mvc open pdf in new tab : Convert pdf to text without losing formatting control SDK platform web page wpf html web browser mhs_read_Jul_2008_RRQ1-part1137

skills, (3) critical reading skills, and (4) survival skills.
After an initial assessment, the students were placed at
the appropriate points in the individualized curriculum.
The Liston (1991) study involved tenth graders
across the U.S. state of South Carolina who had been
identified as being in need of remedial instruction ac-
cording to state standards. Overall, 72% of the students
were African American, and 28% were white. Twenty-six
CCC high schools were compared with  23 control
schools matched on the Comprehensive Test of Basic
Skills (CTBS) pretests and ethnicity in a matched post-
hoc  design.  Two  cohorts  were  studied  during  the
1988–1989 and 1989–1990 school years, respectively.
There were 2,278 students (1,161 treatment students
and 1,117 control students) in Cohort 1 and 2,319 stu-
dents (1,127 treatment students and 1,192 control stu-
dents) in Cohort 2.
CTBS pretests were nearly identical in CCC and con-
trol schools. South Carolina exit exams, which are given
each spring, showed nonsignificant differences for the
first cohort (ES = +0.02, p> .05) and small but significant
differences for the second cohort (ES = +0.10, p < .01),
using analyses of covariance. Effect sizes were +0.09 and
+0.02 for African American and white students, respec-
tively. The overall mean effect size was +0.06.
Other Supplemental CAI Programs
In an early study of CAI, Chiang, Stauffer, and Cannara
(1978) evaluated the use of teacher-authored reading
software among academically handicapped students in
eight  junior  high  schools  in  suburban  Cupertino,
California (N = 168; 99 treatment students and 69 con-
trol students). Students used drill-and-practice software
in a computer lab for an average of 33 minutes per week
as a supplement to other instruction. Schools were
matched according to socioeconomic status and pretests.
Students, categorized as educable mentally retarded,
learning disabled, or oral-language handicapped, were
individually  pre-  and  posttested  on  the  Peabody
Individualized Achievement Test. Students who received
CAI scored higher on Reading Recognition (ES = +0.33)
but slightly lower on Reading Comprehension (ES =
–0.05), for a mean effect size of +0.14.
Metrics Associates (1981) carried out a small evalua-
tion of the use of a variety of supplemental CAI programs
in six school districts in Massachusetts. Two of the dis-
tricts  that  participated  in  the  study,  Billerica  and
Woburn, included junior high schools (grades 7–9). In
one junior high school in each district, Title I students
in the CAI conditions (n = 70) spent 10 minutes of their
daily 30-minute remedial reading period using drill-and-
practice software. Matched students (n = 35) participated
in  daily  30-minute  remedial  classes  without  CAI.
Students were pre- and posttested on the Metropolitan
Achievement Test. Adjusted posttests indicated an effect
size of +0.56, p < .001.
Computer-Managed Learning Systems
Accelerated Reader
Accelerated Reader is a supplemental program that assess-
es students’ reading levels using a computer, which then
prints out suggestions for reading materials at students’
levels. Students read books or other materials and then
take tests on the computer to show their comprehension of
what they have read. Students can earn recognition or re-
wards based on the number of tests that they have passed.
A small matched study by Hagerman (2003) evalu-
ated Accelerated Reader with sixth graders in a subur-
ban middle school near Portland, Oregon, USA. After
using Accelerated Reader for 12 weeks, the treatment stu-
dents (n = 64) were compared with matched students
who were enrolled in another middle school in the same
district (n = 57). Students were pre- and posttested on
the Test of Reading Comprehension, third edition. On
posttests adjusted for pretests, the Accelerated Reader
group scored significantly higher (ES = +0.53, p < .001).
The largest evaluations by far of Accelerated Reader
in grades 6–8 were carried out in two school districts,
Pascagoula and Biloxi, in the U.S. state of Mississippi.
Data on two cohorts of students were analyzed by third-
party evaluators working under contract to the program’s
publisher. During the 2002–2003 school year, Ross and
Nunnery (2005) compared one-year gains for schools us-
ing Accelerated Reader (n = 2,106 students) to those in
matched schools using traditional methods (n = 1,124
students). The schools using Accelerated Reader were
also using Accelerated Math. During the 2003–2004
school year, the same comparisons were made in the
same schools by Ross, Nunnery, Avis, and Borek (2005)
with 2,419 students using the Accelerated Reader pro-
gram and 1,666 students in the control group. Some stu-
dents were of course in the treatment groups for both
years, but the data are presented as two cross-sectional
studies, not as a longitudinal study. Effect sizes for the
2002–2003  cohort  on  the  reading  portion  of  the
Mississippi Curriculum Test, adjusted for pretests, were
+0.11 for sixth grade, +0.16 for seventh grade, and +0.12
for eighth grade, for a mean of +0.13, p < .05. For the
2003–2004 cohort, effect sizes were –0.04 for sixth
grade, +0.04 for seventh grade, and +0.10 for eighth
grade, for a mean of +0.03, p > .05. Combining across
both cohorts, the mean effect size was +0.08.
The weighted mean effect size across all three quali-
fying studies of Accelerated Reader was +0.09.
Conclusions: CAI
A total of 8 qualifying studies evaluated various forms of
CAI. The studies involved a total of 12,984 students.
Reading Research Quarterly  •  43(3) 
300
From the Best Evidence Encyclopedia (www.bestevidence.org)
Convert pdf to text without losing formatting - control SDK platform:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to text without losing formatting - control SDK platform:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
Overall, the weighted mean effect size was +0.10. This is
less than the median effect size of +0.18 for CAI in sec-
ondary math reported by Slavin et al. (2007), but it is in
accord with the conclusions drawn from a review of re-
search on CAI by Kulik (2003). (Kulik did not report a
mean effect size.)
Instructional-Process Programs
Instructional-process programs are methods that focus on
providing teachers with extensive professional develop-
ment to implement specific instructional methods. These
programs fell into three categories: (1) cooperative learn-
ing, (2) strategy instruction, and (3) comprehensive
school reform. Cooperative learning programs (Slavin, in
press) have students work in small groups to help one
another master academic content. Strategy instruction
programs incorporate methods that teach students to use
specific study strategies such as paraphrasing, summariza-
tion, and prediction to improve their reading comprehen-
sion. Comprehensive school reform programs attend to
instruction, curriculum, assessment, classroom manage-
ment, and parent involvement, among other factors. Only
comprehensive school reform programs that incorporate
specific reading approaches are reviewed here (for oth-
ers, see Comprehensive School Reform Quality Center,
2006; Borman et al., 2003). Descriptions and outcomes of
all studies of instructional-process programs that met the
inclusion criteria appear in Table 3.
Cooperative Learning Programs
Peer-Assisted Learning Strategies
Peer-Assisted Learning Strategies, or PALS, is a coopera-
tive learning program in which students work in pairs,
taking turns reading aloud to one another and engaging
in summarization and prediction activities. PALS has pri-
marily been used in the early elementary grades, where
it has been successfully evaluated (Fuchs, Fuchs, Mathes,
& Simmons, 1997); however, it is also used in remedial
and special education programs in upper-elementary and
secondary grades.
Calhoon (2005) evaluated an application of PALS
with students who were enrolled in two middle schools
in the southwestern United States and who were reading
at or below the third-grade level. The 31-week treatment
combined PALS with a training approach that empha-
sized linguistic skills in which students took turns tutor-
ing each other on specific phonological and spelling
skills. Four special education teachers and their classes of
students with learning disabilities (N = 38) were random-
ly assigned to PALS or control conditions, making this a
randomized quasi-experiment. Most students were sixth
graders; however, a few seventh graders and one eighth
grader also participated. Students were pre- and posttest-
ed on  four  scales from the  Woodcock-Johnson III.
Adjusting for pretests, there were significant differences
on Letter–Word Identification (ES = +0.84, p < .05),
Passage Comprehension (ES = +0.66, p < .05), and Word
Attack (ES = +0.46, p < .05) but not on Reading Fluency
(ES = –0.13, p > .05). The mean effect size was +0.46.
Fuchs, Fuchs, and Kazdan (1999) evaluated PALS
among special education and remedial classes in 10 high
schools in the southeastern United States (N = 102 stu-
dents). Eighteen teachers were nonrandomly assigned to
PALS or control classes in a 16-week study. The experi-
mental group used PALS procedures on alternating days,
averaging  2.5  times  per week  for  the entire study.
Students were pre- and posttested on an experimenter-
made  measure  called  the  Comprehensive  Reading
Assessment Battery, an oral reading measure not aligned
with the PALS intervention. Controlling for pretests, dif-
ferences were statistically significant on comprehension
questions (ES = +0.33, p< .05) but not on words read cor-
rectly (ES = +0.04, p> .05), for a mean effect size of +0.19.
Hankinson and Myers (2000) evaluated PALS in a sub-
urban middle school near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA.
A total of 51 eighth graders experienced PALS, and 32
served as a matched control group in a 12-week study.
Students were pretested on the Gates–MacGinitie Reading
Test (GMRT) and the comprehension measure of the
Pennsylvania System of School Assessment (PSSA), and 12
weeks later, they were posttested. Adjusting for pretests,
PALS students gained more than controls on GMRT
Vocabulary (ES = +0.10) and Comprehension (ES =
+0.44), although these gains were nonsignificant, for a
mean effect size of +0.27. On the PSSA, students in the
control group made nonsignificantly greater gains than the
treatment group (ES = –0.34), although the report noted
that the control group received special practice on this
measure. The mean across the two measures was –0.04.
The weighted mean effect size across the three stud-
ies of PALS was +0.15; however, the one randomized
quasi-experiment had the strongest positive effects.
Student Team Reading
1
Student Team Reading (Stevens & Durkin, 1992) is a co-
operative learning program for middle schools in which
students work in four- or five-member teams to help one
another build reading skills. Based on a program called
Cooperative  Integrated  Reading  and  Composition
(Stevens, Madden, Slavin, & Farnish, 1987), which is used
in upper-elementary grades, Student Team Reading has
students engage in partner reading, story retelling, story-
related writing, word mastery, and story-structure activi-
ties to prepare them and their teammates for individual
assessments that form the basis for team scores. Instruction
focuses on explicit teaching of metacognitive strategies.
Stevens and Durkin (1992, Study 1) carried out a
large-scale matched evaluation of Student Team Reading
in five high-poverty, mostly African American middle
Effective Reading Programs for Middle and High Schools: A Best-Evidence Synthesis
301
From the Best Evidence Encyclopedia (www.bestevidence.org)
control SDK platform:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
VB.NET merge PDF files, VB.NET view PDF online, VB.NET convert PDF to tiff, VB.NET read PDF, VB.NET convert PDF to text, VB.NET Convert to PDF with embedded
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK platform:VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Export all Word text and image content into high quality PDF without losing formatting. Create PDF files from both DOC and DOCX formats. Convert multiple pages
www.rasteredge.com
Reading Research Quarterly  •  43(3) 
302
Table 3. Instructional-Process Programs: Descriptive Information and Effect Sizes for Qualifying Studies
Mean 
Study
Design
DurationN
Grade
Sample characteristics
Evidence of initial equality
Posttest
Effect size
effect size
Cooperative learning programs
Peer-Assisted Learning Strategies (PALS)
Calhoon (2005)
Randomized 
31 weeks38 students 
6th–8th
Special education classes 
Scores were adjusted for 
WJ-III
+0.46
quasi-
taught by 4 teachers in 
any pretest differences
Letter-Word Identification +0.84
experiment (S)
2 middle schools in the 
Passage Comprehension
+0.66
southwestern U.S.
Word Attack 
+0.46
Reading Fluency 
-0.13
Fuchs, Fuchs, & 
Matched (S)
16 weeks18 classes (9T, 9C)High schoolSpecial education and 
Scores were adjusted for 
CRAB
+0.19
Kazdan (1999)
102 students 
remedial classes in 10 
any pretest differences
Comprehension
+0.33
(52T, 50C) 
high schools within one 
Correct words read
+0.04
metropolitan southeastern 
U.S. school district
Hankinson & 
Matched (S)
12 weeks 83 students 
8th
Suburban middle school 
Well matched on pretest
GMRT
-0.04
Myers (2000)
(51T, 32C)
near Pittsburgh, PA
Vocabulary
+0.10
Comprehension
+0.44
PSSA
Reading Comprehension
-0.34
Student Team Reading (STR)
Stevens & Durkin 
Matched (L)
1 year
3,986 students
6th–8th 
5 middle schools 
Well matched on 
CAT
+0.40
(1992), Study 1
in Baltimore, MD
demographics; control 
Reading Vocabulary
+0.46
group’s scores were higher 
Reading Comprehension
+0.34
than the treatment group’s 
at pretest
Stevens & Durkin 
Matched (L)
1 year
1,233 students 
6th
20 classes in 6 middle 
Well matched on pretest
CAT
+0.06
(1992), Study 2
(455T, 768C)
schools in an urban 
Reading Vocabulary 
-0.02
district in Maryland
(all students)
Reading Comprehension 
+0.13
(all students)
Reading Vocabulary 
+0.28
(special education students)
Reading Comprehension 
+0.60
(special education students)
From the Best Evidence Encyclopedia (www.bestevidence.org)
control SDK platform:VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
images, C#.NET PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF Convert to PDF with embedded
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK platform:C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
A convenient C#.NET control able to turn all Word text and image content into high quality PDF without losing formatting. Convert multiple pages Word to
www.rasteredge.com
Effective Reading Programs for Middle and High Schools: A Best-Evidence Synthesis
303
Mean 
Study
Design
DurationN
Grade
Sample characteristics
Evidence of initial equality
Posttest
Effect size
effect size
The Reading Edge
Chamberlain, 
Randomized 1 year
788 students 
6th 
Two majority-white, 
Well matched on pretest, 
GMRT
+0.15
Daniels, Madden, 
(L)
(405T, 383C) 
high-poverty rural middle 
demographics, and 
Total
+0.15
& Slavin (2007); 
in 2 cohorts
schools in West Virginia 
special-education status
Vocabulary
+0.15
Slavin, Chamberlain, 
and Florida
Comprehension
+0.12
Daniels, & 
Madden (2008)
Slavin, Daniels, 
Matched (L)
3 years
14 schools (7T, 7C)6th–8th
High-poverty schools 
Schools were matched on 
State assessments
+0.33 
+0.33
& Madden (2005)
3,470 students 
throughout the U.S.
pretest and demographics
(1,748T; 1,722C)
Strategy instruction programs
Reading Apprenticeship
Kemple et al. 
Randomized 1 year
17 schools
9th
Struggling students in 
Well matched on pretest
GRADE
+0.07
(2008)
(L)
1,140 students
schools across the U.S.; 
Comprehension
+0.09
(686T, 454C)
mostly African American 
Vocabulary
+0.05
and Hispanic students
Xtreme Reading
Kemple et al. 
Randomized 1 year
17 schools
9th
Struggling students in 
Well matched on pretest
GRADE
+0.05
(2008)
(L)
1,273 students
schools across the U.S.; 
Comprehension
+0.09
(722T, 551C)
mostly African American 
Vocabulary
+0.01
and Hispanic students
Benchmark Detectives Reading Program
Gaskins (1994)
Matched (S)
1–2 years83 students 
6th
Benchmark School in 
ANCOVA was used to 
MAT Reading
+0.52
(36T, 47C)
Pennsylvania
adjust for IQ and age
1 year
+0.21
2 years
+0.52
Strategy Intervention Model (SIM)
Losh (1991)
Matched (S)
1 year
64 Students 
7th–9th
Students with learning 
Students were individually 
CAT
+0.11
(32T, 32C)
disabilities in a Nebraska 
matched on pretest, 
Composite
+0.11
junior high school
demographics, grade level, 
Comprehension
+0.24
and handicapping conditionVocabulary
-0.01
Mothus (1997) 
Matched 
2 years
67 students 
8th 
Low-performing students 
Students were well matched SDRCT 
+0.36
+0.36
post-hoc (S)
(33T, 34C)
at 2 middle class, mostly 
on pretest 
white junior high schools 
in central British Columbia, 
Canada
(continued)
From the Best Evidence Encyclopedia (www.bestevidence.org)
control SDK platform:C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
An excellent .NET control support convert PDF to multiple Excel formats in C#.NET Turn all Excel spreadsheet into high quality PDF without losing formatting.
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK platform:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Excellent .NET control for turning all PowerPoint presentation into high quality PDF without losing formatting in C#.NET Class. Convert to PDF with embedded
www.rasteredge.com
Reading Research Quarterly  •  43(3) 
304
Table 3. Instructional-Process Programs: Descriptive Information and Effect Sizes for Qualifying Studies (continued)
Mean 
Study
Design
DurationN
Grade
Sample characteristics
Evidence of initial equality
Posttest
Effect size
effect size
Comprehensive school reform programs
Talent Development High School (TDHS)
Balfanz, Legters, 
Matched (L)
1 year
6 schools (3T, 3C)
High schoolInner-city high schools 
Scores were adjusted for 
Terra Nova
+0.17
+0.17
& Jordan (2004)
457 students 
in Baltimore, MD
pretest differences
(257T, 200C)
Kemple, Herlihy, 
Matched (L)
3 years
11 schools (5T, 6C) 9th–11th
High-poverty, mostly 
Students were matched on 
PSSA-Reading
-0.04
-0.04
& Smith (2005) 
399 students
African American schools 
8th-grade test scores
in Philadelphia, PA
Talent Development Middle School (TDMS)
Herlihy & Kemple 
Matched (L)
4–6 years12 schools (6T, 6C)6th–8th
Middle schools in 
TDMS schools were 
PSSA
+0.04
(2004, 2005)
Philadelphia, PA
matched with comparison 
Year 1 
-0.07
schools on pretest and 
Year 2
+0.16
demographics
Year 3
0.00
Year 4
-0.06
Year 5
+0.15
Year 6
+0.06
Mac Iver, Balfanz, 
Matched (L)
3 years
6 schools (3T, 3C)
6th–8th
Middle schools in 
TDMS schools were 
PSSA
+0.20
+0.20
Ruby, Byrnes, 
1,552 students
Philadelphia, PA
matched with comparison 
Lorentz, & Jones 
(890T, 662C)
schools on pretest and 
(2004)
demographics
Note. L = large study with at least 250 students or at least 10 classes or schools; S = small study with less than 250 students or less than 10 classes or schools; T = treatment; C = control; WJ-III = Woodcock Johnson, 3rd
edition; CRAB = Comprehensive Reading Assessment Battery; GMRT = Gates–MacGinitie Reading Test; PSSA = Pennsylvania System of School Assessment; CAT = California Achievement Test; GRADE = Group Reading
Assessment and Diagnostic Examination; MAT = Metropolitan Achievement Test; SDRCT = Stanford Diagnostic Reading Comprehension Test.
From the Best Evidence Encyclopedia (www.bestevidence.org)
control SDK platform:VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
finish high-fidelity PDF to Word conversion without depending on pictures and font formatting of source PDF file are Why do we need to convert PDF to Word file
www.rasteredge.com
schools in Baltimore, Maryland, USA. Two Student Team
Reading schools with 72 reading classes in grades 6–8
were  matched  on  demographic  characteristics  and
California Achievement Test (CAT) pretests with three
control schools with 88 reading classes in grades 6–8 (N
= 3,986). Students in the Student Team Reading classes
also experienced a component called Student Team
Writing.
On reading measures, using z-scores to combine
across grades 6–8 and adjusting for pretests, Student
Team Reading classes scored significantly higher than the
control classes on CAT Reading Vocabulary (+0.46, p <
.05) and Reading Comprehension (+0.34, p < .05), for a
mean effect size of +0.40. There were also positive ef-
fects on CAT Language Expression, but this is ascribed to
the Student Team Writing component, not Student Team
Reading.
In a similar study, Stevens and Durkin (1992, Study
2) evaluated Student Team Reading in six high-poverty,
mostly African American middle schools that were also lo-
cated in Baltimore. Three schools with 20 sixth-grade
classes were compared to three schools with 34 sixth-
grade classes (N= 1,233; 455 treatment students and 768
control students). On CAT posttests, controlling for CAT
pretests, there were small but significant differences favor-
ing Student Team Reading on Reading Comprehension
(ES = +0.13, p < .05), but there were no differences on
Reading Vocabulary (ES = –0.02, p > .05). The mean ef-
fect size was +0.06. Separate analyses for students with
special needs found much larger impacts with effect sizes
of +0.60 for Reading Comprehension and +0.28 for
Reading Vocabulary, for a mean effect size of +0.44.
The Reading Edge
2
In an adaptation of Student Team Reading,  Slavin,
Daniels, and Madden (2005) created a program called
The Reading Edge to serve as the reading component of
the Success for All Middle School program. The Reading
Edge uses the same cooperative learning structures and
basic lesson design as Student Team Reading but re-
groups students for reading instruction according to their
reading levels across grades and classes.
An evaluation of The Reading Edge by Chamberlain,
Daniels,  Madden,  and  Slavin  (2007)  and  Slavin,
Chamberlain, Daniels, and Madden (2008) randomly
assigned two successive cohorts of sixth graders within
two high-poverty, majority-white middle schools to
treatment or control classes. One of the middle schools
was located in a rural area of the U.S. state of West
Virginia, the other in a rural area of Florida. Combining
across cohorts, there was a total of 788 students (405
treatment students and 383 control students). On GMRT
posttests,  controlling  for  pretests,  students  in  The
Reading Edge classes scored significantly higher than
those in the control classes on Reading Total (ES = +0.15,
p< .01). On subtests, students in The Reading Edge
classes scored significantly higher on Vocabulary (ES =
+0.15, p < .01), and there were smaller significant differ-
ences on Comprehension (ES = +0.12, p < .05). There
were no significant differences in outcomes between the
two cohorts.
A large-scale matched study of The Reading Edge was
carried out by Slavin et al. (2005). Seven high-poverty
schools in six U.S. states implemented The Reading Edge
over a three-year period. Each of the seven schools was
matched on prior achievement and demographic factors
with a control school in the same state (usually in the
same district), and state test scores (percent scoring pro-
ficient or better) were compared at pre- and posttest. A
total of 3,470 students (1,748 treatment students and
1,722 control students) were involved. Using arcsine
transformations to analyze data on the proportions of
experimental and control students who passed their state
tests at pre- and posttest (Lipsey & Wilson, 2001), effect
sizes were estimated for each pair of schools. One of the
schools, located on an American Indian reservation in the
U.S. state of Washington, made extraordinary gains, go-
ing from a zero to a 96% passing rate on the Washington
Assessment of Student Learning, while its control school,
which was also on a reservation, gained 18 percentage
points, for an effect size of +2.29. Because of this posi-
tive outlier, a median rather than a mean was computed
across all seven school pairs on their respective state tests,
yielding a median effect size of +0.33.
Across seven qualifying studies of cooperative learn-
ing approaches to middle school reading, the weighted
mean effect size was +0.28. The four studies of the simi-
lar Student Team Reading and The Reading Edge ap-
proaches had a weighted mean effect size of +0.29.
Strategy Instruction Programs
Strategy instruction programs are reading approaches
that emphasize the teaching of cognitive and metacogni-
tive reading strategies such as summarization, use of
graphic organizers, and previewing.
Reading Apprenticeship and Xtreme Reading
Both Reading Apprenticeship and Xtreme Reading are
supplemental literacy programs designed to help strug-
gling high school readers improve their reading skills.
Reading Apprenticeship was designed by WestEd, an
educational laboratory.  Through teaching strategies
based on “cognitive apprenticeship” (gradually passing
responsibility from teacher to students), this program
emphasizes the development of metacognitive skills, sus-
tained  silent  reading, language  study,  and  writing.
Xtreme  Reading  was  developed  by  the  Center  for
Research on Learning at the University of Kansas and em-
phasizes teaching of cognitive and metacognitive skills,
vocabulary,  and  word  identification.  Teachers  and 
Effective Reading Programs for Middle and High Schools: A Best-Evidence Synthesis
305
From the Best Evidence Encyclopedia (www.bestevidence.org)
students follow a regular routine of modeling, practice,
paired practice, independent practice, differentiated in-
struction, and integration and generalization.
As part of a recent initiative of the U.S. Institute of
Education Sciences, Kemple et al. (2008) evaluated these
two  promising  approaches  to  reading  instruction.
Kemple et al. (2008) randomly assigned 34 high schools
in 10 districts across the United States to use either
Reading Apprenticeship or Xtreme Reading. Within
schools, entering ninth graders reading two to four
grades below level were randomly assigned to treatment
(686 Reading Apprenticeship students; 722 Reading
Xtreme students) or control conditions (454 students in
Reading Apprenticeship control group; 551 students in
Xtreme Reading control group). Overall, the students
were 45% African American, 32% Hispanic, 18% white,
and 5% other. Students were pre- and posttested on the
Group Reading Assessment and Diagnostic Evaluation.
Controlling for pretests, the Reading Apprenticeship out-
comes for comprehension (ES = +0.09, p > .05) and vo-
cabulary (ES = +0.05, p > .05) resulted in a mean effect
size of +0.07. For Xtreme Reading, there were few dif-
ferences in reading comprehension (ES = +0.09, p > .05)
or reading vocabulary (ES = +0.01, p > .05), for a mean
effect size of +0.05.
The Benchmark Detectives Reading Program
Gaskins (1994) evaluated a form of strategy instruction
for struggling readers of normal or superior intelligence
called the Benchmark Detectives Reading Program. This
program  was  used  in  the  Benchmark  School,  a
Pennsylvania middle school where teachers were given
professional development in the use of cognitive and
metacognitive reading strategies across the curriculum
(N = 83 students). In monthly inservice sessions taught by
a variety of national experts on the use of cognitive strat-
egy  instruction,  as  well  as  within-school  coaching,
coteaching, and conference attendance, the teachers
learned several comprehension strategies and methods for
introducing these strategies to their students. An evalua-
tion compared students in three cohorts entering the mid-
dle grades to those in a previous cohort that did not
experience strategy instruction. The cohorts were similar
on IQ measures from the revised Wechsler Intelligence
Scale for Children (WISC-R). On the reading portion of
the Metropolitan Achievement Test, adjusted for WISC-R,
the strategy group had scores that were higher but not sig-
nificantly higher than the baseline group after one year
(ES = +0.21, p > .05) and scores that were significantly
higher after two years (ES = +0.52, p < .01).
Strategy Intervention Model
The Strategy Intervention Model, also known as the
Strategic Instruction Model (SIM; Schumaker, Denton, &
Deshler, 1984), is a method in which low-achieving sec-
ondary students are taught metacognitive reading strate-
gies, especially paraphrasing, to help them comprehend
text.
A small study of SIM by Losh (1991) involved stu-
dents with learning disabilities in a junior high school
located in the U.S. state of Nebraska. Students in a SIM
group (n = 32) were individually matched with students
in a control group (n = 32) based on CAT reading scores,
handicapping condition, gender, and grade level. On the
Spring 1990 CAT scores, controlling for prior scores on
the 1989 CAT, SIM students scored higher on the CAT
Composite (ES = +0.11, p > .05), although these scores
were nonsignificant. There were positive effects for
Comprehension (ES = +0.24, p> .05) but not Vocabulary
(ES = –0.01, p > .05).
Mothus (1997) carried out a small matched post-hoc
evaluation of SIM in two middle class, mostly white jun-
ior high schools in central British Columbia, Canada.
One school had used SIM for two years with two cohorts
of low-achieving eighth graders (n = 33). These students
were compared to students in the same school and in a
neighboring school (n = 34) who received conventional
learning  assistance  and  were  well  matched  on  the
Stanford  Diagnostic  Reading  Comprehension  Tests
(SDRCT) given at the beginning of eighth grade. The stu-
dents in the SIM treatment group were also compared to
matched low achievers in both schools who received nei-
ther SIM nor conventional learning assistance but were
similarly low achieving. On SDRCT posttests at the end
of the two years of treatment, SIM students scored sig-
nificantly higher than both the learning-assistance group
(ES = +0.39, p < .05) and the unserved group (ES =
+0.32, p < .05), for a mean effect size of +0.36.
Comprehensive School Reform Programs
Comprehensive school reform programs are whole-
school models that include extensive professional devel-
opment in instructional methods, curriculum, school
organization, classroom management, parent involve-
ment, and other issues. As noted earlier, only compre-
hensive school reform models with specific approaches
to reading were included.
Talent Development High School
3
Talent Development High School, or TDHS, is a compre-
hensive reform model that focuses on improving stu-
dents’ reading and math performance in high-poverty
high schools. A key element of the approach is a ninth-
grade academy, which provides a “double dose” of read-
ing and math instruction (90 minutes of each per day).
The reading program, called Strategic Reading, is used
in the first semester. It emphasizes teacher modeling of
comprehension processes, minilessons on comprehen-
sion strategies and writing, cooperative learning with
paired reading and discussion groups, and self-selected
Reading Research Quarterly  •  43(3) 
306
From the Best Evidence Encyclopedia (www.bestevidence.org)
reading. In the second semester, students experience the
district’s English I curriculum, supported by TDHS dis-
cussion guides and writing supplements that combine
Strategic Reading methods with the district curriculum.
Balfanz, Legters, and Jordan (2004) evaluated the
TDHS Strategic Reading approach in three inner-city,
very low-achieving high schools in Baltimore with most-
ly African American student populations. The three
TDHS schools, which had 20 general-education reading
classes taught by eight teachers (n = 257 students), were
compared to three control schools (n = 200 students) that
were well matched on pretest scores and demographic
factors. The control schools also provided a double dose
of reading and math instruction (90 minutes of each per
day); thus, instructional time was similar for students in
both the treatment and control schools. At the end of one
year, TDHS students scored significantly better than stu-
dents in the control group on the district-administered
Terra Nova scores, after adjusting for pretests (ES =
+0.17, p < .01).
A third-party evaluation of the TDHS model was car-
ried out in five high-poverty, mostly African American
schools in the U.S. city of Philadelphia by Kemple,
Herlihy, and Smith (2005). Six high schools matched
on  eighth-grade  PSSA  scores  served  as  controls.
Eleventh-grade PSSA-Reading scores served as posttests.
Due to high mobility over the course of the three-year ex-
periment, only 399 students from the original sample
were still present at posttest, but the rate of attrition was
similar for the two groups. Among this subsample, ef-
fect sizes were estimated at –0.04, p > .05.
Talent Development Middle School
4
Talent Development Middle School (TDMS) is a compre-
hensive reform model designed to help high-poverty ur-
ban middle schools improve outcomes for their students.
It organizes schools into small, interdisciplinary learning
communities and introduces teaching methods in lan-
guage arts, math, science, and U.S. history that empha-
size cooperative learning. Remedial courses in reading
and math are provided for struggling students, and ex-
tensive professional development and coaching are giv-
en to all teachers. For reading, TDMS uses an adaptation
of Student Team Reading called Student Team Literature,
which also incorporates a focus on classic books, more
high-level questions, and additional background infor-
mation for students.
A third-party evaluation of TDMS was carried out by
Herlihy and Kemple (2004, 2005). Using a comparative
interrupted time-series design, six middle schools in
Philadelphia were compared to six matched comparison
schools in the same district over three baseline years and
four to six implementation years. For reading, eighth-
grade scores on the PSSA for successive cohorts of students
were compared in terms of each school’s deviation from its
own three-year baseline average. The comparisons in gains
were  made across experimental  and control groups.
Different schools had different numbers of follow-up years,
but differences in scores on the PSSA were small in all
years (Year 1, ES = –0.07, p> .05; Year 2, ES = +0.16, p <
.01; Year 3, ES = 0.00, p> .05; Year 4, ES = –0.06, p > .05;
Year 5, ES = +0.15, p > .05; Year 6, ES = +0.06, p > .05).
The mean effect size across all years was +0.04.
Mac Iver et al. (2004) reported a three-year evaluation
of TDMS in the first three Philadelphia schools to use the
program involving cohorts overlapping those in the Herlihy
and Kemple (2004, 2005) study. The TDMS schools (n =
890 students) were compared to three matched control
schools (n = 662). Overall, the schools were approximate-
ly 42% African American, 41% Hispanic, 9% white, and
8% Asian American and served impoverished neighbor-
hoods. Controlling for fifth-grade PSSA scores, eighth-
grade PSSA scores for students who had been in their
respective schools throughout the study favored the TDMS
schools by 4.3 NCEs (ES = +0.20, p < .001).
Averaging across the two evaluations of TDMS, the
mean effect size was +0.12.
Conclusions: Instructional-Process Programs
As was true in the Slavin and Lake (in press) elementary
math review and the Slavin et al. (2007) secondary math
review, the largest numbers of rigorous studies that met
the inclusion criteria for the present review were those
that evaluated instructional-process programs. Across
16 studies, involving approximately 15,000 students, the
weighted mean effect size was +0.21. The three random-
ized studies had a weighted mean effect size of +0.08.
Seven of the studies (two of which used randomized
designs) evaluated various forms of cooperative learning
with 9,700 students. These had a weighted mean effect
size of +0.28. This corresponds with findings from the
math reviews, which for cooperative learning reported
median effect sizes of +0.29 at the elementary level
(Slavin & Lake, in press) and +0.32 at the middle and
high school level (Slavin et al., 2007). The weighted
mean effect size across the four studies of the two simi-
lar programs Student Team Reading and The Reading
Edge was +0.29; these studies involved 9,477 students.
Two large randomized studies and three small matched
studies found small positive effects for programs that
teach cognitive and metacognitive strategies to students,
with a weighted mean effect size of +0.09.
Overall Patterns of Outcomes
Across all categories, there were 33 qualifying studies of
middle and high school reading programs involving a
total of nearly 39,000 students. Four of the qualifying
studies used random assignment. The mean effect size
Effective Reading Programs for Middle and High Schools: A Best-Evidence Synthesis
307
From the Best Evidence Encyclopedia (www.bestevidence.org)
weighted by sample size across all 33 studies was +0.17.
These studies were identified from among more than 300
studies initially reviewed and represent those that used
rigorous experimental procedures.
The most surprising finding is the fact that no studies
of secondary reading textbooks met the inclusion criteria.
Widely used programs such as McDougal Littell and
LANGUAGE! have not been studied in experimental-
control comparisons that met the standards of this re-
view. This contrasts with the situation in secondary
math, where Slavin et al. (2007) found 38 qualifying
studies of math curricula and 100 qualifying studies
overall. Of course, reading traditionally has not been
taught in middle and high schools except to students in
remedial and special education programs, but it is dis-
tressing, nevertheless, to find so little evidence behind
the curricula used with hundreds of thousands of sec-
ondary students who struggle with reading.
The three categories in which qualifying studies did
exist were mixed-method models, CAI, and instruction-
al-process programs. There were robust positive effects
on achievement in mostly matched quasi-experiments for
mixed-method models such as READ 180 and Voyager
Passport (weighted mean effect size of +0.23 across nine
studies) and for instructional-process programs using co-
operative learning (weighted mean effect size of +0.28
across seven studies). However, effects for CAI programs
were small (weighted mean effect size of +0.10 across
eight studies), as were effects for reading strategy pro-
grams that  did  not  emphasize cooperative learning
(weighted mean effect size of +0.09 across five studies).
The mean effect sizes reported for programs catego-
rized as having moderate evidence of effectiveness range
from +0.20 to +0.35 and are similar to those found in
previous reviews of research on math programs. Such
effects are modest compared to those often reported for
brief experiments or studies that use measures closely
aligned with treatments, but they are important given
that they come from large, realistic studies mostly using
the kinds of standardized tests for which schools are held
accountable. In addition, these standardized tests proba-
bly underestimate the true impact of experimental treat-
ments as the tests are unlikely to be sensitive to the
specific content being taught. The importance of effect
sizes of this magnitude becomes clear in light of the fact
that an effect size of +0.25 represents about half of the
minority–white  achievement  gap  on  the  National
Assessment of Educational Progress  (Lee, Grigg,  &
Donahue, 2007). The large, extended studies with stan-
dard measures that form the core of the present review il-
lustrate what could be accomplished at the policy level
if schools widely adopted and implemented effective pro-
grams, not what could theoretically be gained under ide-
al, hothouse conditions.
Sample Size Matters
One factor that did differentiate among studies was sample
size. Studies with total sample sizes of 250 or more stu-
dents (125 students per treatment), or 10 or more classes,
were considered “large.” Previous research (e.g., Rothstein
et al., 2005; Slavin, 2008; Sterne, Gavaghan, & Egger,
2000; Taylor & Tweedie, 1998) has shown that studies
with small sample sizes report larger effect sizes than stud-
ies with large samples. This is due primarily to the fact that
small studies produce much more variable outcomes than
large studies. In addition, small, underpowered studies
that produce zero or negative effects are less likely to be
published or locatable in any format; thus, these studies
are rarely available for review. Moreover, authors are reluc-
tant even to write up the results of small studies that find
zero or negative effects, and journal editors are unlikely to
publish such studies. As a result, reports of small studies
are likely to be available only when their effects are so large
that they are statistically significant despite their small sam-
ple sizes. In contrast, large studies finding zero or nega-
tive effects are more likely to be published, and because
large studies are likely to have been funded or completed
as part of a scholar’s doctoral work, they are more likely
to be reported, even if the report is not published. In ad-
dition, studies with statistically significant differences are
more likely to be published or otherwise reported, and
small studies only have significant differences if effect sizes
are large (Rothstein et al., 2005).
In the present review, large studies clearly produced
lower effect sizes than small studies. For the 22 large
studies, the median effect size was +0.15, while the 11
small studies had a median effect size of +0.36. Because
of these differences, the present study used mean effect
sizes weighted by sample size (up to a cap of 2,500 stu-
dents) in pooling effect sizes across studies.
Summarizing Evidence of
Effectiveness for Current Programs
For many audiences, it is useful to have summaries of the
strength of the evidence supporting achievement effects
for programs that educators might select to improve stu-
dent outcomes. Slavin (2008) proposed a rating system
for such programs that is intended to balance method-
ological quality, weighted mean effect sizes, sample sizes,
and other factors, and this system was applied by Slavin
and Lake (in press) and Slavin et al. (2007). Using the
same rating system and drawing on the results of the pres-
ent review, secondary reading programs were categorized
as follows: strong evidence of effectiveness, moderate ev-
idence of effectiveness, limited evidence of effectiveness,
insufficient evidence of effectiveness, and no qualifying
studies. Programs with strong evidence of effectiveness
Reading Research Quarterly  •  43(3) 
308
From the Best Evidence Encyclopedia (www.bestevidence.org)
had at least two large studies, one of which was a large
randomized or randomized quasi-experimental study, or
multiple smaller studies, with an effect size weighted by
sample size of at least +0.20. A large study was defined
as one in which at least 10 classes or schools, or 250 stu-
dents, were assigned to treatments. Smaller studies were
counted as equivalent to a large study if their collective
sample sizes were at least 250 students. Effect sizes from
randomized studies took precedence over those from
matched studies. Programs with moderate evidence of
effectiveness had at least two studies of any design, each
with a collective sample size of 250 students, with a
weighted mean effect size of at least +0.20. Programs with
limited evidence of effectiveness had at least one qualify-
ing study of any design with a weighted mean effect size of
at least +0.10. Those programs categorized as having in-
sufficient evidence of effectiveness had one or more qual-
ifying study of any design with nonsignificant outcomes
and a weighted mean effect size of less than +0.10.
Table 4 summarizes currently available programs
falling into each of these categories. (Within categories,
programs are listed in alphabetical order.)
None of the programs qualified for the strong evi-
dence of effectiveness category; however, four programs
met the criteria for moderate evidence of effectiveness.
Two of these were the cooperative learning programs The
Reading Edge and Student Team Reading. READ 180, a
mixed-method approach that uses computers in a broad-
er comprehensive model, also fell into this category, as
did the early CAI program, Jostens.
Six programs fell into the limited evidence of effec-
tiveness category. These were SIM and the Benchmark
Detectives Reading Program, both of which provide strat-
egy instruction to students, as well as Voyager Passport,
PALS, Accelerated Reader, and TDMS.
Discussion
The most important conclusion of the research reviewed in
this article is that there are fewer large, high-quality studies
of middle and high school reading programs than one
would wish. There were no methodologically adequate
studies comparing different reading texts or curricula.
Although 33 studies (involving nearly 39,000 students)
did qualify for inclusion, there were only a small number
of studies of any particular program, and only four stud-
ies involved random assignment to conditions. Further,
causal claims cannot be made with confidence in system-
atic reviews, which can only examine existing studies.
Keeping these limitations in mind, there are several
important patterns in the findings that are worthy of
note. First, this review found that most of the programs
with good evidence of effectiveness have cooperative
learning at their core. These programs all rely on a form
of cooperative learning in which students work in small
groups to help one another master reading skills and in
which the success of the team depends on the individ-
ual learning of each team member. Both of these elements
have  been  identified  by  previous  reviewers  (e.g.,
Rohrbeck, Ginsburg-Block, Fantuzzo, & Miller, 2003;
Slavin, 1995, in press; Webb & Palincsar, 1996) as es-
sential to the effectiveness of cooperative learning. The
finding of positive effects for cooperative learning pro-
grams is consistent with the findings of reviews of ele-
mentary and secondary math programs (Slavin & Lake,
in press; Slavin et al., 2007).
Positive effects were also seen for other programs 
designed to improve the core of classroom practice.
Mixed-method models, which combine large-group,
small-group, and CAI, provide extensive professional de-
velopment to teachers, as do strategy instruction pro-
grams such as SIMS and the Benchmark Detectives
Reading Program. Like cooperative learning programs,
these approaches focus on improving classroom teach-
ing, and have good evidence of effectiveness.
Also consistent with previous research is the finding
in the present study that forms of CAI generally pro-
duced small effects. An earlier review of CAI in math and
reading by Kulik (2003) found similarly few positive ef-
fects for reading.
The findings of this review add to a growing body of
evidence to the effect that what matters  for student
achievement are approaches that fundamentally change
what teachers and students do every day (such as cooper-
ative learning and mixed-method models). In earlier re-
views, these strategies had outcomes that were clearly and
consistently more positive than those found for curricula
or CAI alone. More research and development of reading
programs for secondary students is clearly needed, but
we already know enough to take action, to use what we
know now to improve reading outcomes for students with
reading difficulties in their critical secondary years.
Notes
1Student Team Reading was developed by a team that included the
first author of the present review.
2
The Reading Edge was developed by a team that included the first
author of the present review.
3The Talent Development High School program was developed at
Johns Hopkins University in a research center directed by the first
author of the present review.
4
The Talent Development Middle School program was developed at
Johns Hopkins University in a research center directed by the first
author of the present review.
This research was funded by the Institute of Education Sciences (IES),
U.S. Department of Education (Grant No. R305A040082). However,
any opinions expressed are those of the authors and do not necessarily
represent IES positions or policies.
We thank Michele Victor, Lucretia Brown, and Susan Davis for their
help with the review and John Nunnery, Carole Torgerson, Jon Baron,
and anonymous reviewers for comments on earlier drafts.
Effective Reading Programs for Middle and High Schools: A Best-Evidence Synthesis
309
From the Best Evidence Encyclopedia (www.bestevidence.org)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested