thorns, which are never of any use to them? Is the warfare between the sheep and the flowers not
important? Is this not of more consequence than a fat red-faced gentleman’s sums? And if I know,
I, myself, one flower which is unique in the world, which grows nowhere but on my planet, but
which one little sheep can destroy in a single bite some morning, without even noticing what he is
doing, Oh! You think that is not important! His face turned from white to red as he continued: “If
some one loves a flower, of which just one single blossom grows in all the millions and millions of
stars, it is enough to make him happy just to look at the stars.
He can say to himself, ‘Somewhere, my flower is there...’ But if the sheep eats the flower, in one
moment all his stars will be darkened... And you think that is not important!”
He could not say anything more. His words were choked by sobbing. The night had fallen. I had
let my tools drop from my hands. Of what moment now was my hammer, my bolt, or thirst, or
death? On one star, one planet, my planet, the Earth, there was a little prince to be comforted. I
took him in my arms, and rocked him. I said to him: “The flower that you love is not in danger. I
will draw you a muzzle for your sheep. I will draw you a railing to put around your flower. I will...”
I did not know what to say to him. I felt awkward and blundering. I did not know how I could reach
him, where I could overtake him and go on hand in hand with him once more.
It is such a secret place, the land of tears.
I soon learned to know this flower better. On the little prince’s planet the flowers had always been
very simple. They had only one ring of petals; they took up no room at all; they were a trouble to
nobody. One morning they would appear in the grass, and by night they would have faded
peacefully away. But one day, from a seed blown from no one knew where, a new flower had come
up; and the little prince had watched very closely over this small sprout which was not like any
other small sprouts on his planet.
It might, you see, have been a new kind of baobab. The shrub soon stopped growing, and began to
get ready to produce a flower. The little prince, who was present at the first appearance of a huge
bud, felt at once that some sort of miraculous apparition must emerge from it. But the flower was
not satisfied to complete the preparations for her beauty in the shelter of her green chamber. She
Convert pdf to url online - control application platform:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to url online - control application platform:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
www.rasteredge.com
chose her colours with the greatest care. She adjusted her petals one by one. She did not wish to
go out into the world all rumpled, like the field poppies. It was only in the full radiance of her
beauty that she wished to appear. Oh, yes! She was a coquettish creature! And her mysterious
adornment lasted for days and days. Then one morning, exactly at sunrise, she suddenly showed
herself. And, after working with all this painstaking precision, she yawned and said: “Ah! I am
scarcely awake. I beg that you will excuse me. My petals are still all disarranged...” But the little
prince could not restrain his admiration:
“Oh! How beautiful you are!”
“Am I not?” the flower responded, sweetly. “And I was born at the same moment as the sun...”
The little prince could guess easily enough that she was not any too modest, but how moving, and
exciting she was!
“I think it is time for breakfast,” she added an instant later. “If you would have the kindness to
think of my needs” And the little prince, completely abashed, went to look for a sprinkling can of
fresh water.
So, he tended the flower. So, too, she began very quickly to torment him with her vanity, which
was, if the truth be known, a little difficult to deal with.
One day, for instance, when she was speaking of her four thorns, she said to the little prince: “Let
the tigers come with their claws!”
“There are no tigers on my planet,” the little prince objected. “And, anyway, tigers do not eat
weeds.”
“I am not a weed,” the flower replied, sweetly. “Please excuse me...” “I am not at all afraid of
tigers,” she went on, “but I have a horror of drafts. I suppose you wouldn’t screen for me?"
“A horror of drafts, that is bad luck, for a plant,” remarked the little prince, and added to himself,
“This flower is a very complex creature...”
“At night I want you to put me under a glass globe. It is very cold where you live. In the place I
came from...” But she interrupted herself at that point. She had come in the form of a seed. She
could not have known anything of any other worlds.
Embarrassed over having let herself be caught on the verge of such an untruth, she coughed two
or three times, in order to put the little prince in the wrong.
“The screen?”
“I was just going to look for it when you spoke to me...”
Then she forced her cough a little more so that he should suffer from remorse just the same. So
the little prince, in spite of all the good will that was inseparable from his love, had soon come to
doubt her. He had taken seriously words which were without importance, and it made him very
unhappy.
“I ought not to have listened to her,” he confided to me one day.
“One never ought to listen to the flowers. One should simply look at them and breathe their
control application platform:VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net
PDF editing APIs, VB.NET users will be able to add a url to specified area on PDF page and edit hyperlinks within the document. This online tutorial will give
www.rasteredge.com
control application platform:C# PDF url edit Library: insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.
Help to extract and search url in PDF file. By using specific PDF editing APIs, C# users will be able to This online C# tutorial is mainly about how to edit PDF
www.rasteredge.com
fragrance. Mine perfumed all my planet. But I did not know how to take pleasure in all her grace.
This tale of claws, which disturbed me so much, should only have filled my heart with tenderness
and pity.”
And he continued his confidences: “The fact is that I did not know how to understand anything! I
ought to have judged by deeds and not by words. She cast her fragrance and her radiance over
me. I ought never to have run away from her... I ought to have guessed all the affection that lay
behind her poor little stratagems. Flowers are so inconsistent! But I was too young to know how to
love her...”
I believe that for his escape he took advantage of the migration of a flock of wild birds. On the
morning of his departure he put his planet in perfect order. He carefully cleaned out his active
volcanoes. He possessed two active volcanoes; and they were very convenient for heating his
breakfast in the morning. He also had one volcano that was extinct. But, as he said, “One never
knows!” So he cleaned out the extinct volcano, too. If they are well cleaned out, volcanoes burn
slowly and steadily, without any eruptions. Volcanic eruptions are like fires in a chimney.
On our earth we are obviously much too small to clean out our volcanoes. That is why they bring
no end of trouble upon us. The little prince also pulled up, with a certain sense of dejection, the
last little shoots of the baobabs. He believed that he would never want to return. But on this last
morning all these familiar tasks seemed very precious to him. And when he watered the flower for
the last time, and prepared to place her under the shelter of her glass globe, he realised that he
was very close to tears. “Goodbye,” he said to the flower. But she made no answer. “Goodbye,”
he said again. The flower coughed. But it was not because she had a cold.
“I have been silly,” she said to him, at last. “I ask your forgiveness. Try to be happy...” He was
surprised by this absence of reproaches. He stood there all bewildered, the glass globe held
arrested in mid-air. He did not understand this quiet sweetness.
“Of course I love you,” the flower said to him. “It is my fault that you have not known it all the
while. That is of no importance. But you, you have been just as foolish as I. Try to be happy... let
the glass globe be. I don’t want it any more.”
“But the wind...” “My cold is not so bad as all that... the cool night air will do me good. I am a
flower.”
“But the animals...” “Well, I must endure the presence of two or three caterpillars if I wish to
become acquainted with the butterflies. It seems that they are very beautiful. And if not the
butterflies and the caterpillars who will call upon me? You will be far away... as for the large
animals, I am not at all afraid of any of them. I have my claws.”
And, naively, she showed her four thorns.
Then she added: “Don’t linger like this. You have decided to go away. Now go!”
For she did not want him to see her crying. She was such a proud flower...
He found himself in the neighbourhood of the asteroids 325, 326, 327, 328, 329, and 330. He
began, therefore, by visiting them, in order to add to his knowledge. The first of them was
inhabited by a king. Clad in royal purple and ermine, he was seated upon a throne, which was at
control application platform:C#: How to Open a File from a URL (HTTP, FTP) in HTML5 Viewer
svg, C#.NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET How to Open a File from a URL (HTTP, FTP) and Show
www.rasteredge.com
control application platform:C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
NET extract PDF pages, VB.NET comment annotate PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET convert PDF to SVG. Able to load PDF document from file formats and url.
www.rasteredge.com
the same time both simple and majestic.
“Ah! Here is a subject,” exclaimed the king, when he saw the little prince coming. And the little
prince asked himself: “How could he recognise me when he had never seen me before?”
He did not know how the world is simplified for kings. To them, all men are subjects. “Approach,
so that I may see you better,” said the king, who felt consumingly proud of being at last a king
over somebody.
The little prince looked everywhere to find a place to sit down; but the entire planet was crammed
and obstructed by the king’s magnificent ermine robe. So he remained standing upright, and, since
he was tired, he yawned.
“It is contrary to etiquette to yawn in the presence of a king,” the monarch said to him. “I forbid
you to do so.”
“I can’t help it. I can’t stop myself,” replied the little prince, thoroughly embarrassed.
“I have come on a long journey, and I have had no sleep...”
“Ah, then,” the king said. “I order you to yawn. It is years since I have seen anyone yawning.
Yawns, to me, are objects of curiosity. Come, now! Yawn again! It is an order.”
“That frightens me... I cannot, any more...” murmured the little prince, now completely abashed.
“Hum! Hum!” replied the king. “Then I... I order you sometimes to yawn and sometimes to” He
sputtered a little, and seemed vexed. For what the king fundamentally insisted upon was that his
authority should be respected. He tolerated no disobedience. He was an absolute monarch. But,
because he was a very good man, he made his orders reasonable.
“If I ordered a general,” he would say, by way of example, “if I ordered a general to change
himself into a sea bird, and if the general did not obey me, that would not be the fault of the
general. It would be my fault.”
“May I sit down?” came now a timid inquiry from the little prince. “I order you to do so,” the king
answered him, and majestically gathered in a fold of his ermine mantle. But the little prince was
wondering... The planet was tiny. Over what could this king really rule?
“Sire,” he said to him, “I beg that you will excuse my asking you a question”
“I order you to ask me a question,” the king hastened to assure him. “Sire, over what do you
rule?” “Over everything,” said the king, with magnificent simplicity.
“Over everything?” The king made a gesture, which took in his planet, the other planets, and all
the stars. “Over all that?” asked the little prince. “Over all that,” the king answered. For his rule
was not only absolute: it was also universal. “And the stars obey you?” “Certainly they do,” the
king said. “They obey instantly. I do not permit insubordination.”
Such power was a thing for the little prince to marvel at. If he had been master of such complete
authority, he would have been able to watch the sunset, not forty-four times in one day, but
seventy-two, or even a hundred, or even two hundred times, with out ever having to move his
chair. And because he felt a bit sad as he remembered his little planet, which he had forsaken, he
plucked up his courage to ask the king a favour:
control application platform:VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
csv to PDF, C#.NET convert PDF to svg, C#.NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images Able to load PDF document from file formats and url in ASP
www.rasteredge.com
control application platform:VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
PDF to Text. Convert PDF to JPEG. Convert PDF to Png to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete
www.rasteredge.com
“I should like to see a sunset... do me that kindness... Order the sun to set...”
“If I ordered a general to fly from one flower to another like a butterfly, or to write a tragic
drama, or to change himself into a sea bird, and if the general did not carry out the order that he
had received, which one of us would be in the wrong?” the king demanded. “The general, or
myself?”
“You,” said the little prince firmly.
“Exactly. One much require from each one the duty which each one can perform,” the king went
on. “Accepted authority rests first of all on reason. If you ordered your people to go and throw
themselves into the sea, they would rise up in revolution. I have the right to require obedience
because my orders are reasonable.”
“Then my sunset?” the little prince reminded him: for he never forgot a question once he had
asked it.
“You shall have your sunset. I shall command it. But, according to my science of government, I
shall wait until conditions are favourable.”
“When will that be?” inquired the little prince. “Hum! Hum!” replied the king; and before saying
anything else he consulted a bulky almanac. “Hum! Hum! That will be about... about... that will be
this evening about twenty minutes to eight. And you will see how well I am obeyed.”
The little prince yawned. He was regretting his lost sunset. And then, too, he was already
beginning to be a little bored. “I have nothing more to do here,” he said to the king. “So I shall set
out on my way again.” “Do not go,” said the king, who was very proud of having a subject. “Do
not go. I will make you a Minister!” “Minister of what?” “Minster of...of Justice!” “But there is
nobody here to judge!” “We do not know that,” the king said to him. “I have not yet made a
complete tour of my kingdom. I am very old. There is no room here for a carriage. And it tires me
to walk.” “Oh, but I have looked already!” said the little prince, turning around to give one more
glance to the other side of the planet.
On that side, as on this, there was nobody at all... “Then you shall judge yourself,” the king
answered. “that is the most difficult thing of all. It is much more difficult to judge oneself than to
judge others. If you succeed in judging yourself rightly, then you are indeed a man of true
wisdom.”
control application platform:VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Able to render and convert PDF document to/from supported document package offers robust APIs for editing PDF document hyperlink (url), which provide
www.rasteredge.com
control application platform:C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to
Convert PDF to Png, Gif, Bitmap PDF. Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit
www.rasteredge.com
“Yes,” said the little prince, “but I can judge myself anywhere. I do not need to live on this planet.
“Hum! Hum!” said the king. “I have good reason to believe that somewhere on my planet there is
an old rat. I hear him at night. You can judge this old rat. From time to time you will condemn him
to death. Thus his life will depend on your justice. But you will pardon him on each occasion; for
he must be treated thriftily. He is the only one we have.”
“I,” replied the little prince, “do not like to condemn anyone to death. And now I think I will go on
my way.” “No,” said the king. But the little prince, having now completed his preparations for
departure, had no wish to grieve the old monarch. “If Your Majesty wishes to be promptly
obeyed,” he said, “he should be able to give me a reasonable order. He should be able, for
example, to order me to be gone by the end of one minute. It seems to me that conditions are
favourable...” As the king made no answer, the little prince hesitated a moment.
Then, with a sigh, he took his leave. “I made you my Ambassador,” the king called out, hastily.
He had a magnificent air of authority.
“The grown-ups are very strange,” the little prince said to himself, as he continued on his journey.
The second planet was inhabited by a conceited man.
“Ah! Ah! I am about to receive a visit from an admirer!” he exclaimed from afar, when he first
saw the little prince coming. For, to conceited men, all other men are admirers.
“Good morning,” said the little prince. “That is a queer hat you are wearing.”
“It is a hat for salutes,” the conceited man replied. “It is to raise in salute when people acclaim
me. Unfortunately, nobody at all ever passes this way.”
“Yes?” said the little prince, who did not understand what the conceited man was talking about.
“Clap your hands, one against the other,” the conceited man now directed him. The little prince
clapped his hands. The conceited man raised his hat in a modest salute. “This is more entertaining
than the visit to the king,” the little prince said to himself. And he began again to clap his hands,
one against the other. The conceited man against raised his hat in salute. After five minutes of
control application platform:XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, Zero Footprint AJAX Document Image
View, Convert, Edit, Sign Documents and Images. Open file from URL (HTTP.FTP are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
control application platform:VB.NET Image: VB Code to Download and Save Image from Web URL
Apart from image downloading from web URL, RasterEdge .NET Imaging SDK still dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
this exercise the little prince grew tired of the game’s monotony. “And what should one do to
make the hat come down?” he asked. But the conceited man did not hear him. Conceited people
never hear anything but praise.
“Do you really admire me very much?” he demanded of the little prince. “What does that mean,
‘admire’?”
“To admire means that you regard me as the handsomest, the best-dressed, the richest, and the
most intelligent man on this planet.” “But you are the only man on your planet!” “Do me this
kindness. Admire me just the same.”
“I admire you,” said the little prince, shrugging his shoulders slightly, “but what is there in that to
interest you so much?”
And the little prince went away. “The grown-ups are certainly very odd,” he said to himself, as he
continued on his journey.
The next planet was inhabited by a tippler.
This was a very short visit, but it plunged the little prince into deep dejection. “What are you
doing there?” he said to the tippler, whom he found settled down in silence before a collection of
empty bottles and also a collection of full bottles.
“I am drinking,” replied the tippler, with a lugubrious air.
“Why are you drinking?” demanded the little prince.
“So that I may forget,” replied the tippler. “Forget what?” inquired the little prince, who already
was sorry for him.
“Forget that I am ashamed,” the tippler confessed, hanging his head.
“Ashamed of what?” insisted the little prince, who wanted to help him.
“Ashamed of drinking!” The tippler brought his speech to an end, and shut himself up in an
impregnable silence.
And the little prince went away, puzzled. “The grown-ups are certainly very, very odd,” he said to
himself, as he continued on his journey.
The fourth planet belonged to a businessman.
This man was so much occupied that he did not even raise his head at the little prince’s arrival.
“Good morning,” the little prince said to him. “Your cigarette has gone out.”
“Three and two make five. Five and seven make twelve. Twelve and three make fifteen. Good
morning. Fifteen and seven make twenty-two. Twenty-two and six make twenty-eight. I haven’t
time to light it again. Twenty-six and five make thirty-one. Phew ! Then that makes five-hundred-
and-one-million, six-hundred-twenty-two-thousand, seven-hundred-thirty-one.”
“Five hundred million what?” asked the little prince. “Eh? Are you still there? Five-hundred-and-
one million, I can’t stop... I have so much to do! I am concerned with matters of consequence. I
don’t amuse myself with balderdash. Two and five make seven...”
“Five-hundred-and-one million what?” repeated the little prince, who never in his life had let go of
a question once he had asked it.
The businessman raised his head. “During the fifty-four years that I have inhabited this planet, I
have been disturbed only three times. The first time was twenty-two years ago, when some giddy
goose fell from goodness knows where. He made the most frightful noise that resounded all over
the place, and I made four mistakes in my addition. The second time, eleven years ago, I was
disturbed by an attack of rheumatism. I don’t get enough exercise. I have no time for loafing. The
third time, well, this is it! I was saying, then, five -hundred-and-one millions”
“Millions of what?” The businessman suddenly realised that there was no hope of being left in
peace until he answered this question.
“Millions of those little objects,” he said, “which one sometimes sees in the sky.” “Flies?” “Oh,
no. Little glittering objects.” “Bees?” “Oh, no. Little golden objects that set lazy men to idle
dreaming. As for me, I am concerned with matters of consequence. There is no time for idle
dreaming in my life.” “Ah! You mean the stars?” “Yes, that’s it. The stars.” “And what do you do
with five-hundred millions of stars?” “Five-hundred-and-one million, six-hundred-twenty-two
thousand, seven-hundred-thirty-one. I am concerned with matters of consequence: I am
accurate.”
“And what do you do with these stars?” “What do I do with them?” “Yes.” “Nothing. I own them.”
“You own the stars?” “Yes.” “But I have already seen a king who...” “Kings do not own, they
reign over. It is a very different matter.”
“And what good does it do you to own the stars?” “It does me the good of making me rich.”
“And what good does it do you to be rich?”
“It makes it possible for me to buy more stars, if any are ever discovered.”
“This man,” the little prince said to himself, “reasons a little like my poor tippler...” Nevertheless,
he still had some more questions. “How is it possible for one to own the stars?” “To whom do they
belong?” the businessman retorted, peevishly. “I don’t know. To nobody.” “Then they belong to
me, because I was the first person to think of it.” “Is that all that is necessary?” “Certainly.
When you find a diamond that belongs to nobody, it is yours. When you discover an island that
belongs to nobody, it is yours. When you get an idea before any one else, you take out a patent on
it: it is yours. So with me: I own the stars, because nobody else before me ever thought of owning
them.”
“Yes, that is true,” said the little prince. “And what do you do with them?”
“I administer them,” replied the businessman. “I count them and recount them. It is difficult. But I
am a man who is naturally interested in matters of consequence.”
The little prince was still not satisfied. “If I owned a silk scarf,” he said, “I could put it around my
neck and take it away with me. If I owned a flower, I could pluck that flower and take it away with
me. But you cannot pluck the stars from heaven...”
“No. But I can put them in the bank.” “Whatever does that mean?” “That means that I write the
number of my stars on a little paper. And then I put this paper in a drawer and lock it with a key.”
“And that is all?”
“That is enough,” said the businessman.
“It is entertaining,” thought the little prince. “It is rather poetic. But it is of no great
consequence.” On matters of consequence, the little prince had ideas, which were very different
from those of the grown-ups.
“I myself own a flower,” he continued his conversation with the businessman, “which I water
every day. I own three volcanoes, which I clean out every week (for I also clean out the one that is
extinct; one never knows). It is of some use to my volcanoes, and it is of some use to my flower,
that I own them. But you are of no use to the stars...”
The businessman opened his mouth, but he found nothing to say in answer. And the little prince
went away. “The grown-ups are certainly altogether extraordinary,” he said simply, talking to
himself as he continued on his journey.
The fifth planet was very strange. It was the smallest of all. There was just enough room on it for
a street lamp and a lamplighter.
The little prince was not able to reach any explanation of the use of a street lamp and a
lamplighter, somewhere in the heavens, on a planet, which had no people, and not one house.
But he said to himself, nevertheless: “It may well be that this man is absurd. But he is not so
absurd as the king, the conceited man, the businessman, and the tippler. For at least his work has
some meaning. When he lights his street lamp, it is as if he brought one more star to life, or one
flower. When he puts out his lamp, he sends the flower, or the star, to sleep. That is a beautiful
occupation. And since it is beautiful, it is truly useful.”
When he arrived on the planet he respectfully saluted the lamplighter.
“Good morning. Why have you just put out your lamp?”
“Those are the orders,” replied the lamplighter. “Good morning.”
“What are the orders?”
“The orders are that I put out my lamp. Good evening.” And he lighted his lamp again. “But why
have you just lighted it again?”
“Those are the orders,” replied the lamplighter.
“I do not understand,” said the little prince.
“There is nothing to understand,” said the lamplighter. “Orders are orders. Good morning.” And
he put out his lamp.
Then he mopped his forehead with a handkerchief decorated with red squares.
“I follow a terrible profession. In the old days it was reasonable. I put the lamp out in the morning,
and in the evening I lighted it again. I had the rest of the day for relaxation and the rest of the
night for sleep.”
“And the orders have been changed since that time?”
“The orders have not been changed,” said the lamplighter. “That is the tragedy! From year to
year the planet has turned more rapidly and the orders have not been changed!”
“Then what?” asked the little prince.
“Then the planet now makes a complete turn every minute, and I no longer have a single second
for repose. Once every minute I have to light my lamp and put it out!”
“That is very funny! A day lasts only one minute, here where you live!”
“It is not funny at all!” said the lamplighter. “While we have been talking together a month has
gone by.”
“A month?”
“Yes, a month. Thirty minutes. Thirty days. Good evening.” And he lighted his lamp again. As the
little prince watched him, he felt that he loved this lamplighter who was so faithful to his orders.
He remembered the sunsets, which he himself had gone to seek, in other days, merely by pulling
up his chair; and he wanted to help his friend.
“You know,” he said, “I can tell you a way you can rest whenever you want to...”
“I always want to rest,” said the lamplighter. For it is possible for a man to be faithful and lazy at
the same time.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested