how to open pdf file on button click in mvc : Convert pdf to html form software application dll winforms windows html web forms LFJ_FINAL3-part810

& Printing Materials, with sufficient Personal Securities for his
Fidelity, until the first Cost of y
e
Font, y
e
Paper, & such Sums
of Money as the Congress may think proper to advance to
him for Dispatch of the Work, be refunded to the Public.
6. That in Order to render the Price of Binding as low as pos-
sible,  the  Congress  order  their  Commissary  General  for
Hides etc to deliver to the Printer at a moderate Price all the
Sheep  Skins  furnished  at ye Camp, to  be tanned for this
Purpose.
7. That the Printer be bound under sufficient Penalties to fur-
nish Bibles to y
e
Public at a limited Price, not exceeding ten
Shillings each, & to prevent any Retailer, under him in the
United States from asking an higher price on any Pretence
whatsoever.
4
What appears in the Journals of the Continental Congress after
the committee’s report is the following motion. 
Whereupon, the Congress was moved, to order the Com-
mittee of Commerce to import twenty thousand copies of the
Bible.5
The  problem for  the religious right authors who claim that  the
Bibles were imported is that, although this motion passed, it was not
a final vote to import the Bibles. It was a merely a vote on replacing
the original plan of importing the type and paper with the committee’s
proposal  of  importing  already  printed Bibles.  In other  words,  they
were only voting on what they were going to be voting on. The vote
on the motion was close – seven states voted yes; six voted no. A sec-
ond motion was then made to pass a resolution to import the Bibles,
but this was postponed and never brought up again. No Bibles were
imported. This little problem is solved in the religious right history
CONGRESS AND THE BIBLE
7
4. Studies in Bibliography, Vol. 3, (Charlottesville, VA: University Press of Virginia, 1950-
1951), 275-276.
5. Worthington  C.  Ford,  ed.,  Journals  of  the  Continental  Congress, 1774-1789, vol.  8,
(Washington D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1907), 734.
Convert pdf to html form - software application dll:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to html form - software application dll:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
www.rasteredge.com
books by either rewording the motion to turn it into a resolution, or
omitting the motion altogether and ending the story with some state-
ment implying that the Bibles were imported.
In William Federer’s version, the motion is reworded:
“Whereupon it was resolved accordingly to direct said
Committee of Commerce to import 20,000 copies of
the Bible.”
David Barton ends his version of the story with the
following statement:  “Congress agreed and ordered
the Bibles imported.”
The Religion and the Founding of the American Republic Exhibit
on the Library of Congress website presents this story in as mislead-
ing a manner as Federer or Barton, also giving the impression that the
Bibles were imported. It is only in the companion book to the exhib-
it, published at the time of the physical exhibit at the Library in 1998,
that James H. Hutson, Chief of the Manuscript Division at the Library
of Congress, and curator of the exhibit, bothers to mention that the
Bibles were never imported. Of course, far more people will visit the
exhibit on the website than will ever see the book, which is no longer
even available.
The following is all that appears on the  Library of
Congress website version of the exhibit: “The war with
Britain cut off the supply of Bibles to the United States
with  the  result  that  on  Sept.  11,  1777,  Congress
instructed  its  Committee  of  Commerce  to  import
20,000 Bibles from “Scotland, Holland or elsewhere.” 
This is  what appears  in  the  companion  book:  “An
unfailing antidote to immorality was Bible  reading.
Hostilities, however,  had  interrupted  the  supply of
Bibles from Great Britain, raising fears of a shortage
of  Scripture  just  when it was needed most. in the
summer of 1777, three Presbyterian ministers warned
Congress of this danger and urged it to arrange for a
8
LIARS FOR JESUS
software application dll:VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in
RasterEdge .NET PDF SDK is such one provide various of form field edit functions. Demo Code to Retrieve All Form Fields from a PDF File in VB.NET.
www.rasteredge.com
software application dll:C# PDF Form Data Read Library: extract form data from PDF in C#.
A best PDF document SDK library enable users abilities to read and extract PDF form data in Visual C#.NET WinForm and ASP.NET WebForm applications.
www.rasteredge.com
domestic printing of the Bible. Upon investigation, a
committee of Congress discovered that it would be
cheaper to import Bibles from continental Europe and
made such a recommendation to the full Congress on
September 11, 1777. Congress approved the recom-
mendation on the same day, instructing its Committee
of Commerce to import twenty thousand Bibles from
‘Scotland, Holland or elsewhere’ but adjourned—the
British  were  poised  to  take  Philadelphia—without
passing implementing legislation.”
The problem with using the approach of the British as the reason
that Congress never got around to the Bible resolution is that this was
postponed a week before Congress knew the invasion of Philadelphia
was  imminent.  The  letters  of  the  delegates  from  this  week  clearly
show that they were cautiously optimistic. They heard that Howe’s
army had sustained three times the casualties of Washington’s troops
in the Battle of Brandywine, and that two days later the British were
still at the battlefield dealing with their wounded, a delay that might
allow reinforcements  to arrive from  New Jersey in time  to prevent
Howe from reaching Philadelphia. 
On September 11, the day of the battle, and also the day the Bible
motion was voted on, the resolution was postponed until September
13.  On  September  13,  the  Congress  was  still  in  Philadelphia,  and
determined to stay there. It wasn’t until the evening of September 18
that  they  received  the  letter  from  Washington’s  aide,  Alexander
Hamilton, advising them to leave. Other than deciding on September
14 that, if it did become necessary to evacuate, they would reassem-
ble  in Lancaster,  it  was business as usual in Philadelphia  until  the
receipt of Hamilton’s letter.
Hutson’s claim that the Bible resolution was dropped because of
the British is an easy one to get away with because of the language
used at the time to designate an upcoming day. When the Continental
Congress, on a Thursday, postponed something until “Saturday next,”
they meant in two days, not a week from Saturday. The Bible resolu-
tion was only postponed from Thursday, September 11 to Saturday,
September 13. It was not postponed until September 20, the Saturday
that would fit Hutson’s story. 
CONGRESS AND THE BIBLE
9
software application dll:VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
C#: Convert PDF to HTML; C#: Convert PDF to Jpeg; C# File C# Protect: Add Password to PDF; C# Form: extract value from fields; C# Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing.
www.rasteredge.com
software application dll:C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
C# PDF - Convert PDF to JPEG in C#.NET. C#.NET PDF to JPEG Converting & Conversion Control. Convert PDF to JPEG Using C#.NET. Add necessary references:
www.rasteredge.com
The British  approaching excuse  also  makes no  sense  for  a  few
other reasons. The first is that the whole point of changing the plan
from  printing Bibles in  Philadelphia to  importing  Bibles  into other
ports was that Philadelphia was likely to be invaded. Congress didn’t
just  permanently  drop other  business, even after  they  actually  did
move,  so why  didn’t they  just vote to import the  Bibles into  these
other ports after they moved? The second is that Congress never took
up the issue at any later date. The Bible shortage still existed – a year
later, two years later – yet, the issue of Bibles didn’t even come up
again  until over three  years  later, when James  McLene,  a  delegate
from Pennsylvania, proposed a resolution to regulate the printing of
Bibles in the individual states.
According to James H. Hutson, in the Religion and the
Founding of the American Republic companion book:
“The issue  of the  Bible  supply was  raised  again in
Congress in 1780 when it was moved that the states be
requested ‘to procure one or more new and correct
editions of the old and new testament to be published.’”
The following was McLene’s entire resolution.
Resolved, That it be  recommended to such of the States
who may think it convenient for them that they take proper
measures to procure one or more new and correct editions
of the old and new testament to be printed and that such
states regulate their printers by law so as to secure effectu-
ally the said books from being misprinted.
6
The timing of McLene’s proposal makes it next to impossible that
it wasn’t prompted by the fact that Philadelphia printer Robert Aitken
had begun work on an edition of the Bible. But, it wouldn’t have been
Aitken’s edition that McLene feared would be misprinted. Aitken was
 reputable  printer  who  had  not  only  been  the  official  printer  to
Congress until 1779, but had already printed several good editions of
the New Testament. The potential problem was that, if Aitken’s Bibles
10
LIARS FOR JESUS
6. Gaillard Hunt, ed., Journals of the Continental Congress, 1774-1789, vol. 18, (Washington
D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1910), 979.
software application dll:VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF to MS Office Word in VB.NET. VB.NET Tutorial for How to Convert PDF to Word (.docx) Document in VB.NET. Best
www.rasteredge.com
software application dll:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF to TIFF Using VB in VB.NET. Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF in Visual Basic Class.
www.rasteredge.com
sold well,  any number  of not so  reputable  and less skilled printers
would try to get a piece of the action by rushing to produce their own
editions, with little regard to their accuracy. There is also a pretty
good  chance  that McLene, along with John  Hanson, who seconded
McLene’s motion, wanted to give their friend Robert Aitken an edge
in the Bible printing business by making it more difficult for anyone
else to print a competing edition.
What’s interesting about McLene’s resolution, however, isn’t why
he proposed it, but its unusual wording. This wording may actually
provide  the  explanation  for  the  unexplained  disappearance  of  the
1777 Bible resolution. Resolutions of the Continental Congress were
almost always addressed to all of the states. The only exceptions to
this were resolutions that for some reason wouldn’t apply to all of the
states, such as a request to supply the army with a commodity that
was only produced in certain states. In these cases, the states that the
resolution applied  to were  listed  by  name.  Resolutions were never
addressed only to the states that might “think it convenient.” This
odd wording, as well as Congress dropping the plan to import Bibles
three years earlier, may have resulted from a question of states’ rights,
specifically the freedom of the press.
When the committee on the memorial of Rev. Alison drafted their
proposed  regulations for printing  Bibles in 1777, they included the
following two regulations designed to eliminate competition and ensure
that the printer would sell enough of the Bibles to reimburse Congress. 
14. That the Printer employed in the Work devote himself to
this Business alone; &  that no other Printer in the united
States be suffered to interfere with him in the Printing of that
Form or Kind of a Bible, which he has undertaken.
15. That after the Bible is published, no more Bibles of that
Kind be imported into the American States by any Person
whatsoever.
7
In 1777, when Congress was considering the Bible supply problem,
they were also in the middle of writing the Articles of Confederation.
CONGRESS AND THE BIBLE
11
7. Studies in Bibliography, Vol. 3, (Charlottesville, VA: University Press of Virginia, 1950-
1951), 276.
software application dll:C# PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in C#.net, ASP
PDFDocument pdf = new PDFDocument(@"C:\input.pdf"); pdf.ConvertToVectorImages( ContextType.SVG, @"C:\demoOutput Description: Convert to html/svg files and
www.rasteredge.com
software application dll:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to TIFF in C#.NET. Online C# Tutorial for How to Convert PDF File to Tiff Image File with .NET XDoc.PDF Control in C#.NET Class.
www.rasteredge.com
At this time, the question of how much authority Congress should have
over the states would certainly have been on the minds of all the del-
egates. Most of them would have seen any regulation giving Congress
any power over the freedom of the press in their states as setting a
dangerous  precedent.  Regulation number fourteen, prohibiting any
printer in America from printing a similar edition of the Bible, would
make Congress no better than the British government, which prohib-
ited the printing of the Bible without a government license. 
Because the proposed regulations were for the printing of Bibles,
but the motion was to import them, it’s pretty likely that these regu-
lations  were  simply  disregarded  until  it  occurred  to  someone  that
even if the Bibles were imported, the regulations to ensure their sale
would  still  be  necessary.  This could easily  have happened at some
point in the two days following the vote on the motion. If even one of
the seven states that voted in favor of the motion decided that the
freedom of the press was more important than importing Bibles, and
made it known that they were going to vote the other way on the res-
olution, there would have been little point in proceeding.  
The only logical explanation for McLene limiting his 1780 resolu-
tion to the states that might “think it convenient” is that he already
knew a resolution suggesting that any state whose constitution guar-
anteed freedom of the press should pass a law infringing on this right
wouldn’t stand a chance, and the only time that such a suggestion had
been made prior to this was in the regulations proposed in 1777.
The second of the top three myths about Congress and the Bible
involves the edition of the Bible begun by Robert Aitken in 1780, and
completed in 1782.
According to William Federer, in his book America’s
God and Country: “Robert Aitken (1734-1802), on
January 21, 1781, as publisher of The Pennsylvania
Magazine, petitioned  Congress  for  permission  to
print Bibles, since there was a shortage of Bibles in
America due to the Revolutionary War interrupting
trade  with  England.  The  Continental  Congress,
September 10, 1782, in response to the shortage of
Bibles,  approved  and  recommended  to  the  people
that The Holy Bible be printed by Robert Aitken of
12
LIARS FOR JESUS
Philadelphia. This first American Bible was to be ‘a
neat  edition  of  the  Holy  Scriptures  for  the  use  of
schools’:
Whereupon, Resolved, That the United States
in Congress assembled...recommend this edi-
tion  of  the  Bible  to  the  inhabitants  of  the
United States, and hereby authorize [Robert
Aitken] to publish this recommendation in any
manner he shall think proper.”
Elsewhere in the same book, Federer includes a second version of
the story, in which Aitken was “contracted” by Congress to print his
Bibles.
According to Federer: “Congress of the Confederation
September  10,  1782,  in  response  to  the  need  for
Bibles which again arose, granted approval to print ‘a
neat  edition  of  the  Holy  Scriptures  for  the  use  of
schools.’  The  printing  was  contracted  to  Robert
Aitken of Philadelphia, a bookseller and publisher of
The  Pennsylvania  Magazine, who  had  previously
petitioned Congress on January 21, 1781.”
There are many versions of this story floating around, all worded
to mislead that Congress either requested the printing of the Bibles,
granted  Aitken  permission  to  print  them,  contracted  him  to  print
them,  paid  for  the  printing,  or  had  Bibles  printed  for  the  use  of
schools. Congress did none of these things. All they did was grant one
of several requests made by Aitken by having their chaplains exam-
ine his work, and allowing him to publish their resolution stating that,
based on the chaplains’ report, they were satisfied that his edition was
accurate. The words “a neat edition of the Holy Scriptures for the use
of schools” are taken from a letter written by Aitken,
8
not the resolu-
tion of Congress. 
The actual resolution is edited in various ways. The purpose of
CONGRESS AND THE BIBLE
13
8. Papers of the Continental Congress, National Archives Microfilm Publication M247, r48,
i41, v1, p63.
this editing is to omit that Congress also had a secular reason for
recommending Aitken’s Bible, and, in most cases, to turn the resolution
into a recommendation of the Bible itself, rather than a recommen-
dation of the accuracy of Aitken’s work.
This is the typical, and often copied, version of the
resolution that appears on James H. Hutson’s religion
exhibit on the Library of Congress website: “Congress
‘highly approve the pious and laudable undertaking
of Mr. Aitken, as subservient to the interest of reli-
gion...in this country, and...they recommend this edi-
tion  of  the  Bible  to  the  inhabitants  of  the  United
States.’”
The following is the entire resolution.
Whereupon, Resolved, That the United States in Congress
assembled, highly approve the pious and laudable under-
taking of Mr. Aitken, as subservient to the interest of religion
as well as an instance of the progress of arts in this country,
and being satisfied from the above report, of his care and
accuracy in the execution of the work, they recommend this
edition of the Bible to the inhabitants of the United States,
and hereby authorise him to publish this recommendation in
the manner he shall think proper.
9
Aitken actually asked Congress for quite a bit more than they gave
him. In addition to his work being examined by the chaplains, Aitken
requested  that  his  Bible  “be  published  under  the  Authority  of
Congress,”
10
and that he “be commissioned or otherwise appointed
& Authorized to print and vend Editions of the Sacred Scriptures.”
11
He also asked Congress to purchase some of his Bibles and distribute
them to the states. Congress did not grant any of these other requests.
The only help Aitken ever got from Congress was the resolution endors-
14
LIARS FOR JESUS
9. Gaillard Hunt, ed., Journals of the Continental Congress, 1774-1789, vol. 23, (Washington
D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1914), 574.
10. Papers of the Continental Congress, National Archives Microfilm Publication M247, r48,
i41, v1, p63.
11. ibid.
ing the accuracy of his work.
The secular benefit of this resolution, omitted by Hutson and oth-
ers, was that it acknowledged “an instance of the progress of arts in
this country.” Publicizing the accuracy of this Bible was a great way
for Congress to promote the American printing industry. 
Few  American  printers  at this  time were  printing books.  Most
limited  their businesses  to  broadsides,  pamphlets,  and  newspapers.
The books that were printed in America were not only more expensive
than those imported from England, but had a reputation for being full
of errors. Congress knew that as soon as the war was over and books
could once again be imported, any progress that the book shortage had
caused in the printing industry would end. The war had created an
opportunity  for American  printers to  prove  themselves,  and Robert
Aitken had done that. Printing an accurate edition of a book as large
as  the Bible  was a  monumental task for any printer, and  Congress
wanted it known that an American printer had accomplished it. But,
by omitting the part of the resolution acknowledging this “instance of
the progress of arts,” it is easily made to appear that Congress passed
this resolution for the sole purpose of promoting religion.
In 1968,  the American Bible Society published a reprint of the
Aitken Bible. Appearing in the center of the title page of this reprint,
in very large type, are the words “As Printed by Robert Aitken and
Approved & Recommended by the Congress of the United States of
America in  1782.” Although this page  was added  by the American
Bible Society, it is quoted on many websites as the title page of the
original. The first few pages of Aitken’s Bible contained the resolution
of Congress, the letter from the committee to the chaplains request-
ing that they examine the edition for accuracy, and the report of the
chaplains. 
The  following  is  the  committee’s  letter  to  the  chaplains,  as  it
appears in the Journals of the Continental Congress.
Rev. Gentlemen, Our knowledge  of your piety  and  public
spirit leads us without apology to recommend to your par-
ticular attention the edition of the holy scriptures publishing
by Mr. Aitken. He undertook this expensive work at a time,
when from the circumstances of the war, an English edition
of the Bible could not be imported, nor any opinion formed
CONGRESS AND THE BIBLE
15
how long the obstruction might continue. On this account
particularly he deserves applause and encouragement. We
therefore wish you, reverend gentlemen, to examine the exe-
cution of the work, and if approved, to give it the sanction of
your judgment, and the weight of your recommendation. We
are with very great respect, your most obedient humble ser-
vants.12
The chaplains, Rev. Dr. White and Rev. Mr. Duffield, reported back
to the committee:
Gentlemen, Agreeably to your desire, we have paid attention
to Mr. Robert Aitken’s impression of the holy scriptures, of
the old and new testament. Having selected and examined a
variety of passages throughout the work, we are of opinion,
that it is executed with great accuracy as to the sense, and
with as few grammatical and typographical errors as could
be expected in an undertaking of such magnitude. Being
ourselves witnesses of the demand for this invaluable book,
we rejoice in the present prospect of a supply, hoping that it
will prove as advantageous as it is honorable to the gentle-
man, who has exerted himself to furnish it at the evident risk
of private fortune. We are, gentlemen, your very respectful
and humble servants.13
On many Christian American history websites, and in a handful
of  books,  the  Aitken  Bible  is called “The Bible  of  the Revolution,”
implying that this was what the Bible was called at the time it was
published.  In  reality,  however,  this  title  was  invented  much  later,
when individual Aitken Bible leaves were packaged for sale.
According to Mark Beliles and Stephen McDowell in
their book America’s Providential History: “In 1782,
Congress acted the role of a Bible society by officially
approving the printing and distribution of the ‘Bible
16
LIARS FOR JESUS
12. Gaillard Hunt, ed., Journals of the Continental Congress, 1774-1789, vol. 23, (Washington
D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1914), 573.
13. ibid.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested