how to open pdf file on button click in mvc : How to convert pdf file to html document control software system azure html wpf console letterfaq8-part755

130 Choice of Type 1fonts for typesetting Maths
If you are interested in text alone, you can in principle use any of the huge numbers of
text fonts in Adobe Type 1, TrueType or OpenType formats. Theconstraint is, of course,
that your previewer and printer driver should support such fonts (TeX itself only cares
about metrics, not the actual character programs).
If youalso need mathematics, then your choice is more limited, in particular by the
demands that TeX makes of maths fonts (for details, see the papers byB.K.P.Hornin
TUGboat14(3),orby Thierry Bouche in TUGboat19(2)).Thereareseveraloptions
available, which are based on Knuth’s original designs. Others complement other
commercial and free text font designs; one set (MicroPress’s ‘informal math’) stands
alone.
Users should also considerthe possibilities of typesettingmathsusingOpenType
fonts.
“Free” font families that will support TeX mathematics include:
Computer Modern (75 fonts — optical scaling) Donald E. Knuth
The CM fonts were originally designed in Metafont, but are also now available in
scalable outline form. There are commercial as well as public domain versions, and
there are both Adobe Type 1 and TrueType versions. A set of outline versions of
the fonts was developed as a commercial venture byY&Y and Blue Sky Research;
they have since assigned the copyright to the AMS, and the fonts are now freely
available from CTAN. Their quality is such that they have become the de facto
standard for Type 1 versions of the fonts.
AMS fonts (52 fonts, optical scaling) The AMS
This set of fonts offers adjuncts to the CM set, including two sets of symbol fonts
(msam and msbm) and Euler text fonts. These are not a self-standing family, but
merit discussion here (not least because several other families mimic the symbol
fonts). Freely-available Type 1 versions of the fonts are available on CTAN. The
eulervm package permits use of the Euler maths alphabet in conjunction with text
fonts that do not providemaths alphabets of their own (for instance, Adobe Palatino
or Minion).
Mathpazo version 1.003 (5 fonts) Diego Puga
The Pazo Math fonts are a family of type 1 fonts suitable for typesetting maths in
combination with the Palatino family of text fonts. Four of the five fonts of the
distribution are maths alphabets, in upright and italic shapes, medium and bold
weights; the fifth font contains a small selection of “blackboard bold” characters
(chosen for their mathematical significance). Support under LaTeX2e is available
inPSNFSS; the fonts are licensed under the GPL, with legalese permitting the use
of the fonts in published documents.
Fourier/Utopia (15 fonts) Michel Bovani
Fourier is a family built on Adobe Utopia (which has been released for usage
free of charge by Adobe). The fonts provide the basic Computer Modern set of
mathematical symbols, and addmany of the AMS mathematical symbols (though
you are expected to use some from the AMS fonts themselves). There are also
several other mathematical anddecorative symbols. The fonts come with a fourier
package for use with LaTeX; text support of OT1 encoding is not provided — you
are expected to use T1.
For a sample, see
http://www.tug.dk/FontCatalogue/utopia/
Fourier/New Century Schoolbook Michael Zedler
Fouriernc is a configuration using the Fourier fonts in the context of New Century
Schoolbook text fonts.
For a sample, see
http://www.tug.dk/FontCatalogue/newcent/
KP-fonts The Johannes Kepler project
The kp-fonts family provides a comprehensive set of text and maths fonts. The
set includes replacement fixed-width and sans fonts (though some reports have
81
How to convert pdf file to html document - control software system:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
www.rasteredge.com
How to convert pdf file to html document - control software system:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
www.rasteredge.com
suggested that these are less successful, and their use may be suppressed when
loading the fonts’ kpfonts LaTeX support package).
For an example, see
http://www.tug.dk/FontCatalogue/kpserif/
MathDesign (3 free families, 3 commercial-based families... so far) Paul Pichaureau
This set so far offers mathematics fonts to match the free fonts Adobe Utopia, URW
Garamond and Bitstream Charter (the text versions of all of which are separately
available, on CTAN, in Type 1 format), and Adobe Garamond Pro, Adobe UtopiaStd
and ITC Charter (which are commercial fonts, all available for purchase on the
web). There has been a little comment on these fonts, but none from actual users
posted to the public forums. Users, particularly those who are willing to discuss
their experiences, would obviously be welcome. Browse the CTAN directory and
see which you want: there is a wealth of documentation and examples.
For samples of the free variants, see
http://www.tug.dk/FontCatalogue/
charter/
for URW Charter,
http://www.tug.dk/FontCatalogue/garamond/
for URW Garamond and
http://www.tug.dk/FontCatalogue/utopia-md/
for
Adobe Utopia.
Belleek (3fonts) Richard Kinch
Belleek is the upshot of Kinch’s thoughts on how Metafont might be used in the
future: they were published simultaneously as Metafont source, as Type1 fonts, and
as TrueType fonts. The fonts act as “drop-in” replacements for the basic MathTime
set (as an example of “what might be done”).
The paper outlining Kinch’s thoughts, proceeding from considerations of the
‘intellectual’ superiority of Metafont to evaluations of why its adoption is so
limited and what might be done about the problem, is to be found at
http:
//truetex.com/belleek.pdf
MTPro2 Lite Pubish or Perish (Michael Spivak)
A(functional) subset of the MathTime Pro 2 font set, that is made available, free,
for general use. While it does not offer the full power of the commercial product
(see below), it is nevertheless a desirable font set.
Mathptmx Alan Jeffrey, Walter Schmidt and others.
This set contains maths italic, symbol, extension, and roman virtual fonts, built
from Adobe Times, Symbol, Zapf Chancery, andthe Computer Modern fonts. The
resulting mixture is not entirely acceptable, but can pass in many circumstances.
The real advantage is that the mathptm fonts are (effectively) free, and the resulting
PostScript files can be freely exchanged. Support under LaTeX2e is available in
PSNFSS.
For a sample, see
http://www.tug.dk/FontCatalogue/times/
Computer Modern Bright Freescalableoutlineversionsofthesefontsdoexist;they
are covered below together with their commercial parallels.
URW Classico (4 fonts) LaTeX support by Bob Tennent
These are clones of Zapf’s Optima available from CTAN (for non-commercial
use only). Mathematics support can be provided by using packages eulervm or
sansmath. As a sans-serif font family, Optima is especially suitable for presenta-
tions.
The excellentfont catalogue keeps anup-to-datelistwhich describes the fonts by giving
names and short examples, only. (At the time of writing — June 2008 — the list has
several that are onlyscheduled for inclusion here.
Another useful document is Stephen Hartke’s “Free maths font survey”, which is
available on CTAN in both PDF and HTML formats. The survey covers most of the
fonts mentioned in the font catalogue, but also mentions some (such as Belleek that the
catalogue omits.
Fonts capable of setting TeX mathematics, that are available commercially, include:
82
control software system:Online Convert PDF to HTML5 files. Best free online PDF html
component makes it extremely easy for C# developers to convert and transform a multi-page PDF document and save each PDF page as a separate HTML file in .NET
www.rasteredge.com
control software system:VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
All object data. File attachment. Hidden layer content. Convert smooth lines to curves. VB.NET Demo Code to Optimize An Exist PDF File in Visual C#.NET Project.
www.rasteredge.com
BA Math (13 fonts) MicroPress Inc.
BA Math is a family of serif fonts, inspired by the elegant and graphically perfect
font design of John Baskerville. BA Math comprises the fonts necessary for
mathematical typesetting (maths italic, math symbols and extensions) in normal
and bold weights. The family also includes all OT1 and T1 encoded text fonts
of various shapes, as well as fonts with most useful glyphs of the TS1 encoding.
Macros for using the fonts with Plain TeX, LaTeX2.09 and current LaTeX are
provided.
For further details (including samples) see
http://www.micropress-inc.com/fonts/bamath/bamain.htm
CH Math (15 fonts) MicroPress Inc.
CH Math is a family of slab serif fonts, designed as a maths companion for
Bitstream Charter. (The distribution includes four free Bitstream text fonts, in
addition to the 15 hand-hinted MicroPress fonts.) For further details (including
samples) see
http://www.micropress-inc.com/fonts/chmath/chmain.htm
Computer Modern Bright (62 fonts — optical scaling) Walter Schmidt
CM Bright is a family of sans serif fonts, based on Knuth’s CM fonts. It comprises
the fonts necessary for mathematical typesetting, including AMS symbols, as well
as text and text symbol fonts of various shapes. The collection comes withits own
set of files for use with LaTeX. The CM Bright fonts are supplied in Type 1 format
by MicroPress, Inc. The hfbright bundle offers free Type 1 fonts for text using
the OT1 encoding — the cm-super fonts provide the fonts in T1 text encoding but
don’t support CM bright mathematics.
For further details of Micropress’ offering (including samples) see
http://www.micropress-inc.com/fonts/brmath/brmain.htm
Concrete Math (25 fonts — optical scaling) Ulrik Vieth
The Concrete Math font set was derived from the Concrete Roman typefaces
designed byKnuth. The set provides a collection of math italics, math symbol, and
math extension fonts, and fonts of AMS symbols that fit with the Concrete set, so
that Concrete may be used as a complete replacement for Computer Modern. Since
Concrete is considerably darker than CM, the family may particularly attractive for
use in low-resolution printing or in applications such as posters or transparencies.
Concrete Math fonts, as well as Concrete Roman fonts, are supplied in Type 1
format by MicroPress, Inc.
For further information (including samples) see
http://www.micropress-inc.com/fonts/ccmath/ccmain.htm
HV Math (14 fonts) MicroPress Inc.
HV Math is a family of sans serif fonts, inspired by the Helvetica (TM) typeface.
HV Math comprises the fonts necessary for mathematical typesetting (maths italic,
maths symbols and extensions) in normal and bold weights. The family also
includes all OT1 and T1 encoded textfonts of various shapes, as well as fonts with
most useful glyphs of the TS1 encoding. Macros for using thefonts with Plain TeX,
LaTeX2.09 and current LaTeX are provided. Bitmapped copies of the fonts are
available free, on CTAN.
For further details (and samples) see
http://www.micropress-inc.com/fonts/hvmath/hvmain.htm
Informal Math (7 outline fonts) MicroPress Inc.
Informal Math is a family of fanciful fonts loosely based on the Adobe’s Tekton
(TM) family, fonts which imitate handwritten text. Informal Math comprises the
fonts necessary for mathematical typesetting (maths italic, maths symbols and
extensions) in normal weight, as well as OT1 encoded text fonts in upright and
oblique shapes. Macros for using the fonts withPlainTeX, LaTeX2.09 and current
LaTeX are provided.
83
control software system:C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
All object data. File attachment. Hidden layer content. Convert smooth lines to curves. Flatten visible layers. C#.NET DLLs: Compress PDF Document.
www.rasteredge.com
control software system:VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
VB.NET Demo code to Append PDF Document. In addition, VB.NET users can append a PDF file to the end of a current PDF document and combine to a single PDF file.
www.rasteredge.com
For further details (including samples) see
http://www.micropress-inc.com/fonts/ifmath/ifmain.htm
Lucida Bright with Lucida New Math (25 fonts) Chuck Bigelow and Kris Holmes
Lucida is a family of related fonts including seriffed, sans serif, sans serif fixed
width, calligraphic, blackletter, fax, Kris Holmes’ connected handwriting font, etc;
they’re not as ‘spindly’ as Computer Modern, with a large x-height, and include
alarger set of maths symbols, operators, relations and delimiters than CM (over
800 instead of 384: among others, it also includes the AMS msam and msbm
symbol sets). ‘Lucida Bright Expert’ (14 fonts) adds seriffed fixed width, another
handwriting font, smallcaps, bold maths, upright ‘maths italic’, etc., to the set.
Support under LaTeX is available under the auspices of the PSNFSS, and pre-built
metrics are also provided.
TUG has the right to distribute these fonts; the web site “LucidaandTUG
has details.
Adobe Lucida, LucidaSans and LucidaMath (12 fonts)
Lucida and LucidaMath are generally considered to be a bit heavy. The three maths
fonts contain only the glyphs in the CM maths italic, symbol, and extension fonts.
Support for using LucidaMath with TeX is not very good; you will need to do
some work reencoding fonts etc. (In some sense this set is the ancestor of the
LucidaBright plus LucidaNewMath font set, which are not currently available.)
MathTime Pro2 Publish or Perish (Michael Spivak)
This latest instance of the MathTime family covers all the weights (medium, bold
and heavy) and symbols of previous versions of MathTime. In addition it has a
much extended range of symbols, and many typographic improvements that make
for high-quality documents. The fonts are supported under both Plain TeX and
LaTeX2e, and are exclusively available for purchase fromPersonalTeXInc.
For further details and samples and fliers, see
http://www.pctex.com/
mtpro2.html
Minion Pro and MnSymbol Adobe,LaTeXsupportandpackagingbyAchimBlumen-
sath et al.
Minion Pro derives from the widely-available commercial OpenType font of the
same name by Adobe; scripts are provided toconvert relevant parts of it to Adobe
Type 1 format. The MinionPro package will set up text and maths support using
Minion Pro, but a separate (free) font set MnSymbol greatly extends the symbol
coverage.
PA Math PAMathisafamilyofseriffontslooselybasedonthePalatino(TM)typeface.
PA Math comprises the fonts necessary for mathematical typesetting (maths italics,
maths, calligraphic and oldstyle symbols, and extensions) in normal and bold
weights. The family also includes all OT1, T1 encoded text fonts of various shapes,
as well as fonts withthe most useful glyphs of the TS1 encoding. Macros for using
the fonts with Plain TeX, LaTeX2.09 and current LaTeX are provided.
For further details (and samples) see
http://www.micropress-inc.com/fonts/pamath/pamain.htm
TM Math (14 fonts) MicroPress Inc.
TM Math is a family of serif fonts, inspiredby the Times (TM) typeface. TM Math
comprises the fonts necessary for mathematical typesetting (maths italic, maths
symbols and extensions) in normal and bold weights. The family also includes all
OT1 and T1 encoded text fonts of various shapes, as well as fonts with most useful
glyphs of the TS1 encoding. Macros for using thefonts with Plain TeX, LaTeX 2.09
and current LaTeX are provided. Bitmapped copies of the fonts are available free,
on CTAN.
For further details (and samples) see
http://www.micropress-inc.com/fonts/tmmath/tmmain.htm
84
control software system:VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Separate source PDF document file by defined page range in VB.NET class application. Divide PDF file into multiple files by outputting PDF file size.
www.rasteredge.com
control software system:C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
C#.NET PDF to HTML Conversion. If you want to transform and convert PDF document to HTML file format, this article should be read.
www.rasteredge.com
Two other font sets should be mentioned, even though they don’t currently produce
satisfactory output — their author is no longer working on them, and several problems
have been identified:
Pxfonts set version 1.0 (26 fonts) by Young Ryu
The pxfonts set consists of
• virtualtextfontsusingAdobePalatino(oritsURWreplacement,Palladio)with
modified plus, equal and slash symbols;
• maths alphabets using Palatino (or Palladio;
• mathsfontsofallsymbolsinthecomputermodernmathsfonts(cmsy,cmmi,
cmex and the Greek letters of cmr)
• maths fonts of all symbols corresponding to the AMS fonts (msam andmsbm);
• additional maths fonts of various symbols.
The text fontsareavailablein OT1, T1 and LY1 encodings, and TS encoded symbols
are also available. The sans serif and monospaced fonts supplied with thetxfonts set
(see below) may be used with pxfonts; the txfonts set should be installed whenever
pxfonts are. LaTeX, dvips and PDFTeX support files are included.
The fonts are not perfect; the widths assigned to the characters in the
.tfm
file are
wrong for some glyphs; this can cause sequences of characters to“look wrong”, or
in some cases even to overlap; the newpx fonts (noted above) aim to reduce these
problems.
The fonts are licensed under the GPL; use in published documents is permitted.
Newpx by Michael Sharpe from Young Ryu’s pxfonts
This collection is derived from pxfonts; the maths fonts metrics have been adjusted
so that the output is less cramped than when pxfonts is used; the appearance of
the output is much improved. Two packages are provided, newpxtext for using the
associated text fonts, and newpxmath for mathematics.
Txfonts set version 3.1 (42 fonts) by Young Ryu
The txfonts set consists of
• virtualtextfontsusingAdobeTimes(ortheURWNimbusRomanNo9Lfont
that substitutes for Times, which is distributed as part of the URW “basic 35”
collection) with modified plus, equal and slash symbols;
• matchingsetsofsansserifandmonospace(‘typewriter’)fonts(thesansserifset
is based on Adobe Helvetica);
• mathsalphabetsusingAdobeTimes,ortheURWequivalentNimbusRomanNo9;
• mathsfontsofallsymbolsinthecomputermodernmathsfonts(cmsy,cmmi,
cmex and the Greek letters of cmr)
• maths fonts of all symbols corresponding to the AMS fonts (msam andmsbm);
• additional maths fonts of various symbols.
The text fontsareavailablein OT1, T1 and LY1 encodings, and TS encoded symbols
are also available.
The fonts are not perfect; the widths assigned to the characters in the
.tfm
file are
wrong for some glyphs; this can cause sequences of characters to“look wrong”, or
in some cases even to overlap; the newtx fonts (noted above) aim to reduce these
problems.
The fonts are licensed under the GPL; use in published documents is permitted.
Txfontsb set version 1.00 by Young Ryu and Antonis Tsolomitis
The txfontsb bundles txfonts, extended to provide a Small Caps set, Old-Style
numbers and Greek text (from the GNUFreefont set).Documentationis available
for this variant, too.
Newtx by Michael Sharpe from Young Ryu’s txfonts
This collection is derived from txfonts; the maths fonts metrics have been adjusted
85
control software system:C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
Using this PDF document concatenating library SDK, C# developers can easily merge and append one PDF document to another PDF document file, and choose to
www.rasteredge.com
control software system:VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
In order to convert PDF document to Word file using VB.NET programming code, you have to integrate following assemblies into your VB.NET class application by
www.rasteredge.com
so that the output is less cramped than when txfonts is used; the appearance of
the output is much improved. Two packages are provided, newtxtext for using
the associated text fonts, and newtxmath for mathematics. Options are provided
to substitute letters and symbols from the Libertine set, and from the Garamond
extension font garamondx (but note that garamondx, which is an adaptation of
URW Garamond, is not available via TeX Live).
Finally, one must not forget:
Proprietary fonts Various sources.
Since having a high quality font set in scalable outline form that works with TeX
can give a publisher a real competitive advantage, there are some publishers that
have paid (a lot) to have such font sets made for them. Unfortunately, these sets are
not available on the open market, despite the likelihood that they’re more complete
than those that are.
We observe a very limited selection of commercial maths font sets; a Type 1 maths font
has to be explicitly designed for use with TeX, which is an expensive business, and is
of little appeal in other markets. Furthermore, the TeX market for commercial fonts is
minute by comparisonwith the huge sales of other font sets.
Text fonts in Type 1 format are available from many vendors including Adobe,
Monotype and Bitstream. However, be careful with cheap font “collections”; manyof
them dodge copyright restrictions by removing (or crippling) parts of the font programs
such as hinting. Such behaviour is both unethical and bad for the consumer. The fonts
may not render well (or at all, under ATM), may not have the ‘standard’ complement of
228 glyphs, or may not include metric files (which you need to make TFM files).
TrueType was for a long time the “native” format for Windows, but MicroSoft
joined the development of the OpenType specification, and ‘modern’ windows will
work happily with fonts in either format. Some TeX implementations such asTrueTeX
use TrueType versions of Computer Modern and Times Maths fonts to render TeX
documents in Windows without the need for additional system software like ATM.
(When used on a system running Windows XP orlater, TrueTeX can also use Adobe
Type 1fonts.)
When choosing fonts, your own system environment may not be the only one of
interest. If you will be sending your finished documents to others for further use, you
should consider whether a given font format will introduce compatibility problems.
Publishers may require TrueType exclusively because their systems are Windows-based,
or Type 1 exclusively, because their systems are based on the early popularity of that
format in the publishing industry. Many service bureaus don’t care as long as you
present them with a finishedprint file (PostScript or PDF) for their output device.
CM family collection: Distributed as part of
fonts/amsfonts
AMS font collection: Distributed as part of
fonts/amsfonts
Belleek
fonts:
fonts/belleek
URW Classico fonts:
fonts/urw/classico
CM-super
collection:
fonts/ps-type1/cm-super
eulervm.sty
and supporting metrics:
fonts/eulervm
fourier
(including metrics and other support for utopia:
fonts/fourier-GUT
fouriernc
:
fonts/fouriernc
garamondx
:
fonts/garamondx
hfbright
collection:
fonts/ps-type1/hfbright
hvmath
(free bitmapped version):
fonts/micropress/hvmath
kpfonts
family:
fonts/kpfonts
Libertine
family:
fonts/libertine
Lucida Bright/Math metrics
:
fonts/psfonts/bh/lucida
86
Lucida PSNFSS support
:
macros/latex/contrib/psnfssx/lucidabr
MathDesign
collection:
fonts/mathdesign
Maths Font Survey:
info/Free_Math_Font_Survey/en/survey.pdf
(PDF) or
info/Free_Math_Font_Survey/en/survey.html
(HTML)
MathTime Pro 2 Lite:
fonts/mtp2lite
Minion Pro support:
fonts/minionpro
MnSymbol
family:
fonts/mnsymbol
Newtx
fonts:
fonts/newtx
NimbusRomanNo9 fonts
: distributed in
fonts/urw/base35
Palladio fonts
: distributed in
fonts/urw/base35
pxfonts
:
fonts/pxfonts
sansmath.sty
:
macros/latex/contrib/sansmath
tmmath
(free bitmapped version):
fonts/micropress/tmmath
txfonts
:
fonts/txfonts
URW “35 fonts” collection:
fonts/urw/base35
utopia
fonts:
fonts/utopia
131 Unicode Maths using OpenType fonts
The ISO standard Universal Coding Scheme (UCS), which is commonly known as
Unicode, was adopted early by the designers of TrueType (TTF) and OpenType (OTF)
fonts. The flexibility of the fonts offers hope, for the first time, of a uniform method for
typesetting essentially any language.
TeX users have been eagerly adopting the fonts, for some time, using XeTeX (now a
rather stable system) and LuaTeX (which is, at thetime of writing, still being developed).
While TeX users were investigating the use of these text fonts, ISO was extending
Unicode to provide a means of expressing mathematics. As this work proceeded,
MicroSoft and (separately) a consortium of publishing companies were developing
OpenType maths fonts. (Microsoft contributed on the development of the concepts,
within the ISO process.) MicroSoft’s OpenType Maths font, Cambria Math has been
available for purchase for some time.
ThefirstfreeOpenTypeMaths fontto appear was Asana Math, which waseventually
followed by the publishers’ consortium’s offer of an interim version of their font, STIX,
which has beenredeveloped to provide a more usable whole, XITS, by a group of TeX
users.
Other fonts are appearing, including TeX Gyre Termes Math (based on Times-like
fonts) and TexGyre Pagella Math (based on Palatino-like fonts), and LM Math extending
the OpenType versionof the Latin Modern font family.
Actually using a unicode maths font is quite a complicated business, but the La-
TeX package unicode-math (supported by the fontspec package) does the essential
groundwork.
Asana-Math
font:
fonts/Asana-Math
fontspec.sty
:
macros/latex/contrib/fontspec
lm-math
fonts:
fonts/lm-math
STIX
fonts:
fonts/stix
unicode-math.sty
:
macros/latex/contrib/unicode-math
tex-gyre-math-pagella
font: distributed as part of
fonts/tex-gyre-math
tex-gyre-math-termes
font: distributed as part of
fonts/tex-gyre-math
XITS
fonts:
fonts/xits
87
132 Weird characters in dvips output
You’ve innocently generated output, using dvips, and there are weird transpositions in it:
for example, the
fi
ligature has appeared as a £ symbol. This is an unwanted side-effect
of the precautions outlined ingeneratingPostScriptforPDF. The
-G1
switch discussed
in that question is appropriate for Knuth’s text fonts, but doesn’t work with text fonts
that don’t follow Knuth’s patterns (such as fonts supplied byAdobe).
If the problem arises, suppress the
-G1
switch: if you were using it explicitly, don’t;
if you were using
-Ppdf
,add
-G0
to suppress the implicit switch in the pseudo-printer
file.
The problem has been corrected in dvips v 5.90 (and later versions); it is unlikely
ever to recur.. .
K.2 Macros for using fonts
133 Using non-standard fonts in Plain TeX
Plain TeX (in accordance with its description) doesn’t do anything fancy with fonts: it
sets up the fonts that Knuth found he needed when writing the package, and leaves you
to do the rest.
To use something other than Knuth’s default, you can use Knuth’s mechanism, the
\font
primitive:
\font\foo=nonstdfont
...
\foo
Text set using nonstdfont ...
The name you use (
nonstdfont
,above) is the name of the
.tfm
file for the font you
want.
If you want to use an italic version of
\foo
,you need to use
\font
again:
\font\fooi=nonstdfont-italic
...
\fooi
Text set using nonstdfont italic...
This is all very elementary stuff, and serves for simple use of fonts. However, there
are wrinkles, the most important of which is the matter offontencodings. One almost
never sees new fonts that use Knuth’s eccentric font encodings — but those encodings
are built into Plain TeX, so that some macros of Plain TeX need to be changed to use
the fonts. LaTeX gets around all these problems by using a “font selection scheme” —
this ‘NFSS’ (‘N’ for ‘new’, as opposed to what LaTeX2.09 had) carries around with
it separate information about the fonts you use, so the changes to encoding-specific
commands happen automagically.
If you only want to use theECfonts, you can in principle use the ec-plain bundle,
which gives you a version of Plain TeX which you can run in the same way thatyou run
Plain TeX using the original CM fonts, by invoking tex. (Ec-plain also extends the EC
fonts, for reasons which aren’t immediately clear, but which might cause problems if
you’re hoping to use Type 1 versions of the fonts.)
The font_selection package provides a sort of halfway house: it provides font face
and size, but not family selection. This gives you considerable freedom, but leaves you
stuck with the original CM fonts. It’s a compact solution, within its restrictions.
Other Plain TeX approaches to the problem (packages plnfss, fontch and ofs) break
out of the Plain TeX model, towards the sort of font selection provided by ConTeXt and
LaTeX — font selection that allows youto change family, as well as size and face. The
remaining packages all make provision for using encodings other than Knuth’s OT1.
Plnfss has a rather basic set of font family details; however, it is capable of using
font description (
.fd
)files created for LaTeX. (This is useful, since most modern
mechanisms for integrating outline fonts with TeX generate
.fd
files in their process.)
Fontch has special provisionfor T1 and TS1 encodings, which you select byarcane
commands, such as:
88
\let\LMTone\relax
\input fontch.tex
for T1.
Ofs seems to be the most thoroughly thought-through of the alternatives, and can
select more than one encoding: as well as T1 it covers the encoding IL2, which is
favoured in the Czech Republic and Slovakia. Ofs also covers mathematical fonts,
allowing you the dubious pleasure of using fonts such as thepxfontsandtxfonts.
The pdcmac Plain TeX macro package aims to be a complete document preparation
environment, likeEplain. One of its components is a font selection scheme, pdcfsel,
which is rather simple but adequately powerful for many uses. The package doesn’t
preload fonts: the user is required to declare the fonts the document is going to use,
and the package provides commands to select fonts as they’re needed. The distribution
includes a configuration to use Adobe ‘standard’ fonts for typesetting text. (Eplain itself
seems not to offer a font selection scheme.)
The font-change collection takes a rather different approach — it supplies what are
(in effect) a series of templates thatmay be included in a document to change font usage.
The package’s documentation shows the effect rather well.
Simply to change font size in a document (i.e., not changing the default font itself),
may be done using the rather straightforward varisize, which offers font sizes ranging
from 7 points to 20 points (nominal sizes, all). Font size commands are generatedwhen
any of the package files is loaded, so the
11pt.tex
defines a command
\elevenpoint
;
each of the files ensures there’s a “way back”, by defining a
\tenpoint
command.
ec-plain
:
macros/ec-plain
font-change
:
macros/plain/contrib/font-change
fontch
:
macros/plain/contrib/fontch
font_selection
:
macros/plain/contrib/font_selection
ofs
:
macros/generic/ofs
pdcmac
:
macros/plain/contrib/pdcmac
plnfss
:
macros/plain/plnfss
varisize
:
macros/plain/contrib/varisize
K.3 Particular font families
134 Using the “Concrete” fonts
The Concrete Roman fonts were designed by Don Knuth for a book called “Concrete
Mathematics”, which he wrote with Graham and Patashnik (the Patashnik, of BibTeX
fame). Knuth only designed text fonts, since the book used the Euler fonts for mathe-
matics. The book was typeset using Plain TeX, of course, with additional macros that
may be viewed in a file
gkpmac.tex
,which is available on CTAN.
The packages beton, concmath, and ccfonts are LaTeX packages that change the
default text fonts from Computer Modern toConcrete. Packages beton and ccfonts also
slightly increase the default value of
\baselineskip
to account for the rather heavier
weight of the Concrete fonts. If you wish to use the Euler fonts for mathematics, as
Knuth did, there’s the euler package which has been developed from Knuth’s own Plain
TeX-based set: these macros are currently deprecated (they clash with many things,
including AMSLaTeX). The independently-developed eulervm bundle is therefore
preferred to the euler package. (Note that installing the eulervm bundle involves
installing a series of virtual fonts. While most modern distributions seem to have the
requisite files installed by default, you may find you have to install them. If so, see the
file
readme
in the eulervm distribution.)
Afew years after Knuth’s original design, UlrikVieth designed the Concrete Math
fonts. Packagesconcmath, and ccfonts also change thedefaultmath fonts from Computer
Modern to Concrete and use the Concrete versions of the AMS fonts (this last behaviour
is optional in the case of the concmath package).
89
There are no bold Concrete fonts, but it is generally accepted that the Computer
Modern Sans Serif demibold condensed fonts are an adequate substitute. If you are
using concmath or ccfonts and you want to follow this suggestion, then use the package
with
boldsans
class option (in spite of the fact that the concmath documentation calls
it
sansbold
class option). If you are using beton, add
\renewcommand{\bfdefault}{sbc}
to the preamble of your document.
Type 1 versions of the fonts are available. For OT1 encoding, they are available
fromMicroPress. TheCM-SuperfontscontainType 1 versions of the Concrete fonts in
T1 encoding.
beton.sty
:
macros/latex/contrib/beton
ccfonts.sty
:
macros/latex/contrib/ccfonts
CM-Super fonts:
fonts/ps-type1/cm-super
concmath.sty
:
macros/latex/contrib/concmath
Concmath fonts:
fonts/concmath
Concrete fonts:
fonts/concrete
euler.sty
:
macros/latex/contrib/euler
eulervm
bundle:
fonts/eulervm
gkpmac.tex
:
systems/knuth/local/lib/gkpmac.tex
135 Using the Latin Modern fonts
The lm fonts are an exciting addition to the armoury of the (La)TeX user: high quality
outlines of fonts that were until recently difficult to obtain, all in a free and relatively
compact package. However, the spartan information file that comes with the fonts
remarks “Itis presumed that a potentialuser knows what to do with all these files”. This
answer aims to fill in the requirements: the job is really not terribly difficult.
Note that teTeX distributions, from version 3.0, already have the lm fonts: all you
need do is use them. The fonts may also be installed via the package manager, in a
current MiKTeX system. The remainder of this answer, then, is for people who don’t
use such systems.
The font (and related) files appear on CTAN as a set of single-entryTDStrees
fonts
,
dvips
,
tex
and
doc
.The
doc
subtree really need not be copied (it’s really a
pair of sample files), but copy the other three into your existing Local
$TEXMF
tree, and
update the filename database.
Now, incorporatethe fontsin thesetsearched by PDFLaTeX,dvips, dvipdfm/dvipdfmx,
your previewers and Type 1-to-PK conversion programs, by
• OnateTeXsystemearlierthanversion2.0,editthefile
$TEXMF/dvips/config/
updmap
and insert an absolute path for the
lm.map
just after the line that starts
extra_modules="
(and before the closing quotes).
• On a teTeX version 2.0 (or later), execute the command
updmap --enable Map lm.map
• OnaMiKTeXsystemearlierthanversion2.2,the“Refreshfilenamedatabase”
operation, which you performed after installing files, also updates the system’s
“PostScript resources database”.
• OnaMiKTeXsystem,version2.2orlater,update
updmap.cfg
as described in the
MiKTeXonlinedocumentation. Then execute the command
initexmf --mkmaps
,
and the job is done.
To use the fonts in a LaTeX document, you should
\usepackage{lmodern}
this will make the fonts the default for all three LaTeX font families (“roman”, “sans-
serif” and “typewriter”). You also need
90
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested