Measurement Good Practice Guide No. 11 (Issue 2) 
4
3.2  Basic statistical calculations 
You  can  increase  the  amount  of  information  you  get  from  your  measurements  by  taking  a 
number of readings and carrying out some basic statistical calculations. The two most important 
statistical calculations are to find the average or arithmetic mean, and the standard deviation 
for a set of numbers. 
3.3  Getting the best estimate - taking the average of a number of 
readings 
If repeated measurements give different answers, you may not be doing anything wrong. It may 
be due to natural variations in what is going on. (For example, if you measure a wind speed 
outdoors, it will not often have a steady value.) Or it may be because your measuring instrument 
does not behave in a completely stable way. (For example, tape measures may stretch and give 
different results.) 
If there is variation in readings when they are repeated, it is best to take many readings and take 
an average. An average gives you an estimate of the ‘true’ value.  An 
average
or 
arithmetic 
mean is usually shown by a symbol with a bar above it, e.g. 
x (‘x-bar’) is the mean value of x. 
Figure 1 shows an illustration of a set of values and their mean value. Example 1 shows how to 
calculate an arithmetic mean. 
Mean or average reading
Value of reading
Figure 1. ‘Blob plot’ illustrating an example set of values and showing the mean 
3.4  How many readings should you average? 
Broadly speaking, the more measurements you use, the better the estimate you will have of the 
‘true’  value.   The ideal would be to find the mean from an infinite set of values. The more 
results you use, the closer you get to that ideal estimate of the mean.  But performing more 
readings takes extra effort, and yields ‘diminishing returns’. What is a good number?  Ten is a 
Converting pdf to editable text - Library application class:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Converting pdf to editable text - Library application class:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
Measurement Good Practice Guide No. 11 (Issue 2) 
5
popular choice because it makes the arithmetic easy.  Using 20 would only give a slightly better 
estimate than 10. Using 50 would be only slightly better than 20. As a rule of thumb usually 
between 4 and 10 readings is sufficient.
Example 1. Taking the average or arithmetic mean of a number of values
Suppose you have a set of 10 readings. To find the average, add them together and divide 
by the number of values (10 in this case). 
The readings are:   16, 19, 18, 16, 17, 19, 20, 15, 17 and 13 
The sum of these is: 
170 
The average of the 10 readings is: 
10
170
= 17    
3.5  Spread ... 
standard deviation
When repeated measurements give different results, we want to know how widely spread the 
readings are. The spread of values tells us something about the uncertainty of a measurement. 
By knowing how large this spread is, we can begin to judge the quality of the measurement or 
the set of measurements. 
Sometimes it is enough to know the range between the highest and lowest values. But for a 
small set of values this may not give you useful information about the spread of the readings in 
between the highest and the lowest. For example, a large spread could arise because a single 
reading is very different from the others. 
The  usual  way to quantify  spread  is  standard deviation.  The  standard  deviation of  a  set  of 
numbers tells us about how different the individual readings typically are from the average of 
the set. 
As a ‘rule of thumb’, roughly two thirds of all readings will fall between plus and minus (±) one 
standard deviation of the average. Roughly 95% of all readings will fall within two standard 
deviations. This ‘rule’ applies widely although it is by no means universal. 
The ‘true’ value for the standard deviation can only be found from a very large (infinite) set of 
readings. From a moderate number of values, only an estimate of the standard deviation can be 
found. The symbol s is usually used for the 
estimated standard deviation
Library application class:C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
Powerful components for batch converting PDF documents in C#.NET Convert PDF to multiple MS Word formats such as Create editable Word file online without email.
www.rasteredge.com
Library application class:Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
Professional PDF to text converting library from RasterEdge PDF document for Visual C# developers to convert PDF document to editable & searchable
www.rasteredge.com
Measurement Good Practice Guide No. 11 (Issue 2) 
6
3.6  Calculating an estimated standard deviation 
Example 2 shows how to calculate an estimate of standard deviation. 
Example 2. Calculating the estimated standard deviation of a set of values
It is rarely convenient to calculate standard deviations by hand, with pen and 
paper alone. But it can be done as follows: 
Suppose you have a set of n readings (let’s use the same set of 10 as above). 
Start by finding the average: 
For the set of readings we used before, 16, 19, 18, 16, 17, 19, 20, 15, 17 and 
13, the average is 17.  
Next, find the difference between each reading and the average, 
i.e.   -1 
+2   +1 
-1 
+2 
+3 
-2 
-4, 
and square each of these, 
i.e. 
        4          1          1          0          4           9         4        0      16. 
Next, find the total and divide by n-1 (in this case n is 10, so n-1 is 9), 
i.e. 
1 4 1 1 0 4 9 4 0 16
9
40
9
444
+ + + + + + + + +
 . .
The estimated standard deviation, s, is found by taking the square root of the 
total, i.e. 
s
=
=
444 21
.
.
(correct to one decimal place). 
The  complete  process  of  calculating  the  estimated  standard  deviation  for  a  series  of  n 
measurements can be expressed mathematically as: 
s
x
x
n
i
i
n
=
=
(
)
(
)
,
2
1
1
(1) 
Library application class:VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
Create editable Word file online without email. Supports transfer from password protected PDF. The PDF to Word converting toolkit is a thread-safe VB.NET
www.rasteredge.com
Library application class:VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
VB.NET Tutorial for Converting PDF from Microsoft Office spreadsheet into high quality PDF without losing Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel
www.rasteredge.com
Measurement Good Practice Guide No. 11 (Issue 2) 
8
Visual alignment is an operator skill.  A movement of the observer can make an object appear 
to move. ‘Parallax errors’ of this kind can occur when reading a scale with a pointer. 
• 
Operator skill - some measurements depend on the skill and judgement of the operator. 
One person may be better than another at the delicate work of setting up a measurement, or 
at reading fine detail by eye.  The use of an instrument such as a stopwatch depends on the 
reaction time of the operator.  (But gross mistakes are a different matter and are not to be 
accounted for as uncertainties.)  
• 
Sampling  issues - the measurements you make must be properly representative of the 
process you are trying to assess. If you want to know the temperature at the work-bench, 
don’t measure it with a thermometer placed on the wall near an air conditioning outlet. If 
you are choosing samples from a production line for measurement, don’t always take the 
first ten made on a Monday morning. 
• 
The  environment - temperature, air pressure, humidity and many other conditions can 
affect the measuring instrument or the item being measured. 
Where the size and effect of an error are known (e.g. from a calibration certificate) a correction 
can  be  applied  to  the  measurement  result.  But, in general, uncertainties  from  each  of  these 
sources,  and  from  other  sources,  would  be  individual  ‘inputs’  contributing  to  the  overall 
uncertainty in the measurement.  
Library application class:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. Create PDF file from PowerPoint free online without NET Demo Code for Converting PowerPoint to
www.rasteredge.com
Library application class:VB.NET TIFF: TIFF Imaging SDK, Insert & Add New TIFF Page Using VB
be easily populated with editable text and images & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff capturing, viewing, processing, converting, compressing and
www.rasteredge.com
Measurement Good Practice Guide No. 11 (Issue 2) 
9
 The general kinds of uncertainty in any measurement 
5.1  Random or systematic 
The effects that give rise to uncertainty in measurement can be either: 
•  random - where repeating the measurement gives a randomly different result. If so, the 
more measurements you make, and then average, the better estimate you generally can 
expect to get. 
or 
• systematic  -  where  the  same  influence  affects  the  result  for  each  of  the  repeated 
measurements (but you may not be able to tell). In this case, you learn nothing extra just 
by repeating measurements. Other methods are needed to estimate uncertainties due to 
systematic effects, e.g. different measurements, or calculations. 
5.2  Distribution - the ‘shape’ of the errors 
The spread of a set of values can take different forms, or probability distributions.  
5.2.1  Normal distribution 
In a set of readings, sometimes the values are more likely to fall near the average than further 
away.  This  is  typical  of  a  normal  or  Gaussian  distribution.  You  might  see  this  type  of 
distribution if you examined the heights of individuals in a large group of men. Most men are 
close to average height; few are extremely tall or short.  
Figure 2 shows a set of 10 ‘random’ values in an approximately normal distribution. A sketch of 
a normal distribution is shown in Figure 3.
Figure  2.    ‘Blob plot’ of a set of values 
lying in a normal distribution 
Figure 3.  Sketch of a ‘normal’ distribution 
Measurement Good Practice Guide No. 11 (Issue 2) 
10
5.2.2  Uniform or rectangular distribution 
When the measurements are quite evenly spread between the highest and the lowest values, a 
rectangular or uniform distribution is produced. This would be seen if you examined how rain 
drops fall on a thin, straight telephone wire, for example. They would be as likely to fall on any 
one part as on another. 
Figure 4  shows  a  set of  10 ‘random’  values in  an approximately rectangular  distribution. A 
sketch of a rectangular distribution is shown in Figure 5. 
Figure 4. ‘Blob plot’ of a set of values lying 
in a rectangular distribution. 
Figure 5. Sketch of a rectangular 
distribution. 
5.2.3  Other distributions 
More rarely, distributions can have other shapes, for example, triangular, M-shaped (bimodal or 
two-peaked), or lop-sided (skew). 
5.3  What is not a measurement uncertainty? 
Mistakes made by operators are not measurement uncertainties. They should not be counted as 
contributing to uncertainty. They should be avoided by working carefully and by checking work. 
Tolerances are not uncertainties. They are acceptance limits which are chosen for a process or a 
product. (See Section 10 below, about compliance with specifications.) 
Specifications  are  not  uncertainties.  A  specification  tells  you  what  you  can  expect  from  a 
product. It may be very wide-ranging, including ‘non-technical’ qualities of the item, such as its 
appearance. (See Section 10 below). 
Measurement Good Practice Guide No. 11 (Issue 2) 
11
Accuracy (or rather inaccuracy) is not the same as uncertainty. Unfortunately, usage of these 
words is often confused. Correctly speaking, ‘accuracy’ is a qualitative term (e.g. you could say 
that a measurement was ‘accurate’ or ‘not accurate’). Uncertainty is quantitative. When a ‘plus 
or minus’ figure is quoted, it may be called an uncertainty, but not an accuracy.  
Errors are not the same as uncertainties (even though it has been common in the past to use the 
words interchangeably in phrases like ‘error analysis’). See the earlier comments in Section 2.3. 
Statistical  analysis  is not  the same as uncertainty analysis. Statistics can be used to draw all 
kinds of conclusions which do not by themselves tell us anything about uncertainty. Uncertainty 
analysis is only one of the uses of statistics. 
 How to calculate uncertainty of measurement 
To  calculate  the  uncertainty  of  a  measurement,  firstly  you  must  identify  the  sources  of 
uncertainty in the measurement. Then you must estimate the size of the uncertainty from each 
source. Finally the individual uncertainties are combined to give an overall figure.  
There are clear rules for assessing the contribution from each uncertainty, and for combining 
these together. 
6.1  The two ways to estimate uncertainties 
No matter what are the sources of your uncertainties, there are two approaches to estimating 
them:  ‘Type  A’  and  ‘Type  B’  evaluations.  In  most  measurement  situations,  uncertainty 
evaluations of both types are needed. 
Type A evaluations - uncertainty estimates using statistics (usually from repeated readings)  
Type B evaluations - uncertainty estimates from any other information. This could be 
information  from  past  experience  of  the  measurements,  from  calibration  certificates, 
manufacturer’s  specifications,  from  calculations,  from  published  information,  and  from 
common sense. 
There is a temptation to think of ‘Type A’ as ‘random’ and ‘Type B’ as ‘systematic’, but this is 
not necessarily true. 
How to use the information from Type A and Type B evaluations is described below. 
Measurement Good Practice Guide No. 11 (Issue 2) 
12
6.2  Eight main steps to evaluating uncertainty 
The main steps to evaluating the overall uncertainty of a measurement are as follows. 
1.  Decide  what  you  need  to  find  out  from  your  measurements.  Decide  what  actual 
measurements and calculations are needed to produce the final result. 
2.  Carry out the measurements needed. 
3.  Estimate the uncertainty of each input quantity that feeds into the final result. Express all 
uncertainties in similar terms. (See Section 7.1). 
4.  Decide whether the errors of the input quantities are independent of each other. If you think 
not, then some extra calculations or information are needed. (See correlation in Section 7.3.) 
5.  Calculate the result of your measurement (including any known corrections for things such 
as calibration). 
6.  Find the combined standard uncertainty from all the individual aspects. (See Section 7.2.) 
7.  Express the uncertainty in terms of a coverage factor (see Section 7.4), together with a size 
of the uncertainty interval, and state a level of confidence. 
8.  Write down the measurement result and the uncertainty, and state how you got both of these. 
(See Section 8.) 
This is a general outline of the process. An example where these steps are carried out is given in 
Section 9. 
 Other things you should know before making an uncertainty 
calculation 
Uncertainty contributions must be expressed in similar terms before they are combined. Thus, 
all the uncertainties must be given in the same units, and at the same level of confidence. 
7.1  Standard uncertainty 
All contributing uncertainties should be expressed at the same confidence level, by converting 
them into standard uncertainties. A standard uncertainty is a margin whose size can be thought 
of  as  ‘plus  or  minus  one  standard  deviation’.  The  standard  uncertainty  tells  us  about  the 
uncertainty of an average (not just about the spread of values). A standard uncertainty is usually 
shown by the symbol u (small u), or u(y) (the standard uncertainty in y). 
Measurement Good Practice Guide No. 11 (Issue 2) 
13
7.1.1  Calculating standard uncertainty for a Type A evaluation 
When a set of several repeated readings has been taken (for a Type A estimate of uncertainty), 
the mean, 
x, and estimated standard deviation, s, can be calculated for the set. From these, the 
estimated standard uncertainty, u, of the mean is calculated from: 
u
s
n
,
=
(2)
where n was the number of measurements in the set. (The standard uncertainty of the mean has 
historically also been called  the standard deviation of the mean,  or  the standard error of  the 
mean.) 
7.1.2  Calculating standard uncertainty for a Type B evaluation 
Where the information is more scarce (in some Type B estimates), you might only be able to 
estimate the upper and lower limits of uncertainty. You may then have to assume the value is 
equally  likely  to  fall  anywhere  in  between,  i.e.  a  rectangular  or  uniform  distribution.  The 
standard uncertainty for a rectangular distribution is found from: 
a
3
,
(3)
where a is the semi-range (or half-width) between the upper and lower limits. 
Rectangular  or uniform  distributions occur quite  commonly,  but if you have good  reason  to 
expect some other distribution, then you should base your calculation on that. For example, you 
can usually assume that uncertainties ‘imported’ from the calibration certificate for a measuring 
instrument are normally distributed. 
7.1.3  Converting uncertainties from one unit of measurement to another 
Uncertainty contributions must be in the same units before they are combined. As the saying 
goes, you cannot ‘compare apples with pears’.  
For  example,  in  making  a  measurement  of  length,  the  measurement  uncertainty  will  also 
eventually be stated in terms of length. One source of uncertainty might be the variation in room 
temperature.  Although the source of this uncertainty is temperature, the effect is  in terms of 
length, and it must be accounted for in units of length. You might know that the material being 
measured expands in length by 0.1 percent for every degree rise in temperature. In that case, a 
temperature uncertainty of ±2 °C would give a length uncertainty of ±0.2 cm in a piece of the 
material 100 cm long. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested