asp.net mvc display pdf : Convert pdf to ascii text software Library project winforms asp.net html UWP mgpg112-part1101

Measurement Good Practice Guide No. 11 (Issue 2) 
14
Once the standard uncertainties are expressed in consistent units, the combined uncertainty can 
be found using one of the following techniques. 
7.2  Combining standard uncertainties 
Individual standard uncertainties calculated by Type A or Type B evaluations can be combined 
validly by ‘summation in quadrature’ (also known as ‘root sum of the squares’). The result of 
this is called the combined standard uncertainty, shown by u
c
or u
c
(y). 
Summation in quadrature is simplest where the result of a measurement is reached by addition 
or subtraction. The more complicated cases are also covered below for the multiplication and 
division of measurements, as well as for other functions. 
7.2.1  Summation in quadrature for addition and subtraction 
The simplest case is where the result is the sum of a series of measured values (either added 
together or subtracted). For example, you might need to find the total length of a fence made up 
of different width fence panels. If the standard uncertainty (in metres) in the length of each fence 
panel was given by a, b, c, etc., then  the combined standard uncertainty (in metres) for  the 
whole fence would be found by squaring the uncertainties, adding them all together, and then 
taking the square root of the total,  
i.e. 
7.2.2  Summation in quadrature for multiplication or division 
For  more  complicated  cases,  it  can  be  useful  to  work  in  terms  of  relative  or  fractional 
uncertainties to simplify the calculations. 
For example, you might need to find the  area, A, of a rectangular carpet, by multiplying the 
length, L, by the width, W (i.e. A=L
×
W). The relative or fractional uncertainty in the area of the 
carpet can be found from the fractional uncertainties in the length and width. For length L with 
uncertainty u(L),  the  relative  uncertainty  is u(L)/L. For  width W,  the  relative  uncertainty  is 
u(W)/W. Then the relative uncertainty u(A)/A in the area is given by 
u A
A
u L
L
uW
W
( )
( )
( )
=
+
2
2
(5) 
...etc
+
c
+
b
+
a
y= 
uncertaint
Combined
2
2
2
.
(4)
Convert pdf to ascii text - Library software class:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to ascii text - Library software class:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
Measurement Good Practice Guide No. 11 (Issue 2) 
15
For a case where a result is found by multiplying three factors together, equation (5) would have 
three such terms, and so on. This equation can also be used (in exactly the same form) for a case 
where the result is a quotient of two values (i.e. one number divided by another, for example, 
length divided by width). In other words, this form of the equation covers all cases where the 
operations are multiplication or division. 
7.2.3  Summation in quadrature for more complicated functions 
Where a value is squared (e.g. Z
2
) in the calculation of the final measurement result, then the 
relative uncertainty due to the squared component is in the form 
2u(Z)
Z
.
(6)
Where a square root (e.g. 
Z) is part of the calculation of a result, then the relative uncertainty 
due to that component is in the form 
u(Z)
2Z
.
(7)  
Of  course,  some  measurements  are  processed  using  formulae  which  use  combinations  of 
addition,  subtraction,  multiplication  and  division,  etc.  For  example,  you  might  measure 
electrical  resistance  R  and  voltage  V,  and  then  calculate  the  resulting  power  P  using  the 
relationship 
P
V
R
=
2
.
(8) 
In this case, the relative uncertainty u(P)/P in the value of power would be given by 
u P
P
uV
V
u R
R
( )
( )
( )
=
+
2
2
2
(9) 
Generally  speaking,  for  multi-step  calculations,  the  process  of  combination  of  standard 
uncertainties  in  quadrature  can  also  be  done  in  multiple  steps,  using  the  relevant  form  for 
addition,  multiplication,  etc.  at  each  step.  The  combination  of  standard  uncertainties  for 
complicated formulae is more fully discussed elsewhere (e.g. UKAS Publication M 3003.).  
Library software class:Generate and draw Code 128 for Java
Various barcode image formats, like ASCII, BMP, DIB, EPS Preview, JPEG, etc, are valid Code 128 Auto"); //Encode data for Code 128 barcode image text in Java
www.rasteredge.com
Library software class:Generate and draw Code 39 for Java
or not, text margin setting, show check sum digit or not choices for Code 39 linear barcode in java applications. Various barcode image formats, like ASCII, BMP
www.rasteredge.com
Measurement Good Practice Guide No. 11 (Issue 2) 
16
7.3  Correlation 
The  equations given above in Section 7.2 to calculate the combined standard uncertainty are 
only correct if the input standard uncertainties are not inter-related or correlated. This means we 
usually need to question whether all the uncertainty contributions are independent. Could a large 
error  in  one  input  cause  a  large  error  in  another?  Could  some  outside  influence,  such  as 
temperature, have a similar effect on several aspects of uncertainty at once - visibly or invisibly? 
Often individual errors are independent. But if they are not, extra calculations are needed. These 
are not detailed in this Beginner’s Guide, but can be found in some of the further reading listed 
in Section 16. 
7.4  Coverage factor k 
Having  scaled  the  components  of  uncertainty  consistently,  to  find  the  combined  standard 
uncertainty, we may then want to re-scale the result. The combined standard uncertainty may be 
thought  of  as  equivalent  to  ‘one  standard  deviation’,  but  we  may  wish  to  have  an  overall 
uncertainty stated at another level of confidence, e.g. 95 percent. This re-scaling can be done 
using a coverage factor, k. Multiplying the combined standard uncertainty, u
c
, by a coverage 
factor gives a result which is called the expanded uncertainty, usually shown by the symbol U, 
i.e. 
U
ku
c
=
(10) 
 particular  value  of  coverage  factor  gives  a  particular  confidence  level  for  the  expanded 
uncertainty. 
Most commonly, we scale the overall uncertainty by using the coverage factor k = 2, to give a 
level  of confidence of  approximately 95 percent. (k  = 2 is correct if the  combined standard 
uncertainty is normally distributed. This is usually a fair assumption, but the reasoning behind 
this is explained elsewhere, in the references in Section 16.)   
Some other coverage factors (for a normal distribution) are: 
k = 1 for a confidence level of approximately 68 percent 
k = 2.58 for a confidence level of 99 percent 
k = 3 for a confidence level of 99.7 percent 
Other, less common, shapes of distribution have different coverage factors. 
Conversely, wherever an expanded uncertainty is quoted with a given coverage factor, you can 
find the standard uncertainty by the reverse process, i.e. by dividing by the appropriate coverage  
Library software class:VB.NET TIFF: TIFF Tag Viewer SDK, Read & Edit TIFF Tag Using VB.
TiffTagID.ImageDescription, "Insert a private tiff tag", TiffTagDataType.Ascii)) file.Save VB.NET TIFF manipulating controls, like TIFF text extracting control
www.rasteredge.com
Library software class:Data Matrix C#.NET Integration Tutorial
datamatrix.CodeToEncode = "C#DataMatrixGenerator"; //Data Matrix data mode, supporting ASCII, Auto, Base256, C40, Edifact, Text, X12. datamatrix.
www.rasteredge.com
Measurement Good Practice Guide No. 11 (Issue 2) 
17
factor. (This is the basis for finding the combined standard uncertainty as shown in Sections 
7.1.1  and 7.1.2.)  This means  that  expanded uncertainties given on  calibration  certificates, if 
properly expressed, can be ‘decoded’ into standard uncertainties.  
 How to express the answer 
It is important to express the answer so that a reader can use the information. The main things to 
mention are: 
•  The  measurement  result, together  with  the uncertainty figure,  e.g. ‘The length of  the 
stick was 20 cm ±1 cm.’ 
•  The  statement  of  the  coverage  factor  and  the  level  of  confidence.  A  recommended 
wording is: ‘The reported uncertainty is based on a standard uncertainty multiplied by a 
coverage factor k = 2, providing a level of confidence of approximately 95%.’ 
and 
•  How the uncertainty was estimated (you could refer to a publication where the method is 
described, e.g. UKAS Publication M 3003). 
 Example - a basic calculation of uncertainty 
Below is a worked example of a simple uncertainty analysis. It is not realistic in every detail, but 
it is meant to be simple and clear enough to illustrate the method. First the measurement and the 
analysis of uncertainty are described. Secondly, the uncertainty analysis is shown in a table (a 
‘spreadsheet model’ or ‘uncertainty budget’).  
9.1  The measurement - how long is a piece of string?  
Suppose you need to make a careful estimate of the length of a piece of string. Following the 
steps listed in Section 6.2, the process is as follows. 
Library software class:PDF-417 C#.NET Integration Tutorial
PDF417; //Set PDF 417 encoding valid input: All ASCII characters, including 0-9 PDF417DataMode.Auto // Data mode, Auto, Byte, Numeric,Text supported //Set
www.rasteredge.com
Library software class:Image Converter | Convert Image, Document Formats
formats; Convert in memory for higher speeds; Multiple image formats Support, such as TIFF, GIF, BMP, JPEG Rich documents formats support, like ASCII, PDF,
www.rasteredge.com
Measurement Good Practice Guide No. 11 (Issue 2) 
18














Figure 6. How long is a piece of string? 
Example 3: Calculating the uncertainty in the length of a piece of string 
Step 1. Decide what you need to find out from your measurements. Decide what actual 
measurements and calculations  are needed  to  produce the  final  result. You need to 
make a measurement of the length, using a tape measure. Apart from the actual length 
reading on the tape measure, you may need to consider: 
• 
Possible errors of the tape measure 
 Does it need any correction, or has calibration shown it to read correctly - and 
what is the uncertainty in the calibration? 
 Is the tape prone to stretching? 
 Could bending have shortened it?  How much could it have changed since it was 
calibrated? 
 What  is  the  resolution,  i.e.  how  small  are  the  divisions  on  the  tape  (e.g. 
millimetres)?  
• 
Possible errors due to the item being measured 
 Does the string lie straight?  Is it under- or over-stretched? 
 Does the prevailing temperature or humidity (or anything else) affect its actual 
length? 
 Are the ends of the string well-defined, or are they frayed? 
Library software class:VB.NET Image: Generate GS1-128/EAN-128 Barcode on Image & Document
AddFloatingItem(item) rePage.MergeItemsToPage() REFile.SaveDocumentFile(doc, "c:/ean128.pdf", New PDFEncoder Data, All 128 ASCII characters (Char from 0 to 127).
www.rasteredge.com
Library software class:Generate and Print 1D and 2D Barcodes in Java
Various barcode image formats, like ASCII, BMP, DIB, EPS Preview options include show text or not, text margin setting like QR Code, Data Matrix and PDF 417 in
www.rasteredge.com
Measurement Good Practice Guide No. 11 (Issue 2) 
20
string. Let us guess that the underestimate is about 0.2 percent, and that the uncertainty 
in this is also 0.2 percent at most. That means we should correct the result by adding 
0.2 percent (i.e. 10 mm).  The uncertainty is assumed to be uniformly distributed, in 
the absence of better information. Dividing the half-width of the uncertainty (10 mm) 
by 
3 gives the standard uncertainty u = 5.8 mm (to the nearest 0.1 mm). 
The above are all Type B estimates. Below is a Type A estimate. 
• 
The  standard  deviation  tells  us  about  how  repeatable  the  placement  of  the  tape 
measure is, and how much this contributes to the uncertainty of the mean value. The 
estimated standard deviation of the mean of the 10 readings is found using the formula 
in Section 3.6:  
s
n
 
.
  .  
21
10
07 mm  (to one decimal place)
.
Let us suppose that no other uncertainties need to be counted in this example. (In reality, 
other things would probably need to be included.) 
Step 4. Decide whether the errors of the input quantities are independent of each other. 
(If you think not, then some extra calculations or information are needed.)  In this case, 
let us say that they are all independent. 
Step 5. Calculate the result of your measurement (including any known corrections for 
things such as calibration). The result comes from the mean reading, together with the 
correction needed for the string lying slightly crookedly, 
i.e.     
5.017 m + 0.010 m = 5.027 m. 
Step 6. Find the combined standard uncertainty from all the individual aspects. The 
only calculation used in finding the result was the addition of a correction, so summation 
in quadrature can be used in its simplest form (using the equation in Section 7.2.1). The 
standard uncertainties are combined as 
Combined standard uncertainty  =  
 =    
2
2
2
2
2.5 +0.3 +5.8 + 0.7
6.4 mm (to one decimal place)
Step 7. Express the uncertainty in terms of a coverage factor (see Section 7.4 above), 
together with a size of the uncertainty interval, and state a level of confidence. For a 
coverage  factor  k = 2,  multiply  the  combined  standard  uncertainty  by  2,  to  give  an 
expanded uncertainty of 12.8 mm (i.e. 0.0128 m). This gives a level of confidence of 
about 95 percent. 
Measurement Good Practice Guide No. 11 (Issue 2) 
21
Step 8. Write down the measurement result and the uncertainty, and state how you got 
both of these. You might record: 
‘The  length  of  the  string  was  5.027 m  ±0.013 m.  The  reported  expanded 
uncertainty  is  based  on  a  standard  uncertainty  multiplied  by  a  coverage  factor 
k = 2, providing a level of confidence of approximately 95%. 
‘The reported length is the mean of 10 repeated measurements of the string laid 
horizontally. The result is corrected for the estimated effect of the string not lying 
completely straight when measured. The uncertainty was estimated according to 
the method in A Beginner’s Guide to Uncertainty of Measurement.’ 
9.2  Analysis of uncertainty - spreadsheet model 
To help in the process of calculation, it can be useful to summarise the uncertainty analysis or 
‘uncertainty budget’ in a spreadsheet as in Table 1 below. 
Table 1. Spreadsheet model showing the ‘uncertainty budget’ 
Source of uncertainty 
Value 
± 
Probability 
distribution 
Divisor 
Standard 
uncertainty 
Calibration uncertainty 
5.0 mm 
Normal 
2.5 mm 
Resolution (size of divisions) 
0.5 mm*  Rectangular 
0.3 mm 
String not lying perfectly straight 
10.0 mm*
Rectangular 
5.8 mm 
Standard uncertainty of mean of 10   
repeated readings 
0.7 mm 
Normal 
0.7 mm 
Combined standard uncertainty 
Assumed 
normal 
6.4 mm 
Expanded uncertainty 
Assumed 
normal (k = 2)
12.8 mm 
*Here the (±) half-width divided by 
3 is used. 
10  Other statements (e.g. compliance with specification) 
When conclusions are drawn from measurement results, the uncertainty of the measurements 
must  not  be forgotten.  This  is  particularly  important  when  measurements are used to  test 
whether or not a specification has been met. 
Sometimes  a  result may  fall clearly  inside  or  outside  the  limit  of  a specification,  but the 
uncertainty  may  overlap the  limit.  Four  kinds  of  outcome  are  shown in the illustration in 
Figure 7. 
Measurement Good Practice Guide No. 11 (Issue 2) 
22
specified
upper limit
specified
lower limit
(a)  
(b) 
(c) 
(d) 
Figure 7. Four cases of how a measurement result and its uncertainty may lie relative to the 
limits of a stated specification. (Similarly, an uncertainty may overlap the lower limit of a 
specification.) 
In Case (a), both the result and the uncertainty fall inside the specified limits. This is classed 
as a ‘compliance’.  
In Case (d), neither the result nor any part of the uncertainty band falls within the specified 
limits. This is classed as a ‘non-compliance’. 
Cases  (b)  and (c) are neither  completely  inside nor  outside the limits. No  firm conclusion 
about compliance can be made. 
Before stating compliance with a specification, always check the specification. Sometimes a 
specification  covers  various  properties  such  as  appearance,  electrical  connections,  inter-
changeability, etc., which have nothing to do with what has been measured. 
11  How to reduce uncertainty in measurement
Always remember that it is usually as important to minimise uncertainties as it is to quantify 
them.  There  are  some  good  practices  which  can  help  to  reduce  uncertainties  in  making 
measurements generally. A few recommendations are: 
• 
Calibrate measuring instruments (or have them calibrated for you) and use the calibration 
corrections which are given on the certificate. 
• 
Make corrections to compensate for any (other) errors you know about. 
• 
Make your measurements traceable to national standards - by using calibrations which can 
be traced  to  national  standards via an  unbroken chain of measurements.  You can place 
particular confidence in measurement traceability if the measurements are quality-assured 
through a measurement accreditation (UKAS in the UK). 
Measurement Good Practice Guide No. 11 (Issue 2) 
23
• 
Choose  the  best  measuring  instruments, and  use calibration facilities with the smallest 
uncertainties. 
• 
Check measurements by repeating them, or by getting someone else to repeat them from 
time to time, or use other kinds of checks. Checking by a different method may be best of 
all. 
• 
Check calculations, and where numbers are copied from one place to another, check this 
too. 
• 
Use an uncertainty budget to identify the worst uncertainties, and address these. 
• 
Be aware that in a successive chain of calibrations, the uncertainty increases at every step 
of the chain. 
12  Some other good measurement practices 
Overall, use recognised good practices in measurements, for example: 
• 
Follow the maker’s instructions for using and maintaining instruments. 
• 
Use experienced staff, and provide training for measurement. 
• 
Check or validate software, to make sure it works correctly. 
• 
Use rounding correctly in your calculations. (See Section 13.4.) 
• 
Keep good records of your measurements and calculations. Write down readings at the 
time  they are made. Keep a note of any extra information that may  be relevant.  If past 
measurements are ever called into doubt, such records can be very useful. 
Many  more  good  measurement  practices  are  detailed  elsewhere,  for  example  in  the 
international standard ISO/IEC 17025  ‘General requirements for the  competence of testing 
and calibration laboratories’ (See ‘Further Reading’, Section 16). 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested