11 
the low requirements inhibit progression between different level NVQs, and from 
vocational to academic routes (Clarke and Winch, 2006). 
This discussion has shown that in the context of VET in France, Germany and the 
Netherlands, with their holistic concepts of education, a high content of theoretical 
al 
knowledge and general education, the notion of employability has very different 
connotations compared to England. It also strongly suggests that in these countries, 
‘learning outcomes’ have rather different meanings and serve different purposes. As 
part of a comprehensive VET system, they are negotiated by a variety of stakeholders, 
including the state, employers, unions, and teaching institutions, thus representing the 
interests of all these bodies. Learning processes are formulated as outcomes in order 
to enhance comparability of qualifications and thus the occupational mobility and 
employability of individuals. In England, by contrast, it seems that it is learning 
ng 
outcomes that are defined according to employers’ skills needs, and with no union 
ion 
involvement, and that then serve to structure VET provision in order to achieve those 
outcomes. This will become clearer in the next section, where we will explore shifts 
towards a competence-based approach in each of the countries. 
The knowledge society: Competence and Competencies - But are we talking 
ing 
about the same things? 
While the turn to outcomes-oriented or competency-based approaches in VET appears 
ars 
to be partly a result of EU policies (in particular the development of the EQF), in the 
literature it is frequently linked to changes in the organisation of work and the demand 
for new skills in the knowledge society. Some commentators have argued that, as 
VET systems have sought to structure their outcomes according to employer demand, 
the competence-approach can be observed across countries (e.g. Straka, 2002).  
Many commentators describe the move from a Taylorist/Fordist organisation of work 
to post-Fordist production methods since the 1980s (e.g. Boreham et al., 2002; 
Boreham, 2002). The former was geared towards mass production and relied on a 
strict division of labour, both vertically between different grades of employees and 
horizontally between departments. The work was organised and directed by managers 
and executed by operatives, who performed highly fragmented routinised tasks. 
Economic and technological change, such as the integration of information 
technology and communications, and the diversification of industries, has gone 
together with a new organisation of work, with flatter hierarchies, where staff are 
required to work in teams and across different functions and departments and to be 
responsible for their own area of activity. With greater use of technology, there has 
been an increasing demand for ‘knowledge’, a need to understand the whole work 
process and being able to deal with ‘risk’ and unpredictable situations. Employers 
have placed increasing emphasis on ‘soft’ skills such as problem-solving, independent 
dent 
decision-making as well as the ability to communicate with colleagues. Because of 
of 
shorter cycles of innovation, there is also a need for flexibility and a new emphasis on 
lifelong learning and less on initial VET (Ertl and Sloane, 2004). 
In this section, we will look at the development of competence-based approaches in 
the particular national contexts. It will be argued that the economic change described 
Embed pdf to website - control Library system:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
www.rasteredge.com
Embed pdf to website - control Library system:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
www.rasteredge.com
12 
above has not been an even or universal process in the four countries. As indicated 
earlier, the notion of lifelong learning is underpinned by a more functional 
understanding of employability in England, oriented towards employer demand for 
low skilled labour, at least in certain sectors of the economy. By contrast, on the 
Continent, lifelong learning can be seen as a shift of emphasis away from the all-or-
-
nothing approach of initial VET towards a system that enables the acquisition of skills 
and qualifications beyond IVET, providing both individual lifelong careers and the 
innovative knowledge required in modern work processes. In a similar vein, there are 
important differences in the ways in which competence-based VET has been 
operationalised in practice. These need to be understood within the context of the 
countries’ unique social histories if we are to explain why the responses to socio-
-
economic change are so different. Before examining the different national system, we 
will have a brief look at the overwhelming range of definitions attached to the concept 
of competence in the literature.  
One confusion is over whether competence serves as an umbrella term for a 
framework of competencies, or whether competence is one component within a 
framework. In an attempt to square the circle, the EQF incorporates both definitions. 
Referring to a competence framework, it distinguishes between sub-categories or 
‘competencies’ of knowledge, skills and competencies, whereby competencies are 
re 
defined as ‘responsibility and autonomy’ (EC, 2006). Thus, competence is a sub-
-
category of itself. In their extensive review of the literature, Winterton et al. (2005) 
cite a vast range of definitions. Woodruffe distinguishes between areas of competence 
(aspects of the job) and competency (a person’s behaviour) (cited in ibid). Others 
refer to objective competence (performance) and subjective competence (personal 
abilities or qualities) (ibid.). Many authors identify a distinction between an 
overarching notion of ‘being competent’ in the workplace (i.e. meeting job demands) 
and ‘having competencies’ (possessing the necessary attributes) (Burgoyne cited in 
Winterton et al., 2005). Such a distinction may be applied across countries, with 
ith 
competencies loosely defined as the components of an overall competence (i.e. most 
commonly understood to include different types of knowledge, technical skills, social 
attributes, etc). However, we will demonstrate that it is precisely the definition of 
‘what makes somebody competent’ that varies, i.e., that there are different 
understandings particularly in terms of the types of knowledge and know-how 
ow 
involved, whether or not they relate to a broad occupational field or a narrowly 
defined set of activities, how they are acquired and assessed, whether or not they are 
re 
transferable, and whether they are person- or job-centred. 
Following Winterton et al., a distinction can be drawn between two models of 
of 
competence, each underpinned by a distinct set of epistemological principles: the 
functionalist-behaviourist model (exemplified by England) and the multi-dimensional 
nal 
model (exemplified by France, the Netherlands, and Germany). We would like to 
stress at this point that there are of course important differences between the three 
latter countries, but that the typology has been developed on the basis of principles 
which are common to them and which sets them apart from the Anglo-Saxon 
approach. 
The functionalist-behaviourist model posits the employee as passive, and as oriented 
ented 
towards the demonstration of prescribed competencies. The approach is ‘functionalist’ 
as competencies are grounded in the functional analysis of occupations: They refer to 
control Library system:VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Embed PDF to image converter in viewer. the API, sample codes are provided for PDF document to Our website offers PDF to Raster Images Conversion Control for VB
www.rasteredge.com
control Library system:C# Image: How to Integrate Web Document and Image Viewer
RasterEdgeImagingDeveloperGuide8.0.pdf: from this user manual, you can existing one from where the website is ready Embed Document Viewer to Your ASPX Web Page.
www.rasteredge.com
13 
particular skills necessary to perform specific tasks as specified by employers. It is 
‘behaviourist’ because whether or not somebody has acquired a competence relies on 
the person’s ability to demonstrate performance to the standards required.  
The multi-dimensional competence-approach is based on a model of the active 
ive 
employee, who takes an active role in constructing knowledge. Competence is 
understood as performance in the workplace, i.e. the ability to deal with complex 
work situations, drawing on multiple resources that the employee brings to the 
workplace. Thus, competence is a holistic notion, relating to the whole person and 
including different dimensions (including occupational, personal and inter-personal). 
Crucially, this approach encapsulates the notion of development of competence (and 
thus personal development), both through VET and the employee’s own experience at 
the workplace (Rauner, 2004; Straka, 2002; Fischer, 2002; Fischer and Rauner, 2002). 
Employees acquire resources throughout their work career and are assessed on their 
ir 
ability to mobilise those resources in a given situation, i.e. their performance. Also, 
while competencies are developed within a work situation, learning theories posit that 
the corresponding components of learning (knowledge, skills, etc) are articulated and 
can be transferred to other work situations and processes. Importantly, competencies, 
like learning outcomes, are negotiated by the social partners, and to some extent 
incorporate the interests of the employer and the employee. 
An important distinction is the way in which the two competence models integrate the 
different types of knowledge. As we have seen in the previous section, the countries 
of the multi-dimensional model all have a considerable element of school-based 
ed 
learning and theoretical knowledge. In France and the Netherlands, school-based 
ed 
learning dominates, while in Germany, knowledge taught in vocational schools has 
traditionally been subject-based. In these countries, the shift towards a knowledge 
based economy has sparked criticism as to the relevance of school-based learning for 
employment. The debate about competencies and the need for practice-oriented 
learning has led to a new emphasis on other forms of knowledge, notably tacit and 
practical knowledge. Theories that attach great value to tacit knowledge and the ways 
in which it can contribute to overall knowledge creation and innovation have been 
very influential. Nonaka and Takeuchi have drawn attention to the way in which 
Japanese companies make use of the largely tacit knowledge of the workforce by 
providing mechanisms for converting it into explicit and back again into tacit 
knowledge, thus creating a ‘spiral of knowledge’. The idea rests on the assumption 
that knowledge is primarily tacit and that workers through years of experience 
develop ‘subjective insights, intuitions, and hunches’ that form an integral part of 
their knowledge applied at the workplace (Nonaka and Takeuchi, 1995: 311). 
In addition, as already noted, European research has heavily drawn on the US 
US 
literature which emphasises the role of practical and tacit knowledge, notably the 
research done by Lave and Wenger (1991) and the notion of a community of practice. 
The competence-based approaches of the Continental model, while lacking a coherent 
nt 
theory, stress the importance of learning by ‘growing into’ a community of practice 
(Weigel and Mulder 2006; Rauner, 2004; Biemans et al., 2004; Wesselink et al., 
., 
2006). The approach thus recognises the importance of situated and experiential 
learning, which is held to be particularly crucial to competence development. Rauner 
ner 
(2004) argues that competencies develop in confrontation with the task itself. 
Furthermore, competence development goes hand in hand with the development of an 
an 
control Library system:VB.NET Word: VB Code to Create Word Mobile Viewer with .NET Doc
prorgam, please link to see: PDF Document Mobile RasterEdge_Imaging_Files" to your created website folder Embed "RasterEdge.css" and "RasterEdge.js" references
www.rasteredge.com
control Library system:VB.NET Image: VB Code to Download and Save Image from Web URL
this, you can instantly and quickly embed required RasterEdge users to download image from website link more & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
14 
occupational identity. Practical knowledge, or know-how, is now an accepted and 
and 
distinct form of knowledge, and is not simply derived from formal, theoretical 
knowledge (ibid.).  
It is important to note that the emphasis on tacit and practical knowledge is in the 
context of VET systems that have traditionally included a substantial body of 
theoretical knowledge that had come to be regarded as irrelevant to work situations. 
However, as we will see, it is the particular integration of tacit and practical 
knowledge with formal knowledge that marks a major distinction between the Anglo-
Saxon and Continental models. A common development in the latter countries has 
been the move from subject-based towards situated or workplace learning (e.g. 
Sloane, 2004). 
Critical for the multi-dimensional model is the notion of work process knowledge
e
1
first introduced by Kruse (Boreham et al, 2002; Rauner, 2004; Weigel and Mulder, 
2006). The term encapsulates the shift towards a new organisation of work in which 
knowledge of the whole process replaces that of distinct functions (Rauner, 2004). 
Rauner describes it as a central category of knowledge, which is derived from 
reflected work experience, and which underpins practice (2004: 14). He goes on to 
explain that work process knowledge is the integration of context-bound, practical 
(tacit) knowledge and context-free, theoretical (explicit) knowledge (ibid). 
Importantly, the resulting work process knowledge itself is explicit. 
The concept of knowledge creation through a process of experiential learning and 
reflection is absent in the English competence model, as is the principle of 
of 
competence development (Straka, 2004). It appears that, as people are required to 
perform to narrowly prescribed competencies, they do not have the knowledge, skills 
or, indeed, the motivation to perform tasks or deal with situations beyond the 
he 
prescribed outcomes. In what follows we will examine in detail the competence 
approaches in the individual VET systems. 
Germany
In Germany, Handlungskompetenz, or competence of action-taking, (also referred to 
as Handlungsfaehigkeit or capability to act) together with its dimensions pertaining to 
the occupation (Fachkompetenz), the social group (Sozialkompetenz) and the person 
(Individual- or Humankompetenz) has been the structuring principle of VET since the 
late 1980s (Ott, 1999; Straka, 2002; Sloane 2004). In contrast to dominant Anglo-
Saxon models of VET, the German Handlungskompetenz is not only a holistic notion, 
which comprises particular knowledge, skills and competencies within each of the 
different dimensions, it is, crucially, tied to a curriculum, most commonly within the 
dual system of vocational education. The aim of VET, as enshrined in the KMK 
legislation of 1991, is to enable the student to take autonomous and responsible action 
within the workplace (Halfpap, 2000). The concept clearly refers to performance in 
the workplace as conceptualised by John Erpenbeck (2005:11): 
‘Competences are about the ability to take action in complex, often chaotic situations. 
Competence is about performance.’ 
1
There is a question over whether the German notion of Arbeitsprozesswissen should in fact be 
translated as labour process knowledge to reflect the wider scope of knowledge involved. 
control Library system:C# PDF url edit Library: insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.
embed link to specific PDF pages. Easy to put link into specified position of PDF text, image and PDF table. Link access to variety of objects, such as website,
www.rasteredge.com
control Library system:VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net
Able to embed link to specific PDF pages in VB Extract and search url in existing PDF file in VB access to variety of objects, including website, image, document
www.rasteredge.com
15 
The concept is integrative rather than cumulative, relying on the different components 
of occupational, social and individual competence to come together in a given work 
situation (Straka, 2002; Sloane, 2004). Just as the notion of Beruf comprises a broad 
spectrum of activities, so are the different dimensions of competence based on broad 
areas of occupational and industrial knowledge. The notion is holistic, as within the 
dimension of individual competence it comprises the notion of development of the 
self (for example, confidence, ability to reflect, social behaviour) both in relation to 
the workplace and to society as a whole. Ott (1999) poignantly sums up the 
educational mandate of the vocational school, clearly pinpointing the Humboldt idea 
of Allgemeine Menschenbildung:  a) the continuation of general education; b) 
upbringing; c) vocational education; d) non-specific education through an occupation 
(i.e. character development). The idea of erzieherische Werte (bringing up children to 
to 
embrace certain values) is a dominant principle in German pedagogy, which still 
holds strong today. 
As indicated in the previous section, throughout the past two decades there have been 
increasing pressures to open up the German dual system, largely by employers as the 
sharp demarcation of Berufe was no longer seen as suited to the accelerating 
technological developments, one effect of which has been that employers have been 
increasingly reluctant to offer training places (Boreham, 2002; Halfpap, 2000). 
Echoing the founders of the NVQ system in England, a major criticism was that 
theoretical knowledge taught in vocational schools was removed from actual work 
practice and was therefore inert knowledge. Since the mid-1990s there have been 
initiatives to orient learning more towards the workplace, the most significant 
development being the introduction of ‘Lernfelder’ or learning fields in the new 
framework curriculum. Learning fields are a major didactic innovation, structuring 
learning according to concrete work situations, processes and tasks rather than 
subjects.  The new guidelines place a renewed emphasis on holistic action-oriented 
learning, promoting occupational as well as social and individual competencies. The 
new didactic reference point is the situation. 
While the implementation of learning fields has been uneven, a number of 
developments have advanced the notion of situated learning. A number of new 
occupations have been introduced (notably in ICT) which allow an element of project-
based, employer-specific learning, opening up the notion of Beruf to include elements 
ts 
of self-directed ‘learning through work’ and thus enabling flexibility and innovation 
(Halfpap, 2002; Steedman, 2006; Boreham, 2002). New learning and teaching 
methods are being piloted in a number of projects across the Länder (Halfpap, 2002; 
Achtenhagen, 2004). While (holistic) competencies are thus developed in work 
situations, they are tied to a curriculum, in which task-based and project work, 
individual and group work serve as innovative didactic tools. And while competencies 
are dependent on the particular context of the work situation, they become 
transferable through the learning process. As pointed out by Halfpap, the learner 
assumes a central role, entailing ‘a shift from consumer of knowledge towards active 
producer of knowledge’ (Halfpap, 2002: p 43). This constitutes a major shift away 
way 
from largely imparted knowledge towards experiential learning as advocated by 
Kerschensteiner (1968). By promoting key faculties of autonomous thinking, learning 
and action-taking, German VET enables students to determine their own learning and 
thus develop their own Handlungskompetenz. 
control Library system:C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Create Online TIFF Document Viewer
how to create more web viewers on PDF and Word Create an ASP.NET website in Visual Studio 2005 or any If you want to embed .NET Web TIFF Document Viewer DLL
www.rasteredge.com
control Library system:C# PowerPoint: Create Web Document Viewer for PowerPoint Viewing
and saving web PowerPoint document to PDF and TIFF. a web application and then add and embed Web PowerPoint C# Guide: Setup an ASP.NET Website in Visual Studio.
www.rasteredge.com
16 
France
The concept of competence in France was originally developed by educationalists, 
such as Bertrand Schwartz in his work on social exclusion and low skills among 
ong 
young people (e.g. Schwartz, 1981). As already indicated in the first section, this 
is 
approach was quickly taken up by the social partners (employers and unions) who 
were instrumental in bringing about an outcomes-oriented model and thus a 
conceptual shift from school-based to work-based learning, for the first time 
recognising the workplace as a place of learning. Thus, the competence approach was 
was 
first associated with continuing vocational education and as such is closely bound up 
up 
with the development of the latter and the notion of lifelong learning. With the 
changing organisation of work and changing labour markets, successive pieces of 
legislation provided for individualised training and career planning. In the context of 
the supremacy of abstract knowledge and initial education, the opening up of 
education and training to adults and those who had been unable to gain initial 
qualifications can be seen as the democratisation of VET in France. From the 
employer’s point of view, the notion of the ‘learning organisation’ encapsulates the 
importance of lifelong learning for the competitiveness of the company (Méhaut, 
1999, Zarifian, 1995, Hoff 2004). Méhaut’s study of the role of enterprises in lifelong 
learning showed the importance of continuous learning in the workplace to meet the 
demand for new skills, in the context of an initial training system where work 
experience is largely absent (Méhaut, 1999). Competence-based management based 
ed 
on the analysis of jobs and competencies required was first introduced around 1990 
(Mériot, 2005; Weigel and Mulder, 2006). Central to this has been the bilan de 
de 
compétences, which aims at competence development of the individual employee.  
With a view to enhancing the practical relevance of a strongly school-based system, a 
competence-based approach was subsequently introduced into initial VET. Indeed, 
d, 
since 2002, all Diploma qualifications need to follow this model. The introduction of 
a National Qualifications Framework based on a ‘competence grid’ together with the 
recognition of APEL clearly signalled the move away from an input-based model (see 
Méhaut, 2006). Lists of competencies (référentiels de certification) are formulated on 
ulated on 
the basis of activities or tasks (référentiels d’activités) presumed to define a particular 
ticular 
occupational role. The process of developing competence-based qualifications 
appears to be similar to the one in the Netherlands, whereby competencies refer to 
core abilities of more or less broadly defined occupations (see next section). 
Importantly, and in contrast to the NVQ system in England, they are developed within 
a process of negotiation involving both social partners (as opposed to a solely 
demand-led system), and they are linked to a curriculum. However, and again 
similarly to the Netherlands, there are tensions between the different stakeholders as 
to the broadness or narrowness of competencies and the implications for the 
associated learning programme. Demands by some employers for narrower definitions 
have met with resistance from teachers. Moreover, there is a debate about whether 
competencies can be acquired in simulated situations within school-based education 
(Mériot, 2005). The remainder of this section will focus on the competence model as 
as 
it applies in employment and continuing education. 
As already noted, it is in the particular context of the French education system, in 
which abstract knowledge is valued above all else, and in which work-based training 
has been neglected, that we need to understand the value placed on individual 
17 
competence. Hoff criticises the almost exclusive attention paid to explicit knowledge 
in French VET at the expense of tacit forms of knowledge (2004). However, there are 
crucial differences in the construction of meaning in France of the notion of 
competence compared with the English NVQ system. As pointed out by Hoff, central 
ral 
to this is the principle of competence development, which, similarly to German VET, 
relies on the interaction of theory (derived from vocational education) with experience 
(personal and vocational). She stresses the importance of learning processes through 
ough 
which tacit knowledge is converted into (new) explicit knowledge to make it 
ke it 
effective. Rabardel and Duvenci-Langa develop a conceptual framework in which 
employees produce and improve their competencies through a process of 
‘constructive activity’, by building on external knowledge and integrating it with 
experience (2002: 67). Without referring to Kerschensteiner, this process is very 
similar to the latter’s account of ‘productive work’ according to which people 
construct knowledge by reflecting their experiences on existing, imparted knowledge 
(Kerschensteiner, 1968). Unlike the theory of social learning put forward by Lave and 
Wenger (1991), in these models learners do not rely solely on tacit knowledge 
through imitation and socialisation, but actively relate to their existing theoretical 
knowledge. Other French authors have referred to similar processes producing 
knowledge mobilised for successful work performance, referred to as savoir d’action 
(Barbier, cited in Pouget and Osborne, 2004). In all these accounts, tacit knowledge is 
transformed into explicit knowledge by way of reflective practice (ibid; Eraut, 1994). 
Notably, therefore, the French concept of competence is holistic, involving theoretical 
as well as tacit knowledge (savoir) and personal experience, technical know-how 
(savoir-faire), and social competencies (savoir-être). As competencies are developed 
eveloped 
in the workplace they are seen as context-bound and pertaining to the individual. 
Rabardel and Duvenci-Langa refer to the personal resources that an individual 
employee draws upon in a given work situation (2004). These resources depend very 
much on the individual employee, his or her particular knowledge base as well as 
personal attributes, such as their way of interacting with colleagues and their personal 
identity (ibid). Crucially, and again in contrast to the English concept, the competence 
embraces the notion of potentiality. Eraut refers to ‘capability’, as existing knowledge 
and skills form the basis for future learning, also in terms of career expectations 
(1994; Eraut et al., 2000).  
There has been a debate in France about ways of assessing competencies. Existing 
mechanisms are informed by the particular understanding of the term, and thus differ 
in crucial aspects from the English NVQ system. Pouget and Osborne illustrate 
vividly how competencies in France are ‘validated’ rather than ‘assessed’ (2004). 
What is validated are the whole range of resources as described above that the 
employee brings to a post, i.e. over and above what is required and specified in a job 
description. Methods of validation as identified by Feutrie (cited in ibid) include ways 
in which employees see themselves in their post, assessing the ways in which they 
master particular work situations, or assessing potential.  
The Netherlands
In the Netherlands, the stated objectives of the introduction of the competence-based 
qualifications structure include improving the transparency and flexibility of 
qualifications, and enabling the quick adaptation of qualifications to changes in the 
18 
labour market (ReferNet, 2005). In combination with other elements such as 
modularisation and APEL, this approach resembles the English NVQ system. 
However, qualifications are underpinned by a holistic notion of competence, and 
importantly, they are linked to curricula developed by the social partners and 
delivered through the VET system. Competence-based VET has been piloted in many 
areas and is being formally integrated into the VET system as part of the current 
reforms (ibid., Weigel and Mulder, 2006). Thus, in line with the traditional focus on 
citizenship, the system has been designed to advance individual career-building and 
person-centred employability. 
As in Germany and France, the notion of competence is multi-dimensional and 
includes knowledge, skills, and the concept of ‘attitude’, which refers to the moral 
dimension of action and may be similar to the German notion of ‘Humankompetenz’ 
(Westerhuis, 2006). Indeed, in the absence of an official definition, Mulder’s (2001:9) 
working definition is reminiscent of the German and French use of capability: 
‘Competence is the capability of a person or an organisation to reach specific 
achievements. Personal competencies comprise: integrated performance-oriented 
capabilities, which consist of clusters of knowledge structures and also cognitive, 
interactive, affective and where necessary psychomotor capabilities, and attitudes and 
values, which are conditional for carrying out tasks, solving problems and more 
generally, effectively functioning in a certain profession, organisation, position or 
role.’ 
Like the German notion of Handlungskompetenz, this definition refers to integrated 
capabilities related to performance, although notably, not related to a particular 
occupation or Beruf, but to a broader conception of position or role, or even an 
organisation. In order to introduce competence-based VET, the current reforms have 
recognised the need to transform teaching and learning environments. They draw on a 
range of approaches, including constructivist theories of learning, emphasising 
situated and experiential learning (Mulder and Sloane, 2004; Simons and Bolthuis, 
s, 
2004). As in Germany and France, students develop competencies by making explicit 
and articulating knowledge. 
VET reforms are based on two main principles (ReferNet, 2005). Firstly, they firmly 
embrace the notion of work process knowledge. Secondly, competence development 
will be tailored to the individual student, their personal capacities and wishes. 
However, there are fears that students’ wishes may be overridden by employer 
demands. Similarly, as in all our Continental countries, there are tensions between the 
different stakeholders in terms of how they conceptualise the competence-based 
sed 
approach, and notably between teaching organisations (as broad, abstract knowledge, 
driven by learners) and national policy-makers (more outcome-oriented) (Biemans et 
et 
al., 2004). 
England
As stated earlier, the UK has been a pioneer in Europe in terms of developing a 
competence-based approach in VET (Winterton et al, 2005). In 1986, the 
Conservative government set up the National Council for Vocational Qualifications as 
part of a substantial reorganisation of the VET system in an effort to close the 
perceived skills gap with other major economies (King, 2001; Boreham, 2002). This 
19 
constituted a paradigm shift from a dual system linked to a curriculum to a system 
based on outcomes – NVQs – which are not linked to a training programme, and 
nd 
which are measured in terms of performance of skills in the workplace (defined as 
competencies). National Occupational Standards are used to draw up the 
competencies presumed to be required for certain key roles and jobs, as well as to 
define the performance criteria against which competencies are assessed (Winterton et 
al, 2005). 
The NVQ system has been widely criticised on a number of grounds, including its 
lack of underpinning knowledge and the highly fragmented and atomised nature of 
skills. Michael Young has argued that the kind of knowledge people acquire is the 
result of power relationships in society (cited in Boreham, 2002). Clearly, the low 
theoretical content and the narrowness of skills reflect the strongly employer-led 
ed 
nature of and lack of union involvement in the development of qualifications in 
England. As suggested by Keep, the lack of interest in a broader, comprehensive 
training must be attributed to the abolition of the tripartite system and the deregulation 
of the labour market (2007).  
The traditional Anglo-Saxon notion of skill and learning on the job, underpinned by 
minimal knowledge, still underlies the current NVQ model, which clearly echoes the 
tradition of thought in the writings of Ryle and Oakeshott introduced in the first 
section. The principal founder of the system, Gilbert Jessup, believed that theoretical 
knowledge taught in college was inert and of little relevance to practice (Boreham, 
2002). His belief that the knowledge needed for the execution of tasks is acquired 
through experience in the workplace is the main epistemological pillar of the NVQ 
system. Thus, in contrast to the Continental model, the competence approach in 
England contains very little input of any formal knowledge and relies heavily on tacit 
knowledge. There is no notion of an integration of different forms of knowledge, and 
thus of experiential learning and knowledge creation. The idea of workers following 
instructions or ‘rules’ in a non-reflective way clearly builds on Oakeshott’s notion of 
technical knowledge (1962). Biemans et al. (2004: 527) have described the English 
sh 
competence model as: 
‘[a] rigid backward mapping approach, in which the state of the art on the shop floor 
is the untouchable starting point for the definition of occupational competencies, 
leading to routinised job descriptions, in which the proactive and reflective worker is 
left out.’ 
It appears therefore that in England, the competence-based approach as 
as 
operationalised through the NVQ system has not only failed to produce the skills and 
knowledge base needed for the new knowledge economy, it has actively promoted the 
production of low-skilled labour that clearly is demanded by some employers.  
Indeed, Grugulis et al. (2004) refer to the polarisation of skills in England, where a 
Taylorist-Fordist system still operates in many parts of the economy. They argue that 
the competence based approach functions to meet the continued demand for low 
skilled labour, thus further disadvantaging those in the lower echelons of the labour 
market (ibid.). Thus, unlike in Germany, France and the Netherlands, employability in 
England has a functional connotation, serving first and foremost the needs of the 
economy. Lifelong learning in practice constitutes the accumulation of skills in 
in 
20 
relation to a particular job or task, rather than the more holistic career development 
nt 
envisaged in the continental VET systems which includes professional as well as 
personal growth. 
Conclusions 
In the light of the creation of a European Qualifications Framework, this paper has 
analysed the VET systems of four European countries, England, France, the 
the 
Netherlands, and Germany, including the national debates and recent developments in 
in 
these countries, on the basis of a review of the existing literature. In particular, it has 
explored in detail the distinct meanings attached to some of the key terms which form 
the basis of the framework: ‘qualification’, ‘knowledge’, ‘skills’, ‘competence’, and 
‘learning outcomes’. It is argued that without taking into consideration the diverging 
understandings of these concepts, it remains questionable whether the aims of the 
EQF, such as enhancing transferability and comparability, can be fulfilled. 
Clearly, there appears to have been some support for the EQF from diverse national 
stakeholders, underpinned by a desire to develop or revise national qualification 
frameworks. Within VET systems traditionally based on learning inputs, advocates of 
learning outcomes have cited socio-economic changes and the need to develop 
flexible mechanisms of VET, as well as the need to enhance occupational mobility 
both nationally and internationally. 
The four VET systems in this paper are all in a state of flux and have been undergoing 
major changes over the past two decades. For example, to differing degrees all 
systems have moved towards greater ‘employability’ (individualised, flexible VET) 
away from ‘occupational education’ (tightly regulated, fixed qualifications), by 
allowing elements of flexibilisation. However, an analysis of the different contexts 
and traditions in each country has revealed the very distinct meanings and 
understandings of different terms and their embeddedness within the VET system and 
the labour market. While recent developments might signal convergence, e.g. in the 
shift towards learning outcomes, these need to be understood within these contexts.  
This analysis has identified marked differences between the construction of VET in 
England, on the one hand, and that of the Netherlands, France and Germany, on the 
other, notwithstanding major differences between the three latter countries. A major 
distinction is the differing relationship between theoretical and practical knowledge 
involved in qualifications. In our three continental countries, qualifications have 
traditionally included a high theoretical content, as well as the notion of personal 
development and civic education. As we have seen, all three have modified their VET 
inputs in response to the need for more practice-oriented learning. However, on the 
continent, this has led to the reconfiguration of theoretical knowledge rather than its 
eradication. There has been a greater emphasis on situated, experiential learning, and 
on the need to value different forms of knowledge, both tacit and explicit. The idea of 
integrating theory and practice is accentuated in the notion of competence, which 
captures the bringing together of different resources and applying them to a given 
work situation. Importantly, competence in the continental countries is understood as 
a multi-dimensional concept. The individual develops competencies by applying 
aspects of the whole person, including the ability to reflect on situations and on one’s 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested