Updates and Implication of Obamacare       
Mizuho Industry Focus
20 
B. Beneficiary Backlash 
Strong push-back from beneficiaries regarding benefit design or cuts could lead to rising healthcare cost. 
The backlash against HMOs in late 1990s contributed to the abandonments of some cost-containment 
practices and subsequent rapid growth in healthcare spending. So far in health exchanges, there doe
sn’t 
seem to be a big pushback on narrow network. However there are strong pushbacks in certain cuts to 
coverage. For example, early in the year, CMS proposed rules that eliminate 2 of the 6 protected classes in 
Medicare Part D. Previously all Part D plans have to cover substantially all approved drugs in six classes. 
The new proposed rule would eliminate the requirement for antidepressants and immunosupressants for 
translplants. After the proposed rule was released, CMS came under strong criticism from seniors. Now it 
appears CMS has abandoned this proposal.
C. Improving economy 
Improving economy and tightening of labor market will drive up medical cost. U.S. economy just went 
through a traumatic period of great recession. Although U.S. economy has made back the 8+ million jobs 
lost in the recession, labor market recovery is still tepid and wage inflation is absent. With the improving 
economy, U.S. healthcare spending may pick up again. Historically, healthcare spending growth has 
tracked GDP growth. But on relative terms (i.e., NHE grows faster than GDP growth), it is hard to pinpoint 
how much acceleration NHE may have due to the improving economy.
Pdf to text converter - SDK software API:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Pdf to text converter - SDK software API:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
Updates and Implication of Obamacare       
Mizuho Industry Focus
21 
V. Impact of Obamacare on Each Segment of U.S. Healthcare  
A. Impact of Healthcare Reform on Brand Pharma Industry 
Pharmaceutical industry has contributed substantial rebates and fees to ACA (see Table 3). In 2014, with 
the coverage expansion, the industry will finally get some returns to its multi-year down payments. As 
shown in Table 11, in 2014 absent of the ACA coverage expansion, sales of U.S. prescription drug are 
expected to grow 2.3%, but with ACA, growth is expected to be 5.2%. So ACA will boost U.S. 
prescription drug growth by 2.9% (i.e., 5.2%-2.3%) in 2014. In 2015, ACA is expected to boost 
prescription drug sales by 1.8% (see Table 11). 
Table 11 CMS's Forecast of ACA Impact on U.S. Prescription Drug Sales 
$ in billions
2011A
2012E
2013E
2014E
2015E
2016E
2017E
2018E
2019E
2020E
2021E
2022E
Rx Drugs without ACA
262.3
259.9
261.5
267.4
281.1
297.8
316.5
337.0
359.7
384.4
411.0
439.7
year/year increase
-0.9%
0.6%
2.3%
5.1%
5.9%
6.3%
6.5%
6.7%
6.9%
6.9%
7.0%
Rx Drugs including ACA
263.0
260.8
262.3
275.9
294.9
311.6
330.7
350.6
372.7
397.9
425.5
455.0
year/year increase
-0.8%
0.6%
5.2%
6.9%
5.7%
6.1%
6.0%
6.3%
6.8%
6.9%
6.9%
Rx $ impact from ACA
0.2
-0.1
7.7
4.9
-0.8
-0.5
-1.5
-1.5
0.4
0.1
-0.2
year/year increase
0.1%
0.0%
2.9%
1.8%
-0.3%
-0.1%
-0.5%
-0.4%
-0.1%
0.0%
0.0%
Source: Compiled by MHBK/IRD based on data from CMS, Office of the Actuary. Note: Forecast released September 
2013 
In the current healthcare system, there is increasingly higher copay, deductible and more tiering for 
consumers. ACA will accelerate this trend as consumers are increasingly empowered and value-based 
model takes hold. More ACOs are likely to be formed under ACA, which will exert downward pressure on 
drug usage. The bundled payment system (e.g., how Medicare pays for kidney dialysis) is likely to gain 
more popularity. Reimbursement for poorly differentiated drugs will become ever tougher. The market will 
still pay for innovation. But for therapeutic classes where generics or many similar drugs are available, the 
reimbursement will be challenging. In short, companies have to demonstrate the value of the medicines to 
payers in addition to the FDA in order to get coverage. This value-based reimbursement environment will 
force pharma to change R&D processes to proactively develop such evidence. 
An important element from the ACA is the establishment of a biosimilar pathway. President Obama has 
tried to shorten the biologic exclusivity from 12 years to 7 years. But with heavy pushback from the biotech 
industry, especially from heavily Democratic states such as California and Massachusetts, the 12-year 
exclusivity is likely to stay. ACA sets out an elaborate litigation process for biosimilars. So far, there hasn
’t 
been any litigation to our knowledge as stipulated by the ACA. So the mechanism is untested. FDA has put 
out several guidance documents. On the important points, FDA is likely to demand a fairly large clinical 
trial and would likely allow extrapolation of clinical d
ata across indications. There hasn’t been clar
ity on 
the interchangeability between biosmilars and brands from the FDA. At least the agency would require 
switching studies to show the maintenance of efficacy. So biosimilars are coming to the U.S. market. 
Whether they will go through the ACA pathway is another question. 
ACA also funded $500mn to create PCORI (Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute), which is 
responsible for doing comparative effectiveness research (CER). So far, PCORI’s work has been 
mostly 
meta-analysis using existing clinical trial data, rather than running new trials on its own. With the relatively 
small budget and given the often very complex medical problem it tries to resolve, perhaps it is unrealistic 
for PCORI to run comparative trials. Pharma are not a fan of comparative trials as they could pit their 
expensive drugs vs. cheap generics. There is often little upside for pharma in such comparative trials. For 
example, NIH ran a trial comparing Lucentis to Avastin in advanced macular degeneration (AMD). 
Fortunately the trial result was mixed. Otherwise, Lucentis’ blockbuster sales could be undercut. 
Overall 
the impact of PCORI on the pharmaceutical industry is unclear to us. 
Also on the pricing side, under ACA, the increasingly wide-spread 340(b) drug discount program has 
become a headache for biopharma companies. Its rock-bottom pricing has become more prevalent. Many 
institutions are using the 340(b) program for patients not intended to benefit under such program. We could 
see more industry push-back on this program. 
SDK software API:Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
Online PDF to Text Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF to Text. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button or drag
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software API:C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Text: Extract Text from PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Text. Enable extracting PDF text to another PDF file, TXT and SVG formats.
www.rasteredge.com
Updates and Implication of Obamacare       
Mizuho Industry Focus
22 
B. Impact of Healthcare Reform on Medical Device Industry 
Medical device industry started contributing 2.3% excise tax from the beginning of 2013. President Obama 
has strongly supported this fee despite wide Congressional support to repeal the tax. Increased healthcare 
utilization is also expected to benefit the device industry. However as most people signed up for the Silver 
plan in the Health Exchanges, it is unclear how much they are willing to spend on high copay for expensive 
procedures.  
S
ame as the pharmaceutical industry, the “value
-
based” medicine concept also rings loudly for device 
companies. The consolidating hospital providers have substantial bargaining power when they purchase 
medical devices. They are not going to pay extra for incremental benefits. Device makers increasingly find 
it lucky just to hold the line on pricing. To cope with increasingly bargaining power from providers and 
rising cost pressure, device makers are realizing the benefit of a bigger scale. Certain big device companies 
(such as Medtronic and Johnson & Johnson) are trying the approach of product bundling to get some 
bargaining advantage. They claim having a big portfolio of products helps them in the marketplace. The 
preference for larger scale has also pushed M&As in the industry. Recently Zimmer acquired Biomet to 
create a behemoth in the orthopedic industry, and Medtronic acquired Covidien in the largest deal ever in 
the medtech industry. We could see more consolidations to follow in the device industry.  
Some device companies have also entered into hospital services business to wrap services around their 
device offerings. For example, Medtronic acquired home-monitoring company Cardiocom in August 2013 
for $200mn. Cardiocom is a supplier of patient home-monitoring services. It provides patients with 
cardiovascular diseases monitoring tools (to measure weight, blood pressure, glucose, pulse oximetry, etc.) 
and a software system to connect with caregivers. Per ACA, beginning in 2013, hospital payments will be 
reduced if a hospital has excessive 30-day readmission rate for conditions such as heart failure, heart 
attacks, pneumonia and other conditions. Therefore it is to hospitals’ economic interest to prevent 
readmissions within 30 days of discharge. Therefore, the service of Cardiocom will be quite valued by 
hospitals. In September 2013, Medtronic formed Medtronic Hospital Solutions, This business will first help 
manage cath labs in Europe. In this setting, Medtronic will simultaneously sell products to the hospital cath 
labs and manage them to achieve cost savings. The goal is not so much to earn revenues on the service side, 
but to get larger share of Medtronic products in those cath labs and potentially shut out competitors. 
Johnson & Johnson through its Janssen Healthcare Innovation group announced a disease management 
platform called Care4Today. Initially Care4Today will focus on J&J’s stronghold in orthopedics
Care4Today Orthopedic Solutions will integrate mobile health and other tools to help patients return home 
faster and also 
improve patients’ recovery at home. 
Beyond J&J and Medtronic, other medtech companies have also recognized the need to offer hospitals 
other help beyond their medical devices. In 2012, Zimmer acquired Dornoch Medical, which makes 
medical waste disposal system that can keep hospital workers safe from handling infectious fluids. In late 
2013, Stryker acquires Patient Safety Technologies, Inc. The company's proprietary Safety-Sponge® 
System and SurgiCount 360(TM) compliance software help prevent Retained Foreign Objects (RFOs) in 
the operating room, thereby improving patient safety and reducing healthcare costs. Per ACA, hospitals 
with excessive number of hospital-acquired conditions (HAC) especially the so-c
alled “never events” like 
RFO will be penalized. Starting in 2015, hospitals falling in the top quartile will face 1% reduction in 
Medicare payments. Sponges are the most common items accidentally left in the body after surgical 
operation. So Zimmer tries to offer hospital a product to address this safety issue. 
SDK software API:VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Text. Advanced Visual Studio .NET PDF text extraction control, built in .NET framework 2.0 and compatible with Windows system.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software API:VB.NET Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in vb.net
File from Text Using Visual Basic .NET Demo Code. Best VB.NET adobe text to PDF converter library for Visual Studio .NET project.
www.rasteredge.com
Updates and Implication of Obamacare       
Mizuho Industry Focus
23 
C. Impact of Healthcare Reform on Managed Care Industry 
Healthcare reform is often referred to as a healthcare insurance reform. Therefore ACA has the largest 
impact on the managed care industry. Contrary to initial concern, ACA actually turned out to be a boost for 
managed care industry. As shown in Figure 12 and Table 12, enrollment growth for the five-year periods 
prior to 2013 had been around 3%, but from 2013-2018, ACA will boost enrollment by 14%. Managed care 
will enjoy a period of robust growth in membership. 
As listed in Table 3, since 2011, various reimbursement cuts have been imposed on MCOs. Starting in 
2014, MCOs will start paying annual industry fees totaling $8bn. MCOs are expected to mostly pass this 
fee onto their customers. MCOs will also face substantial cut to Medicare Advantage (MA) rate in 2014 
and 2015 to narrow the premium to Medicare fee-for-service levels. However many congressmen (even 
from the Democratic Party) oppose to such cut to MA rate. MCOs may have benefited from the political 
climate ahead of the mid-term election in late 2014. During recent years, MCOs have benefited from 
moderating medical cost and they have downward adjusted their cost structure. Therefore, the 
reimbu
rsement cuts haven’t caused notable
hardship for the industry. With the prospect of enrollment 
growth and subdued cost trend, MCOs shares are currently trading close to all-time highs. 
Going forward, whether this subdued medical cost trend can continue will be crucial for MCOs. There is a 
constant debate on whether this subdued medical cost trend is cyclical (impacted by the weak economy) or 
secular (structural forces discussed in section II). MCOs have conservatively assumed a pick-up in medical 
cost trend this year.   
Because of the Medicaid expansion by ACA, one opportunity for MCO is the Medicaid managed care 
space. In 2012, WellPoint acquired Medicaid MCO Amerigroup for $4.9bn. Separately, anticipating the 
growth of Medicare advantage, in October 2011 Cigna acquired Healthspring, a player in Medicare space 
for $3.8bn.  
Besides Medicaid, health exchange will provide another boost to the managed care industry. Health 
exchanges represent both opportunities and risks to MCOs. Based on the preliminary enrollment statistics, 
public exchanges are unlikely to be very profitable for MCOs this year. MCOs are likely to raise premium 
next year for plans on the exchanges. Beyond public exchanges, private exchanges could be an opportunity 
for MCOs. If employers switch their ACO plans to private exchanges, MCOs will be able to capture these 
lives at good commercial margins. The risk of ACA to MCOs is if employers dump many non-ASO 
insured employees to the public exchange at less favorable margins to health plans. 
Figure 12 Growth in Healthcare Enrollment in the U.S. 
0
50
100
150
200
250
300
350
400
2003
2008
2013
2018E
Enrollment in Millions
Commercial Group
Medicare
Medicaid
Individual
301
343
286
294
3%
3%
14%
Source: CMS and WellPoint. Note: Medicaid includes CHIP, Individual includes Health Exchanges, and Commercial 
excludes all individual commercial insurance. Enrollment figures exclude other public enrollment through Department 
of Veterans Affairs and Department of Defense. 
SDK software API:C#: How to Use SDK to Convert Document and Image Using XDoc.
Sample Code. Here's a snippet of sample code for converting Tiff to PDF file using XDoc.Converter for .NET in C# .NET program. Six
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software API:C# Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in C#.net, ASP
Best C# text to PDF converter SDK for converting adobe PDF from TXT in Visual Studio .NET project. Use Text to PDF Converter Library DLLs in C#.NET.
www.rasteredge.com
Updates and Implication of Obamacare       
Mizuho Industry Focus
24 
Table 12 Growth in WellPoint Membership and Revenues 
WellPoint 
2008
2013
2018E
Membership (mn)
35
36
40
Operating revenues ($bn)
64
$      
70
$      
100
$      
Source: Compiled by MHBK/IRD based on data from WellPoint 2014 Analyst Day Presentation.  
D. Impact of Healthcare Reform on Hospital Industry 
Hospitals are widely recognized as the group most benefited from ACA. The reduction in uninsured 
population will directly lead to a reduction in uncompensated care and bad debt. Cuts to Hospital 
reimbursement by ACA started in 2010 (see Table 3). Besides ACA, starting in April 2013, sequestration 
per the Budget Control Act of 2011 cut Medicare reimbursement to providers by 2% per annum. So 
hospitals have been operating under tough environment for a number of years. In 2014, with the enrollment 
expansion, finally they will see the benefits from ACA.  
The fact that half of the 50 states had chosen not to expand Medicaid this year was a setback for the 
hospital industry. However, this is mitigated by the fact that hospitals lose money on admissions of 
Medicaid and Medicare patients. Still with the big difference between the close-to-nothing hospitals get 
from the uninsured population and the discounted Medicaid provider rate, hospitals are much better off 
having people enrolled in Medicaid. The Medicaid picture is likely to improve as more states opt to expand 
their Medicaid programs under ACA. 
The enrollment numbers as well as the composition of enrollees from ACA will be important in gauging 
ACA’s impact on hospitals.
If many so-called frequent-flyers (patients often use emergency rooms and in-
patient services) are enrolled in ACA, it will reduce the uncompensated care at hospitals.  
As we discussed earlier, one logical strategic reaction from payment cut is for hospitals to merge. Indeed, 
hospital mergers have been on the rise. In 2013, we saw two huge hospital mergers 
Community Health 
Systems
$7.6bn acquisition of Health Management Associates and Tenet’s $4.3bn acquisition of Vanguard 
Health Systems. The logic for hospital merger is very sound. But from the perspective of controlling 
medical cost, it is not desirable for hospitals to have big market share in a given location. Therefore, FTC 
and other regulatory bodies may want to ramp up anti-trust review of hospital mergers. 
SDK software API:XDoc.Converter for .NET, Support Documents and Images Conversion
file converter SDK supports various commonly used document and image file formats, including Microsoft Office (2003 and 2007) Word, Excel, PowerPoint, PDF, Tiff
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software API:VB.NET PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file
PDF barcode generation, PDF content extraction and metadata editing if they integrate this VB.NET PDF converter control with other Conversion of PDF to Text.
www.rasteredge.com
Updates and Implication of Obamacare       
Mizuho Industry Focus
25 
VI.  A Brief Primer of the U.S. Healthcare System
8
A. U.S. Health Insurance Coverage Scheme 
As shown in Table 13, Americans obtain health insurance through employers, Medicare, Medicaid, or 
directly from health plans. Compared to other developed countries such as Japan and European countries, 
public health insurance plays a relatively small role in the U.S. Of the 316mn U.S. population, half obtain 
coverage through employers. The U.S. system provides health insurance safety net for the elderly (at or 
above 65) through Medicare and low-income people through Medicaid. Because of the lack of universal 
health insurance from the government, a substantial number of Americans don’t have any health insurance. 
The goal of ACA is to reduce the number of uninsured people through expanding Medicaid and 
facilitating/subsidizing people to purchase insurance directly from newly created health insurance 
marketplace.  
Table 13 U.S. Health Insurance Coverage Scheme 
Insurance Scheme
Target Population
Benefits
Source of funding
Impact from ACA 
1. Public Insurance
Medicare
Seniors at or above 65 and young adults 
with permanent disabilities. Currently 
54mn (~17% of total) people are 
enrolled in Medicare. 
See below.
Federal general revenues (40%), 
Payroll tax (38%), premiums (12%)
ACA will reduce the growth in 
Medicare spending. Medicare 
reduction is achieved through: 
cuts of MA payment; cut to 
providers; delivery system 
reforms.
Medicare Part A
Also known as the Hospital Insurance 
(HI) program. Covers 47mn people in 
2010, including 39mn seniors and 8mn 
young adults. 
Covers inpatient hospital services, skilled 
nursing facility, home health, and hospice.
Payroll tax - 2.9% of earnings paid 
by employers and workers (1.45% 
each). ACA added 0.9% tax for high-
income taxpayers (earnings >$200K 
individual and $250K/couple)
Medicare Part B
Also called the Supplementary Medical 
Insurance (SMI) program. Covers 
43.6mn people in 2010.
Physician, outpatient, home health, and 
preventive services
General revenues and beneficiary 
premiums ($110.50 per month in 
2010).
Medicare Part C
Also known as the Medicare Advantage 
(MA) program, allows beneficiaries to 
enroll in a private plan as an alternative 
to traditional fee-for-service program. 
Covers 15.7mn people or 30% total 
Medicare. 
Private plans receives payments from 
Medicare to provide Medicare benefits, 
including hospital and physician services 
and in some cases prescription drug 
benefits (MA-PD). 
Medicare (pass-through), premiums 
from beneficiaries. 
Medicare Part D
The outpatient prescription drug benefit 
was established by Medicare 
Modernization Act of 2003 (MMA). As of 
January 2014, 36.6mn people enrolled, 
with 23mn with stand-alone plans and 
13.5mn with MA-PD plans.
Outpatient prescription drug benefits.
General revenues, beneficiary 
premiums, and state payments. 
ACA will gradually eliminate 
the coverage gap (doughnut 
hole) in Part D.
Medicaid and CHIP 
(The Children's 
Health Insurance 
Program)
Low-income Americans (adults and 
children). CHIP was established in 1997 
to cover low-income children ineligible 
for Medicaid. Currently 66mn people 
(~20% of total) are covered.
Wide benefits.
Federal, state general revenues.
Expand Medicaid non-elderly 
adults eligibility to 138% of 
FPL.
2. Private Insurance
Employer
Employment-based insurance. The 
majority of U.S. non-senior population 
(~157mn, or ~50% of total) receive 
insurance from employers. Because the 
contribution from employer is not taxed, 
this is a tax-advantaged way for 
employees to receive benefits from 
employers. 
Wide benefits.
Employer and employee premiums.  ACA allows children to stay 
on parents' plan until age 26. 
ACA has an "employer 
mandate." ACA will tax overly 
generous "Cadillac" plan. 
Employers with 50 or more 
employees are required to 
offer insurance. Otherwise, 
they need to pay a panelty.
Individual, small 
group, and other
People who are self employed or work 
for small companies that don't offer 
insurance obtain insurance directly from 
private insurers. Around 25mn, or 8% of 
total, Americans are in this category.
Wide benefits.
Individual premiums
Individuals will go to health 
exchanges to purchase 
insurance. Some may be 
eligible for federal subsidies. 
3. Uninsured
57mn people, or ~18% total, in the U.S. 
are uninsured before ACA 
implementation. These include legal 
residents as well as illegal immigrants. 
ACA will cut this population by 26mn to 
31mn. 
No benefits. But tap health care and lead 
to uncompensated care. 
Medicaid, uncompensated care, 
some copays. 
ACA expands coverage and 
provide federal subsidy for 
legal residents to obtain 
coverage. There is also a 
penalty for not getting 
insurance.
Source: Compiled by MHBK/IRD based on data from Kaiser Family Foundation and Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. 
Note: numbers in the table sometimes don’t match up perfectly with the following text due to dif
ferent sources of statistics or 
different year for which the statistics is based. 
8
This section is primarily referenced from Kaiser Family Foundation and data from government sources (CMS and The While House) 
Updates and Implication of Obamacare       
Mizuho Industry Focus
26 
1. 
Employer-Sponsored Health Insurance 
Most U.S. working adults get health insurance through employers. Mid-large U.S. corporations 
typically offer health insurance to their employees. According to the 2013 Kaiser Survey of 
employer health benefits (see Figure 13), 99% of large firms (over 200 employees) and 57% of 
small firms (3-199) offer health insurance benefits to their employees. Twenty-eight percent of 
large firms also offer health benefits to retirees. In total, employer-sponsored insurance covers 
149mn nonelderly people. Covered workers contribute on average 18% of premium for single 
coverage and 29% of the premium for family coverage. Premium for employer-sponsored health 
benefits has grown substantially (see Figure 14). Many employers are trying to find ways to slow 
down the growth of health care expense. One trend is for employers to shift more expenses to 
employees. This comes in the forms of higher annual deductibles, higher copays (a fixed dollar 
amount), and higher coinsurance (a percentage of covered amount). Seventy-eight percent of 
covered workers have a general deductible for single coverage that must be met before service is 
reimbursed by the plan. Twenty percent of covered workers are enrolled in an HDHP/SO (high-
deductible health plans with a savings option). In HDHP/SO plans, workers pay lower premium 
but face high deductibles before reimbursement. Enrollment in HDHP/SOs increased significantly 
between 2009 and 2011, from 8% to 17% of covered workers, but has plateaued since then
9
Copays and coinsurance for physician visits, prescription drugs and other forms of health services 
have also gone up. Overall, this cost shift to employees is expected to empower consumers of 
healthcare and lead to more healthcare consumerisms. This will help address one of the 
shortcomings of the U.S. healthcare, which is the decoupled nature of providers and consumers 
(because employers and government pay for most of the care, historically patients have little 
incentive to use more efficient care). 
Figure 13 Percentage of U.S. Firms Offering Health Benefits, by Firm Size 
45%
68%
85%
91%
57%
99%
57%
0%
20%
40%
60%
80%
100%
120%
3-9 workers
10-24
workers
25-49
workers
50-199
workers
All small
firms (3-199)
All large
firms (200 or
more)
All firms
% of U.S. Firms Offering Health Benefits
Source: Compiled by MHBK/IRD based on Kaiser/HRET Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Benefits, 
2003-2013 
9
Kaiser/HRET 2013 Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Benefits, 2003-2013 
Updates and Implication of Obamacare       
Mizuho Industry Focus
27 
Figure 14 Average Annual Health Insurance Premiums and Worker Contributions for Family Coverage 
$2,412 
$4,565 
$6,657 
$11,786 
2003
2013
Worker contribution
Employer contribution
$9,068
$16,351
80% Total 
Premium 
Increase
89% Worker  
Contribution
Increase
Source: Compiled by MHBK/IRD based on Kaiser/HRET Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Benefits, 2003-2013 
2. 
Medicare 
Medicare offers a healthcare safety net for Americans 65 and older. Prior to the enactment of 
Social Security Amendments of 
1965, half of the U.S. elderly population didn’t have insurance. 
As explained in Table 13, Medicare has four parts. Part A offers hospital services. It is paid for by 
payroll taxes and the government. Seniors need to pay copays for hospital visits. Part B covers 
physician visits and other health services. It is funded by government and beneficiary premiums. 
Most seniors enroll in both Part A and B. Part A and B are operated on a so-called fee-for-service 
(FFS) basis, which is to reimburse per use of care. 
In the 1970s, Medicare Part C came into being. Through Part C, Medicare beneficiaries have the 
option to receive their Medicare benefits through private health plans - mainly health maintenance 
organizations (HMOs, 64%), but also preferred provider organizations (PPOs, 23%), provider-
sponsored organizations (PSOs, 3%), private fee-for-service (PFFS, 2%) plans.  The Balanced 
Budget Act (BBA) o
f 1997 named Medicare’s managed care program “Medicare+Choice” and the 
Medicare Modernization Act (MMA) of 2003 renamed it “Medicare Advantage.”  Medicare 
payments to plans are projected to total $156 billion in 2014, accounting for 30% of total 
Medicare spending. Since 2004, enrollment in MA has almost tripled from 5.3mn to 15.7mn, or to 
30% of the Medicare population in 2014 (see Figure 15). Medicare pays Medicare Advantage 
plans a capitated amount per enrollee to cover Part A, Part B and Part D (if the plan offers 
prescription drug benefit). Historically, Medicare pays a premium to MA plans over the traditional 
FFS. ACA aims to reduce and eliminate this premium over time. When ACA was passed in 2010, 
there was wide-spread concern over the future of MA. Seniors, represented by the American 
Association of Retired Persons (AARP), pushed back on the planned MA cut. However, as shown 
in Figure 15, MA enrollment has grown substantially since then. Many plans prove to be quite 
capable of managing costs and reducing premiums. So the initial concern appears to be moot.  
Updates and Implication of Obamacare       
Mizuho Industry Focus
28 
Figure 15 Growth of Medicare Advantage Enrollment, 1999-2014 
1999200020012002200320042005200620072008200920102011201220132014
01220132014
14
MA enrollment 6.9 6.8 6.2 5.6 5.3 5.3 5.6 6.8 8.4 9.7 10.511.1 11.913.1 14.415.7
13.1 14.415.7
.7
% Tota Medicare 18% 17% 15% 14% 13% 13% 13% 16% 19%22% 23% 24% 25% 27% 28% 30%
27% 28% 30%
%
6.9 6.8
6.2
5.6
5.3 5.3
5.6
6.8
8.4
9.7
10.5
11.1
11.9
13.1
14.4
15.7
Total Medicare Advantage Enrollment (in millions)
Source: Compiled by MHBK/IRD based on data from Kaiser Family Foundation 
The Medicare Modernization Act of 2003 established Medicare Part D, which provides 
prescription drug benefits for Medicare beneficiaries. Medicare beneficiaries can either enroll in 
stand-alone prescription drug plans (PDPs) or in Medicare Advantage prescription drug (MA-PD) 
plans. Part D is very popular among seniors and also very profitable for drug makers. Currently 
around 37mn seniors are enrolled in Part D. When Part D was set up, there was a coverage gap, 
which is also colloquially called the “doughnut hole” (see
Figure 16). With the passage of ACA, 
brand drug makers agreed to cover half of the drug costs in the doughnut hole from January 2011. 
Government will gradually increase its share of the doughnut hole cost to 25% in 2020. So from 
2020 onward, doughnut hole will be completely phased out. This element of ACA is quite 
favorable to seniors and more than offsets the cut to MA in terms of impact to seniors. 
Figure 16 Illustration of Medicare Part D "Doughnut hole" in 2010 
Source: Kaiser Family Foundation 
3.  Medicaid 
Medicaid covers low income Americans and is the single largest source of healthcare coverage in 
the U.S. Currently Medicaid covers 66 million 
more than 1 in every 5, Americans. The 66mn 
beneficiaries include 32mn children, 18mn low-income adults, and 16mn elderly and people with 
disabilities.  
Historically, Medicaid mostly covered children. 
Medicaid, with the smaller Children’s Health 
Insurance Program, covers one in three children in the U.S. In addition to children, Medicaid also 
covers pregnant women and low-income parents. But overall coverage for adults is very limited. 
ACA greatly expanded coverage for adults. As shown in Figure 17, ACA expanded the coverage 
limit to 138% FPL.  
Updates and Implication of Obamacare       
Mizuho Industry Focus
29 
Medicaid is administered by the states. States and the federal government fund the program jointly. 
The federal government’s share of Medicaid funding varies by state, higher in poor state
s and 
lower in rich states. It ranges from 50% to 73% with average being 57%. The ACA Medicaid 
expansion is very favorable to states. Government will pay 100% cost for first three years (2014-
2016) and at least 90% thereafter. Therefore, the additional federal Medicaid funding per ACA is 
almost like free money to states. However, a substantial number of states had chosen not to 
expand Medicaid, mostly based on ideological ground. The SCOTUS (The Supreme Court of the 
United States) ruling in 2012 made it optional for states to expand Medicaid under ACA. 
Currently 25 states plus the District of Columbia have expanded Medicaid under ACA. In states 
where there is no Medicaid expansion, a coverage gap emerges, which makes many low-income 
adults vulnerable. Under ACA, Medicaid expansion is expected to cover 13mn of the uninsured 
people.  
Figure 17 Medicaid Enrollment Eligibilities 
4.  Uninsured People 
In 2013, there were over 50mn people in the U.S. without health insurance
10
. According to Kaiser, 
in 2012, 47.3mn or 17.7% nonelderly Americans were without health insurance. Most of the 
uninsured earn low income - 90% of the uninsured population has income below 400% FPL (see 
Figure 18). Premium affordability is the primary reason for nonelderly adults to forego insurance. 
Besides employer-sponsored insurance and Medicaid, only 5.8% nonelderly adults purchase 
insurance in the individual and non-group market. The majority of the uninsured are native or 
naturalized U.S. citizens. Legal or illegal immigrants count for less than 20% of the uninsured 
population.  
10
CBO estimates released May 2013.  
Source: Kaiser Family Foundation. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested