The National Physical Laboratory is operated on behalf of the DTI by NPLManagement Limited, a wholly owned subsidiary of Serco Group plc
A Beg
i
nne
r
'
s Gu
i
de
t
o Un
c
e
r
t
a
i
n
t
y o
f
Measu
r
emen
t
Stephanie Bell
I
ssue 2
No. 11
Measuremen
t
Good Prac
t
ice Guide
Convert pdf to text online no email - software application dll:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to text online no email - software application dll:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
A Beginner’s Guide to Uncertainty of Measurement 
Stephanie Bell 
Centre for Basic, Thermal and Length Metrology
National Physical Laboratory 
The  aim  of  this  Beginner’s  Guide  is  to  introduce  the  subject  of  measurement 
Every measurement is subject to some uncertainty. A measurement result is only 
f  it  is  accompanied  by  a  statement  of  the  uncertainty  in  the  measurement. 
nt  uncertainties can  come from the  measuring  instrument, from the  item being 
rom the environment, from the operator, and from other sources. Such uncertainties 
ated using statistical analysis of a set of measurements, and using other kinds of 
about the measurement process. There are established rules for how to calculate an 
mate of uncertainty from these individual pieces of information. The use of good 
uch as traceable calibration, careful calculation, good record keeping, and checking – 
measurement uncertainties. When the uncertainty in a measurement is evaluated and 
itness for purpose of the measurement can be properly judged. 
software application dll:RasterEdge.com General FAQs for Products
Q3: Why there's no license information in my it via the email which RasterEdge's online store sends powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
software application dll:RasterEdge Product License Agreement
is active, you may contact RasterEdge via email. permitted by applicable law, in no event shall powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
www.rasteredge.com
August 1999 
Issue 2 with amendments March 2001 
National Physical Laboratory 
Teddington, Middlesex, United Kingdom, TW11 0LW 
was produced under the Competing Precisely project - a measurement awareness 
paign within the National Measurement Partnership Programme, managed on behalf 
by the National Physical Laboratory.  NPL is the UK’s centre for measurement 
nd associated science and technology. 
formation, or for help with measurement problems, contact the NPL Helpline on: 
80 or e-mail: enquiry@npl.co.uk. 
software application dll:VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
C#.NET PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF Convert Excel to PDF document free
www.rasteredge.com
software application dll:C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
or no border. Free online Excel to PDF converter without email. Quick integrate online C# source code into .NET class. C# Demo Code: Convert Excel to PDF in
www.rasteredge.com
urement...................................................................................................................1 
What is a measurement?..........................................................................................1 
What is not a measurement?....................................................................................1 
rtainty of measurement..........................................................................................1 
What is uncertainty of measurement? .....................................................................1 
Expressing uncertainty of measurement..................................................................1 
Error versus uncertainty ..........................................................................................2 
Why is uncertainty of measurement important?......................................................2 
statistics on sets of numbers.................................................................................3 
‘Measure thrice, cut once’ ... operator error...........................................................3 
Basic statistical calculations....................................................................................4 
Getting the best estimate - taking the average of a number of readings..................4 
How many readings should you average? ...............................................................4 
Spread ... standard deviation...................................................................................5 
Calculating an estimated standard deviation...........................................................6 
How many readings do you need to find an estimated standard deviation?............7 
e do errors and uncertainties come from?..........................................................7 
eneral kinds of uncertainty in any measurement...............................................9 
Random or systematic.............................................................................................9 
Distribution - the ‘shape’ of the errors....................................................................9 
5.2.1  Normal distribution.....................................................................................9 
5.2.2  Uniform or rectangular distribution...........................................................10 
5.2.3  Other distributions.....................................................................................10 
What is not a measurement uncertainty?...............................................................10 
to calculate uncertainty of measurement...........................................................11 
The two ways to estimate uncertainties.................................................................11 
Eight main steps to evaluating uncertainty............................................................12 
r things you should know before making an uncertainty calculation...............12 
Standard uncertainty..............................................................................................12 
7.1.1  Calculating standard uncertainty for a Type A evaluation ........................13 
7.1.2  Calculating standard uncertainty for a Type B evaluation.........................13 
software application dll:VB.NET Image: RasterEdge JBIG2 Codec Image Control for VB.NET
in PDF file can also be viewed and processed online through our VB.NET PDF web viewer. coding algorithm to encode images which are neither text or halftones
www.rasteredge.com
software application dll:C#: Frequently Asked Questions for Using XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .
If you have additional questions or requests, please send email to support@rasteredge. com. The site configured in IIS has no permission to operate.
www.rasteredge.com
to express the answer...........................................................................................17 
ple - a basic calculation of uncertainty..............................................................17 
The measurement - how long is a piece of string?................................................17 
Analysis of uncertainty - spreadsheet model.........................................................21 
r statements (e.g. compliance with specification) ..............................................21 
to reduce uncertainty in measurement ..............................................................22 
other good measurement practices....................................................................23 
f calculators..........................................................................................................24 
Calculator keys......................................................................................................24 
Calculator and software errors...............................................................................24 
Scaling...................................................................................................................25 
Rounding...............................................................................................................26 
ning more and putting it into practice................................................................27 
s of warning.........................................................................................................27 
er reading.............................................................................................................28 
Understanding the terminology..........................................................................30 
software application dll:C# Tiff Convert: How to Convert Dicom to Tiff Image File
in C# program, there would be no need for dcm"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.tif"; // Convert Dicom to You may directly copy and paste this PDF to
www.rasteredge.com
software application dll:RasterEdge Product License Options
Among all listed products on purchase page, Twain SDK has no Server License and only SDK To know more details or make an order, please contact us via email.
www.rasteredge.com
ner’s Guide  will not teach you all you will need to know to perform your own 
analysis. But it explains the most important things you need to understand before 
ster the subject. It will prepare you to read the more advanced and authoritative texts 
nty.  In particular,  this  Guide  will  be  useful  preparation for reading  the United 
ccreditation Service (UKAS) Publication M 3003, ‘The Expression of Uncertainty 
ence in Measurement’, and the Publication EA-4/02 of the European co-operation 
tation (EA), ‘Expression of the Uncertainty in Measurement and Calibration’. 
le are daunted by the subject of measurement uncertainty. It is a subject that is 
nderstood, from the factory floor to the highest academic circles.  It is a complicated 
still evolving. So there is a great need for a guide that provides clear, down-to-earth 
s, easy enough for non-expert readers. In the development of this Beginner’s Guide, 
en taken to make the explanations and examples understandable to anyone who can 
ort time it takes to read it. On most pages, examples are given of uncertainties that 
everyday situations.  
ner’s Guide is not the ‘last word’ on uncertainty of measurement - far from it.  It 
he basic concepts. Although what you can read here is correct and in line with good 
is not complete or rigorous. It does not cover any difficult or special cases. (Section 
of warning’, briefly lists some cases where the basic procedures given in this Guide 
e sufficient.) For more complete information, the references detailed in the ‘Further 
ction should be consulted. 
sections  of this  Beginner’s Guide, the concept and importance of measurement 
are introduced. Following this, details are given of how to estimate uncertainties in 
rement  situations.  The  main  steps  involved  in  calculating  the  uncertainty  for  a 
nt are outlined with easy to follow examples. Finally a glossary, some cautionary 
d list of publications for further reading are given, to direct you towards the next 
erstanding and calculating measurement uncertainties. 
go to John Hurll of UKAS and Maurice Cox of NPL for their assistance during the 
his document, and also to the many other people who supplied valuable comments 
during the review process. 
Stephanie Bell 
1
or how long it is. A measurement gives a number to that property. 
nts  are  always  made  using  an  instrument  of  some  kind.  Rulers,  stopwatches, 
ales, and thermometers are all measuring instruments. 
f a measurement is normally in two parts: a number and a unit of measurement, e.g. 
is it? ... 2 metres.’ 
at is not a measurement? 
ome processes that might seem to be measurements, but are not. For example, 
two pieces of string to see which is longer is not really a measurement. Counting is 
y viewed as a measurement. Often, a test is not a measurement: tests normally lead 
’ answer or a ‘pass/fail’ result. (However, measurements may be part of the process 
o a test result.) 
certainty of measurement 
at is uncertainty of measurement? 
inty of a measurement tells us something about its quality.  
of measurement 
is the doubt that exists about the result of any measurement. You 
that well-made rulers, clocks and thermometers should be trustworthy, and give the 
rs. But for every measurement - even the most careful - there is always a margin of 
eryday speech, this might be expressed as ‘give or take’ ... e.g. a stick might be two 
‘give or take a centimetre’. 
ressing uncertainty of measurement 
is always a margin of doubt about any measurement, we need to ask ‘How big is the 
d ‘How bad is the doubt?’ Thus, two numbers are really needed in order to quantify 
e, at the 95 percent confidence level. This result could be written:  
20 cm ±1 cm, at a level of confidence of 95%. 
ent says that we are 95 percent sure that the stick is between 19 centimetres and 
res long. There are other ways to state confidence levels. More will be said about 
, in Section 7. 
or versus uncertainty  
nt not to confuse the terms ‘error’ and ‘uncertainty’.  
e difference between the measured value and the ‘true value’ of the thing being 
is a quantification of the doubt about the measurement result. 
possible  we  try  to  correct  for  any  known 
errors
:  for  example,  by  applying 
from calibration certificates. But any error whose value we do not know is a source 
ty. 
y is uncertainty of measurement important? 
e interested in uncertainty of measurement simply because you wish to make good 
surements and to understand the results. However, there are other more particular 
thinking about measurement uncertainty. 
making the measurements as part of a: 
tion - where the uncertainty of measurement must be reported on the certificate 
here the uncertainty of measurement is needed to determine a pass or fail 
3
sic statistics on sets of numbers 
easure thrice, cut once’ ... 
operator error
aying among craftsmen, ‘Measure thrice, cut once’. This means that you can reduce 
making a mistake in the work by checking the measurement a second or third time 
roceed.  
‘Measure thrice, cut once’.  You can reduce the risk of making a mistake  
by checking the measurement a second or third time. 
wise to make any measurement at least three times. Making only one measurement 
a mistake could go completely unnoticed. If you make two measurements and they 
e, you still may not know which is ‘wrong’. But if you make three measurements, 
ree with each other while the third is very different, then you could be suspicious 
ird. 
to guard against gross mistakes, or operator error, it is wise to make at least three 
measurement. But uncertainty of measurement is not really about operator error. 
ther good reasons for repeating measurements many times. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested