMINA
F
OUNDATION
L
ESSONS
I
S
PRING
2010
software SDK project:VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF to MS Office Word in VB.NET. VB.NET Tutorial for How to Convert PDF to Word (.docx) Document in VB.NET. Best
www.rasteredge.com
software SDK project:C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
C# PDF - Convert PDF to JPEG in C#.NET. C#.NET PDF to JPEG Converting & Conversion Control. Convert PDF to JPEG Using C#.NET. Add necessary references:
www.rasteredge.com
“The goal is to show what young
people can accomplish when they’re
given the opportunities and support
they deserve,” says Cervone. “Most
important, we provide real-life examples
of what students can contribute when adults
take their ideas and voices seriously.”
“If you don’t really know from the
student level what’s going on with stu-
dents’ learning and their lives, it’s really
hard to shape changes in the way they
are educated,” adds WKCD co-founder
Kathleen Cushman. 
Loaded questions
The work begins with a series of
questions: What do students yearn for?
What do they want to do, and what
supports are missing from their lives?
Students provide the first-person
answers, and those answers form the
basis for the stories that WKCD presents.
In addition to its college access and
success work, WKCD produces stu-
dent stories on topics about interna-
tional issues, community service and
youth activism. The organization also
maintains a not-for-profit publishing
arm, Next Generation Press, which has
published 12 books.
Cervone and Cushman showcase
their work on young people and their
adult allies at WKCD’s Web site
(www.whatkidscando.org), which attracts
about 75,000 visitors monthly. Stu-
dents are active collaborators in all
facets of WKCD’s efforts. They con-
duct research, act as narrators for
videos, recount personal experiences
for books and more.
“We call it powerful learning with a
public purpose,” Cervone notes. “We see
students as the knowledge creators and
experts in the college-going equation.”
Cervone’s interest in school reform
dates back more than four decades. In
the early 1970s, she was instrumental
in launching a multi-state network of
alternative high schools. Her decision
to leave Annenberg to start WKCD
was a “leap of faith” — one that Cervone
says she’s never regretted.
Today, Cervone, 62, says WKCD has
allowed her to go “wherever the work
may take her.” That might include an
inner-city classroom in the Bronx or, as
was the case in 2005, a small village with
no running water or electricity in the
16  L
UMINA
F
OUNDATION
L
ESSONS
I
S
PRING
2010
Barbara Cervone works with student
Dalida Alves at Central High School in
Providence, R.I. Cervone calls young
people “the knowledge creators and
experts in the college-going equation.”
preneur and author Marc Freedman, the
Purpose Prize program shines the spot-
light on social innovators over 60 who
redefine their retirement years bytack-
ling longstanding social challenges.
Kathleen Cushman is WKCD’s chief
storyteller. A veteran journalist, Cush-
man collects and documents the voices
of students, turning their words and
perspectives on college access and suc-
cess into stories and mixed-media pieces.
For instance, in the WKCD audio
slide show Becoming a Scholar, Dara
Walker talks about academic supports
for first-generation college students.
Another piece, Academic Culture Shock,
introduces Fahad Qurashi, who con-
fronts the challenges of transferring
from a community college to a four-
year institution. In WKCD’s story
Beyond Graduation, high school students
and teacher Kate Gardoqui describe a
classroom project on college prepara-
tion and workforce readiness.
The audio shows and stories serve a
dual purpose. They act as a guide for
students who may experience similar
challenges. For policymakers and oth-
ers, the stories offer the perspective of
those in the trenches — i.e., students —
about their higher education obstacles
and what can be done to improve their
chances of success.
Taking it personally
“It’s easy for people in a higher edu-
cation setting to say: ‘Oh, that’s some-
one else’s job; it’s not up to me,’ ” says
Cushman. But that changes when students
tell of their own struggles and successes.
“When you get to know a student who
is staying up all night to do her reading
for a class because she didn’t get home
from work until 10 at night, you begin
to view things differently and start to
ask how you can help,” Cushman adds.
outskirts of Tanzania. Cervone wrote a
photo essay book about the people living
in that village, and WKCD used the book’s
proceeds to fund scholarships for the vil-
lage’schildren to attend secondary schools.
Cervone’s work with WKCD was
recognized in 2008 when Civic Ventures
honored her with a $10,000 Purpose
Prize fellowship. Co-founded by entre-
“The goalis to show what young people can accomplish when
they’re given opportunitiesand support.”
Barbara Cervone, co-founder and president of What Kids Can Do
Continued on Page 19
Kathleen Cushman records a student’s
comments for use in a mixed-media
presentation. Cushman, a co-founder
of What Kids Can Do, says her work 
“is about bringing the actual voices 
of students to the forefront.” 
18  L
UMINA
F
OUNDATION
L
ESSONS
I
S
PRING
2010
In third grade, Dara Walker had serious
doubts about college. It wasn’t until a visit to
the African American History Museum in
Washington, D.C., that she changed her mind. 
The exhibit featured the work and life of
activist poet E. Ethelbert Miller — and that got
Walker thinking about social movements and
their impact on systemic change.
“I looked at that exhibit, and it felt like that’s
what I wanted to do in life,” Walker says. “I wanted
to discover how I, as a student, could work with
people to bring about equality and change.
This is when I began to think about college —
not just as a way to make money, but something
I needed in order to make a difference.”
Walker started her journey at Eastern Michi-
gan University, where she excelled academi-
cally. She also started organizing events around
social issues and promoting youth empowerment.
“I used to have an issue
presenting in front of peo-
ple. But a professor, Dr.
Melvin Peters, would tell
me: ‘It’s not about you; it’s
about the information.’ He
helped me understand that,
even though I was a student,
I had something important
to say,” Walker explains.  
“In grade school, I was
the one kids picked on
because of my weight,” Walker adds. “It kept me in
the background. When I got involved in commu-
nity activism, things began to change. Now, I walk
into a room and people may still see a big kid. But
when I speak, they start to look at me differently.
“That’s when I believe in myself, so others
do, too,” she says.
Today, Walker is a first-year graduate student in the
Pan African Studies Program at Syracuse University’s
Department of African American Studies, andher
sense of student activism is stronger than ever.As
part of her master’s thesis, Walker plans to explore
high school activism in Detroit during the civil
rights era. She hopes the stories she uncoverswill
one day become part of a high school’s curriculum.
“Students need to feel empowered,” Walker
says. “They need to feel their voices count and
be connected to what they learn in school.”
These types of school/real-world connections
are exactly what English teacher Kate Gardoqui is
forging for her students at Noble High Schoolin
North Berwick, Maine. Some time ago, Gardoqui
picked up a book written by What Kids Can Do
co-founder Kathleen Cushman on what motivates
kids to learn. Inspired by the book, Gardoqui
created Beyond Graduation for her Advanced
Placement Language and Composition class. 
“This was a service-learning project that took
an investigative approach so students could see
how they can use academic skills to be of serv-
ice,” explains Gardoqui.
Beyond Graduation begins with the question,
“How do students fare once they graduate from
Noble High School and begin a job or enter
college?” To answer, students conduct research
on college and workplace readiness and collect
data on high school graduation rates, college
remediation and dropout trends. They then
interview and write about those who have either
graduated from or dropped out of Noble High.
The profiles offer an illuminating look into
howstudents view their
high school experiences
and their impact on college
and career success. One
student interviewed a teen
mother who became preg-
nant while in high school;
another student talked to
a successful filmmaker.
Students also write rec-
ommendations for policy
changes that they believe
will help improve college and workforcereadi-
ness. Gardoqui’s students have made dozensof
thoughtful recommendations, including mentor-
shipprograms involving younger and older stu-
dents, an advisory program on college planning,
and sit-down meetings with college administrators. 
For aspiring journalist Zachary Harmon, Beyond
Graduation is more than just a lesson on college
readiness. The summer between his sophomore
and junior years, Harmon was diagnosed with a
form of cancer. Following surgery and radiation
treatments, his cancer wentinto remission. As a
junior, he met Kate Gardoqui,and he says her
enthusiasm for his writing made him begin to
take education more seriously.
Harmon points to an essay he wrote titled
“Swimming Lessons,” a metaphor for a person
drowning in personal problems. With Gardoqui’s
support, he submitted the story for a Scholastic
Art and Writing Award.
“It won,” says Harmon. “That gave me the pat
on the back to believe I had talent as a writer.”
‘I believe in myself, so others do, too’
Dara Walker (center),
a first-year graduate
student in African
American studies at
Syracuse University,
has an on-campus chat
with three fellow grad
students, including
Remy Johnson.
“Students need to
feel empowered
They need to feel
their voices count.”
Dara Walker
19  L
UMINA
F
OUNDATION
L
ESSONS
I
S
PRING
2010
“This is the purpose behind the work
of WKCD,” Cushman says. “It’s about
bringing the actual voices of students
to the forefront, not as an advertise-
ment of someone who has succeeded
but as a human voice who is saying, ‘I
have these human problems, and here’s
what I’m struggling with.’ ”
Bringing the message of young peo-
ple to a wider audience also is part of
WKCD’s work with KnowHow2GO
(KH2GO), a national public awareness
and action campaign designed to
encourage young teens to prepare for
college. With funds from a Lumina
Foundation grant, WKCD is spearhead-
ing efforts to link national youth-serv-
ing organizations to the KH2GO
initiative. The goal is to take the cam-
paign’s college-prep message to YSOs
and to the young people served by
these organizations.
WKCD also plans to develop a best-
practices guide to share among the
KH2GO networks. The idea is to help
participants strengthen their individual
programs, as well as learn about each
other’s successes and challenges.
Making connections
Engaging stakeholders at the grass-
roots level will be a key part of the
process, says Cervone.
“To me, networks that fail to actively
engage the work on the ground may
fall short of their hopes and expecta-
tions. You have the meetings, papers
and the funding at the top, but unless it
reaches and engages the folks who at
the end of the day have to produce
the results, you may be limited in a net-
work’s impact.”
Cushman echoes those sentiments,
adding: “This is why networks that
reach out to students are so important.
“Adults get out of the habit of mak-
ing connections with youth,” she says.
“It’s pretty easy to put it on someone
else — teachers, parents, the church or
the local community. What is most sur-
prising to me is the degree to which it
matters when one personcreates a support-
iverelationship with a student. One
person reaching out to one student —
one potential college student — is
enough to help them succeed on their
higher education journey.”
Continued from Page 16
20  L
UMINA
F
OUNDATION
L
ESSONS
I
S
PRING
2010
‘College helped me define who I am’
Fahad Qurashi’s hard-fought journey to college is an exam-
ple of what can happen when young people are seen as valued
resources rather than problems.
Qurashi is the son of Pakistani immigrants. He grew up on
the east side of San Jose, Calif., in a low-income neighbor-
hood scarred by violence, drugs and gangs.
“In high school, my focus wasn’t on school.” Qurashi says.
“I wasn’t motivated to think about the future. I was focused
on the now. I didn’t feel my teachers connected with me,
maybe because I wasn’t a model
student,” he claims. 
At 18, Qurashi’s life took an
ominous turn. An altercation and
drug possession with intent to
sell led to his arrest on two felony
charges. He was sentenced to
eight months in the Elmwood
County Correctional Facility.
For Qurashi, incarceration
turned out to be a critically
important teachable moment.
“I knew I was a major disap-
pointment to my parents,” he
recalls. “They didn’t visit me the
entire time I was in jail. It made
me really reflect on what I was
doing and where I was going.”
Compelled by this introspec-
tion, Qurashi enrolled in the
county’s Regimented Correc-
tions Program (RCP), an effort
that combines boot camp-style
discipline with counseling and
educational services. 
Qurashi says his success in
the RCP gave him a sense of
accomplishment and left him
wanting more.
“Graduating from the RCP
was huge. It was the first time I
actually applied myself to some-
thing. It left me thinking that
maybe I had the potential to do
something good with my life,”
Qurashi says.
Armed with this new outlook,
Qurashi enrolled in De Anza College in Cupertino, Calif.,
when he was released from jail. He later transferred to Mary-
mount College, where he discovered his academic passion:
political science. 
“The professors just got me,” he recalls. “The bottom line
is, college helped me define who I am. I didn’t understand
that four or five years ago. Now I get it.”
After earning an associate’s degree from Marymount,
Qurashi attended San Francisco State University for his
bachelor’s degree. He says his San Francisco State experi-
ences were the perfect training ground for his interests in
policymaking, helping shape him into a “serious” student.
Qurashi’s academic success at San Francisco State led to an
internship with a Youth Leadership Institute (YLI) program
designed to help prevent tobacco use among young people.
That experience fed Qurashi’s growing appetite for policy-
making and advocacy, and at the
same time opened a career path-
way.Six months into the pro-
gram, YLI offered Qurashi a paid
position as a program assistant.
After graduating from San Fran-
ciscoState, Qurashi accepted a
full-time position with YLI.
Today, Qurashi, 26, remains
focused on youth-development
issues, working with YLI to
develop programs and services
that bring young people and their
adult allies together for positive
social change. Qurashi says the
work reminds him of how far
he’s come while also giving him
the chance to help other young
people discover the tremendous
potential of higher education.
And he is helping others;
just ask 18-year-old Luisa
Sicairos. She met Qurashi four
years ago through Qurashi’s
work with YLI. The experience
sparked her interest in youth
activism, Sicairos says, and she
began to volunteer regularly
with Qurashi to work on com-
munity issues she believed in.
“Fahad opened doors for me,
whether it’s with my speaking
skills or homework. He pushed me
to finish my goals,” Sicairos says.
Sicairos, a first-year student at
San Francisco City College, hopes
to become a social worker. It’s a
career goal that stems from her desire to make a difference in her
community and was inspired, in part, by Sicairos’ close relation-
shipwith her younger sister, Viridiana, who suffers from autism.
“Working with Fahad and the YLI showed me that young
people can make a difference,” Sicairos says. “We do have
something important to contribute when it comes to making
positive change in our communities if adults are willing to listen.”
Fahad Qurashi overcame a troubled youth, including
an eight-month jail sentence at age 18. Now 26, he’s
a college graduate and works as a policy advocate
for the Youth Leadership Institute in San Francisco.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested