modeling (HLM),as Bijmolt and Pieters (2001) suggest.
Consistent with previous meta-analyses in marketing (e.g.,
Rubera and Kirca 2012; Troy, Hirunyawipada, and Paswan
2008), we estimate the models using the maximum likelihood
estimation method because it produces robust, efficient, and
consistent estimates (Hox 2002; Singer and Willet 2003).
The estimated model is as follows:
Level 1: Y
ij
= b
0j
+ b
j
¥X
ij
+ e
ij
, and
Level 2: b
j
= g
0
+ m
j
,
A Meta-Analysis of Electronic Word-of-Mouth Elasticity/ 29
where Y
ij
is the itheWOM volume (or valence) elasticity
from study j, b
0j
is the intercept for the jth study, b
j
is the
parameter estimate of the influencing factors for the jth
study, e
ij
is random error associated with ith elasticity in
study j, g
0
is overall intercept, and m
j
is the study-level
residual error term. The Level 1 equation describes the
impact of the contextual, data, and model characteristics
previously hypothesized on eWOM volume (or valence)
elasticity, which vary at a study level, whereas the Level 2
equation describes the effect of study characteristics on the
intercept and slopes in the Level 1 equation.
Robustness Checks
Before estimating an HLM, we conducted several checks to
ensure the robustness of this meta-analysis. First, we exam-
ined the bivariate correlations among the potential factors
in both volume and valence models and found that some
correlations were greater than .7, indicating potential
collinearity problems (Ofir and Khuri 1986). Specifically,
in the valence model, the correlations between product
durability and omission of marketing-mix variables were
TABLE 3
Summary Statistics of Key Variables
eWOM Volume Model (N = 339)                       eWOM Valence Model (N = 271)
Variable                                          M               SD             Min            Max              M               SD             Min            Max
Dependent Variable (DV)
Volume elasticity                        .236            .526         –1.443           3.08
Valence elasticity                                                                                                    .417          1.491          –5.86            7.73
Independent Variable (IV)
Product durability                       .569            .496           0                  1
Product trialability                      .195            .397           0                  1                .269            .444            0                 1
Observability of product 
consumption                          .507            .501           0                  1                .520            .501            0                 1
Industrygrowth                    –15.420        51.310     –119              140                .719        62.750      –119             140
Competition                           72.540      161.240           7              687            81.770      151.800            7             687
Expertise of eWOM-hosted       .381            .486           0                  1
platform
Trustworthiness of                     .640            .481           0                  1                .387            .488            0                 1
eWOM-hosted platform 
(eWOM motivation)
Trustworthiness of                     .378            .634           0                  2                .063            .272            0                 2
eWOM-hosted platform 
(relationships between 
sender and recipient of 
message)
Advertising                                 .602            .490           0                  1                .860            .348            0                 1
Distribution                                 .652            .477           0                  1                .745            .436            0                 1
Temporal interval of DV             .198            .399           0                  1                .314            .465            0                 1
eWOM volume measure            .475            .500           0                  1
eWOM positive ratings                                                                                          .177            .382            0                 1
eWOM negative ratings                                                                                         .177            .382            0                 1
eWOM valence value                                                                                             .703            .175              .23              .96
Omitted variable: lagged DV     .690            .463           0                  1                .779            .416            0                 1
Omitted variable: valence          .274            .447           0                  1
Omitted variable: volume                                                                                       .103            .305            0                 1
Functional form: multiplicative   .071            .257           0                  1                .092            .290            0                 1
Estimation method: OLS           .599            .491           0                  1                .653            .477            0                 1
Endogeneity                               .307            .462           0                  1                .336            .473            0                 1
Heterogeneity                            .324            .469           0                  1                .310            .463            0                 1
Manuscript status                      .805            .397           0                  1                .882            .323            0                 1
5We estimate the intraclass correlation coefficients (r
1
and r
2
)
for volume and valence models, respectively, which interpret the
proportion of within-study variance to the total variance (Rauden-
bush and Bryk 2001; Snijders and Bosker 1994). In the volume
(valence) model, the within-study variance component is signifi-
cant and equal to .11 (1.04), and the between-studies variance
component is significant and equal to .19 (.15). Thus, the intra-
class correlation coefficient r
1
is .63 (.19/[.19 + .11]) and r
2
is .13
(.15/[.15 + 1.04]), meaning that approximately 63% and 13% of
the variance is between studies in the volume and valence models,
respectively. Therefore, the use of HLM is appropriate in this con-
text (Raudenbush and Bryk 2001).
Convert pdf to word to edit text online - Library SDK API:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to word to edit text online - Library SDK API:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
very high (ranging from .5 for omission of advertising to .8
for omission of distribution), leading us to exclude the dura-
bility variable. In addition, because the correlation between
eWOM platform expertise and trustworthiness (eWOM
motivation) was more than .8 in the valence model and the
expertise of eWOM platform variable was not significant,
we excluded it from further analyses. Furthermore, the
omit-price variable had correlations greater than .7 with
other variables in the volume and valence models and was
insignificant in both models; thus, we also excluded it in the
final models.
Second, we considered various plausible interaction
effects among product characteristics, industry characteris-
tics, platform characteristics, and eWOM metrics in both
volume and valence models. However, due to strong multi-
collinearity caused by adding certain interaction effects, we
could only retain interactions between eWOM valence mea-
sures and product or industry characteristics in the final
valence model; we had to drop all interaction terms from
the volume model. Furthermore, we applied the residual
centering procedure (e.g., De Jong, De Ruyter, and Wetzels
2005; Hennig-Thurau, Houston, and Heitjans 2009; Lance
1988) to rule out any remaining collinearity potentially
caused by adding interaction terms in the valence model.
An inspection of the final models’ variance inflation factors
(4.5 in the volume model and 3.8 in the valence model)
indicates that multicollinearity is not a problem in our
analyses.6
Third, we applied several methods to check the stability
of our results in the final volume and valence models. Only
10 (3) of 171 (171) correlations between key factors in the
volume (valence) model were greater than .5, and no corre-
lation was greater than .7. We performed sensitivity analy-
ses by omitting each of the factors with at least one correla-
tion greater than .5, one at a time, as proposed in previous
meta-analyses (e.g., Bijmolt, Van Heerde, and Pieters
2005). Doing so did not change our findings. Moreover, we
randomly sampled observations from each data set and esti-
mated multiple volume and valence models. The coefficient
estimates were stable in all cases in both volume and
valence models.7
Fourth, we performed a residual analysis of errors to
determine whether the assumptions of HLM are satisfied
(Hox 2002; Singer and Willett 2003). The residual plot did
not show significant violations.8In summary, our extensive
robustness checks rule out multicollinearity and ensure the
stability of our model and results.
Results and Discussion
Univariate Analysis of eWOM Elasticity
In Figure 2, Panels A and B, we present the frequency dis-
tributions of the eWOM volume and valence elasticity esti-
30/ Journal of Marketing, March 2015
mates, respectively. There are 339 (271) eWOM volume
(valence) elasticities with magnitudes ranging from –1.44
(–5.86) to 3.08 (7.73). The overall mean eWOM volume and
valence elasticities in our meta-analysis are .236 (Mdn =
.096, SD = .526) and .417 (Mdn = .147, SD = 1.491). There
were 15 (25) studies reporting negative volume (valence)
elasticities, and these results were usually derived from
studies conducted in the context of experiential products
(books, music, or movies). In the existing eWOM literature,
online consumer reviews can influence product sales
through awareness effects of volume, persuasive effects of
valence, or both (Duan, Gu, and Whinston 2008; Liu 2006).
As the results show, the mean of eWOM valence elasticities
is much higher than that of eWOM volume elasticities,
which highlights the importance of persuasiveness com-
pared with the informative role of eWOM in changing con-
sumer behavior and market outcomes. Furthermore, as
shown in Figure 2, Panels A and B, the distribution of
valence elasticities seems closer to normal, whereas the dis-
tribution of volume elasticities seems bimodal. Using the
HLM model, we analyze the effect of various factors that
may drive this observation.
Effects of Influencing Factors
Effects of contextual factors. Table 4 presents the results
of the HLM regression for the meta-analysis. We used two
fit statistics to verify model fit: (1) Akaike information cri-
terion (AIC) statistics and (2) deviance (–2 log-likelihood
ratio). The final volume model (model with factors:
deviance = 312, AIC = 357) has a better fit than the null
volume model (intercept-only model: deviance = 372, AIC =
379), as does the valence model (model with factors:
deviance = 796, AIC = 856; intercept-only model: deviance =
978, AIC = 984). Consistent with H
1a
, we find that eWOM
volume elasticities (b = .523, p < .05) are greater for
durables than for nondurables. We also find that both
eWOM volume and valence elasticities (respectively, b=
.414, p< .05; b= 1.602, p< .001) are greater for products
with low trialability than for those with high trialability,
which confirms H
2a
and H
2b
. In addition, our results show
that for private (vs. public) goods, eWOM volume elas-
ticities (b b = .462, p < .05) are higher, as are the valence
elasticities (b= 1.396, p< .01). This finding provides sup-
port for H
3a
and H
3b
.
Regarding the influence of industry characteristics on
eWOM effect, we find that the industry growth has no impact
on eWOM volume and valence elasticities, which is con-
trary to H
4a
and H
4b
. However, the results indicate that both
eWOM volume and valence elasticities (respectively, b= 
–.001, p< .01; b= –.005, p< .001) are lower with a greater
level of competition, in line with the effects hypothesized in
H
5a
and H
5b
. Thus, our findings show that information over-
load, which can be driven by increase in product choices,
reduces eWOM elasticity.
With respect to the effect of platform characteristics, we
find that eWOM volume elasticities are greater by .646 (p<
.01) when estimated with reviews on specialized review
sites than when estimated with reviews on general review
sites, in support of H
6a
. Moreover, consistent with H
7a
and
6
We thank an anonymous reviewer for leading us to conduct
this process.
7Detailed results are available upon request.
8
Detailed results are available upon request.
Library SDK API:VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
Convert PDF document to DOC and DOCX formats in Visual Basic control to export Word from multiple PDF files in Create editable Word file online without email.
www.rasteredge.com
Library SDK API:C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
third-party software, you can hardly edit PDF document Under this situation, you need to convert PDF document to some easily editable files like Word document
www.rasteredge.com
A Meta-Analysis of Electronic Word-of-Mouth Elasticity/ 31

 
 
 
  
  
     
 

  
 


< –.5
8
85
79
34
27
36
15
13
16
26
–.5 to 0 0 to .1
.1 to .2 .2 to .3 .3 to .4
.4 to .5 .5 to .6
.6 to 1
> 1
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
eWOM Volume Elasticity
Frequency
FIGURE 2
Frequency Distribution of eWOM Volume and Valence Elasticities
A: Volume Elasticity
B: Valence Elasticity
 
 



 
 

  
 
 
 


 
  



 
  
 
  
 

 
< –1.5
11
6
18
59
90
33
17
12
19
6
–1.5 to –1–1 to –.5 –.5 to 0
0 to .5
.5 to 1
1 to 1.5
1.5 to 2
2 to 4
> 4
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
eWOM Valence Elasticity
Frequency
Library SDK API:VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer. view, Annotate,Convert documents online using ASPX. XImage.Raster. XDoc.PDF. Scanning. Microsoft Office. XDoc.Word. XDoc.Excel. XDoc.PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
Library SDK API:C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
source PDF document file for word processing, presentation extract text content from source PDF document file obtain text information and edit PDF text content
www.rasteredge.com
32/ Journal of Marketing, March 2015
TABLE 4
Estimation Results of HLM
eWOM Volume Elasticity                             eWOM Valence Elasticity
Predicted                                                       Predicted
Variable                                             Estimate      SE       p-Value    Elasticity   Estimate      SE       p-Value    Elasticityb
Constant                                              –1.361        .332        <.001                           –4.330        .916        <.001
Product Characteristics
Product durability
Nondurable                                                                                       –.007
Durable                                            .523        .240          .029          .516
Product trialability
High                                                                                                    .210
Low                                                  .414        .206          .044          .624           1.602        .454        <.001
Observability of product 
consumption
Public                                                                                                  .057
Private                                             .462        .214          .031          .519           1.396        .525          .008
Industry Characteristics
Industry growth                                  –.001        .002          .545                               .0002      .002          .937
Competition                                       –.001        .001          .003                             –.005        .001        <.001
Platform Characteristics
Expertise of eWOM-hosted 
platform
General review sites                                                                           .045
Specialized review sites                  .646        .208          .002          .691
Trustworthiness of eWOM-
hosted platform
Retailers’ sites                                                                                   –.026                                                                  .221
Independent review sites                .496        .193          .010          .469           2.897        .389        <.001          3.121
Community-based sites                  .259        .185          .161                             1.190        .392          .002
versus blogs versus online 
product review sites
Firm Strategic Action
Advertising
Included                                                                                              .165                                                                  .969
Omitted                                            .210        .232          .366          .375             .436        .406          .284          1.405
Distribution
Included                                                                                              .365                                                                  .325
Omitted                                          –.113        .108          .296          .252           1.367        .443          .002          1.692
Data Characteristics
Temporal interval of DV
Others                                                                                                 .178                                                                1.386
Daily                                                .573        .164        <.001          .751           –.133        .346          .700          1.253
eWOM volume measure
Single period                                                                                       .296
Accumulative                                 –.011        .132          .932          .285
eWOM valence measure
Average ratings
Positive ratings                                                                                                        .179        .271          .508
Negative ratings                                                                                                  –1.277        .271        <.001
eWOM valence value                                                                                                1.148        .919          .212
Omitted Variables
Lagged DV
Included                                                                                              .138                                                                1.139
Omitted                                            .222        .128          .083          .360             .263        .258          .309          1.402
Valence
Included                                                                                              .405
Omitted                                          –.417        .191          .029        –.012
Volume
Included                                                                                                                                                                     1.365
Omitted                                                                                                                  –.196        .414          .635          1.169
Library SDK API:VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
C#.NET convert csv to PDF, C#.NET convert PDF to svg, C#.NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET
www.rasteredge.com
Library SDK API:VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
C#.NET convert csv to PDF, C#.NET convert PDF to svg, C#.NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET
www.rasteredge.com
H
7b
, we find that both eWOM volume and valence elas-
ticities (respectively, b= .496, p< .05; b= 2.897, p< .001)
estimated with reviews on independent review sites are
greater than those estimated with reviews on retailers’ sites.
Furthermore, only valence elasticities are greater for plat-
forms with strengthened consumer relationships (b= 1.19, p <
.01), in support of H
8b
; volume elasticities are insensitive to
different platform categories, whether they are community-
based sites, blogs, or online product review sites. This
implies that the relationships between message sender and
recipient influence the persuasive effect, rather than the
awareness effect, of eWOM. In contrast, the awareness
effect prevails when products are expensive and complex
(i.e., durables) or when reviewer expertise is accounted for
(i.e., on specialized review sites).
Effects of other factors. In terms of firm strategic
actions, counterintuitively, we do not find any effects on
either volume or valence elasticity estimates from the omis-
sion of marketing-mix variables, with the exception of
(omission of) distribution on the valence elasticity (positive
A Meta-Analysis of Electronic Word-of-Mouth Elasticity/ 33
and significant; b= 1.367, p< .01). We attribute these find-
ings to the nature of the products studied. A large majority
of the product categories are associated with uniformly
heavy advertising (e.g., cell phones, movies, consumer
electronics) and pricing (movies), which may drive this
result.
Among data characteristics, our results indicate that the
temporal interval of the dependent variable affects eWOM
volume elasticities but not valence elasticities. Specifically,
eWOM volume elasticity estimates increase by .573 (p<
.001) when estimated with daily rather than weekly or
monthly sales data. This is intuitively appealing because
several forms of eWOM have a relatively short life cycle,
and consumers are more likely to be influenced by what is
“trending” than by the qualitative aspects of the conversa-
tion (valence).
Notably, the measure of eWOM volume—that is,
whether it is cumulative or single period—does not have
any effect on volume elasticity estimates. A potential reason
for this finding is that eWOM generates a strong carryover
TABLE 4
Continued
eWOM Volume Elasticity                             eWOM Valence Elasticity
Predicted                                                       Predicted
Variable                                             Estimate      SE       p-Value    Elasticity   Estimate      SE       p-Value    Elasticityb
Model Characteristics
Function form
Others                                                                                                 .315                                                               1.504
Multiplicative                                  –.335        .284         .237           –.020         –1.735       .657         .008           –.231
Estimation method
Others                                                                                                 .390                                                               1.098
OLS                                               –.165        .148         .264            .225            .377         .305         .216           1.475
Endogeneity
Accounted for                                                                                      .257                                                               1.076
Not accounted for                           .111          .113         .326            .368           –.688        .225         .002            .388
Heterogeneity
Accounted for                                                                                      .207                                                               1.096
Not accounted for                           .259         .163         .112            .466            .800         .276         .004           1.896
Other Factors
Manuscript status
Unpublished                                                                                        .051                                                                .843
Published                                       .298         .232         .199            .349            .568         .391         .146           1.411
Interaction Effects
Product trialability ¥                                                                                                 –1.772       .681         .009            .693
Positive ratings
Observability of consumption ¥                                                                                –.907        .654         .166            .192
Positive ratings
Industry growth ¥                                                                                                       .013         .004        <.001
Positive ratings
Competition ¥Positive ratings                                                                                   .011         .007         .119
Product trialability ¥                                                                                                 –3.412       .681        <.001         –2.456
Negative ratings
Observability of consumption ¥                                                                                –.963        .654         .141          –2.957
Negative ratings
Industry growth ¥                                                                                                       .021         .004        <.001
Negative ratings
Competition ¥Negative ratings                                                                                  .026         .007        <.001
aCalculation of predicted elasticities is adapted from Bijmolt, Van Heerde, and Pieters (2005; Table 2).
bPredicted elasticity for interactions in the valence model is provided when both variables take a value of 1. Detailed results are available upon
request.
Library SDK API:VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer. view, Annotate,Convert documents online using ASPX. XImage.Raster. XDoc.PDF. Scanning. Microsoft Office. XDoc.Word. XDoc.Excel. XDoc.PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
Library SDK API:C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Convert to PDF with embedded fonts or without original fonts fast. Able to get word count in PDF pages. Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark.
www.rasteredge.com
effect (e.g., Liu 2006; Trusov, Bucklin, and Pauwels 2009),
which may negate the recency effect on consumer decision
making. The contrast between the impact of aggregation of
dependent and independent variables on eWOM elasticities
is striking.
Furthermore, we find that models using negative ratings
in place of mean ratings are associated with much lower
valence elasticities (b = –1.277, p < .001). This notable
finding may indicate risk aversion by consumers, who react
more negatively to bad product reviews. This in turn leads
to lower elasticities, an effect that would be masked when
using mean ratings.
Our results also show that volume elasticities are posi-
tively affected when a lagged dependent variable is omitted
but negatively affected when valence information is
excluded in the volume models (b= .222, p< .1; b= –.417,
p < .05, respectively). Thus, the inclusion of a lagged
dependent variable in eWOM volume models seems neces-
sary to avoid a positive bias, and the inclusion of valence as
an explanatory variable is associated with an improvement
in volume elasticity estimates. In contrast, the omission of a
lagged dependent variable or volume information does not
affect estimates of valence elasticities.
With regard to the model characteristics, in general we
find that the valence models are more sensitive to issues
such as functional form, endogeneity, and heterogeneity
adjustment than are volume models. Indeed, we find that
volume models are not affected by functional form (multi-
plicative or others), estimation method (OLS or others), or
whether endogeneity or heterogeneity is explicitly accounted
for. Valence models, in contrast, tend to produce lower elas-
ticities when estimated with multiplicative models (b = 
–1.735, p< .01) or when endogeneity is not accounted for
(b= –.688, p< .01), but they produce greater elasticities (b=
.8, p< .01) when estimated with models without hetero-
geneity concerns. We find no publication biases in either
eWOM volume or valence elasticity estimates.
Finally, we find several notable interaction effects to be
significant. Our results show that positive/negative ratings
are more impactful in high-growth industries and less
impactful for low-trialability products. We find positive
interactions between industry growth and both positive and
negative ratings (respectively, b= .013, p< .001; b= .021,
p< .001) and between competition and negative ratings (b=
.026, p < .001). However, we find negative interactions
between product trialability and positive and negative rat-
ings (respectively, b = –1.772, p< .01; b b = –3.412, p<
.001). Thus, polarized ratings are more impactful in turbu-
lent industries either because they attract consumers from
the long tail, especially in online contexts (Brynjolfsson,
Hu, and Simester 2011), or because in such conditions, all
publicity is good publicity. As indicated previously, most of
the studies that find negative elasticities are in the context
of the book and movie industries, providing credence to the
idea that poor ratings can result in sales, especially because
the marginal cost of these products is low. Finally, we find
that consumers discount polarized eWOM ratings for prod-
ucts that cannot be tried before consumption. Next, we dis-
cuss the various implications of these findings.
34/ Journal of Marketing, March 2015
Implications and Future Research
Discussion
Table 5 provides an overview of our key results. By includ-
ing separately collected product, industry, and eWOM plat-
form variables in addition to the standard variables used in
meta-analysis and then modeling them separately on
eWOM volume and valence elasticities, we not only iden-
tify important factors driving eWOM elasticities but also
arrive at a rich set of academic and managerial implications.
Academic contributions. From an academic perspective,
our research makes contributions to both theoretical and
empirical approaches used to analyze eWOM effectiveness.
From a theoretical perspective, our contributions are three-
fold. First, we provide a generalized impact of eWOM vol-
ume and valence on sales after accounting for a large num-
ber of contextual, empirical, and strategic factors. By doing
so, we synthesize extant research on eWOM elasticity and
also provide a comparison between elasticities of eWOM
and other marketing-mix variables (shown in Table 6).
Second, our analysis resolves existing conflicts in this
literature on the effectiveness of eWOM valence and vol-
ume metrics by identifying product, industry, and platform
characteristics that can influence eWOM elasticity. Specifi-
cally, and as noted previously, several studies have found
either a very small effect or a notable lack of impact of
valence on sales (e.g., Duan, Gu, and Whinston 2008; Liu
2006). Our model results demonstrate that valence elas-
ticities will be lower for high-trialability, publicly con-
sumed goods that are rated on retailer sites; they will also
be lower when negative ratings are used as an explanatory
variable. In addition, valence elasticities are much more
sensitive to model and data characteristics, as noted previ-
ously. By showing that the effect of eWOM metrics on sales
is contingent on product, industry, and platform characteris-
tics, we highlight a more nuanced explanation for observed
heterogeneity in eWOM elasticity. Future research (which
we discuss in detail subsequently) should expand on the
various contingencies that might affect the relationship
between these two factors.
Third, we use a cost–benefit of information search argu-
ment to develop our hypotheses, thereby providing greater
insights into when eWOM volume and valence metrics affect
sales. This, combined with our technique of modeling eWOM
volume and valence separately, also overturns several find-
ings from the previous meta-analysis (Floyd et al. 2014).
Specifically, and in contrast to previous findings, we demon-
stratethat (1) product durability, trialability, and observabil-
ity can each affect elasticities; (2) increased competition
lowers volume and valence elasticities; (3) the impact of
platform variables is asymmetric between eWOM volume
and valence elasticities; and (4) the inclusion of negative
ratings (vs. average ratings) drastically affects valence mod-
els, as do model form, endogeneity, and heterogeneity.
From an empirical analysis perspective, these results
also offer several tips for researchers. Capturing the impact
of eWOM volume on sales is easier from a modeling per-
spective because these elasticities are not sensitive to model
form, estimation method, or inclusion of endogeneity or
heterogeneity, thereby giving researchers a great deal of
flexibility in estimating this variable. The robustness of the
relationship between eWOM volume and sales is probably
one reason that a large number of studies have found only
this relationship to be significant. As Tellis (1988) dis-
cusses, an appropriate functional form is an empirical issue,
and our findings confirm that there is no single best model
for eWOM modeling. However, the volume variable may
be biased if the lag structure is not properly captured or if
valence is not accounted for. In contrast, researchers should
exercise caution in using appropriate model form and in
accounting for endogeneity or heterogeneity when studying
the impact of valence; however, this variable is not affected
by lag structure or inclusion of volume as an explanatory
variable. Our findings also indicate that eWOM volume
elasticity estimates  are  greater  when the dependent
variables are at a finer level of aggregation (daily) than a
A Meta-Analysis of Electronic Word-of-Mouth Elasticity/ 35
coarser level (weekly or monthly), which is consistent with
our expectations. Nevertheless, valence elasticity estimates
are not affected by the temporal interval of the dependent
variable, which again provides flexibility to researchers
who do not have access to finely aggregated data. In addi-
tion, the measure of eWOM volume (whether accumulative
or single period) does not bias volume elasticities.
Managerial implications. In revisiting Table 6, we
demonstrate the importance of eWOM to managers. Of all
marketing-mix instruments, eWOM has among the highest
short-term elasticities, with the exception of price elas-
ticities (which are fraught with danger for both top-line
[Nijs et al. 2001] and bottom-line [Pauwels et al. 2004]
metrics). Thus, in eWOM, managers have a powerful tool
to influence consumer preferences. We also find that the
average volume elasticities are much lower and valence
elasticities are higher when a variety of platforms and
Hypo-
Volume
Valence
thesis
Result
Variable
Expected Actual Expected Actual
Inference
H
1
Confirmed
Product 
durability
+
+
+
n.e.
a
The eWOM volume is more effective for
durable goods probably because of the higher
cost associated with a wrong decision.
H
2
Confirmed
Product 
trialability
+
+
+
+
The eWOM volume and valence are more effec-
tive for a product that has lower trialability proba-
bly because consumers can accurately learn
about the fit of the product with user needs
through trials and do not need to rely on eWOM.
H
3
Confirmed
Product 
observability
+
+
+
+
Because consumers cannot view the 
consumption of products with low observability,
eWOM volume and valence are more effective
for these products.
H
4
Rejected
Industry 
growth
+
n.s.
+
n.s.
The eWOM volume and valence elasticities are
not affected by industry growth.
H
5
Confirmed Competition
The eWOM volume and valence elasticities are
negatively affected by increased competition
probably because choice overload reduces
eWOM elasticities.
H
6
Confirmed
Platform 
expertise
+
+
+
n.e.
a
The eWOM volume elasticities are positively
affected by the perceived expertise of the source
of eWOM because it provides more information
and lends credibility to these communications.
H
7
Confirmed
Platform
trust-
worthiness
(eWOM 
motivation)
+
+
+
+
The eWOM volume and valence elasticities are
positively affected by the perceived trustworthi-
ness of the platform with altruistic eWOM 
motivation because it lends credibilityto these
communications.
H
8
Partially 
confirmed
Platform
trust-
worthiness
(relationships
between
eWOM
sender and
recipient)
+
n.s.
+
+
eWOM valence elasticities are positively
affected by the perceived trustworthiness of the
platform with strengthened relationships
between message sender and recipient
because of inferred credibility from these 
relationships on persuasive effect of eWOM. 
TABLE 5
Key Inferences from Analysis
aWe were unable to include product durability and platform expertise in the valence model due to multicollinearity.
Notes: n.s. = not significant; n.e. = not estimable.
sources are accounted for, rather than just the online prod-
uct reviews that Floyd et al. (2014) consider. However, our
subsequent analysis shows that practitioners should not
ignore industry, platform, and other contextual factors in
their calculation of effectiveness of eWOM.
Our study provides clear directions for managers of
durable, low-trialability, privately consumed products. Such
managers can benefit more from eWOM because both 
volume and valence elasticities are positively affected for
these categories. In general, it can be expected that high-
involvement, experience product categories, for which con-
sumers typically engage in extensive prepurchase informa-
tion searches, may exhibit greater effectiveness of both
eWOM volume and valence.
The analysis of industry characteristics provides further
directions for managers. Managers in industries in which
competitive pressures are intense should be wary of relying
on eWOM alone for generating sales: our results indicate
that industry competition is associated with lower elas-
ticities. In contrast, managers in more mature and stable set-
tings (with relatively lower levels of competition) can uti-
lize eWOM as a powerful tool in their marketing mix. More
broadly, insofar as these results are driven by advertising
share of voice and an expanding and evolving product
offering, we would expect that product life cycle may also
affect eWOM elasticities. Thus, managers in such volatile
environments may be well advised not to overly depend on
eWOM to drive sales but to rely more on traditional means
of advertising and promotion.
Importantly, we find that the medium is indeed the mes-
sage, and the type of platform that carries the information
has a large impact on its effectiveness. We have argued that
the main drivers behind the impact of eWOM are its acces-
sibility and trustworthiness, and these factors are further
amplified by the medium. Consumers trust eWOM from
neutral, expert-driven third-party sources more, as is
reflected in higher elasticities for both volume and valence
for information originating from such sites. In addition to
36/ Journal of Marketing, March 2015
highlighting the importance of critics in a wide variety of
industries, this finding also explains the popularity of inde-
pendent, user review–driven sites such as Yelp.com. Thus,
we demonstrate that not all social media and eWOM are
created equal. We discuss this idea in more detail in the fol-
lowing section.
Intriguingly, our finding that eWOM valence elasticities
are lower when negative ratings are included in a model
offers a warning for managers: ignoring consumer com-
plaints on the Internet can be a risky proposition. This finding
not only explains the growing roles of social media managers
and online community managers in organizations but also
prompts laggard firms to pay special attention to this aspect
of firm-related consumer-to-consumer communication.
Future Research
Our findings help us generate avenues for future research.
We discuss these avenues in the following subsections.
Better understanding of how product characteristics
influence eWOM elasticity. In addition to product durabil-
ity, trialability, and observability identified in our study,
several other product characteristics may also influence
eWOM elasticity. For example:
•Luxury products versus commodity products. The openness of
online platforms might generate more information on luxury
brands; alternatively, consumers with high “need for unique-
ness” (Cheema and Kaikati 2010) might be reluctant to rec-
ommend luxury products, which are purchased for exclusiv-
ity and prestige. Future research should provide a more
nuanced understanding of whether eWOM has a differential
impact on sales of luxury and commodity products and deter-
mine which eWOM metric (volume or valence) plays a rela-
tively larger role in generating sales for luxury brands.
•Interaction between product characteristics and consumer
search motives. Although our results show that consumers are
more responsive to eWOM for durables, we do not directly
observe consumer information search behavior. Thus, future
studies might explore how product characteristics may inter-
Marketing Instruments
Article
Mean Elasticity
Advertising elasticities
Assmus, Farley, and Lehmann (1984)
.22 (short-term)
.41 (long-term)
Sethuraman, Tellis, and Briesch (2011)
.12 (short-term)
.24 (long-term)
Price elasticities
Tellis (1988)
–1.76
Bijmolt, Van Heerde, and Pieters (2005) –2.62
Pharmaceutical promotional 
elasticities
Kremer et al. (2008)
.33 (detailing)
.12 (direct-to-physician advertising)
.06 (other direct-to-physician instruments)
.07 (direct-to-consumer advertising)
Personal selling elasticities
Albers, Mantrala, and Sridhar (2010)
.31 (short-term)
.75 (long-term)
Online product review elasticities
Floyd et al. (2014)
.69 (volume)
.35 (valence)
eWOM elasticities
Current research
.236 (volume)
.417 (valence)
TABLE 6
Comparison with Other Marketing Instrument Elasticities
act with consumer information search motive (prepurchase
vs. ongoing search) to affect eWOM effectiveness.
Understanding the effect of environmental characteris-
tics on eWOM elasticity. Our findings indicate that environ-
mental characteristics significantly influence eWOM elas-
ticities. However, we have only scratched the surface with
regard to this relationship. The resource dependence per-
spective (Pfeffer and Salancik 1978) identifies three critical
dimensions of any environment that influence performance:
munificence (i.e., the industry’s ability to accommodate
growth of all firms within the industry), dynamism (i.e.,
unpredictability in the industry), and complexity (i.e.,
heterogeneity or concentration of resources in the industry;
Bahadir, Bharadwaj, and Parzen 2009; Dess and Beard
1984). Industry clock speed (a measure of the rate of innova-
tionin the industry; e.g., Souza, Bayus, and Wagner 2004)
and industry advertising intensity (the level of competition
on traditional advertising within the industry) are also key
operating environment characteristics that can influence
firm performance through eWOM generated. Thus, future
research could explore the effectiveness of eWOM volume
and valence in generating sales in an industry environment
that varies in (1) munificence, (2) dynamism, (3) com-
plexity, (4) clock speed, and (5) advertising.
Understanding the effect of eWOM sender and recipient
characteristics on eWOM elasticities. Prior research has
shown that people differ in their motivation to spread
eWOM and to take actions on the basis of eWOM (Zhang,
Moe, and Schweidel 2013). We identify two factors that
future studies could examine:
•Organic versus incentivized eWOM. Content that consumers
feel intrinsically motivated to publish and share on social
media is considered organic eWOM, whereas content
“encouraged” by firm rewards is called incentivized eWOM.
The motives of the eWOM sender may affect how a message
is perceived by its recipients and thus may have an impact on
eWOM effectiveness. Future research could provide a clear
understanding on this topic.
•Recipient heterogeneity. Future studies could investigate how
recipient characteristics such as prior knowledge and main-
A Meta-Analysis of Electronic Word-of-Mouth Elasticity/ 37
stream product versus niche product preferences influence
the effect of eWOM on sales.
Understanding the joint effect of eWOM metrics better.
Although most researchers have examined eWOM volume
and valence effects independently in previous studies, anec-
dotal evidence suggests that consumers may evaluate
eWOM volume and valence simultaneously and jointly
from multiple platforms when making their purchase deci-
sions. Thus, future research could provide a deeper under-
standing of how eWOM volume and valence may interact
with each other across different online platforms to influ-
ence consumer purchase behavior.
Understanding the interplay between traditional media
and eWOM. Extensive research has been conducted on media
synergies (e.g., Naik and Raman 2003) for traditional media,
and yet the interplay between advertising and eWOM has
been understudied. In particular, very few prior studies distin-
guish broadcasting and print media.9It would be worthwhile
to understand whether there are differences in the effective-
ness of traditional media such as broadcasting and print
advertising in generating eWOM across online platforms
and determine the effectiveness of these advertisements in
attracting the right sources of WOM (e.g., early adopters).
Conclusion
The objectives of this study are (1) to draw insights from
the existing literature on eWOM to shed light on the factors
that influence eWOM elasticities and (2) to provide impli-
cations for researchers and managers and future research
avenues in this evolving field. We find that the average
eWOM volume (valence) elasticity across the 339 (271)
observations is .236 (.417) and identified a large number of
contextual, strategic, and empirical factors that affect these
relationships. These findings shed light on whether, how, and
under what conditions eWOM works. Our research there-
fore provides multiple contributions to this important field.
Growth,” International Journal of Research in Marketing, 26
(4), 263–75.
Bansal, Harvir S. and Peter A. Voyer (2000), “Word-of-Mouth
Processes Within a Services Purchase Decision Context,” Jour-
nal of Service Research, 3 (2), 166–77.
Bawa, Kapil and Robert Shoemaker (2004), “The Effects of Free
Sample Promotions on Incremental Brand Sales,” Marketing
Science, 23 (3), 345–63.
Beatty, Sharon E. and Scott M. Smith (1987), “External Search
Effort: An Investigation Across Several Product Categories,”
Journal of Consumer Research, 14 (1), 83–95.
Belk, Russell (1988), “Possessions and Self,” in Wiley International
Encyclopedia of Marketing. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.
———, Kenneth D. Bahn, and Robert N. Mayer (1982), “Develop-
mental Recognition of Consumption Symbolism,” Journal of
Consumer Research, 9 (1), 4–17.
REFERENCES10
Agarwal, Ritu and Jayesh Prasad (1997), “The Role of Innovation
Characteristics and Perceived Voluntariness in the Acceptance
of Information Technologies,” Decision Sciences, 28 (3), 557–
82.
Albers, Sonke, Murali K. Mantrala, and Shrihari Sridhar (2010),
“Personal Selling Elasticities: A Meta-Analysis,” Journal of
Marketing Research, 47 (October), 840–53.
Assmus, Gert, John U. Farley, and Donald R. Lehmann (1984),
“How Advertising Affects Sales: Meta-Analysis of Economet-
ric Results,” Journal of Marketing Research, 21 (February),
65–74.
Bahadir, S. Cem, Sundar Bharadwaj, and Michael Parzen (2009),
“A Meta-Analysis of the Determinants of Organic Sales
9
We thank an anonymous reviewer for this suggestion.
10Studies included in our meta-analysis data set and used in the
body of the article are marked with asterisk (*). For a full set of
studies included in our data set, see Theme 1 in the Web Appendix.
Berger, Jonah and Chip Heath (2007), “Where Consumers Diverge
from Others: Identity Signaling and Product Domains,” Jour-
nal of Consumer Research, 34 (2), 121–34.
Bickart, Barbara and Robert M. Schindler (2001), “Internet
Forums as Influential Sources of Consumer Information,”
Journal of Interactive Marketing, 15 (3), 31–40.
Bijmolt, Tammo H.A. and Rik G.M. Pieters (2001), “Meta-Analysis
in Marketing When Studies Contain Multiple Measurements,”
Marketing Letters, 12 (2), 157–69.
———, Harald J. van Heerde, and Rik G.M. Pieters (2005), “New
Empirical Generalizations on the Determinants of Price Elas-
ticity,” Journal of Marketing Research, 42 (May), 141–56.
Bikhchandani, Sushil, David Hirshleifer, and Ivo Welch (1992),
“A Theory of Fads, Fashion, Customer, and Cultural Change as
Informational Cascades,” Journal of Political Economy, 100
(5), 992–1026.
Botti, Simona and Sheena S. Iyengar (2006), “The Dark Side of
Choice: When Choice Impairs Social Welfare,” Journal of
Public Policy & Marketing, 25 (Spring), 24–38.
Brown, Jacqueline Johnson and Peter H. Reingen (1987), “Social
Ties and Word-of-Mouth Referral Behavior,” Journal of Con-
sumer Research, 14 (3), 350–62.
Brynjolfsson, Erik, Yu Hu, and Duncan Simester (2011), “Good-
bye Pareto Principle, Hello Long Tail: The Effect of Search
Costs on the Concentration of Product Sales,” Management
Science, 57 (8), 1373–86.
Chandy, Rajesh K. and Gerard J. Tellis (2000), “The Incumbent’s
Curse? Incumbency, Size, and Radical Product Innovation,”
Journal of Marketing, 64 (July), 1–17.
Cheema, Amar and Andrew M. Kaikati (2010), “The Effect of
Need for Uniqueness on Word of Mouth,” Journal of Market-
ing Research, 47 (June), 553–63.
*Chen, Yubo, Qi Wang, and Jinhong Xie (2011), “Online Social
Interactions: A Natural Experiment on Word of Mouth Versus
Observational Learning,” Journal of Marketing Research, 48
(April), 238–54.
——— and Jinhong Xie (2005), “Third Party Product Review and
Firm Marketing Strategy,” Marketing Science, 24 (2), 218–40.
——— and ——— (2008), “Online Consumer Review: Word-of-
Mouth as a New Element of Marketing Communication Mix,”
Management Science, 54 (3), 477–91.
Chernev, Alexander (2003), “When More Is Less and Less Is More:
The Role of Ideal Point Availability and Assortment in Con-
sumer Choice,” Journal of Consumer Research, 30 (2), 170–83.
Cheung, Christy M.K. and Matthew K.O. Lee (2012), “What Drives
Consumers to Spread Electronic Word of Mouth in Online
Consumer-Opinion Platforms,” Decision Support Systems, 53
(1), 218–25.
*Chintagunta, Pradeep K., Shyam Gopinath,  and Sriram
Venkataraman (2010), “The Effects of Online User Reviews on
Movie Box Office Performance: Accounting for Sequential
Rollout and Aggregation Across Local Markets,” Marketing
Science, 29 (5), 944–57.
De Jong, Ad, Ko de Ruyter, and Martin Wetzels (2005),
“Antecedents and Consequences of Group Potency: A Study of
Self-Managing Service Teams,” Management Science, 51 (11),
1610–25.
Denson, Nida and Michael H. Seltzer (2011), “Meta-Analysis in
Higher Education: An Illustrative Example Using Hierarchical
Linear Modeling,” Research in Higher Education, 52 (3), 215–
44.
Dess, Gregory G. and Donald W. Beard (1984), “Dimensions of
Organizational Task Environments,” Administrative Science
Quarterly, 29 (1), 52–73.
Dholakia, Utpal M., Suman Basuroy, and Kerry Soltysinski
(2002), “Auction or Agent (or Both)? A Study of Moderators of
the Herding Bias in Digital Auctions,” International Journal of
Research in Marketing, 19 (2), 115–30.
38/ Journal of Marketing, March 2015
*Duan, Wenjing, Bin Gu, and Andrew B. Whinston (2008), “The
Dynamics of Online Word-of-Mouth and Product Sales—An
Empirical Investigation of the Movie Industry,” Journal of
Retailing, 84 (2), 233–42.
Escalas, Jennifer Edson and James R. Bettman (2003), “You Are
What They Eat: The Influence of Reference Groups on Con-
sumers’ Connections to Brands,” Journal of Consumer Psy-
chology, 13 (3), 339–48.
Farley, John U. and Donald R. Lehmann (1977), “An Overview of
Empirical Applications of Buyer Behavior Systems Models,”
in Advances in Consumer Research, W.D. Perrault, ed. Atlanta:
Association for Consumer Research, 337–41.
Floyd, Kristopher, Ryan Freling, Saad Alhoqail, Hyun Young Cho,
and Traci Freling (2014), “How Online Product Reviews
Affect Retail Sales: A Meta-Analysis,” Journal of Retailing, 90
(2), 217–32.
*Forman, Chris, Anindya Ghose, and Batia Wiesenfeld (2008),
“Examining the Relationship Between Reviews and Sales: The
Role of Reviewer Identity Disclosure in Electronic Markets,”
Information Systems Research, 19 (3), 291–313.
Gemmill, Marin C., Joan Costa-Font, and Alistair McGuire
(2007), “In Search of a Corrected Prescription Drug Elasticity
Estimate: A Meta-Regression Approach,” Health Economics,
16 (6), 627–43.
Goldsmith, Ronald E. and David Horowitz (2006), “Measuring
Motivations for Online Opinion Seeking,” Journal of Interac-
tive Advertising, 6 (2), 2–14.
*Gu, Bin, Jaehong Park, and Prabhudev Konana (2012), “The
Impact of External Word-of-Mouth Sources on Retailer Sales
for High  Involvement Products,”  Information  Systems
Research, 23 (1), 182–96.
Hennig-Thurau, Thorsten, Mark B. Houston, and Torsten Heitjans
(2009), “Conceptualizing and Measuring the Monetary Value
of Brand Extensions: The Case of Motion Pictures,” Journal of
Marketing, 73 (November), 167–83.
Hox, Joop J. (2002), Multilevel Analysis: Techniques and Applica-
tion. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
Hulland, John S. and Don N. Kleinmuntz (1994), “Factors Influ-
encing the Use of Internal Summary Evaluations Versus Exter-
nal Information in Choice,” Journal of Behavioral Decision
Making, 7 (2), 79–102.
Iyengar, Sheena S. and Mark R. Lepper (2000), “When Choice Is
Demotivating: Can One Desire Too Much of a Good Thing?”
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 79 (6), 995–
1006.
Jacoby, Jacob, Donald E. Speller, and Carol A. Kohn (1974),
“Brand Choice Behavior as a Function of Information Load,”
Journal of Marketing Research, 11 (February), 63–69.
Kelman, H.C. (1961), “Processes of Opinion Change,” Public
Opinion Quarterly, 25, 57–78.
Kim, Byung-Do and Mary W. Sullivan (1998), “The Effect of Par-
ent Brand Experience on Line Extension Trial and Repeat Pur-
chase,” Marketing Letters, 9 (2), 181–93.
Klein, Lisa R. and Gary T. Ford (2003), “Consumer Search for
Information in the Digital Age: An Empirical Study of Prepur-
chase Search for Automobiles,” Journal of Interactive Market-
ing, 17 (3), 29–49.
Kleine, Robert, E., Susan Schultz Kleine, and Jerome B. Kernan
(1993), “Mundane Consumption and the Self: A Social-Identity
Perspective,” Journal of Consumer Psychology, 2 (3), , 209–
235.
Klepper, Steven (1996), “Entry, Exit, Growth, and Innovation over
the Product Life Cycle,” American Economic Review, 86 (3),
562–83.
Krasnikov, Alexander and Satish Jayachandran (2008), “The Rela-
tive Impact of Marketing, Research-and-Development, and
Operations Capabilities on Firm Performance,” Journal of
Marketing, 72 (July), 1–11.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested