in LaTeX. The following packages are known to work with Eplain: graphics, graphicx,
color, autopict (LaTeX picture environment), psfrag, and url.
Eplain documentationisavailableonline(there’saPDFcopyintheCTANpackage
as well), and there’s also a mailing list — sign up, or browse the list archives, via
http://tug.org/mailman/listinfo/tex-eplain
Eplain distribution:
macros/eplain
21 What is Texinfo?
Texinfo is a documentation system that uses one source file to produce both on-line
information and printed output. So instead of writing two different documents, one
for the on-line help and the other for a typeset manual, you need write only one
document source file. When the work is revised, you need only revise one document.
By convention, Texinfo source file names end with a
.texi
or
.texinfo
extension.
Texinfo is a macro language, somewhat similar to LaTeX, but with slightly less
expressive power. Its appearance is of course rather similar to any TeX-based macro
language, except that its macros start with
@
rather than the
\
that’s more commonly
used in TeX systems.
You can write and format Texinfo files into Info files within GNU emacs, and read
them using the emacs Info reader. You can also format Texinfo files into Info files using
makeinfo and read them using info, soyou’re not dependent on emacs. The distribution
includes a Perl script, texi2html, that will convert Texinfo sources into HTML: the
language is a far better fit to HTML than is LaTeX, so that the breast-beating agonies of
converting LaTeX to HTMLarelargelyavoided.
Finally, of course, you can also print thefiles, or convertthem to PDF using PDFTeX.
Texinfo distribution:
macros/texinfo/texinfo
22 Lollipop
Along time ago (in the early 1990s), the Lollipop TeX format was developed (originally
to typeset the excellent bookTeXbytopic). Several people admired the format, but no
“critical mass” of users appeared, that could have prompted maintenance of the format.
More than 20 years later, a new maintainer appeared: he hopes to build Lollipop
into an engine for rapid document style development. (In addition, he intends to add
support for right-to-left languages such as his own — Persian.)
We can only hope that, this time, Lollipop will “catchon”!
lollipop
:
macros/lollipop
23 If TeX is so good, how come it’s free?
It’s free because Knuth chose to make it so (he makes money from royalties on his TeX
books, which still sell well). He is nevertheless apparently happy thatothers should earn
money by selling TeX-based services and products. While several valuable TeX-related
tools and packages are offered subject to restrictions imposed by the GNU General
Public Licence (GPL, sometimes referred to as ‘Copyleft’), which denies the right to
commercial exploitation. TeX itself is offered under a pretty permissive licence of
Knuth’s own.
There are commercial versions of TeX available; for some users, it’s reassuring
to have paid support. What is more, some of the commercial implementations have
features that are not available in free versions. (The reverse is also true: some free
implementations have features not available commercially.)
This FAQ concentrates on ‘free’ distributions of TeX, but we do at least list the
major vendors.
24 What is the future of TeX?
Knuth has declared that he will do no further development of TeX; he will continue to
fix any bugs that are reported to him (though bugs are rare). This decision was made
soon after TeX version 3.0 was released; at each bug-fix release the version number
acquires one more digit, so that it tends to the limitp (at the time of writing, Knuth’s
latest release is version 3.1415926). Knuth wants TeX to be frozen at versionp when
21
Convert pdf to html code online - software control cloud:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to html code online - software control cloud:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
www.rasteredge.com
he dies; thereafter, no further changes may be made to Knuth’s source. (A similar rule
is applied to Metafont; its version number tends to the limit e, and currently stands at
2.718281.)
Knuth explains his decision, and exhorts us all to respect it, in a paper originally
published inTUGboat11(4), and reprinted in theNTGjournalMAPS.
There are projects (some of them long-term projects: see, for example,theLaTeX3
project)tobuildsubstantialnewmacropackagesbasedonTeX.Therearealsovarious
projects to build a successor to TeX. Thee-TeX extension to TeX itself arose from such
aproject (NTS). Another pair of projects, which have delivered all the results they are
likely to deliver, is the relatedOmegaandAleph. TheXeTeXsystem is in principle still
under development, but is widelyused, and theLuaTeXproject(though not scheduled
to produce for some time) has already delivered a system that increasingly accessible to
“ordinary users”.
25 Reading(La)TeX files
So you’ve been sent an (La)TeX file: what are you going to do with it?
You can, of course, “just read it”, since it’s a plain text file; the problem is that the
markup tags in the document may prove distracting. Mostof the time, even TeX experts
will typeset a (La)TeX file before attempting to read it .. .
So you shouldn’t be too concerned if you can’t make head nor tail of the file: it is
designedto be read by a (sort of) compiler, and compilers don’t have much in common
with human readers.
Apossible next step is to try an on-line LaTeX editor. There are many of these — a
compilation of links may be found inthisblogpost
Of that long list, the present author has only dabbled withWriteLaTeX; it seems
well suited to simple ‘one-shot’ use in this way.
If no online compiler helps, you need to typeset the document “yourself”. The good
news is that TeX systems are available, free, for most sorts of computer; the bad news
is that you need a pretty complete TeX system even to read a single file, and complete
TeX systems are pretty large.
TeX is atypesetting system that arose from a publishing project(see “whatisTeX”),
and its basic source is available free from its author. However, at its root, it is just a
typesetting engine: even to view or to print the typeset output, you will need ancillary
programs. In short, you need a TeX distribution — a collection of TeX-related programs
tailored to your operating system: for details of the sorts of things that are available, see
TeX distributionsorcommercial TeX distributions(forcommercialdistributions).
But beware — TeX makes no attempt to look like the sort of
WYSIWYG
system
you’reprobably used to (see “whyisTeXnot
WYSIWYG
”): whilemany modern versions
of TeX have a compile–view cycle that rivals the best commercial word processors in
its responsiveness, what you type is usually markup, which typically defines a logical
(rather than a visual) view of what you want typeset.
So there’s a balance between the simplicity of the original (marked-up) document,
which can more-or-less be read in any editor, and the really rather large investment
needed to install a system to read a document “as intended”.
Are you “put off” by all this? — remember thatTeX is good atproducing PDF: why
not ask the person who sent the TeXfile to send an PDF copy?
26 Why is TeX not a
WYSIWYG
system?
W
YSIWYG
is a marketing term (“What you see is what you get”) for a particular style
of text processor. W
YSIWYG
systems are characterised by two principal claims: that
you type what you want to print, and that what you see on the screen as you type is a
close approximation to how your text will finally be printed.
The simple answer to the question is, of course, that TeX was conceived long
before the marketing term, at a time when the marketing imperative wasn’t perceived
as significant. (In fact, it appears that the first experimental
WYSIWYG
systems were
running in commercial labs, near where Knuth was working on TeX. At the time, of
course, TeX was only available on a mainframe, and getting it to run on the small
22
software control cloud:Online Convert PDF to HTML5 files. Best free online PDF html
it extremely easy for C# developers to convert and transform a save each PDF page as a separate HTML file in Download and try RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF for .NET with
www.rasteredge.com
software control cloud:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
Resize converted Tiff image using VB.NET. Convert PDF file to Tiff and jpeg in ASPX webpage online. Online source code for VB.NET class.
www.rasteredge.com
experimental machines would have distracted Knuth from his mission to create a
typesetting system that he could use when preparinghis books for publication.)
However, all that was a long time ago: why has nothing been done with the “wonder
text processor” to make it fit with modern perceptions?
There are two answers to this. First, the simple “things have been done” (but they’ve
not taken over the TeX world); and second, “there are philosophical reasons why the
way TeX has developed is ill-suited to the
WYSIWYG
style”.
Indeed, there is a fundamental problem with applying
WYSIWYG
techniques to TeX:
the complexity of TeX makes it hard to get the equivalent of TeX’s output without
actually running TeX over the whole of the document being prepared.
Acelebrated early system offering “
WYSIWYG
using TeX” came from the VorTeX
project: a pair of Sun workstations worked in tandem, one handling the user interface
while the other beavered away in the background typesetting the result. VorTeX was
quite impressive for its time, but the two workstations combined had hugely less power
than the average sub-thousand-dollar Personal Computer nowadays, and its code has
not proved portable (it never even made the last ‘great’ TeX version change, at the turn
of the 1990s, to TeX version 3).
Lightning Textures (an extension of Blue Sky’s original TeX system for the Macin-
tosh), is sadly no longer available.
Thus“ScientificWord” (which can also interact witha computer algebra system), is
the only remaining TeX system that even approximates to
WYSIWYG
operation.
The issue has of recent years started to attract attention from TeX developers, and
several interesting projects that address the “TeXdocumentpreparationenvironment
are in progress.
All the same, it’s clear thatthe TeX world has taken a long time to latch onto the idea
of
WYSIWYG
.Apartfrom simple arrogance (“we’re better, and have no need to consider
the petty doings of the commercial word processor market”), there is a real conceptual
difference between the word processor model of the world and the model LaTeX and
ConTeXtemploy — the idea of “markup”. “Pure” markup expresses a logical model of
adocument, where every object within the document is labelled according to what it is
rather than how it should appear: appearance is deduced from the properties of the type
of object. Properly applied, markup can provide valuable assistance when it comes to
re-use of documents.
Established
WYSIWYG
systems find the expression of this sort of structured markup
difficult; however, markup is starting to appear in the lists of the commercial world’s
requirements, for two reasons. First, an element of markup helps impose style on a
document, and commercial users are increasingly obsessed with uniformity of style;
and second, the increasingly pervasive use of XML-derived document archival formats
demands it. The same challenges must needs be addressed by TeX-based document
preparation support schemes, so we are observing a degree of confluence of the needs
of the two communities: interesting times may be ahead of us.
27 TeX User Groups
There has been a TeX User Group since very near the time TeX first appeared. Thatfirst
group, TUG, is still active and its journal TUGboat continues in regular publication
with articles about TeX, Metafont and related technologies, and about document design,
processing and production. TUG holds a yearly conference, whose proceedings are
published in TUGboat.
TUG’swebsiteis a valuable resource for all sorts of TeX-related matters, such as
details of TeX software, and lists of TeX vendors and TeX consultants. Back articles
from TUGboat are also available.
Some time ago, TUG established a “technical council”, whose task was to oversee
the development of TeXnical projects. Most such projects nowadays go on their way
without any support from TUG, but TUG’s web site lists its
Technical Working Groups (TWGs).
TUG has a reasonable claim to be considered a world-wide organisation, but there
are many national and regional user groups, too; TUG’s web site maintains a list of
23
software control cloud:VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
VB.NET class source code for .NET framework. This VB.NET PDF to Word converter control is a and mature .NET solution which aims to convert PDF document to Word
www.rasteredge.com
software control cloud:C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
in .NET developing platforms using simple C# programming code. Using this C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion C# developers can easily and quickly convert a large
www.rasteredge.com
hrefhttp://www.tug.org/lugs.html“Local User Groups” (LUGs).
Contact TUG itself via
http://tug.org/contact
LastEdit2013-06-25
B Documentation and Help
28 Books relevant to TeX and friends
Thereare too many books for them all to appear in a single list, so thefollowing answers
aim to cover “related” books, with subject matter as follows:
• TeXitselfandPlainTeX
• LaTeX
• BooksonotherTeX-relatedmatters
• BooksonType
These lists only cover books in English: notices of new books, or warnings that
books are now out of print are always welcome. However, these FAQs do not carry
reviews of current published material.
29 Books on TeX, Plain TeX and relations
While Knuth’s book is the definitive reference for both TeX and Plain TeX, there are
many books covering these topics:
The TeXbook byDonaldKnuth(Addison-Wesley,1984,ISBN-100-201-13447-0,pa-
perback ISBN-10 0-201-13448-9)
ABeginner’s Book of TeX byRaymondSeroulandSilvioLevy,(SpringerVerlag,1992,
ISBN-10 0-387-97562-4)
TeX by Example: A Beginner’s Guide byArvindBorde(AcademicPress,1992,ISBN-
10 0-12-117650-9 — now out of print)
Introductionto TeX byNorbertSchwarz (Addison-Wesley, , 1989, ISBN-10 0-201-
51141-X — now out of print)
APlain TeX Primer byMalcolmClark(OxfordUniversityPress,1993,ISBNs0-198-
53724-7 (hardback) and 0-198-53784-0 (paperback))
ATeX Primer for Scientists byStanleySawyerandStevenKrantz(CRCPress,1994,
ISBN-10 0-849-37159-7)
TeX by Topic byVictorEijkhout(Addison-Wesley,1992,ISBN-100-201-56882-9—
now out of print, but seeonlinebooks; you can also now buy a copy printed, on
demand, by Lulu — see
http://www.lulu.com/content/2555607
)
TeX for the Beginner byWynterSnow(Addison-Wesley,1992,ISBN-100-201-54799-
6)
TeX for the Impatient byPaulW.Abrahams,KarlBerryandKathrynA.Hargreaves
(Addison-Wesley, 1990, ISBN-10 0-201-51375-7 — now outof print, but seeonline
books)
TeX in Practice byStephanvonBechtolsheim(SpringerVerlag,1993,4volumes,
ISBN-10 3-540-97296-X for the set, or Vol. 1: ISBN-10 0-387-97595-0, Vol. 2:
ISBN-10 0-387-97596-9, Vol. 3: ISBN-10 0-387-97597-7, and Vol. 4: ISBN-10 0-
387-97598-5)
TeX: Starting from
1
1
by Michael Doob (Springer Verlag, 1993, ISBN-10 3-540-
56441-1 — now out of print)
The Joy of TeX byMichaelD.Spivak(secondedition,AMS,1990,ISBN-100-821-
82997-1)
1
That’s ‘Starting from SquareOne’
24
software control cloud:C# PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in C#.net, ASP
PDFDocument pdf = new PDFDocument(@"C:\input.pdf"); pdf.ConvertToVectorImages( ContextType.SVG, @"C:\demoOutput Description: Convert to html/svg files and
www.rasteredge.com
software control cloud:C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Online C# Demo Codes for Converting PDF to Raster Images, .NET Graphics, and REImage in C#.NET Project. You can use this sample code to convert PDF file to
www.rasteredge.com
The Advanced TeXbook byDavidSalomon(SpringerVerlag,1995,ISBN-100-387-
94556-3)
Acollection of Knuth’s publications about typography is also available:
Digital Typography byDonaldKnuth(CSLIandCambridgeUniversityPress,1999,
ISBN-10 1-57586-011-2, paperback ISBN-10 1-57586-010-4).
and in late 2000, a “Millennium Boxed Set” of all 5 volumes of Knuth’s “Computers
and Typesetting” series (about TeX and Metafont) was published by Addison Wesley:
Computers & Typesetting, Volumes A–E Boxed Set byDonaldKnuth(Addison-Wesley,
2001, ISBN-10 0-201-73416-8).
30 Books on LaTeX
LaTeX, a Document Preparation System byLeslieLamport(secondedition,Addison
Wesley, 1994, ISBN-100-201-52983-1)
Guide to LaTeX HelmutKopkaandPatrickW.Daly(fourthedition,Addison-Wesley,
2004, ISBN-10 0-321-17385-6)
LaTeX Beginner’s Guide byStefanKottwitz(PacktPublishing,2011,ISBN-101847199860,
ISBN-13 978-1847199867)
The LaTeX Companion byFrankMittelbach, Michel Goossens,JohannesBraams,
David Carlisle and Chris Rowley (second edition, Addison-Wesley, 2004, ISBN-
10 0-201-36299-6, ISBN-13 978-0-201-36299-2);the book as also availableas adig-
ital download (in EPUB, MOBI and PDF formats) from
http://www.informit.
com/store/latex-companion-9780133387667
The LaTeX Graphics Companion: IllustratingdocumentswithTeXandPostScriptby
Michel Goossens, Sebastian Rahtz, Frank Mittelbach, Denis Roegel and Her-
bert Voß (second edition, Addison-Wesley, 2007, ISBN-10 0-321-50892-0, ISBN-
13 978-0-321-50892-8)
The LaTeX Web Companion: IntegratingTeX,HTMLandXMLbyMichelGoossens
and Sebastian Rahtz (Addison-Wesley, 1999, ISBN-10 0-201-43311-7)
TeX Unbound: LaTeXandTeXstrategiesforfonts,graphics,andmorebyAlanHoenig
(Oxford UniversityPress, 1998, ISBN-10 0-19-509685-1 hardback, ISBN-100-19-
509686-Xpaperback)
More Math into LaTeX: AnIntroductiontoLaTeXandAMSLaTeXbyGeorgeGrätzer
(fourth edition Springer Verlag, 2007, ISBN-10 978-0-387-32289-6
Digital Typography Using LaTeX Incorporatingsomemultilingualaspects,anduse
ofOmega, by Apostolos Syropoulos, Antonis Tsolomitis and Nick Sofroniou
(Springer, 2003, ISBN-10 0-387-95217-9).
First Steps in LaTeX by George Grätzer (Birkhäuser, 1999, ISBN-10 0-8176-4132-7)
LaTeX: Line by Line: TipsandTechniquesforDocumentProcessingbyAntoniDiller
(second edition, John Wiley& Sons, 1999, ISBN-10 0-471-97918-X)
LaTeX for Linux: AVadeMecumbyBerniceSacksLipkin(Springer-Verlag,1999,
ISBN-10 0-387-98708-8, second printing)
Typesetting Mathematics with LaTeX byHerbertVoß(UITCambridge,2010,ISBN-
10 978-1-906-86017-2)
Typesetting Tables with LaTeX byHerbertVoß,(UITCambridge,2011,ISBN-10978-
1-906-86025-7)
PSTricks: Graphics and PostScript for TeX and LaTeX by Herbert t Voß, , (UIT T Cam-
bridge, 2011, ISBN-10 978-1-906-86013-4)
Asample of George Grätzer’s “Math into LaTeX”, in Adobe Acrobat format, and
example files for the threeLaTeX Companions, and for Grätzer’s “FirstSteps in LaTeX”,
are all available on CTAN.
25
software control cloud:VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
This online VB tutorial aims to illustrate the process of PDF document splitting. VB.NET PDF Splitting & Disassembling DLLs. In order to run the sample code,
www.rasteredge.com
software control cloud:VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
VB.NET Sample Code for PDF to Png Conversion. This is a VB.NET programming sample code to convert PDF file to Png image. ' Load a PDF file.
www.rasteredge.com
Examples for First Steps in LaTeX:
info/examples/FirstSteps
Examples for LaTeX Companion:
info/examples/tlc2
Examples for LaTeX Graphics Companion:
info/examples/lgc
Examples for LaTeX Web Companion:
info/examples/lwc
Sample of Math into LaTeX:
info/mil/mil.pdf
31 Books on other TeX-related matters
There’s a nicely-presented list of of “recommended books” to be had on the web:
http://www.macrotex.net/texbooks/
The list of Metafont books is rather short:
The Metafontbook byDonaldKnuth(AddisonWesley,1986,ISBN-100-201-13445-4,
ISBN-10 0-201-52983-1 paperback)
Alan Hoenig’s ‘TeX Unbound’ includes some discussion and examples of using Meta-
font.
Abook covering a wide range of topics (including installation and maintenance) is:
Making TeX Work by Norman Walsh (O’Reilly and Associates, Inc, 1994, ISBN-10 1-
56592-051-1)
The book is decidedly dated, and is now out of print, but a copy is available via
sourceforge
and on CTAN, and we list it under “onlinebooks”.
32 Books on Type
The following is a partial listing of books on typography in general. Of these, Bringhurst
seems to be the one most oftenrecommended.
The Elements of Typographic Style by Robert Bringhurst (Hartley &Marks, 1992,
ISBN-10 0-88179-033-8)
Finer Points in the Spacing & Arrangement of Type byGeoffreyDowding(Hartley&
Marks, 1996, ISBN-10 0-88179-119-9)
The Thames & Hudson Manual of Typography byRuariMcLean(Thames&Hudson,
1980, ISBN-10 0-500-68022-1)
The Form of the Book byJanTschichold(LundHumphries,1991,ISBN-100-85331-
623-6)
Type & Layout byColinWheildon(StrathmorePress,2006,ISBN-101-875750-22-3)
The Design of Books byAdrianWilson(ChronicleBooks,1993,ISBN-100-8118-
0304-X)
Optical Letter Spacing byDavidKindersleyandLidaCardozoKindersley(TheCar-
dozo Kindersley Workshop2001,ISBN-101-874426-139)
There are many catalogues of type specimens but the following books provide a
more interesting overall view of types in general and some of their history.
Alphabets Old & New by Lewis F. Day (Senate, 1995, ISBN-10 1-85958-160-9)
An Introduction to the History of Printing Types by Geoffrey Dowding (British Li-
brary, 1998, UK ISBN-10 0-7123-4563-9; USA ISBN-10 1-884718-44-2)
The Alphabet Abecedarium byRichardA.Firmage(DavidR.Godine,1993,ISBN-
10 0-87923-998-0)
The Alphabet and Elements of Lettering byFrederickGoudy(Dover,1963,ISBN-100-
486-20792-7)
Anatomy of a Typeface byAlexanderLawson(DavidR.Godine,1990,ISBN-100-
87923-338-8)
ATally of Types byStanleyMorison(DavidR.Godine,1999,ISBN-101-56792-004-7)
26
Counterpunch by Fred Smeijers (Hyphen, 1996, ISBN-10 0-907259-06-5)
Treasury of Alphabets and Lettering byJanTschichold(W.W.Norton,1992,ISBN-
10 0-393-70197-2)
AShort History of the Printed Word byWarrenChappellandRobertBringhurst(Hart-
ley & Marks, 1999, ISBN-10 0-88179-154-7)
The above lists are limited to books published in English. Typographic styles are
somewhat language-dependent, and similarly the ‘interesting’ fonts depend on the
particular writing system involved.
33 Where to find FAQs
Bobby Bodenheimer’s article, from which this FAQ was developed, used to be posted
(nominally monthly) to newsgroup
comp.text.tex
.The (long obsolete) last posted
copy of that article is kept on CTAN for auld lang syne.
Aversion of thepresentFAQ may be browsed via the World-Wide Web, and its
sources are available from CTAN.
This FAQ and others are regularly mentioned, on
comp.text.tex
and elsewhere,
in a “pointer FAQ” which is also saved at
http://tug.org/tex-ptr-faq
A2006 innovation from Scott Pakin is the “visual” LaTeX FAQ. This is a document
with (mostly rubbish) text formatted so as to highlight things we discuss here, and
providing Acrobat hyper-links to the relevant answers in this FAQ on the Web. The
visual FAQ is provided in PDF format, on CTAN; it works best using Adobe Acrobat
Reader 7 (or later); some features are missing with other readers, or with earlier versions
of Acrobat Reader
Another excellent information source, available in English, is the(La)TeXnavigator.
Both the Francophone TeX user group Gutenberg and the Czech/Slovak user group
CS-TUG have published translations of this FAQ, with extensions appropriate to their
languages.
The Open Directory Project (ODP) maintains a list of sources of (La)TeX help,
including FAQs. View the TeX area at
http://dmoz.org/Computers/Software/
Typesetting/TeX/
Other non-English FAQs are available (off-CTAN):
German Postedregularlyto
de.comp.tex
,and archived on CTAN; the FAQ also
appears at
http://www.dante.de/faq/de-tex-faq/
French AFAQusedtobepostedregularlyto
fr.comp.text.tex
,and is archived on
CTAN — sadly, that effort seems to have fallenby the wayside.
Czech See
http://www.fi.muni.cz/cstug/csfaq/
Resources available onCTAN are:
Dante FAQ:
help/de-tex-faq
French FAQ:
help/LaTeX-FAQ-francaise
Sources of this FAQ:
help/uk-tex-faq
Obsolete
comp.text.tex
FAQ:
obsolete/help/TeX,_LaTeX,_etc.:
_Frequently_Asked_Questions_with_Answers
The visual FAQ:
info/visualFAQ/visualFAQ.pdf
34 Getting help online
We assume, here, that you have looked at all relevantFAQanswersyou can find, you’ve
looked in anybooks you have, and scanned relevanttutorials. .. and still you don’t
know what to do.
There are two more steps you can take before formulating a question to the TeX
world at large.
First, (if you are seeking a particular package or program), start by looking on your
own system: you might already have what you seek — the better TeX distributions
provide a wide range of supporting material. TheCTANCataloguecan also identify
27
packages that might help: you cansearchit, or you can browse it “bytopic”. Each
catalogue entry has abrief description of the package, and linksto known documentation
on the net. In fact, a large proportion of CTAN package directories now include
documentation, so it’s often worth looking at the catalogue entry for a package you’re
considering using (where possible, each package link in the main body of these FAQs
has a link to the relevant catalogue entry).
Failing that, look to see if anyone has solved the problem before; places where
people ask are:
1. newsgroup
comp.text.tex
,whose “historical posts” are accessible viaGoogle
groups,and
2. themailinglist
texhax
via itsarchive, or via the ‘Gmane’ newsgroup
gmane.comp.
tex.texhax
,which holds a very long history of the list. A long shot would be to
search the archives of the mailing list’s ancient posts on CTAN, which go back to
the days when it was a digest: in those days, a question asked in one issue would
only ever be answered in the next one.
If the “back question” searches fail, you must ask the world at large.
So, how do you like to ask questions? — the three available mechanisms are:
1. Mailinglists:therearevariousspecialistmailinglists,buttheplacefor‘general’
(La)TeX queries is the
texhax
mailing list. Mail to
texhax@tug.org
to ask a
question, but it’s probably better to subscribe to the list (via
http://tug.org/
mailman/listinfo/texhax
)first — not everyone will answer to you as well as
to the list.
2. Newsgroup: toaskaquestionon
comp.text.tex
,you can use your own news
client(if you haveone),or use the“+ new post”button on
http://groups.google.
com/group/comp.text.tex
.
3. Webforum:alternativesare:the“LaTeXcommunity”site,whichoffersavariety
of ‘categories’ to place your query, and theTeX,LaTeXandfriendsQ&Asite
(“StackExchange”).
StackExchange has a scheme for voting on the quality of answers (and hence of
those who offer support). This arrangement is supposed to enable you to rank any
answers that are posted.
StackExchange offershintsabout“goodbehaviour”, which any user should at least
scan before asking for help there. (The hints’ principal aim is to maximise the
chance that you get useful advice from the first answer; for example, it suggests
that you supply aminimalexampleofyourproblem, just as these FAQs do. There
are people on the site who can be abrasive to those asking questions, who seem not
to be following the guidelines for good behaviour)
Donottry mailing the LaTeX project team, the maintainers of the TeX Live or MiKTeX
distributions or the maintainers of these FAQs for help; while all these addresses reach
experienced (La)TeX users, no small group can possibly have expertise in every area of
usage so that the “big” lists and forums are a far better bet.
texhax
‘back copies’:
digests/texhax
35 Specialist mailing lists
The previous question, “gettinghelp”, talked of the two major forums in which (La)TeX,
Metafont and Metapost are discussed; however, these aren’t the only ones available.
The TUG web site offers many mailing lists other than just
texhax
via itsmaillist
management page.
The French national TeX user group, Gutenberg, offers a Metafont (and, de facto,
Metapost) mailing list,
metafont@ens.fr
:subscribe to it by sending a message
subscribe metafont
to
sympa@ens.fr
(Note that there’s also a Metapost-specific mailing list available via the TUG list
server; in fact there’s little danger of becoming confused by subscribing toboth.)
28
Announcements of TeX-related installations on the CTAN archives are sent to
the mailing list
ctan-ann
. Subscribe to the list via its MailMan web-site
https:
//lists.dante.de/mailman/listinfo/ctan-ann
;list archives are available at the
same address. The list archives may also be browsed via
http://www.mail-archive.
com/ctan-ann@dante.de/
,and an RSS feed is also available:
http://www.mail-
archive.com/ctan-ann@dante.de/maillist.xml
36 How to ask a question
You want help from the community at large; you’ve decided where you’re going toask
your question,buthowdoyouphraseit?
Excellent “general” advice (how to ask questions of anyone) is contained inEric
Raymond’s article on the topic. Eric’sanextremelyself-confidentperson,andthis
comes through in his advice; but his guidelines are very good, even for us in the un-
self-confidentmajority. It’s important to remember that you don’thave a right to advice
from the world, but that if you express yourself well, you will usually find someone
who will be pleased to help.
So how do you express yourself in the (La)TeX world? There aren’t any compre-
hensive rules, but a few guidelines may help in the application of your own common
sense.
• Makesureyou’reaskingtherightpeople.Don’taskinaTeXforumaboutprinter
device drivers for the Foobar operating system. Yes, TeX users need printers, but
no, TeX users will typically not be Foobar systems managers.
Similarly, avoid posing a question in a language that the majority of the group
don’t use: post in Ruritanian to
de.comp.text.tex
and you may have a long wait
before a German- and Ruritanian-speaking TeX expert notices your question.
• Ifyourquestionis(ormaybe)TeX-system-specific,reportwhatsystemyou’re
using, or intend to use: “I can’t install TeX” is as good as useless, whereas “I’m
trying to install the mumbleTeX distribution on theGrobble operating system” gives
allthe context a potential respondent mightneed. Another common situation where
this information is important is when you’re having trouble installing something
new in your system: “I want to add the glugtheory package to my mumbleTeX v12.0
distribution on the Grobble 2024 operating system”.
• Ifyouneedtoknowhowtodosomething,makeclearwhatyourenvironmentis:“I
want to do x in Plain TeX”, or “I want to do y in LaTeX running the boggle class”.
If you thought you knew how, but your attempts are failing, tell us what you’ve
tried: “I’ve already tried installing the elephant in the minicar directory, and it
didn’t work, even after refreshing the filename database”.
• Ifsomething’sgoingwrongwithin(La)TeX,pretendyou’resubmittingaLaTeX
bug report,andtrytogeneratea minimum failing example.Ifyourexampleneeds
your local xyzthesis class, or some other resource not generally available, be sure to
include a pointer to how the resource can be obtained.
• Figuresarespecial,ofcourse.Sometimesthefigureitselfisreallyneeded,butmost
problems may be demonstrated with a “figure substitute” in the form of a
\rule
{width}{height}
command, for some value ofhwidthi andhheighti. If the (real)
figure is needed, don’t try posting it: far better to put it on the web somewhere.
• Beassuccinctaspossible.Yourhelpersdon’tusuallyneedtoknowwhyyou’re
doing something, just what you’re doing and where the problem is.
37 How to make a “minimum example”
Our advice on asking questionssuggeststhatyoupreparea“minimumexample”(also
commonly known as a “minimal example”) of failing behaviour, as a sample to post
with your question. If you have a problem in a two hundred page document, it may be
unclear how toproceedfrom this problem to a succinct demonstration of your problem.
There are two valid approaches to this task: building up, and hacking down.
The “building up” process starts with a basic document structure (for LaTeX,
this would have
\documentclass
,
\begin{document}
,
\end{document}
)and adds
things. First to add is a paragraph or so around the actual point where the problem
29
occurs. (It may prove difficult to find the actual line that’s provoking the problem. If the
original problem is an error, reviewing“thestructureofTeXerrors” may help.)
Note that there are things that cango wrong in one part of the document as a result
of something in another part: the commonest is problems in the table of contents (from
something in a section title, or whatever), or the list ofhsomethingi (from somethingin
a
\caption
). In such a case, include the section title or caption (the caption probably
needs the
figure
or
table
environment around it, but it doesn’t need the figure or table
itself).
If this file you’ve built up shows the problem already, then you’re done. Otherwise,
try adding packages; the optimum is a file with only one package in it, but you may
find that the guilty package won’t even load properly unless another package has been
loaded. (Another common case is that package A only fails when package B has been
loaded.)
The “hacking down” route starts with your entire document, and removes bits until
the file no longer fails (and then of course restores the last thing removed). Don’t forget
to hack out any unnecessary packages, but mostly, the difficulty is choosing what to
hack out of the body of the document; this is the mirror of the problem above, in the
“building up” route.
If you’ve added a package (or more than one), add
\listfiles
to the preamble
too: that way, LaTeX will produce a list of the packages you’ve used and their version
numbers. This information may be useful evidence for people trying to help you.
The process of ‘building up’, and to some extent that of ‘hacking down’, can be
helped by stuff available on CTAN:
• theminimalclass(partoftheLaTeXdistribution)doeswhatitsnamesays: it
provides nothing more than what is needed to get LaTeX code going, and
• themwebundleprovidesanumberofimagesinformatsthat(La)TeXdocuments
can use, and a small package mwe which loads other useful packages (such as
blindtext and lipsum, both capable of producing dummy text in a document).
What if none of of these cut-down derivatives of your document will show your
error? Whatever you do, don’t post the whole of the document: if you can, it may be
usefulto make a copy availableon theweb somewhere: people willprobably understand
if it’s impossible . .. or inadvisable, in the case of somethingconfidential.
If the whole document is indeed necessary, it could be that your error is an overflow
of some sort; the best you cando is to post the code “around” the error, and (of course)
the full text of the error.
It may seem that all this work is rather excessive for preparing a simple post. There
are two responses to that, both based on the relative inefficiency of asking a question on
the internet.
First, preparing a minimum document very often leads you to the answer, without
all the fuss of posting and lookingfor responses.
Second, your prime aim is to get an answer as quickly as possible; a well-prepared
example stands a good chance of attracting an answer “in a single pass”: if the person
replying to your post finds she needs more information, you have to find that request,
post again, and wait for your benefactor to produce a second response.
All things considered, a good example file can save you a day, for perhaps half an
hour’s effort invested.
Much of the above advice, differently phrased, may also be read on the web at
http://www.minimalbeispiel.de/mini-en.html
; source of that article may be
found at
http://www.minimalbeispiel.de/
,in both German and English.
blindtext.sty
:
macros/latex/contrib/blindtext
lipsum.sty
:
macros/latex/contrib/lipsum
minimal.cls
: Distributed as part of
macros/latex/base
mwe.sty
:
macros/latex/contrib/mwe
30
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested