Jefferson assured Rev. Moore that his opinion in favor of a general
suffrage had never changed, and explained that he had not been in Vir-
ginia in 1776 when the state’s constitution was written and adopted. 
The times are certainly such as to justify anxiety on the sub-
ject of political principles, & particularly those of the public
servants. I have been so long on the public theatres that I
supposed mine to be generally known. I make no secret of
them: on the contrary I wish them known to avoid the impu-
tation of those which are not mine. You may remember per-
haps that in the year 1783. after the close of the war there
was a general idea that a convention would be called in this
state to form a constitution. In that expectation I then pre-
pared a scheme of constitution which I meant to have pro-
posed. This is bound up at the end of the Notes on Virginia,
which being in many hands, I may venture to refer to it as
giving a general view of my principles of government. It par-
ticularly shews what I think on the question of the right of
electing & being elected, which is principally the subject of
your letter. I found it there on a year’s residence in the coun-
try; or the possession of property in it, or a year’s enrollment
in it’s militia. When the constitution of Virginia was formed I
was in attendance at Congress. Had I been here I should
probably have proposed a  general  suffrage: because  my
opinion has always been in favor of it. Still I find very honest
men who, thinking the possession of some property neces-
sary to give due independence of mind, are for restraining
the elective franchise to property. I believe we may lessen
the danger of buying and selling votes, by making the num-
ber of voters too great for any means of purchase: I may fur-
ther say that I have not observed men’s honesty to increase
with their riches.
40
Because he had told Rev. Moore that his 1783 draft of a new con-
stitution for Virginia could still be relied on as an accurate assessment
THE ELECTION OF 1800
407
40. Thomas Jefferson to Jeremiah Moore, August 14, 1800, Paul Leicester Ford, ed., The
Works of Thomas Jefferson, Federal Edition,vol. 9, (New York and London: G.P. Putnam’s Sons,
1905), 142-143.
Embed pdf into webpage - software control dll:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
www.rasteredge.com
Embed pdf into webpage - software control dll:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
www.rasteredge.com
of his political principles, Jefferson needed to point out the one thing
in that draft that he had changed his mind about. When Jefferson
wrote this in 1783, he had opposed allowing members of the clergy to
hold public office in that state. With the Anglican Church only recent-
ly disestablished, there was too great a risk that its clergymen would
attempt to use public offices as a way to regain some power. In 1800,
however, nearly fifteen years after the complete and permanent dis-
establishment of religion in Virginia, Jefferson thought that it was safe
to remove the restriction.
The  clergy,  by  getting  themselves  established  by  law,  &
ingrafted into the machine of government, have been a very
formidable  engine against  the  civil and religious rights of
man. They are still so in many countries & even in some of
these United States. Even in 1783, we doubted the stability
of our recent measures for reducing them to the footing of
other useful callings. It now appears that our means were
effectual. The clergy here seem to have relinquished all pre-
tension to privilege and to stand on a footing with lawyers,
physicians &c. They ought therefore to possess the same
rights.41
Jefferson’s letter to Rev. Moore is used by a handful of religious right
American history authors because, in it, Jefferson wrote that he had
changed his mind about allowing clergymen to hold public office in
Virginia. Mark Beliles, for example, cites it as his source for one of the
claims on the list his version of the Jefferson Bible of things that Jef-
ferson “supported government being involved in.” Beliles, however,
citing no other source, adds school teachers to this claim.
According to Beliles, Jefferson supported: “allowing
clergymen to hold public office or be school teachers.”
Jefferson said absolutely nothing in this letter indicating that he
supported  clergymen  being  school  teachers.  The only  mention  of
408
LIARS FOR JESUS
41. Thomas Jefferson to Jeremiah Moore, August 14, 1800, Paul Leicester Ford, ed., The
Works of Thomas Jefferson, Federal Edition,vol. 9, (New York and London: G.P. Putnam’s Sons,
1905), 143.
education  in his  letter to  Rev.  Moore was the following comment
about the political principles being taught in some schools.
I have with you wondered at the change of political princi-
ples which has taken place in many in this state however
much less than in others. I am still more alarmed to see, in
the other states, the general political dispositions of those to
whom is confided the education of the rising generation. Nor
are  all  the  academies of  this  state  free  from  grounds  of
uneasiness. I have great confidence in the common sense of
mankind in general: but it requires a great deal to get the
better  of  notions  which  our  tutors  have  instilled  into  our
minds while incapable of questioning them, & to rise superi-
or to antipathies strongly rooted.
42
Contrary to dire predictions of Rev. William Linn and the other reli-
gious alarmists, both America and religion managed to survive the eight
years of Thomas Jefferson’s presidency. But even many years later,
rumors of Jefferson’s irreligious tendencies were still a source of concern
for some. One of these was Massachusetts Congressman Cyrus King. 
Jefferson had provided that Congress would have the first oppor-
tunity to buy his extensive library upon his death, but when the library
in Washington D.C. was destroyed by the British in 1814, he offered
to sell it to them immediately. Cyrus King was a bit worried about
what the infidel Jefferson’s library might contain.
In  his  book  America’s  God  and  Country, William
Federer  writes:  “In  response  to  Thomas  Jefferson’s
announcing his plans to donate his personal library of
6,487 books to the Library of Congress, Cyrus King,
before the committee moved:
To report a new section authorizing the Library
Committee,  as  soon  as  said  library  shall  be
received at Washington, to select there from all
THE ELECTION OF 1800
409
42. Thomas Jefferson to Jeremiah Moore, August 14, 1800, Paul Leicester Ford, ed., The
Works of Thomas Jefferson, Federal Edition,vol. 9, (New York and London: G.P. Putnam’s Sons,
1905), 143-144.
books of an atheistical, irreligious, and immoral
tendency, if any such there be, and send the
same back to Mr. Jefferson without any expense
to him.”
Federer, apparently not wanting to pass up the opportunity to
show how religious another early politician was, quotes Cyrus King,
in spite of the fact that King obviously wouldn’t have agreed with his
own assertion that Jefferson was a devout Christian. According to the
records of the House, the other representatives had quite a bit of fun
with King’s motion, and he ended up withdrawing it.
Mr. King afterwards moved to recommit the bill to a select
committee, with instructions to report a new section author-
izing the Library Committee, as soon as said library shall be
received at Washington, to select therefrom all books of an
atheistical,  irreligious,  and  immoral tendency,  if any  such
there be, and send the same back to Mr. Jefferson without
any expense to him. This motion Mr. K. thought proper after-
wards to withdraw.
This subject, and the various motions relative thereto, gave
rise to a debate which lasted to the hour of adjournment;
which, though it afforded much amusement to the auditors,
would not interest the feelings or judgement of any reader.
43
410
LIARS FOR JESUS
43. The Debates and Proceedings in the Congress of the United States, vol. 28, 13th Cong.,
3rd Sess., (Washington D.C.: Gales and Seaton, 1854), 1105.
—  C H A P T E R   E L E V E N   —
More Lies About 
Ben
j
amin Franklin
While his famous motion for prayers at the Constitutional Conven-
tion is by far the most popular, and often the only, Benjamin Franklin
story in religious right American history books, some books contain a
number of other Franklin lies. Many of these are simply out of context
quotes, such as the following from David Barton’s book Original Intent,
which has become a favorite on websites that support censorship.
According to Barton: “Concerning the balance between
the freedom of the press and the responsibility of the
press, printer and publisher Benjamin Franklin  ex-
plained:
If by the liberty of the press were understood
merely the liberty of discussing the propriety
of public measures and political opinions, let
us have as much of it as you please; But if it
means the liberty of affronting, calumniating
[falsely accusing], and defaming one another,
I, for my part...[am] willing to part with my
share of it when our legislators shall please so
to alter the law, and shall cheerfully consent to
exchange my liberty of abusing others for the
privilege of not being abused myself.”
411
What Barton quotes is from a satire written by Franklin in 1789
entitled An Account of the Supremest Court of Judicature in Penn-
sylvania, viz., The Court of the Press. Franklin was condemning abus-
es of the press, as well as people who supported  these abuses by
creating a market for them, but he wasn’t seriously proposing limiting
the freedom of the press. By the end of this article, Franklin had
arrived at what he thought was a very practical solution to the prob-
lem – leave the freedom of the press alone, but change the battery
laws to make it perfectly legal for a victim of libel to give their libeller
“a good drubbing.”
...since so much has been written and published on the fed-
eral constitution, and the necessity  of checks in all  other
parts of good government has been so clearly and learned-
ly explained, I find myself so far enlightened as to suspect
some check may be proper in this part also; but I have been
at  a  loss  to  imagine  any  that  may  not  be  construed  an
infringement  of the  sacred liberty of the  Press. At  length,
however, I think I have found one that, instead of diminishing
general liberty, shall augment it; which is, by restoring to the
people  a  species  of  liberty,  of  which  they  have  been
deprived by our laws, I mean the liberty of the Cudgel.—In
the rude state of society prior to the existence of laws, if one
man gave another ill language, the affronted person would
return it by a box on the ear, and, if repeated, by a good
drubbing; and this without offending against any law. But
now the right of making such returns is denied, and they are
punished as breaches of the peace; while the right of abus-
ing seems to remain in full force, the laws made against it
being rendered ineffectual by the liberty of the Press.
My  proposal  then  is,  to  leave  the  liberty  of  the  Press
untouched,  to  be  exercised  in  its  full  extent,  force,  and
vigour, but to permit the liberty of the Cudgelto go with it pari
passu. Thus, my fellow-citizens, if an impudent writer attacks
your reputation, dearer to you perhaps than your life, and
puts his name to the charge, you may go to him as openly
and break his head. If he conceals himself behind the print-
412
LIARS FOR JESUS
er, and you can nevertheless discover who he is, you may in
like manner way-lay him in the night, attack him behind, and
give him a good drubbing. If your adversary hire better writ-
ers than himself to abuse you the more effectually, you may
hire brawny porters, stronger than yourself, to assist you in
giving him a more effectual drubbing.—Thus far goes my
project as to private resentment and retribution. But if the
public should ever happen to be affronted, as it ought to be,
with the  conduct of such writers, I  would not advise pro-
ceeding immediately to these extremities; but that we should
in moderation content ourselves with tarring and feathering,
and tossing them in a blanket.1
Another popular misquote comes from Benjamin Franklin’s 1784
pamphlet, Information To Those Who Would Remove To America. As
Minister to France, Franklin was  constantly getting inquiries from
people considering a move to America, and became aware that there
were certain misconceptions among the French about what they could
expect. Rather than continuing to answer these inquiries individual-
ly, he published a pamphlet correcting the common misconceptions,
and explaining why certain types of people would find great opportu-
nities in America, while others would be disappointed.
In his book The Myth of Separation, David Barton
writes:  “Franklin  was  in  France—the  home  of  the
‘enlightenment,’ land of the rejection of religion, bas-
tion  of  atheism  and  marital  infidelity;  notice  his
description of America for the French:
Bad examples to youth are more rare in Amer-
ica, which must be a comfortable considera-
tion to parents. To this may be truly added,
that serious religion, under its various denom-
inations, is not only tolerated, but respected
and practised. Atheism is unknown there; infi-
delity rare and secret; so that persons may live
MORE LIES ABOUT BENJAMIN FRANKLIN
413
1. J.A. Leo Lemay, ed., Benjamin Franklin, Writings,(New York: Literary Classics of the United
States, 1987), 1153-1154.
to a great age in that country, without having
their piety shocked by meeting with either an
Atheist or an Infidel.”
By omitting the beginning of this paragraph, Barton makes it look
like atheists and infidels were the bad examples that Franklin was refer-
ring to. Barton begins his quote with the last sentence of a statement
about the rarity of unemployment in America, which, without the rest
of the paragraph, makes it appear to be the first sentence of a state-
ment about religion. This was the final paragraph of a fairly long pam-
phlet, the main point of which was that America was a country where
there were very few people lived in poverty, very few would be con-
sidered  wealthy  by  European  standards,  and  virtually  everyone
worked. Idleness, not atheism, was the bad example to youth that
Franklin was talking about.
At this time in Europe, unemployment among young men was
high because there were too many tradesmen competing for a limited
amount of work. There weren’t any uninhabited areas left where the
settlement of new farmers would create a demand for other business-
es. European tradesmen were reluctant to take on apprentices because
their apprentices would become their future competition. America,
on the other hand, was expanding, and had a growing demand for
tradesmen of all descriptions, making unemployment low and appren-
ticeships easy to come by. The following is the beginning of Franklin’s
statement about bad examples, ending with the sentence that Barton
begins with.
The  almost  general  Mediocrity  of  Fortune  that  prevails  in
America obliging its People to follow some Business for sub-
sistence, those Vices, that arise usually from Idleness, are in a
great measure prevented. Industry and constant Employment
are great preservatives of the Morals and Virtue of a Nation.
Hence  bad  Examples  to  Youth  are  more  rare  in  America,
which must be a comfortable Consideration to Parents....2
Franklin’s  description of  religion in America was aimed at the
414
LIARS FOR JESUS
2. J.A. Leo Lemay, ed., Benjamin Franklin, Writings,(New York: Literary Classics of the United
States, 1987), 982.
French Protestants. This was written in 1784, five years before the
French Revolution began, when France was still a Catholic country in
which Protestants were persecuted. They were barred from most pro-
fessions and trade guilds, couldn’t hold public office, couldn’t enroll
their children in schools, etc. Children of Protestant marriages were
considered illegitimate and not legally entitled to inheritances, and
Protestant girls were sometimes kidnapped and placed in convents.
Even in areas where Protestants were permitted to practice their reli-
gion, their churches could not be built near Catholic churches, and
had to be disguised as houses or shops. In areas where Protestants
were completely prohibited from practicing their religion, they resort-
ed to giving their ministers code names, and changed their places of
worship frequently to avoid detection. The only places where Protes-
tants  had  anything  like  religious  freedom  were  the  cities,  where
wealthy  Protestants  owned  banking  and  shipping  businesses  that
were necessary to the economy. 
The only way Protestants could enter most trades or professions
was to obtain a Certificate of Catholicity, which stated that they had
converted to Catholicism. If a Protestant needed a certificate to get a
job, they would attend a Catholic church for a few months, pretend
they had converted, and get one. Everyone knew that the process of
obtaining these certificates was just a game. The Protestants weren’t
really converting, and many of the clergymen issuing the certificates
were actually atheists and infidels who only became clergymen for
political power. This is why Franklin made the unusual comment that
“serious” religion was practiced in America. As Foreign Minister to
France, he couldn’t very well come right out and say the state religion
was a joke, so he just snuck in a little dig at it, while letting the Protes-
tants know that, in America, they would be welcomed in all of the
trades and professions described in his pamphlet without having to
hide their religion.
A number of religious right American history authors do actually
agree with mainstream historians that Benjamin Franklin was no more
than a deist. There are some, however, who are determined to prove
that every single one of our founders was a devout Christian. As evi-
dence of Franklin’s devotion to Christianity, these authors often bring
up his friendship with Rev. George Whitefield, disregarding or misquot-
ing Franklin’s own words describing this friendship.
MORE LIES ABOUT BENJAMIN FRANKLIN
415
In his book America’s God and Country,William Federer presents
his own interpretation of the events involving Rev. Whitefield found
in Franklin’s autobiography.
According to Federer: “Benjamin Franklin became very
appreciative of the preaching of George Whitefield,
even to the extent of printing many of his sermons
and journals.”
Nowhere in his autobiography did Franklin write anything indi-
cating whether or not he appreciated Whitefield’s preaching. In fact,
in the same paragraph on which Federer bases his lie, Franklin made
a point of stating that he was not one of Whitefield’s followers. White-
field simply hired Franklin as a printer, and they became friends. 
Some of Mr. Whitefield’s enemies affected to suppose that
he would apply these Collections to his own private Emolu-
ment; but I who was intimately acquainted with him (being
employed in printing his Sermons and Journals, &c.), never
had the least Suspicion of his Integrity, but am to this day
decidedly of Opinion that he was in all his Conduct a per-
fectly honest Man. And methinks my Testimony in his Favour
ought to have the more Weight, as we had no religious Con-
nection. He us’d indeed sometimes to pray for my Conver-
sion, but  never had  the  Satisfaction  of  believing  that  his
Prayers were heard. Ours was a mere civil Friendship, sin-
cere on both Sides, and lasted to his Death.3
Federer continues, putting his own spin on what was  actually
Franklin’s description of a little acoustic experiment.
According to Federer: “In his Autobiography, Franklin
wrote  about  attending  Whitefield’s  crusades  at  the
Philadelphia Courthouse steps. He noted over 30,000
people were present, and that Whitefield’s voice could
be heard nearly a mile away.”
416
LIARS FOR JESUS
3. J.A. Leo Lemay, ed., Benjamin Franklin, Writings,(New York: Literary Classics of the United
States, 1987), 1408.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested