I
NSTITUTE OF
P
HYSICS
P
UBLISHING
M
ETROLOGIA
Metrologia 41 (2004) 17–32
PII: S0026-1394(04)70012-2
Review of methods for time interval
measurements with picosecond resolution
J´ozef Kalisz
Military University of Technology, Kaliskiego 2, 00-908 Warsaw, Poland
E-mail: jkalisz@wel.wat.edu.pl
Received 29 July 2003
Published 10 December 2003
Online at
stacks.iop.org/Met/41/17(
DOI: 10.1088/0026-1394/41/1/004
)
Abstract
This paper is a review of methods and techniques used for precise
measurement of time intervals (TIs) or precise conversion of TIs to digital
data. The following methods are described: the counter method and
averaging, time stretching, time-to-amplitude conversion followed by
analogue-to-digital conversion, the Vernier method, conversion utilizing
tapped delay lines, and interpolation methods. Special attention has been
paid to converters utilizing integrated delay lines for digital conversion of
TIs, including designs with phase-locked loop and delay-locked loop
circuits. This review is illustrated by design examples and contains a
comprehensive list of references.
1. Introduction
Precise measurements of time intervals (TIs) between two
or more physical events are frequently needed in many
applications in science and industry. In a simple case shownin
figure 1, the time interval T is measured between the leading
edges of two electrical pulses applied to the inputs START
and STOP of the time-interval meter (TIM). The pulses may
be generated by the time discriminators used to extract the
timing information from the pulses received from the detectors
of some physical events, for example, light flashes. Time
discrimination involves the use of advanced methods and
electroniccircuitstoproducethe pulses preciselytimedrelative
to the related events. The definition of the ‘points’ on the time
axis to measure the TI between them becomes a challenging
issue, hard to resolve in applications demanding the highest
accuracy.
It is easy to draw TIM input pulses of zero rise time.
However, real pulses always have a finite slope of the leading
edge, and usually the timing points are referred to the instants
Figure 1. Principle of TI measurement.
when the pulse edges cross an arbitrarily defined threshold
level.
The TIM performs conversion of a time interval T into
a digital (binary) word, frequently displayed in the decimal
form. Therefore aTIMisalsocalledatime-to-digitalconverter
(TDC). Originally this name referred to non-interpolating
TIMs with a short measuring range, usually not longer
than 100 ns to 200ns. Interpolating TIMs, with a longer
range (reaching tenths of seconds), are frequently called time
counters (TCs).
It shouldbe noted thatthe above classification with regard
to TDC and TC is not obligatory in the timing community,
and quite frequently a TC is called a TDC. The name ‘time
digitizer’ is also used in both cases.
Figure 1 shows an exemplary TIM with two sepa-
rate inputs, START and STOP. The TIM can also (or only)
have a single COMMON input. Then the START pulse and
the subsequentSTOP pulse(s)shouldbe generatedonthe same
wire. A useful feature of that mode of operation is virtually
zero offset error, but the shortest measured TIis limited. It has
to be longer than the TIM dead time or the input pulse width
(whichever is greater).
In the real world all repetitive ‘constant’ TIs have some
dispersion (time jitter) caused by the measured physical
phenomena and also introduced by the time discriminators
used. The TIMalso contributes some jitter (due to the inherent
noise) and a measurement uncertainty caused by the non-
linearity of conversion and the quantization process. The total
statistical variation of measured TIs is usually calculated from
0026-1394/04/010017+16$30.00 © 2004 BIPM and IOP Publishing Ltd Printed in the UK
17
Convert pdf to txt - control application system:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to txt - control application system:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
JKalisz
the collected data sample as an estimator, s, of the standard
deviation, σ (sigma, root-mean-square (rms)), following the
ISO Guide called ‘standard uncertainty’, and also called
‘random error’ or ‘precision’.
What does ‘precise’ measurement of TI mean? We can
assume that this featurecan be attributedto suchmeasurements
whose standard uncertainty, s, due to the TIM is less than
1ns (rms). In the best instruments, designed with the use of
advanced methods and modern technologies, the lowest value
of s is between 3 ps and 10 ps, and in interpolating TIMs it
is typically about 20 ps. Values between 50 ps and 500ps are
typical for the instruments employing fully digital processing
methods, i.e. without the use of any intermediate analogue
processing (like time-to-amplitude (T/A) conversion or time
stretching). Due to the rapiddevelopment of new methods and
growth of technology, the new integrated digital TDCs can
achieve s < 50ps.
TIMs are used in science research (experiments in
nuclear physics and astronomy), industry (dynamic testing
of integrated circuits and hard drives), telecommunications
(evaluation of high-speed data transfer), geodesy, and military
equipment (in laser ranging systems).
The basic and most important technical parameters of
TIMs are:
•measurement range (MR),
•standard measurement uncertainty or random error or
precision (s),
•non-linearity of the time-to-digital conversion: differen-
tial (DNL) and integral (INL),
•quantization step (q) or least significant bit (LSB) or
(incremental) resolution (r),
•dead time (T
d
)or the shortest TI between the end of a
measurement and the start of the next one,
•readout speed, important when the measurements are
performed continuously at a high rate and with readout
‘on the fly’.
In this paperI present an overview of some representative
methods and techniques usedfor precise measurements ofTIs.
The main assumption is that the measured TI is defined by the
specific time points on the edges of the related START and
STOP pulses at the inputs of the TDC or TC.
Methods based on digital signal processing (DSP),
commonly used in sampling oscilloscopes, are generally
beyond the scope of this paper. DSP methods are based
on precise sampling and memorizing the signal waveforms
to calculate the TI between specific time points. Advanced
samplingoscilloscopes anddedicatedinstruments arepowerful
(and very costly) measuring tools, which can also be used for
precise TI measurements. Real-time sampling oscilloscopes
are optimized for acquisitions of single-shot events (but not
only these), while random sampling and sequential sampling
oscilloscopes can be usedonly forvisualizationandprocessing
of repetitive signals. The jitter floor can be as low as 1ps to
3ps. Modern sampling oscilloscopes provide high comfort of
operation and comprehensive mathematical processing. Some
oscilloscopes can also be used to advantage as high-quality
time discriminators (figure 1). For example, after acquisition
of a detector pulse, the accurate time position of the centre
of gravity of such a pulse can be computed to determine the
START (or STOP) instant.
The related database of publications is quite large and
thus, unfortunately, this review is not complete due to the
lackofspace(manyvaluable contributions have been omitted).
The classic methods used for measurement of TIs were earlier
presented in a comprehensive review [1].
Many related publications may be found on the Web, for
example with the aid of the search engines at www.scirus.com
and odysseus.ieee.org/ieeesearch, and also in the database of
the United States Patent Office (www.uspto.gov).
In the following text, in descriptions of the digital circuits
the low (L) and high (H) logical levels have been assumed
as equivalent to the logical states ‘0’ and ‘1’, respectively
(positive logic).
2. Measurement methods
2.1. ‘Coarse’ counting
The simplest method of measuring TIs involves the use of a
counter (figure 2(a)) which is driven by the reference clock,
CP, offrequency f
0
orperiod T
0
=1/f
0
.The resolution(LSB)
also equals T
0
. After initial reset R the EN pulse enables the
counter for the duration T to obtain the measurement result
T
p
= nT
0
,where n is the decimal equivalent of the integer
binary number Q read at the counter output.
When using the counter method, we assume that
the measured intervals T are asynchronous with regard to the
clock. It means that neither the origin nor the end of the
measured interval is correlated in time with the clock pulses.
In other words, there is a uniform probability distribution of
the TIbetween the active edge of the clockpulse and the origin
(and the end) of the measured time interval T. In such a case
the maximum quantization error of a single measurement may
(b)
(a)
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Figure 2. Counter as a simple TDC: (a) counting principle,
(b) counting errors (T
p
is the result of counting).
18
Metrologia, 41 (2004) 17–32
control application system:Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
library from RasterEdge PDF document conversion SDK provides reliable and effective .NET solution for Visual C# developers to convert PDF document to editable
www.rasteredge.com
control application system:VB.NET Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in vb.net
Batch convert editable & searchable PDF document from TXT formats in VB.NET class. ' txt convert to pdf Dim txt As BaseDocument = New RasterEdge.XDoc.Converter
www.rasteredge.com
Methods fortime interval measurements
(a)
(b)
Figure 3. Quantization error inherent in the counter method:
(a) example of a negative (ε
1
)and positive (ε
2
)error appearing in
measurements of a constant and asynchronous time interval T ,
(b) standard deviation of measurements shown as a function of c, the
fractional part of the quotient T/T
0
.
reach almost ±T
0
,depending on the true value of the interval
Tand its time location with regard to the clock (figure 2(b)).
When measuring a series of a constant and asynchronous
interval T ,one obtains two results,T
1
<T and T
2
=T
1
+T
0
>
T (figure 3(a)). The probability of each reading depends on
the fractional part c = Frc(T /T
0
):
p(T
1
)= 1 − c
(1a)
and
q(T
2
)= c.
(1b)
The measured TI is
T = pT
1
+qT
2
(2)
and the quantization error is expressed by two values, ε
1
=
T
1
−T < 0 and ε
2
=T
2
−T > 0.
The random error due to quantization can be expressed
by the standard deviation of the related binomial probability
distribution:
σ= T
0
pq = T
0
c(1 − c).
(3)
Thehalf-circle showninfigure3(b)is theplotofthenormalized
standard deviation σ/T
0
=
c(1 − c). The maximum value
σ
max
= T
0
/2 is obtained at c = p = q = 0.5. The
average variance, (σ2)
av
,can be calculated as the integral of
the function σ2(c) within the bounds 0  c  1. It yields
2)
av
=T
2
0
/6
=
0.17T
2
0
. The average standard deviation
can be calculated by integration of (3) or written directly by
using the known formula for area of the half-circle of unity
diameter
σ
av
=
πT
0
8
=0.39T
0
.
(4)
The accuracy of counter measurements can be improved by
taking a series of measurements of the same interval T and
averaging the results [2]. For a given measurement sample of
size N, the results T
1
and T
2
are obtained with the numbers N
1
and N
2
,respectively. Since N
1
+N
2
=N, the corresponding
probabilities can be approximated by p ≈ N
1
/N and q ≈
N
2
/N. The averaged result is
T
N
=
T
1
N
1
+T
2
N
2
N
.
(5)
IfN is large enough,thenT
N
≈T andthe averagequantization
error T
N
−T approaches zero. The random error of T
N
is
lowered by
Nas compared with single-shot measurements,
and the related maximum and average standard deviations are
σ
Nmax
=
T
0
2
N
(6)
and
σ
Nav
=
πT
0
8
N
=0.39
T
0
N
.
(7)
Thus at N = 100 the spread of the averaged result is ten times
lower than that at N = 1. A disadvantage of the averaging
method is the long time needed to take many measurements.
Asubstantial advantage of the counter method is the long
MR (up to hundreds of seconds), which can be achieved in
a relatively simple circuitry, because every additional flip-
flop (FF) in the binary counter multiplies MR by two. Such
coarse counters are also used in precise, interpolating TDCs,
described in section 2.3.
Apractical limitation of the counter method is the low
single-shot resolution, which equals only1 ns ata 1GHzclock.
Such a design requires a stable 1GHz clock generator and a
very fast counter, which are rather expensive devices.
The counter can be designed as a simple ripple counter
(figure 2(a)), but usually it is synchronous, with the maximum
cycle length 2
m
,where m is the number of bits (FFs) of the
counter. A very simple and fast synchronous counter can be
obtained in the structure of the linear feedback shift register
[3,4], because it may require only a single XOR gate as a
feedback. A disadvantage is the pseudo-random output code,
which has to be converted separately to the natural binary or
BCD code. In the counter design gating of the clock pulses
should be avoided because this could cause an additional
erroneous count in some cases [2].
The counter can also be used for TI measurement in the
free-running mode. It means that in the START instant the
current state of the counter is sampled and read on the fly, and
the same operation is also performed in the STOP instant. The
number of counts needed to calculate TI is determined taking
into account the possible overflow of the counter or even the
numberofoverflows (which would require a separate overflow
counter). That kind of operation is preferred when a multistop
or multichannel mode of measurements is needed. To achieve
alowerror (notgreater than one LSB) during readout on thefly
offast synchronous counters, the Graycode is frequentlyused.
2.2. ‘Fine’ measurement methods
Inthis section the basic (non-interpolating)methodsthatutilize
TDCs of a short MR (usually between 10ns and 200ns) and
Metrologia, 41 (2004) 17–32
19
control application system:C# Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in C#.net, ASP
Now you can convert text file to PDF document using Sample code for text to PDF converting in C# DocumentConverter.ToDocument(@"C:\input.txt", @"C:\output.pdf
www.rasteredge.com
control application system:VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
2. To TIFF. Export PDF to TIFF file format. 3. To TXT. Export and convert PDF to TXT file. 4. To Image. Convert PDF to image formats, such as PNG, JPG, BMP and
www.rasteredge.com
JKalisz
have a much better accuracy than the ‘coarse’ counters are
presented. The accuracy of those TDCs is determined mainly
bythenon-linearity (DNLand INL,see section3.1)ofthe time-
to-digital conversion, as in the commonly used analogue-to-
digital converters (ADCs). As a rule, such TDCs are designed
to obtain INL
max
< LSB. When measuring repetitively a
constant time interval T , the observed random error, s, is
mainly caused by the time jitter inherent in the electronic
circuits used. The value of s may be quoted for a given T
(usually s < 10ps) or it may be presented as s
max
within the
whole MR.
These methods canberoughly classified as ‘analogue’ (A)
and ‘digital’ (D). The most popular are
(a) TI stretching (A) followed by the counter method (D),
(b) double conversion: time-to-amplitude (A) followed by
standard analogue-to-digital (A/D) conversion,
(c) the Vernier method with two startable oscillators (D),
(d) time-to-digital conversion utilizing the tapped delay
line (D),
(e) the Vernier method with a ‘differential’ delay line
comprising two tapped delay lines (D).
The methods listed above are utilized in two ways. In
the first one a method is applied without an additional ‘coarse’
real-time counter andthe designedTDC has a reasonably short
MR. In the second one a method is applied with such a coarse
counter, following the interpolation principle (section 2.3).
The relevant instrument is frequently called a TC. The MR
of the TC can be much longer (e.g. 40s). Such a TC contains
the coarse binary counter and a single or two TDCs of a short
MR andhigh resolution to enhance the measurement accuracy.
An exception to this rule is the Vernier method (c), which
inherently utilizes counters and in both solutions allows for a
long MR.
In general, the ‘digital’ methods are preferred because the
classic ‘analogue’ methods are difficult to implement in the
integratedcircuit technology, aremore sensitive to the ambient
temperature,are more susceptible toexternaldisturbances,and
have a longer conversion time.
The classic method of time stretching (figure 4) to obtain
dual-slope conversion was already introduced in the era of
vacuum tubes [5]. The time stretcher performs like a voltage
amplifier, and sometimes is even called a ‘time amplifier’. In
thesteady state thediode, D,conducts current I
2
I
1
.During
the measured interval T , the capacitor, C, is charged with a
constant current (I
1
−I
2
)and then discharged with a much
smaller current, I
2
. The stretching factor is defined as K =
(I
1
−I
2
)/I
2
.The discharging time is stretchedproportionally:
T
r
= T K. The total time (T + T
r
)is detected by a fast
comparator and measured by a simple counter that provides
an effective resolution LSB = T
0
/(K + 1). Ignoring the
quantization and linearity errors, when the count number is
n, the measurement result is nT
0
/(K + 1).
It is clear that the method involves dual conversion:
time/time/digital. This method was used, among others, in
nuclear physics experiments [6], in precision laser ranging
systems for space applications [7,8] and for testing the
dynamic parameters of CMOS digital circuits [9]. The time
stretchers in these applications were built as low-cost, discrete
circuits. An integrated TDC of this type was designed in
BiCMOS technology [10].
Figure 4. Linear stretching of the measured time interval T for
subsequent counting.
Figure 5. Conversion of TI to amplitude followed by a typical A/D
conversion.
The best resolution obtainable with this method is about
10ps. Considerable improvement became possible with the
use of the two-stage time stretching method [11,12]. In this
approach, at T
0
= 10ns (f
0
= 100MHz) and K = 104 a
single-shot resolution of 1 ps was obtained [11,12]. However,
the jitter level was about 5ps and the linearity error about
10ps. Hence the main advantage of the very high resolution
(of very low value) is a small quantization error, which may
be neglected.
Adisadvantage of the time stretching method is the long
conversion time, equal to TK, which limits the maximum
frequency of measurements. A considerable shortening of
this time has been possible with the use of the two-fold
interpolation method [13,14] and the multiple interpolation
method [15], which can be implemented with a reasonably
simple circuitry. Those methods are used only in interpolating
TCs (section 2.3).
In another commonly used method the measured TI is
first converted to a voltage (amplitude) by charginga capacitor
with a constant current, and then the voltage is held briefly to
allowits conversiontodigital form bya typical, integratedA/D
converter (figure 5). After conversion the capacitor is rapidly
discharged to reduce dead time. Thus the conversion time
in this method is equal to that of the A/D converter used. The
method has been used withsuccess in many designs [1,16–20]
and alsoina commercialcounterSR620 (SRS).Usingmodern,
high-resolution, integrated A/C converters this allows us to
achieve a high resolution in TI measurements. In practice an
LSB value of 1 ps to 20ps is readily achieved.
The above two methods are based on analogue processing
of the measured TI. The first truly digital time conversion
method has become the Vernier method (Pierre Vernier,
1584–1638, inventor of the popular Vernier caliper1), which
http://www-history.mcs.st-andrews.ac.uk/history/Mathematicians/
Vernier.html.
20
Metrologia, 41 (2004) 17–32
control application system:C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
2. To TIFF. Export PDF to TIFF file format. 3. To TXT. Export and convert PDF to TXT file. 4. To Image. Convert PDF to image formats, such as PNG, JPG, BMP and
www.rasteredge.com
control application system:C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
Allow users to convert PDF to Text (TXT) file. It's easy to be integrated into your C# program and convert PDF to .txt file with original PDF layout.
www.rasteredge.com
Methods fortime interval measurements
actually is a method of digital time stretching [21,22]. In
the basic configuration of the Vernier converter (figure 6),
two startable oscillators (SG1 and SG2) generate signals
of frequencies f
1
= 1/T
1
and f
2
= 1/T
2
differing only
slightly. The incremental resolution is r = T
1
−T
2
. The
start of the waveform obtained at the output of each generator
is synchronous with the active edge of the related input
signal (START and STOP). The conversion is completed when
coincidence of the active edges of the pulses produced by the
generators is detectedbythecoincidence circuit (CC).Thenthe
respectivecounters,CTR1andCTR2,store the numbers n
1
and
n
2
.When the quantization error is ignored, the measurement
result is
T= (n
1
−1)T
1
−(n
2
−1)T
2
=(n
1
−n
2
)T
1
+(n
2
−1)r.
(8)
When T < T
1
, then n
1
= n
2
and T = (n
2
−1)r. The
use of a single counter, CTR2, is then sufficient. The longest
conversion time is n
2max
T
2
= T
1
T
2
/r. For example, when
T
1
=10ns and T
2
=9.9ns (r = 100ps) that time is 990ns.
The Vernier method described allows us to obtain a
resolution below 100 ps. It was shown [23,24] that in an
improved design the resolution value can be obtained as low
as 1 ps.
To achieve good accuracy of measurements utilizing the
Vernier method, the startable oscillators should have high
accuracy and stability, which poses a hard design challenge,
especiallyatlongTIs. Thereforethedual interpolationmethod
with two Vernier converters is preferred (section 2.3).
Aconceptuallysimple methodofTImeasurementisbased
on the use of the tapped delay line. The line is composed of a
number of delay cells, each having the same (in an ideal case)
propagation delay τ. The TI measurement is accomplished
by sampling the state of the line during propagation of an
Figure 6. TDC based on the Vernier method: (a) circuit example,
(b) example of conversion process at EN = H.
initial (START) pulse. First conventional coaxial cables were
used for this purpose, but following continued growth in
semiconductor technology,newmethods havebeendeveloped,
based on integrated delay lines [25–35]. The first inventions
in this field were filed in the early 1980s [25,26]. The
new integrated TDCs [46–49,52–66] utilize the delay lines
within the phase-locked loop (PLL) or delay-locked loop
(DLL)circuits toachievehigh stabilityandinherent calibration
(section 2.3).
The tapped delay lines can be used in different
configurations (figure 7). In the simplest one (a), the delay
line is created by a train of N cells containing latch FFs,
which are initially transparent (STOP = H) andreset (because
START = L). The rising edge of the START pulse propagates
through consecutive latches having the propagation delay τ
until the falling edge ofthe STOP pulse appears,which latches
the state of all FFs (samples the current state of the line)
and stops the propagation. The measured TI is the sum of
propagation times of all FFs that store the state H, or T = kτ,
where k is the highest position of the FF storing the state
Q = H. The output data are obtained in the thermometer
code, which should be converted to the natural or BCD binary
code as needed by the application.
The delayline can alsobe createdas atrain ofbuffers, each
having the delay τ. In theschemeshowninfigure 7(b)the state
of the line is sampled (by the rising edge of the STOP pulse)
and held (in the edge-triggered D flip-flops FF1,. .. ,FFN).
The measurement result is determined by the highest position
ofthe FF storingthe H state. That method has beenused inthe
commercial frequency and time interval analyser HP5371A
[29] to obtain a 200ps resolution.
If in that configuration the FF inputs of the clock (C)
and data (D) are interchanged, we obtain the circuit shown
in figure 7(c). Here the line operates like a multiphase clock
(a)
(b)
(c)
Figure 7. TDC utilizing the tapped delay line: (a) line comprising
latches, (b) line comprising buffers with simultaneous sampling of
its state, (c) line comprising buffers with successive sampling of the
state of the STOP input.
Metrologia, 41 (2004) 17–32
21
control application system:VB.NET PDF - WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET Program
PDF control. Users can export and convert PDF to Word, Tiff, TXT and various of image file formats. Print PDF in WPF PDF Viewer.
www.rasteredge.com
control application system:C# PDF - Extract Text from Scanned PDF Using OCR SDK
NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images C:\input.pdf"); BasePage page = pdf.GetPage(0 ocrPage.Recognize(); ocrPage.SaveTo(MIMEType.TXT, @"C:\output
www.rasteredge.com
JKalisz
sampling the state of the STOP input. When the STOP pulse
appears, the nearest clock edge changes a FF output to H. If
this does not disable triggering the next FF (by an additional
logic), its output will also be set in the Hstate afterthe delay τ,
and so on. Then the measurement result is given by the lowest
position of the FF that stores the H state.
The above-described ‘delay line’ techniques represent
direct time/digital conversion, that is without any intermediate
processing. The sampling operation results in a negligible
conversion time and therefore such converters are also called
flash TDCs. If the readout time is ignored, the dead time of the
circuit (a) is equal to the time needed to reset all latches in the
line. When the line is reset serially (by setting START = L),
the dead time is Nτ, but when using the parallel reset (using a
separate reset input of all latches) the dead time also becomes
negligibly short. Using separate reset inputs of the FFs in the
circuits (b) and (c) also results in a negligible dead time.
One maypoint out that the use of the tapped delay line for
measurement of TIs is equivalent to the use of a fast counter
driven by a startable clock. For example, the line composed
of latches with τ = 2ns is equivalent to the counter driven by
aclock of frequency equal to 500MHz. The number, N, of
latches in theline is,however, much greater thanthe number,n,
of FFs in the equivalent counter (N = 2
n
). The measuring
range canalso be enlargedmuch more easilyusingthe counter
approach. To double that range using the counter, only one
FF should be added (n
=n + 1), while the length of the line
should be increased two-fold (N = 2N).
An improvement of the basic tapped delay line has been
the ‘pulse-shrinking’ delay line [30,31], which offers better
resolution. It was utilized in a TDC designed for space
instrumentation [32].
A fine resolution of the TDC can also be obtained
using two lines of slightly different cell delays creating the
differential delay line, usually fabricated in an application-
specific integrated circuit (ASIC) [25, 26, 65].
Such a TDC was also designed in a more cost-effective
CMOS FPGA technology [33,34]. The basic time-coding
circuit of this converter is shown in figure 8. It contains two
delay lines with 63 delay cells and the output decoder. Each
delay cell contains the latch L having a delay τ
1
(between the
input, D, and the output, Q) and being a part of the first delay
line,andthenon-invertingbuffer,B,having adelayτ
2
1
and
Figure 8. Example of the differential (Vernier) tapped delay
line [33].
being a part of the second delay line. The input TI is defined
between the rising edges of the pulses START and STOP and
codedinthefirstdelaylineby settingthe Hlevel at the Q output
of the last cell whose C input change (L → H) is ahead of a
similar change at the input D. An average resolution (τ
1
−τ
2
)
of about 200ps was obtained, covering the 10 ns range with
50 cells. The maximum conversion time is 63τ
1
.
Each cell set to the H level generates the reset input signal
to the previous cellin a localfeedbackloop. In this way,all the
cells preceding the last set cell are cleared, and the output from
the line is obtainedin the ‘1-out-of-63’code. To convert it into
6bit natural binary code, an array of multi-input OR gates of
the FPGA device was used. No separate reset input is needed
because in the initial state the line consisting of open latches
(when STOP = L) is transparent to the input START = L.
Figure 9 shows the logic structure of the single delay
cell created within the logic block of the FPGA device
(QuickLogic). The latch (τ
1
)is built with the multiplexer
N and the gates D and E. The non-inverting buffer (τ
2
)is
realizedbythe gate F.One ormoreofthe freeinputs showncan
be connected to the node D and/or the buffer input to increase
the respective delays as needed to obtain minimum linearity
error of conversion.
The designof a precise TDCwith FPGA technology is not
easy, because toobtainlowlinearity error manytrial-and-error
designs have to be testedbefore sufficient experience is gained
and a satisfactory result is obtained. Software simulators are
not accurate enough in such applications. However, when the
design is accepted it can be used for mass production without
further modifications.
It may be noted that the above method of TImeasurement
is similar to the Vernier method described earlier with two
startable oscillators (figure 6). The delays τ
1
and τ
2
may be
regarded as equivalent to the periods T
1
and T
2
. Therefore
the differential line is also called a Vernier delay line [65], and
Figure 9. Delay cell of the differential line shown in figure 8,
created in the FPGA logic block (pASIC1, QuickLogic) [33].
22
Metrologia, 41 (2004) 17–32
Methods fortime interval measurements
Figure 10. Simplified logic diagram of the differential delay line
providing a 100ps resolution in an FPGA device (pASIC2,
QuickLogic) [35].
the respective converter is called a Vernier TDC with delay
lines.
In the improved converter with a Vernier delay line, also
designed in the CMOS FPGA device, a 100 ps resolution was
obtained [35]. The logicofthe delay line is shown in figure10.
Here the time difference is created by two buffers of delays τ
1
and τ
2
,and the coincidence is detected by the D FF whose
output Q is set at the H level.
The use of a more economical, reprogrammable FPGA
device (Virtex XCV300) resulted in the design of TDCs with
100 ps and500ps resolution[81]. Toobtaina 100 ps resolution
the intrinsic carry delay between the logic slices within the
FPGA configurable logic blocks has been utilized to create a
single, 32-tap delay line of the type shown in figure 7(b). The
TDCwith 500 ps resolution utilizes two16-tapdelay lines with
1ns delay per tap. An additional shift of 0.5ns between the
lines creates a virtual 32-tapdelay line with a 0.5ns resolution.
The Vernierdelay line was also usedinthe TDC fabricated
in the CMOS 0.7 µm technology [65] and containing the cells
of a structure similar to that described in [35]. In this design a
high stability and a 30ps resolution were obtained.
2.3. Interpolation methods: coarse and fine measurements
together
The interpolation methods are used when both a long
measuring range and a high resolution are required. The long
MR is provided by the coarse counter driven by the reference
clock (LSB = T
0
), while the high resolution is obtained by the
fine interpolators.
By definition, interpolation is a method for determination
of an approximate value of a function within a range bounded
by two function values. With regard to the TI measurement,
whena timing event, T
x
,occurs between two succeedingstates
of the coarse counter, say between n and (n+1),then T
x
/T
0
=
n
x
+c
x
,wherethe coarse countercontentn
x
=Int(T
x
/T
0
)is an
integer part of the ratio T
x
/T
0
and c
x
=Frc(T
x
/T
0
)represents
the respective fractional part, measured by the interpolator.
The interval T measured with the use of the interpolation
method is decomposed into three intervals. One interval
(which maybe quite long)is measuredinrealtimebythecoarse
counter. The remaining two short intervals are defined at the
beginning and at the end of the interval T (the first when the
START pulse appears and the next at the STOP pulse) and are
measured by a single or two interpolators. Each interpolator
contains the synchronizer, which produces a short TI (usually
between T
0
and 2T
0
), which is measured by a fine TDC of a
short range (usually 2T
0
). The TDC utilizes one of the fine
conversion methods described in the preceding section and
provides high resolution (LSB = T
0
/K, where K = 10–104).
If a startable oscillator is used for coarse counting, then
the START interpolator is not needed because in such a case
c
START
=0.
If the interpolation is performed at the beginning and
at the end of TI, then such an interpolation is called
dual interpolation. Sometimes that term is referred to a
single interpolator, which performs the interpolation in two
succeeding steps and using two separate electronic circuits,
which create a tandem interpolator [13,14]. To avoid
ambiguity, in this paper the latter case will be called a two-
stage interpolation.
Two-stage interpolation can be realized in two ways:
consecutively by two circuits connected in series [13,14] or
simultaneously by two parallel circuits [61]. The correspond-
ing two-stage interpolator may be called, respectively, a serial
or parallel (flash) interpolator.
The interpolation can also be realized in more than
two stages. Recently a three-stage parallel interpolator was
designed [63], and earlier a multiple interpolation method was
described [15], where a single interpolator with a feedback is
repeatedly used in a few consecutive steps at each input event.
The dual interpolation method was first introduced with
the use of the Vernier or digital time stretching method [21]
and later with the use of the analogue processing [36,37]. The
Baronmethod[21] was greatly improved,called‘dualVernier’
and used with success in a commercial TC [38]. The main
invention [39] has been the use of two free-running oscillators
stabilized by the PLL. The oscillators can be momentarily
stopped (PLLs switched out) and then started exactly in-phase
with the beginning of the interpolated TIs. The PLLs are
switched on automatically when theirphase detectors discover
time coincidences. In this way ahigh accuracyof measurement
of even very long TIs was achieved (20ps resolution, 10 s
range).
A detailed analysis of the Nutt method [36,37] has
been presented in [12]. The method has been used with
time stretchers [6–15,17,36] and with T/A + A/D converters
[16,18–20,37]. The latter method has been used in the
commercial counter SR620 (Stanford Research Systems). A
common capacitor for both interpolators has also been used
in some designs. ‘Pulse-shrinking delay lines’ were used
in the specialized TDCs [31, 32]. CMOS FPGA technology
has also been utilized to design a single-chip interpolation
TC [35,40,41]. The leading designs in the CMOS ASIC
technology are presented in the next section.
Figure 11(a) shows an example illustrating the Nutt
method. It has become very popular due to the relative
simplicity of design and low cost while providing high
resolution and large MR. The measured time interval, T , is
decomposed into three parts:
T = n
C
T
0
+T
A
−T
B
,
(9)
where n
C
is the content of the coarse counter operating in real
time. The TIs T
A
and T
B
are measured between the leading
edge of the input pulse (START, STOP) and the second nearest
Metrologia, 41 (2004) 17–32
23
JKalisz
(a)
(b)
Figure 11. The Nutt interpolation method: (a) example of
waveforms, (b) example of the relevant circuit diagram.
clock pulse. The internal signals, ST and SP, are generated to
create the signal enabling the coarse counter. When using
time stretchers, the intervals T
A
and T
B
are stretched by the
respective factors, K
A
and K
B
, and then counted to obtain
the counter contents n
A
and n
B
. Denoting the respective
resolutions as τ
A
=T
0
/K
A
and τ
B
=T
0
/K
B
,we get
T
A
=n
A
τ
A
and
T
B
=n
B
τ
B
.
(10)
These TIs can be expressed similarlywhen the faster and more
precise conversion method of T/A followed by A/D is used
(section 2.2).
An example of the interpolating TC is illustrated by
the simplified logic circuit shown in figure 11(b). Similar
designs are commonly used [6–20]. The circuit contains two
interpolators withshort-range TDCs and the coarse counter. In
eachinterpolator the flip-flopFF1 sets the Hlevel at thenegated
output when the leading edge of the asynchronous input pulse
appears. The 2 bit shift register (FF2 and FF3) is a two-stage
synchronizer detecting the second nearest clock pulse. The
leading edge of the pulse appearing at the FF3 output triggers
FF4, sets ST = H, and completes the complementary pulses
of width T
A
at the FF1 outputs. The coarse counter is enabled
by the XOR gate when CE = ST ⊕ SP = H. The optional
delay, T
d
,compensates for the propagation time of FF4 and
XOR gate if timing is critical (at a high clock frequency).
Traditionally, the main reason for detecting the ‘second
nearest’ clock pulse instead of the ‘first nearest’ has been
the strong non-linearity of the initial part of the transfer
characteristic of thepopularTDCs employing the intermediate
time stretching orT/Aconversion methods. The ‘third nearest’
approach was also used [12].
The synchronizers with two or more stages also help
to reduce or virtually eliminate the adverse influence of the
metastability effect on the accuracy of the interpolating coun-
ters [6,16,24, 60]. The well-known effect of metastability in
FFs [75–77] can be observed when the signal at the FF data
input (D, T , J , K) changes state within a very short time
window around the active edge of the clock signal applied to
the control input (C) of an edge-triggered FF. This results in
random stretching of the FF propagation time, and in some
cases even the final logical state of FF cannot be predicted.
The effect ofsuch a stretching in the single-stage synchronizer
(comprising only a single FF), though appearing very seldom,
may be observed [35].
There are three main sources of errors contributing to the
combinedstandard uncertainty, s, oftheinterpolating counters:
non-linearity of both embedded interpolators, quantization
error, and jitter.
In typical applications,the input START andSTOP pulses
are asynchronous or are not correlated in time with the
reference clock. Then the linearity error is a function of the
measured interval, T . That function is repetitive moduloclock
period T
0
when T is varied, mainly due to the non-linearity of
the short-range TDCs in the interpolators [12]. Thus we may
expect that the behaviour s(T ) is the same when T changes
to T ± iT
0
,where i is an integer. The accurate plot of the
function s(T ) within at least one clock period, T
0
, is the
most representative measure of the standard uncertainty for
agiven interpolating counter. To avoid excessive averaging in
channels of the plot s(T ), a sufficiently narrow channel width
should be chosen. An example of a measured function s(T )
with a channel width 0.1T
0
is shown in figure 17. Clearly a
width of 0.05T
0
would result in a better accuracy.
It also means that the popular plots showing the statistical
dispersion of measurements of a constant interval T are
actually of minor value because many different plots may be
generated within the ‘window’ T
0
. The designer might want
to show the best plot (with s
min
), but for correct evaluation of
the design, the plot with s
max
should rather be shown.
The quantization error appearing in the interpolation
method is the difference between the quantization errors
produced by the START and STOP interpolators. For a given
interval T measured asynchronously, the error induced by
the START interpolator conforms to the uniform distribution,
but the STOP events are strongly correlated in time with the
START events (9). In a simplified theoretical case, when both
interpolators have the same values of ideally linear conversion
factor K being an integer, the value of the quantization error
may be negative or positive, with the respective, normalized
probabilities [12]
P
1
x
η
c
)= 1 − η
c
(11a)
24
Metrologia, 41 (2004) 17–32
Methods fortime interval measurements
and
P
2
x
c
)= η
c
,
(11b)
where η
x
= Frc(Kx) at 0  x  1, η
c
= Frc(Kc),
c = Frc(T /T
0
), and K = T
0
/LSB. This means that the
fraction c is decomposed into Kc quantization steps, each one
of width LSB. The quantization error appears only within the
last step.
In the sample of asynchronous measurements of a time
interval T the probabilities (11) correspond to the normalized
numbers of two-valued hits differing by a single LSB. Then
the quantization error can be represented by the binomial
distribution, as in the simple TCs (section 2.1). The error has
azero mean value but its standard deviation strongly depends
on η
c
or the measured interval T (cf (3) and figure 3(b)):
σ= LSB
(1 − η
c
c
.
(12)
The maximum standard deviation σ = 0.5 LSB is obtained at
η
c
=0.5 and the average standard deviation is (cf (4))
σ
av
=
πLSB
8
=0.39 LSB.
(13)
In real counters the conversion factors K in the interpolators
may be not equal, not exactly integers, and not strictly linear.
Then thequantization steps maynotbe identical (influenced by
non-linearity)and therelevant probabilitydistributions maybe
distorted. Some authors [46,47,56,58]assume thatthe overall
error contribution due to quantization in the real interpolating
counter can be approximated by the rms error of a simple
uniform quantizer, or σ
= LSB/
12
= 0.29LSB. That
measure seems too optimistic in this application.
It should be noted that in a general case the quantization
error is a repetitive (modulo LSB) function of T , like the
linearityerror(modulo T
0
), and the two errorsources combine
to create a non-linear function s(T ) within a ‘window’ T
0
,
or s(c).
The jitter error is caused by the noise inherent in the
components used, jitter contributed by the external signals
(includingthe clock), and the noiseinducedby the environment
(including the power supply). The jittercontribution generally
does not depend on c and creates a ‘floor level’, which usually
is below 10 ps (rms).
Thus, when measuring the characteristic σ(c) at
0< c < 1, we can distinguish the almost constant jitter floor
andthevariable errorcaused bynon-linearityand quantization.
2.4. Interpolating TDCs in CMOS ASIC technology
When ASICs became generally available for custom design
and their manufacturing became economically feasible, the
trend in design of precise time converters shifted towards
‘pure’ digital conversion methods, based on the use of custom
designed, integrated delay lines, and synchronous counters
needed to obtain greater dynamic range. TI measurements
are accomplished by sampling (actually reading) the current
states of the line and the counter,and storing them ‘on the fly’,
(a)
(b)
Figure 12. Basic block diagrams of the PLL (a) and DLL (b).
without interruption of the counting process. Those solutions
have the following distinctive features:
•the delay lines and the complete chips can be designed
specifically for a required application containing a
dedicated control logic and offering, for example, a
multistop (multisampling) operation;
•theuseofaninternal PLL orDLL provides easy,automatic
stabilization of the measuring range and quantization step
(resolution) against ageing and changes of the ambient
temperature and supply voltage;
•the conversion time is virtually zero and the dead time
can be minimized by the use of additional registers and
first-in-first-out (FIFO) memory;
•lower power dissipation, lower chip count, and better
reliability can be obtained than in older technologies.
Precision, integrated TDCs with delay lines are grouped
in two categories, depending on the use of a PLL or DLL
circuit [30]. Both techniques are comparatively described
in the textbook [42]. Figure 12 shows the relevant basic
circuits.
The PLL (figure 12(a)) contains a voltage-controlled
oscillator (VCO), whose frequencyf
0
,after optional dividing,
is compared with the referencefrequency,f
r
.The differenceis
detected, filtered, amplified, and used to adjust the frequency
of the VCO to minimize the difference.
The PLL is a much older idea than the DLL, and was
invented already in the era of vacuum tubes. The design
and analysis of PLL circuits have been described in many
articles and books (e.g. [43,44]). PLL circuits are commonly
used for frequency synthesis. The frequency f
0
can be much
higher than f
r
and can be controlled easily by changing the
dividing ratio in the frequency divider. In a simplified model,
the jitter introduced by the reference source is reduced by
virtue ofthe low-pass behaviourofthe PLL.That is whyPLLs
were first developed to recover data and timing from noisy
communication channels; the VCO acts much like a flywheel
in a mechanical system. However, the inherent jitter of the
VCO is present directly at the output. The output jitter is also
influencedbythe low-frequencyinput jitter(fromthe reference
source), which exists within the PLL band.
Metrologia, 41 (2004) 17–32
25
JKalisz
(a)
(b)
Figure 13. Ring oscillators used in PLL circuits: (a) with odd
number of inverters, (b) with even number of inverters.
In the DLL approach (figure 12(b)) the loop contains the
voltage-controlled delay line (VCDL). The delay, Nτ, of the
line is varied to align the phases at the inputs of the phase
detector. In the ideal case, Nτ = 1/f
0
. A DLL provides
superior jitter performance when a clean reference clock is
available.
Both PLL and DLL circuits have also been successfully
used for aligning the clock in complex digital devices and
systems. For this purpose the circuit elements inducing the
clockskeware insertedin places marked by‘X’in figures 12(a)
(without frequency divider) and (b).
For TI measurements, the free-running VCO in the
integrated PLL loop is usually designed as a ring oscillator.
In the basic configuration it is created by the delay line that
contains an odd number, N, of inverters. The output of the
line is connected to its input, as shown in figure 13(a). The
oscillation period is
T
0
=N(t
pLH
+t
pHL
),
(14)
where t
pLH
and t
pHL
are the respective propagation times of
the inverters I
1
,. .. ,I
N
. In the modified ring counter [45]
containing additional gates, the period (14) has been almost
halved.
Ift
pLH
=t
pHL
=τ, then T
0
=2Nτ, and the signals at the
outputs Q
1
,.. ., Q
N
represent a multiphase clock with delay
step τ = 1/(2Nf
0
). The number of timing signals delayed
by τ is equal to 2N (both rising and falling edges). The ring
counter can also be designed with the asynchronous SR flip-
flops instead of inverters. The invention [80] shows that idea
yet with vacuum tubes and quartz stabilization without using
aDLL or PLL. However, it can be implemented in a modern
integrated circuit.
IntheCMOS timedigitizer[46]afour-stageringoscillator
with frequency 125MHz (T
0
= 8 ns) was used to obtain
LSB = 1 ns. In this design the control voltage of the VCO
was used also to stabilize the separate, startable ring oscillator
[31,32].
Another approach is based on the use of the PLL ring
oscillator as a multiphase clock driving the clock inputs of
the edge-triggered D FFs of the associated register, as shown
previously in figure 7(c). Such a principle was used in the
design of ASIC TDCs of designations TMC-TEG3 [47] and
F1 [48].
The four-channel TMC-TEG3 was developed using a
0.5 µm CMOS sea-of-gates technology.
It contains an
Figure 14. Example of a TDC with the PLL circuit [47].
asymmetric, 32-stage ring oscillator (figure 13(b)), which
delivers an even number of timing signals (M = 32). The
oscillation period is also given by equation (14), where N
should be replaced by M. The number of equally spaced
timing signals (rising edges only), delayed by the resolution
(t
pLH
+t
pHL
), is also equal to M (in this case, not 2M).
Adetailed analysis of this oscillator is presented in the text
[47] where the main circuit blocks of the TDC have also been
described.
The time-digitizing circuit of a single channel contained
in the TMC-TEG3 chip is shown in figure 14. It is also
representative of other PLL designs. The PLL comprises a
phase/frequencydetector, a chargepump, a low-pass filter, and
aVCO (ring oscillator). An external capacitor, C, is used in
the filter. The time-coding register is the same as previously
shown in figure 7(c). At a typical VCO frequency of 40 MHz,
the resolution is 25 ns/32 = 781 ps.
The eight-channel F1 was fabricated with 0.6µm CMOS
sea-of-gates technology and contains 19 inverters of 150 ps
typical delay to create a VCO of the same structure as shown
in figure 14, utilizing both edges of the clock. Thus the typical
frequency, f
0
,of the VCO is 1/(38× 150 ps) ≈175 MHz. The
19 bit register stores the data representing the ‘fine’ part of
the measured TI, which is measured with 150ps resolution.
After conversion to the natural binary code this part represents
an interval equal to a number n times 150ps. The ‘coarse’
counter is driven directly by the VCO and counts the number,
m, of periods T
0
=5.7ns. The dynamic range is determined
by the 16 bit data word or 216 × 150ps ≈ 9.8µs.
In general, when using a VCO to count its periods and
store its state ‘on the fly’, the result of a TI measurement is
obtained as a difference ofthe data sampled first at the START
(n
1
,m
1
)and then at the STOP (n
2
,m
2
)event. This is the dual
sampling principle:
T = (m
2
−m
1
)T
0
+(n
2
−n
1
)r,
(15)
where r is the TDC resolution (LSB). It should be noted again
that the conversion time is virtually zero or the dual sampling
method allows for design of a ‘flash’ TDC. The multistop
(multisampling) operation can be performed by reading the
numbers n and m at succeeding events.
26
Metrologia, 41 (2004) 17–32
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested