Color management
436
Converting .pdf to text - Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
convert pdf to txt format online; convert pdf to rich text format
Converting .pdf to text - VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
text from pdf; convert pdf to editable text
Understanding color management
To the top
To the top
Why colors sometimes don’t match
What is a color management system?
Do you need color management?
Creating a viewing environment for color management
A color management system reconciles color differences among devices so that you can be reasonably certain of the colors your system
ultimately produces. Viewing color accurately allows you to make sound color decisions throughout your workflow, from digital capture through final
output. Color management also allows you to create output based on ISO, SWOP, and Japan Color print production standards.
Why colors sometimes don’t match
No device in a publishing system is capable of reproducing the full range of colors viewable to the human eye. Each device operates within a
specific color space that can produce a certain range, or gamut, of colors.
A color model determines the relationship between values, and the color space defines the absolute meaning of those values as colors. Some
color models (such as CIE L*a*b) have a fixed color space because they relate directly to the way humans perceive color. These models are
described as being device-independent. Other color models (RGB, HSL, HSB, CMYK, and so forth) can have many different color spaces.
Because these models vary with each associated color space or device, they are described as being device-dependent.
Because of these varying color spaces, colors can shift in appearance as you transfer documents between different devices. Color variations can
result from differences in image sources; the way software applications define color; print media (newsprint paper reproduces a smaller gamut than
magazine-quality paper); and other natural variations, such as manufacturing differences in monitors or monitor age.
Color gamuts of various devices and documents
A.Lab color space B.Documents (working space) C.Devices
What is a color management system?
Color-matching problems result from various devices and software using different color spaces. One solution is to have a system that interprets
and translates color accurately between devices. A color management system (CMS) compares the color space in which a color was created to
the color space in which the same color will be output, and makes the necessary adjustments to represent the color as consistently as possible
among different devices.
A color management system translates colors with the help of color profiles. A profile is a mathematical description of a device’s color space. For
example, a scanner profile tells a color management system how your scanner “sees” colors. Adobe color management uses ICC profiles, a format
defined by the International Color Consortium (ICC) as a cross-platform standard.
Because no single color-translation method is ideal for all types of graphics, a color management system provides a choice of rendering intents, or
translation methods, so that you can apply a method appropriate to a particular graphics element. For example, a color translation method that
preserves correct relationships among colors in a wildlife photograph may alter the colors in a logo containing flat tints of color.
Note: Don’t confuse color management with color correction. A color management system won’t correct an image that was saved with tonal or
color balance problems. It provides an environment where you can evaluate images reliably in the context of your final output.
437
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
HTML webpage will have original formatting and interrelation of text and graphical Besides, this PDF converting library also makes PDF document visible and
pdf to text; conversion of pdf image to text
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
Allow users to convert PDF to Text (TXT) file. This C#.NET PDF converting library is a professional and advanced PDF document manipulating control which can be
convert pdf to text file online; change pdf to txt format
To the top
To the top
Do you need color management?
Without a color management system, your color specifications are device-dependent. You might not need color management if your production
process is tightly controlled for one medium only. For example, you or your print service provider can tailor CMYK images and specify color values
for a known, specific set of printing conditions.
The value of color management increases when you have more variables in your production process. Color management is recommended if you
anticipate reusing color graphics for print and online media, using various kinds of devices within a single medium (such as different printing
presses), or if you manage multiple workstations.
You will benefit from a color management system if you need to accomplish any of the following:
Get predictable and consistent color output on multiple output devices including color separations, your desktop printer, and your monitor.
Color management is especially useful for adjusting color for devices with a relatively limited gamut, such as a four-color process printing
press.
Accurately soft-proof (preview) a color document on your monitor by making it simulate a specific output device. (Soft-proofing is subject to
the limitations of monitor display, and other factors such as room lighting conditions.)
Accurately evaluate and consistently incorporate color graphics from many different sources if they also use color management, and even in
some cases if they don’t.
Send color documents to different output devices and media without having to manually adjust colors in documents or original graphics. This
is valuable when creating images that will eventually be used both in print and online.
Print color correctly to an unknown color output device; for example, you could store a document online for consistently reproducible
on-demand color printing anywhere in the world.
Creating a viewing environment for color management
Your work environment influences how you see color on your monitor and on printed output. For best results, control the colors and light in your
work environment by doing the following:
View your documents in an environment that provides a consistent light level and color temperature. For example, the color characteristics of
sunlight change throughout the day and alter the way colors appear on your screen, so keep shades closed or work in a windowless room.
To eliminate the blue-green cast from fluorescent lighting, you can install D50 (5000° Kelvin) lighting. You can also view printed documents
using a D50 lightbox.
View your document in a room with neutral-colored walls and ceiling. A room’s color can affect the perception of both monitor color and
printed color. The best color for a viewing room is neutral gray. Also, the color of your clothing reflecting off the glass of your monitor may
affect the appearance of colors on-screen.
Remove colorful background patterns on your monitor desktop. Busy or bright patterns surrounding a document interfere with accurate color
perception. Set your desktop to display neutral grays only.
View document proofs in the real-world conditions under which your audience will see the final piece. For example, you might want to see
how a housewares catalog looks under the incandescent light bulbs used in homes, or view an office furniture catalog under the fluorescent
lighting used in offices. However, always make final color judgements under the lighting conditions specified by the legal requirements for
contract proofs in your country.
Legal Notices   |   Online Privacy Policy
438
VB.NET PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file
achieved with this VB.NET tutorial of PDF to text conversion Conversion of MS Office to PDF. give a series of demo code directly for converting MicroSoft Office
convert pdf into text file; convert pdf to text format
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
Word converting toolkit is its industry-leading converting accuracy tables and chats) of original PDF file and maintains the original text style (including
convert pdf to word text document; convert pdf to txt batch
Keeping colors consistent
To the top
To the top
About color management in Adobe applications
Basic steps for producing consistent color
Synchronize color settings across Adobe applications
Set up color management
Managing process and spot colors
About color management in Adobe applications
Adobe color management helps you maintain the appearance of colors as you bring images in from external sources, edit documents and transfer
them between Adobe applications, and output your finished compositions. This system is based on conventions developed by the International
Color Consortium, a group responsible for standardizing profile formats and procedures so that consistent and accurate color can be achieved
throughout a workflow.
By default, color management is turned on in color-managed Adobe applications. If you purchased the Adobe Creative Suite, color settings are
synchronized across applications to provide consistent display for RGB and CMYK colors. This means that colors look the same no matter which
application you view them in.
Color settings for Adobe Creative Suite are synchronized in a central location through Adobe Bridge.
If you decide to change the default settings, easy-to-use presets let you configure Adobe color management to match common output conditions.
You can also customize color settings to meet the demands of your particular color workflow.
Keep in mind that the kinds of images you work with and your output requirements influence how you use color management. For example, there
are different color-consistency issues for an RGB photo printing workflow, a CMYK commercial printing workflow, a mixed RGB/CMYK digital
printing workflow, and an Internet publishing workflow.
Basic steps for producing consistent color
1. Consult with your production partners (if you have any) to ensure that all aspects of your color management
workflow integrate seamlessly with theirs.
Discuss how the color workflow will be integrated with your workgroups and service providers, how software and hardware will be configured for
integration into the color management system, and at what level color management will be implemented. (See Do you need color management?.)
2. Calibrate and profile your monitor.
A monitor profile is the first profile you should create. Seeing accurate color is essential if you are making creative decisions involving the color
you specify in your document. (See Calibrate and profile your monitor.)
439
Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
Professional PDF to text converting library from RasterEdge PDF document conversion SDK provides reliable and effective .NET solution for Visual C# developers
convert pdf to txt file format; convert .pdf to text
C# PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in C#.net, ASP
Support converting PDF document to SVG image within C#.NET it is quite necessary to convert PDF document into As SVG images are defined in XML text lines, they
convert pdf to word searchable text; convert pdf file to text online
To the top
To the top
To the top
3. Add color profiles to your system for any input and output devices you plan to use, such as scanners and printers.
The color management system uses profiles to know how a device produces color and what the actual colors in a document are. Device profiles
are often installed when a device is added to your system. You can also use third-party software and hardware to create more accurate profiles for
specific devices and conditions. If your document will be commercially printed, contact your service provider to determine the profile for the printing
device or press condition. (See About color profilesand Install a color profile.)
4. Set up color management in Adobe applications.
The default color settings are sufficient for most users. However, you can change the color settings by doing one of the following:
If you use multiple Adobe applications, use Adobe® Bridge to choose a standard color management configuration and synchronize color
settings across applications before working with documents. (See Synchronize color settings across Adobe applications.)
If you use only one Adobe application, or if you want to customize advanced color management options, you can change color settings for a
specific application. (See Set up color management.)
5. (Optional) Preview colors using a soft proof.
After you create a document, you can use a soft proof to preview how colors will look when printed or viewed on a specific device. (See Proofing
colors.)
Note: A soft proof alone doesn’t let you preview how overprinting will look when printed on an offset press. If you work with documents that
contain overprinting, turn on Overprint Preview to accurately preview overprints in a soft proof.
6. Use color management when printing and saving files.
Keeping the appearance of colors consistent across all of the devices in your workflow is the goal of color management. Leave color management
options enabled when printing documents, saving files, and preparing files for online viewing. (See Color-managing PDFs for printing (Acrobat
Pro)and Color-managing documents for online viewing.)
Synchronize color settings across Adobe applications
If you use Adobe Creative Suite, you can useAdobe Bridge to automatically synchronize color settings across applications. This synchronization
ensures that colors look the same in all color-managed Adobe applications.
If color settings are not synchronized, a warning message appears at the top of theColor Settings dialog box in each application. Adobe
recommends that you synchronize color settings before you work with new or existing documents.
1. Open Bridge.
To open Bridge from a Creative Suite application, choose File > Browse. To open Bridge directly, either choose Adobe Bridge from the Start
menu (Windows) or double-click the Adobe Bridge icon (Mac OS).
2. Choose Edit > Creative Suite Color Settings.
3. Select a color setting from the list, and click Apply.
If none of the default settings meet your requirements, select Show Expanded List Of Color Setting Files to view additional settings. To
install a custom settings file, such as a file you received from a print service provider, click Show Saved Color Settings Files.
Set up color management
1. Select the Color Management category of the Preferences dialog box.
2. Select a color setting from the Settings menu, and click OK.
The setting you select determines which color working spaces are used by the application, what happens when you open and import files
with embedded profiles, and how the color management system converts colors. To view a description of a setting, select the setting and
then position the pointer over the setting name. The description appears at the bottom of the dialog box.
Note: Acrobat color settings are a subset of those used in InDesign, Illustrator, and Photoshop.
In certain situations, such as if your service provider supplies you with a custom output profile, you may need to customize specific options
in the Color Settings dialog box. However, customizing is recommended for advanced users only.
Note: If you work with more than one Adobe application, it is highly recommended that you synchronize your color settings across
applications. (See Synchronize color settings across Adobe applications.)
Managing process and spot colors
When color management is on, any color you apply or create within a color-managed Adobe application automatically uses a color profile that
corresponds to the document. If you switch color modes, the color management system uses the appropriate profiles to translate the color to the
new color model you choose.
Keep in mind the following guidelines for working with process and spot colors:
440
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Best C#.NET PDF converter SDK for converting PDF to Tiff in Visual Studio .NET project. C# programming sample for PDF to Tiff image converting.
converting pdf to editable text; c# pdf to txt
VB.NET PDF- HTML5 PDF Viewer for VB.NET Project
NET read PDF, VB.NET convert PDF to text, VB.NET VB.NET PDF- HTML5 PDF Viewer for VB.NET Online Guide for Viewing, Annotating And Converting PDF Document with
convert pdf to word and edit text; convert pdf to txt file online
Choose a CMYK working space that matches your CMYK output conditions to ensure that you can accurately define and view process
colors.
Use Lab values (the default) to display predefined spot colors (such as colors from the TOYO, PANTONE, DIC, and HKS libraries) and
convert these colors to process colors. Using Lab values provides the greatest accuracy and guarantees the consistent display of colors
across Creative Suite applications.
Note: Color-managing spot colors provides a close approximation of a spot color on your proofing device and monitor. However, it is difficult to
exactly reproduce a spot color on a monitor or proofing device because many spot color inks exist outside the gamuts of many of those devices.
Legal Notices   |   Online Privacy Policy
441
Color-managing documents
To the top
To the top
To the top
Color-managing documents for online viewing
Proofing colors
Color-managing PDFs for printing (Acrobat Pro)
Color-managing documents for online viewing
Color management for online viewing is very different from color management for printed media. With printed media, you have far more control
over the appearance of the final document. With online media, your document will appear on a wide range of possibly uncalibrated monitors and
video display systems, significantly limiting your control over color consistency.
When you color-manage documents that will be viewed exclusively on the web, Adobe recommends that you use the sRGB color space. sRGB is
the default working space for most Adobe color settings, but you can verify that sRGB is selected in the Color Management preferences. With the
working space set to sRGB, any RGB graphics you create will use sRGB as the color space.
When you export PDFs, you can choose to embed profiles. PDFs with embedded profiles reproduce color consistently under a properly configured
color management system. Keep in mind that embedding color profiles increases the size of PDFs. RGB profiles are usually small (around 3 KB);
however, CMYK profiles can range from 0.5 to 2 MB.
Proofing colors
In a traditional publishing workflow, you print a hard proof of your document to preview how its colors will look when reproduced on a specific
output device. In a color-managed workflow, you can use the precision of color profiles to soft-proof your document directly on the monitor. You
can display an on-screen preview of how your document’s colors will look when reproduced on a particular output device.
Keep in mind that the reliability of the soft proof depends upon the quality of your monitor, the profiles of your monitor and output devices, and the
ambient lighting conditions of your work environment.
Note: A soft proof alone doesn’t let you preview how overprinting will look when printed on an offset press. If you work with documents that
contain overprinting, turn on Overprint Preview to accurately preview overprints in a soft proof.
Using a soft proof to preview the final output of a document on your monitor
A.Document is created in its working color space. B.Document’s color values are translated to color space of chosen proof profile (usually the
output device’s profile). C.Monitor displays proof profile’s interpretation of document’s color values.
Soft-proof colors (Acrobat Pro)
1. Choose Tools > Print Production >Output Preview.
2. Choose the color profile of a specific output device from the Simulation Profile menu.
3. Choose any additional soft-proof options:
Simulate Black Ink Simulates the dark gray you really get instead of a solid black on many printers, according to the proof profile. Not all
profiles support this option.
Simulate Paper Color Simulates the dingy white of real paper, according to the proof profile. Not all profiles support this option.
Color-managing PDFs for printing (Acrobat Pro)
When you createAdobe PDFs for commercial printing, you can specify how color information is represented. The easiest way to do this is using a
PDF/X standard. For more information about PDF/X and how to create PDFs, search Help.
In general, you have the following choices for handling colors when creating PDFs:
(PDF/X-3) Does not convert colors. Use this method when creating a document that will be printed or displayed on various or unknown
442
devices. When you select a PDF/X-3 standard, color profiles are automatically embedded in the PDF.
(PDF/X-1a) Converts all colors to the destination CMYK color space. Use this method if you want to create a press-ready file that does not
require any further color conversions. When you select a PDF/X-1a standard, no profiles are embedded in the PDF.
Note: All spot color information is preserved during color conversion; only the process color equivalents convert to the designated color space.
Legal Notices   |   Online Privacy Policy
443
Color-managing documents
To the top
To the top
To the top
Color-managing documents for online viewing
Proofing colors
Color-managing PDFs for printing (Acrobat Pro)
Color-managing documents for online viewing
Color management for online viewing is very different from color management for printed media. With printed media, you have far more control
over the appearance of the final document. With online media, your document will appear on a wide range of possibly uncalibrated monitors and
video display systems, significantly limiting your control over color consistency.
When you color-manage documents that will be viewed exclusively on the web, Adobe recommends that you use the sRGB color space. sRGB is
the default working space for most Adobe color settings, but you can verify that sRGB is selected in the Color Management preferences. With the
working space set to sRGB, any RGB graphics you create will use sRGB as the color space.
When you export PDFs, you can choose to embed profiles. PDFs with embedded profiles reproduce color consistently under a properly configured
color management system. Keep in mind that embedding color profiles increases the size of PDFs. RGB profiles are usually small (around 3 KB);
however, CMYK profiles can range from 0.5 to 2 MB.
Proofing colors
In a traditional publishing workflow, you print a hard proof of your document to preview how its colors will look when reproduced on a specific
output device. In a color-managed workflow, you can use the precision of color profiles to soft-proof your document directly on the monitor. You
can display an on-screen preview of how your document’s colors will look when reproduced on a particular output device.
Keep in mind that the reliability of the soft proof depends upon the quality of your monitor, the profiles of your monitor and output devices, and the
ambient lighting conditions of your work environment.
Note: A soft proof alone doesn’t let you preview how overprinting will look when printed on an offset press. If you work with documents that
contain overprinting, turn on Overprint Preview to accurately preview overprints in a soft proof.
Using a soft proof to preview the final output of a document on your monitor
A.Document is created in its working color space. B.Document’s color values are translated to color space of chosen proof profile (usually the
output device’s profile). C.Monitor displays proof profile’s interpretation of document’s color values.
Soft-proof colors (Acrobat Pro)
1. Choose Tools > Print Production >Output Preview.
2. Choose the color profile of a specific output device from the Simulation Profile menu.
3. Choose any additional soft-proof options:
Simulate Black Ink Simulates the dark gray you really get instead of a solid black on many printers, according to the proof profile. Not all
profiles support this option.
Simulate Paper Color Simulates the dingy white of real paper, according to the proof profile. Not all profiles support this option.
Color-managing PDFs for printing (Acrobat Pro)
When you createAdobe PDFs for commercial printing, you can specify how color information is represented. The easiest way to do this is using a
PDF/X standard. For more information about PDF/X and how to create PDFs, search Help.
In general, you have the following choices for handling colors when creating PDFs:
(PDF/X-3) Does not convert colors. Use this method when creating a document that will be printed or displayed on various or unknown
444
devices. When you select a PDF/X-3 standard, color profiles are automatically embedded in the PDF.
(PDF/X-1a) Converts all colors to the destination CMYK color space. Use this method if you want to create a press-ready file that does not
require any further color conversions. When you select a PDF/X-1a standard, no profiles are embedded in the PDF.
Note: All spot color information is preserved during color conversion; only the process color equivalents convert to the designated color space.
Legal Notices   |   Online Privacy Policy
445
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested