how to open pdf file on button click in mvc : Embed pdf into webpage software control project winforms azure windows UWP LFJ_FINAL2-part796

Introduction
One day about three years ago, I happened to be reading a news
story on AOL about the Ten Commandments monument in the Alaba-
ma courthouse. Having a little time to kill, I decided to click on the link
to a message board about the story. Little did I know when I clicked on
that link that I was about to discover a whole new version of American
history, or that six months later I’d be writing a book about it. 
Once I got to the message board, I couldn’t resist the urge to
respond to a few of the posts, many of which were defending the Ten
Commandments monument by copying and pasting lies from what I
soon found out were literally thousands of Christian American histo-
ry websites. At first, my responses were short – nothing more than
correcting a misquote or briefly explaining why something couldn’t be
true. It soon became apparent, however, that these brief rebuttals
were not working. I was usually accused of being a liar, and occasion-
ally accused of being the antichrist. So, I began taking a little time to
look things up, and started posting longer, more detailed rebuttals,
complete with footnotes. Before long, other people who were battling
the lies began emailing me posts from the both the Ten Command-
ments board and other boards, asking me whether or not they were
true.  Apparently, they had gotten the impression from my posts that
I was some sort of expert on the subject. I wasn’t, but I did know
enough about history to be able to answer many of these emails, or at
least to tell the people where they could find the information to dis-
prove whatever lie they were trying to disprove. Between posting my
xiii
Embed pdf into webpage - Library SDK class:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
www.rasteredge.com
Embed pdf into webpage - Library SDK class:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
www.rasteredge.com
own messages on the boards and answering emails, what had begun
as a click on a link to kill a few minutes soon became something I was
spending several hours a day on.
From time to time over the next few months, someone would
respond to one of my posts by saying that I should write a book. While
I appreciated the compliment, I didn’t take the idea very seriously – at
least not at first. For one thing, I was was sure that there must already
be plenty of books on the subject, written by people far more qualified
than I was to write about it. When I tried to find such a book, however,
I couldn’t. I found a few books that refuted the lies to a certain degree,
but none providing the amount of information I was including in my
message board posts. At this point, the idea of writing a book was start-
ing to seem a little less crazy. When I mentioned the idea to a few of my
real life friends, I was surprised to find that they didn’t think it was
crazy at all. So, never having written anything before, and having no
particular qualifications to write a history book, I started writing a his-
tory book.
My first step was to read a few of the most popular religious right
history books and compile a list of all the lies. So far, all I had seen
were the various versions of the lies from the internet. People on the
message boards, however, much more familiar than I was with the
sources of these lies, told me which books to buy. These books led me
to other books and other lies, which led me to even more books and
even more lies. I found so many lies, in fact, that I soon realized that
they weren’t all going to fit one book without omitting some of the
information that I felt was necessary to thoroughly explain and dis-
prove them. So, I decided to write not just one book, but two – the
first focusing mainly on the founding era, up until around the 1830s,
and the second covering the rest of the nineteenth and the early
twentieth century. Because most of the lies in the religious right his-
tory books are about the founding era, however, the first volume
began to get too long, and I was once again faced with the decision of
leaving stuff out, or including everything and splitting it up. Since my
goal from the beginning was to write a book that left no stone unturned,
and provided as much information as possible, I decided to split the
first volume into two volumes. This book, therefore, is the first of
what will eventually be three volumes.
For those already familiar with the religious right version of Amer-
xiv
LIARS FOR JESUS
ican history, my choice of topics for the first volume might seem a lit-
tle odd. If I had planned from the start to divide this into two volumes,
I would have put a few more of the most often lied about subjects in
the first volume. By the time I decided to split the volume up, how-
ever, it was too late to change the chapter order. A number of things
in the later chapters rely on information provided in earlier chapters,
so this would have required rewriting large sections of certain chap-
ters. So, this volume contains the first thirteen chapters, and the sec-
ond volume will contain the second thirteen. Since most of the
second volume is already written, its chapter titles, which are unlike-
ly to change, can be listed here.
1. George Washington and Gouverneur Morris
2. Were Half of the Founders Really Ministers?
3. Days of Prayer, Fasting, and Thanksgiving
4. Did James Madison Really Oppose the Bill of Rights?
5. Putting the Founders on Pedestals
6. Thomas Jefferson and the Laws of Virginia
7. Mr. Jefferson’s Bible
8. Tocqueville’s Democracy in America 
9. Sabbath and Blasphemy Laws
10. Toleration vs. Religious Freedom
11. James Madison and the General Assessment
12. Religious Tests and Oaths
13. Thomas Jefferson and the Danbury Baptists
It is my sincere hope that this book, and the two to follow, will be
useful to those already aware of and fighting the religious right’s revi-
sionism of American history, and, even more importantly, that it will
inform those who are unaware, as I was three years ago, of the dan-
gerous extent to which this revisionism has spread.
Chris Rodda
INTRODUCTION
xv
— CHAPTER ONE —
Congress and the Bible
Myths regarding the printing, financing, distribution, or recommend-
ing of Bibles by our early Congresses are among the most popular of
all the religious right American history lies. Most are variations of the
same three stories – two involving the Continental Congress, and one
an act signed by James Madison.
The first is the story of the Continental Congress importing Bibles
in 1777. 
According to William Federer, in his book America’s
God and Country Encyclopedia of Quotations:
“Continental Congress September 11, 1777, approved
and recommended to the people that 20,000 copies
of The Holy Bible be imported from other sources.
This was in response to the shortage of Bibles in
America caused by the Revolutionary War interrupt-
ing trade with England. The Chaplain of Congress,
Patrick Allison, brought the matter to the attention of
Congress, who assigned it to a special Congressional
Committee, which reported:
That the use of the Bible is so universal and
its importance so great that your committee
refers the above to the consideration of
Congress, and if Congress shall not think it
1
expedient to order the importation of types
and paper, the Committee recommends that
Congress will order the Committee of Com-
merce to import 20,000 Bibles from Holland,
Scotland, or elsewhere, into the different parts
of the States in the Union.
Whereupon it was resolved accordingly to
direct said Committee of Commerce to import
20,000 copies of the Bible.”
While most versions of this story are similar to William Federer’s,
some authors turn it into a completely different story.
According to Tim LaHaye, in his book Faith of Our
Founding Fathers:“The Bible, the greatest book ever
written, is indispensable to Christianity. That fact was
clear in the very first act of Congress, authorizing the
printing of twenty thousand Bibles for the Indians.”
It also appears in various lists of lies circulated by email, and
eventually copied onto hundreds of websites.
From History Forgotten, , the most widely circulated
of the internet lists: “Did you know that 52 of the 55
signers of the Declaration of Independence were
orthodox, deeply committed, Christians? The other
three allbelieved in the Bible as the divine truth, the
God of Scripture, and His personal intervention. It is
the same Congress that formed the American Bible
Society.
1
Immediately after creating the Declaration of
Independence, the Continental Congress voted to pur-
2
LIARS FOR JESUS
1.The American Bible Society, which did not exist until 1816, was not formed by the
Continental or any later Congress, nor did it have Thomas Jefferson as its first chairman, an
addition made to the History Forgotten list as it was circulated. It should be noted that a hand-
ful of those copying the list have corrected one of its many inaccuracies, changing “55 signers
of the Declaration of Independence”to the correct number, fifty-six. Apparently, there are a few
Liars for Jesus out there who find it important to be accurate about the number of people they
are lying about.
chaseand import 20,000 copies of Scripture for the
people of this nation.” 
William Federer’s version of the 1777 Bible story is typical of
those found in the majority of religious right American history books.
It tells half of the real story, includes a quote from an actual commit-
tee report, but ends with a fabricated resolution. The resolution is
created to change the outcome of the story from Congress dropping
the matter, which is what really happened, to Congress proceeding to
import the Bibles. Tim LaHaye’s version, that Congress printed Bibles
for the Indians, has absolutely no basis in fact. But, as drastically dif-
ferent as their stories are, both Federer and LaHaye cite the same
pages from the Journals of the Continental Congressas their source.
In addition to changing the outcome of the story, none of the reli-
gious right American history books fully explain why Congress was
considering importing the Bibles in the first place. Most mention that
the war with England caused a shortage of Bibles, which is true, but
this is only half the story. Congress’s consideration of the matter had
to do with the prevention of price gouging.
Not all Americans during the Revolutionary War were the virtu-
ous, Christian citizens portrayed in the religious right version of
American history. Many were taking advantage of war shortages and
charging outrageous prices for just about anything they could get
their hands on. No product was safe – not even Bibles. The wide-
spread problem of price gouging prompted numerous attempts by
individual states, groups of states, and Congress to regulate prices,
none of which were very successful. With less than half the country
in favor of the war to begin with, Congress was very concerned with
minimizing hardships like high prices and shortages of items previ-
ously imported from England.
In 1777, three ministers from Philadelphia, Francis Alison, John
Ewing, and William Marshall, came up with a plan to alleviate the
Bible shortage. Their idea was to import the necessary type and
paper, and print an edition in Philadelphia. The problem with this
plan, however, was that, if the project was financed and controlled by
private companies, the Bibles would most likely be bought up and
resold at prices that the average American couldn’t afford. 
Rev. Alison wrote a memorial to Congress, explaining the dilem-
CONGRESS AND THE BIBLE
3
ma and asking for help. What the ministers wanted Congress to do
was finance the printing, as a loan to be repaid by the sale of the
Bibles. As Rev. Alison explained in the memorial, if Congress import-
ed the type and paper, and Congress contracted the printer, then
Congress could regulate the selling price of the Bibles.
We therefore think it our duty to our country and to the
churches of Christ to lay this danger before this honourable
house, humbly requesting that under your care, and by your
encouragement, a copy of the holy Bible may be printed, so
as to be sold nearly as cheap as the common Bibles, for-
merly imported from Britain and Ireland, were sold.
The number of purchasers is so great, that we doubt not but
a large impression would soon be sold, But unless the sale
of the whole edition belong to the printer, and he be bound
under sufficient penalties, that no copy be sold by him, nor
by any retailer under him, at a higher price than that allowed
by this honourable house, we fear that the whole impression
would soon be bought up, and sold again at an exorbitant
price, which would frustrate your pious endeavours and fill
the country with just complaints.2
Rev. Alison’s memorial was referred to a committee, who conclud-
edthat it would be too costly to import the type and paper, and too
risky to import them into Philadelphia, a city likely to be invaded by
the British. The committee proposed the less risky alternative of
importing already printed Bibles into different ports from a country
other than England. If Congress did this, they would still be able to
regulate the selling price, and would still be reimbursed by the sales.
The report of this committee is cited by every religious right American
history author as their source, whatever their version of this story,
including Tim LaHaye, with his tale of Congress printing the Bibles for
the Indians.
The committee’s report is misquoted in various ways. Usually
omitted is anything indicating that importing the Bibles was proposed
4
LIARS FOR JESUS
2. Papers of the Continental Congress,National Archives Microfilm Publication M247, r53,
i42, v1, p35.
as an alternative to Rev. Alison’s original request that Congress import
the type and paper. Always omitted is that what Congress was con-
sidering was only a loan. With these omissions, no real explanation for
Congress’s involvement is necessary. The committee’s report appears
to fit the story that the ministers simply alerted Congress to the
shortage of Bibles, and Congress considered this to be such a serious
problem that they immediately imported some. 
In his book Original Intent, David Barton quotes only
the following pieces of one sentence from the com-
mittee’s report:  
“[T]hat the use of the Bible is so universal
and its importance so great...your committee
recommend that Congress will order the
Committee of Commerce to import 20,000
Bibles from Holland, Scotland, or elsewhere,
into the different ports of the States in the
Union.” 
The following is the entire report, as it appears in the Journals of
the Continental Congress.
The committee appointed to consider the memorial of the
Rev. Dr. Allison and others, report, “That they have conferred
fully with the printers, &c. in this city, and are of opinion, that
the proper types for printing the Bible are not to be had in
this country, and that the paper cannot be procured, but with
such difficulties and subject to such casualties, as render
any dependence on it altogether improper: that to import
types for the purpose of setting up an entire edition of the
bible, and to strike off 30,000 copies, with paper, binding,
&c. will cost £10,272 10, which must be advanced by
Congress, to be reimbursed by the sale of the books:”
“That, your committee are of opinion, considerable difficulties
will attend the procuring the types and paper; that, afterwards,
the risque of importing them will considerably enhance the
CONGRESS AND THE BIBLE
5
cost, and that the calculations are subject to such uncertain-
ty in the present state of affairs, that Congress cannot much
rely on them: that the use of the Bible is so universal, and its
importance so great, that your committee refer the above to
the consideration of Congress, and if Congress shall not
think it expedient to order the importation of types and
paper, your committee recommend that Congress will order
the Committee of Commerce to import 20,000 Bibles from
Holland, Scotland, or elsewhere, into the different ports of
the states in the Union.”3
Prior to considering the alternative of importing Bibles, the com-
mittee did two things. They had several Philadelphia printers submit
quotes for printing the Bibles, and drafted a list of fifteen proposed
regulations for their printing. The third through the seventh of these
regulations dealt with the arrangement to be made between Congress
and the printer, and clearly show that Congress intended to be reim-
bursed, and that the goal of the plan was to regulate the selling price
of the Bibles.
3. That as there are not Types in America to answer this
Purpose, there should be a compleat Font, sufficient for set-
ting the whole Bible at once, imported by Congress at the
Public Expence, to be refunded in a stipulated Time by the
Printer.
4. That in Order to prevent the Paper Makers from demand-
ing an extravagant Price for the Paper, and retarding the
Work by Breach of Contract or otherwise there should also
be imported with the Types a few Reams of Paper, not
exceeding a thousand, at the Beginning of the Work, to be
paid for by the Printer in y
e
same Manner as y
e
Types are to
be paid for.
5. That a Printer be employed, who shall undertake the Work
at his own Risque & Expence, giving a Mortgage on y
e
Font
6
LIARS FOR JESUS
3. Worthington C. Ford, ed., Journals of the Continental Congress, 1774-1789, vol. 8,
(Washington D.C.: Government Printing Office,1907), 733-734.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested