mvc open pdf in new tab : Convert pdf image to text online SDK software service wpf winforms html dnn Miller%20-%20Combined%20Behavioral%20Intervention%20Thearpist%20Manual0-part1227

Revised 02/28/02 la 
Version 4.0 
Project COMBINE
Combined Behavioral Intervention (CBI) 
Therapist Manual
Editor:  William R. Miller, Ph.D. 
CONTRIBUTING AUTHORS   
Lisa T. Arciniega, M.S.   
Robert J. Meyers, M.S. 
Judith Arroyo, Ph.D. 
William R. Miller, Ph.D. 
David Barrett, M.S. 
Theresa B. Moyers, Ph.D. 
Deborah Brief, Ph.D. 
Lisa M. Najavits, Ph.D. 
Kathy Carty, Ph.D.  
Jane Ellen Smith, Ph.D. 
Suzy Bird Gulliver, Ph.D. 
Angelica Thevos, Ph.D. 
Nancy S. Handmaker, Ph.D.   
Mary Marden Velasquez, Ph.D. 
Joseph LoCastro, Ph.D. 
Carolina E. Yahne, Ph.D.
Richard Longabaugh, Ed.D.   
Allen Zweben, D.S.W.
Funded by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism 
Convert pdf image to text online - SDK software service:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf image to text online - SDK software service:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
ii
This manual was developed in the public domain for Project COMBINE (Combining Medications and 
Behavioral Interventions) funded as a collaborative agreement by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse 
and Alcoholism (NIAAA).   
Three training videotapes were filmed in Project COMBINE to illustrate the flow of Phases 1 and 2 of 
CBI.   
Some material used in this manual was derived from previously published public domain treatment 
manuals developed for Project MATCH: 
Kadden, R., Carroll, K., Donovan, D., Cooney, N., Monti, P., Abrams, D., Litt, M., & Hester, R. 
(1992).  Cognitive-behavioral coping skills therapy manual: A clinical research guide for 
therapists treating individuals with alcohol abuse and dependence.  Rockville, MD: National 
Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.  Project MATCH Monograph Series, Volume 3.   
DHHS Publication No. 92-1895. 
Miller, W. R., Zweben, A., DiClemente, C. C., & Rychtarik, R. G. (1992).  Motivational 
enhancement therapy manual: A clinical research guide for therapists treating individuals with 
alcohol abuse and dependence.  (Project MATCH Monograph Series, Volume 2)  Rockville, MD: 
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. 
Some text in section 5.6 is adapted from Adjustment: The Psychology of Change by William R. Miller, 
Carolina E. Yahne, and John M. Rhodes (Prentice-Hall, 1989).  Copyright for this material is held by the 
authors, who grant unrestricted use of any previously published material included in section 5.6. 
Sections 4.3 and 5.9 are adapted from Lisa M. Najavits, “Seeking Safety”: Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy 
for PTSD and Substance Abuse (in press).  New York: Guilford Press.  Copyright © by Guilford 
Publications, Inc.  Used with permission of the publisher.  
SDK software service:C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
image. Extract image from PDF free in .NET framework application with trial SDK components and online C# class source code. A powerful
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software service:VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
C#: Convert PDF to HTML; C#: Convert PDF to Jpeg; C# File: Compress PDF; C# File: Merge PDF; C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write
www.rasteredge.com
iii
Table of Contents 
1.0 
An Integrated Cognitive-Behavioral Psychotherapy for Alcohol Problems            
1.1 
Overview of the COMBINE Behavioral Intervention (CBI) 
1.2 
Research Basis for the COMBINE Behavioral Intervention 
1.2a  Combining Effective Treatments 
1.2b  Motivational Interviewing 
1.2c  Mutual Help Group Involvement 
1.3 
Coordination with Medication Management (MM) 
1.3a  Scheduling 
1.3b  Client Flow 
1.3c  Continuation 
1.3d  Communicating with the MM Practitioner 
1.4 
How Does CBI Differ from Prior Cognitive-Behavioral Therapies? 
2.0 
Phase 1: Building Motivation for Change 
2.1 
What Is Motivation?   
2.2 
Stages of Change 
2.3 
Rationale and Principles of Motivational Interviewing 
2.3a  Express Empathy 
2.3b  Develop Discrepancy 
2.3c  Avoid Argumentation 
2.3d  Deflect Defensiveness 
2.3e  Support Self-Efficacy 
2.4 
Comparison with Other Approaches 
2.4a  Differences from a Denial-Confronting Approach 
2.4b  Differences from Nondirective Counseling 
2.4c  Integration with Cognitive-Behavioral Skill Training 
2.5 
Clinical Style   
2.5a  Eliciting Self-Motivational Statements 
2.5b  Asking Open Questions 
2.5c  Listening with Empathy 
2.5d  Affirming the Client 
2.5e  Responding to Defensiveness 
2.5f  Reframing 
2.5g  Summarizing 
2.6 
Implementing Phase 1   
2.6a  Getting Started with Motivational Interviewing 
2.6b  Initiating Involvement of a Supportive Significant Other (SSO)   
2.6c  Completing Assessment Needed for Phases 1 and 2 
SDK software service:VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Extract image from PDF free in .NET framework application with trial SDK components for .NET. Online source codes for quick evaluation in VB.NET class.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software service:C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to
C#: Convert PDF to HTML; C#: Convert PDF to Jpeg; C# File: Compress PDF; C# File: Merge PDF; C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write
www.rasteredge.com
iv
2.6d  Ending the First Session 
2.6e  Scheduling the Next Session 
2.6f  Sending a Hand-Written Note 
2.6g  Completing the Session Record Form 
2.6h  Completing the Therapist Session 1 Checklist 
2.6i 
Beginning the Second Session 
2.6j 
Providing Assessment Feedback 
2.6k  Completing Therapist Checklists 
2.6l 
Ending Sessions 
2.7 
Involving the SSO in CBI Treatment   
2.7a  Overview 
2.7b  Orienting the SSO to CBI 
2.7c  When Differences Occur Between the SSO and Client 
2.7d  What Does the SSO Do If the Client Resumes Drinking? 
2.7e  Audiotaping 
2.7f  SSO Consent 
2.7g  The Basic CBI Approach 
2.7h  The Problematic SSO 
2.7i 
Subsequent Sessions 
2.8 
Making the Transition from Phase 1 to Phase 2   
2.8a  Recognizing Change Readiness 
2.8b  Making the Transition to Phase 2 
2.8c  Assessing Motivation 
2.8d  Optional: Exploring Motivation Ratings 
2.8e  Optional: Constructing a Decisional Balance 
2.8f  Optional:  Reviewing Past Successes 
2.8g  Closing Phase 1 
2.9 
Interim Homework Assignments 
3.0 
Phase 2: Developing a Plan for Treatment and Change   
3.1 
Beginning a Plan 
3.2 
Doing a Functional Analysis   
3.2a  Antecedents 
3.2b  Consequences 
3.2c  Client Reluctance 
3.2d  Connections 
3.2e  New Roads 
3.2f  Positive Functional Analysis 
3.3 
Reviewing Psychosocial Functioning   
3.3a  Personal Happiness Form 
3.3b  Card Sorting 
3.3c  Reviewing the Personal Happiness Form 
3.3d  Summarizing 
3.3e  Identifying Priorities 
SDK software service:VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
provides text extraction from PDF images and image files. Best VB.NET PDF text extraction SDK library and Online Visual Basic .NET class source code for quick
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software service:C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Supports text extraction from scanned PDF by using XDoc.PDF for .NET Image text extraction control provides text extraction from PDF images and image files.
www.rasteredge.com
v
3.4 
Identifying Strengths and Resources 
3.5 
Developing a Plan for Treatment and Change   
3.5a  Structuring Statement         
3.5b  Reviewing Options 
3.5c  Recommending Mutual Help Programs 
3.5d  Setting Priorities 
3.5e  Preparing the Treatment Plan 
3.5f  Emphasizing Abstinence 
3.5g  Recapitulating 
3.5h  Asking for Commitment 
4.0 
Pull-Out Procedures 
4.1 
SOBR   
Sobriety Sampling 
4.2    CONC   
Raising Concerns 
4.3    CASM   
Case Management 
4.4    RESU   
Resumed Drinking 
4.5    SOMA  
Support of Medication Adherence  
4.6 
MISS   
Missed Appointment   
4.7 
TELE   
Telephone Consultation  
4.8 
CRIS   
Crisis Intervention 
4.9 
DISS   
Disappointed to receive CBI-only condition
5.0 
Phase 3: Modules 
5.1 
ASSN    
Assertive (Expressive) Communication Skills         
5.2 
COMM  
Communication (Listening) Skills 
5.3 
CRAV   
Coping with Craving and Urges  
5.4 
DREF   
Drink Refusal and Social Pressure Skill Training        
5.5 
JOBF    
Job-Finding Training   
5.6 
MOOD   
Mood Management Training   
5.7 
MUTU  
Mutual Help Group Facilitation     
5.8 
SARC   
Social and Recreational Counseling                     
5.9 
SSSO   
Social Support for Sobriety 
SDK software service:VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
VB.NET code to add an image to the inputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software service:VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
C#: Convert PDF to HTML; C#: Convert PDF to Jpeg; C# File: Compress PDF; C# File: Merge PDF; C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write
www.rasteredge.com
vi
6.0 
Phase 4:  Maintenance Check-Ups 
7.0 
Termination 
8.0 
References 
Appendix A  The Personal Feedback Report 
Appendix B  Instructions for Preparing the Personal Feedback Report  
Appendix C  Therapist Guidelines for Presenting the Personal Feedback Report 
Appendix D  Understanding Your Personal Feedback Report (for clients) 
Appendix E 
Mutual-Support Groups: Representative Readings and National Contacts        
Appendix F 
Forms Used in the Combined Behavioral Intervention 
Appendix G  Therapist Checklists 
Appendix H  Clinical Care Guidelines 
SDK software service:C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
NET library to batch convert PDF files to jpg image files. Thumbnails can be created from PDF pages. Support for customizing image size.
www.rasteredge.com
vii
A Note to Project COMBINE Therapists in Training 
During the initial training period, prior to the formal start of the COMBINE trial, it is 
possible to clarify and improve this manual.  Thus while you are in the process of trying out this 
new combination of treatment procedures, we welcome and encourage you to suggest ways in 
which  the  therapist  manual  can  be  strengthened  to  make  it  clearer,  more  helpful,  and  more 
effective.  Once the trial has begun, we can make few changes in the treatment procedures - only 
those that prove absolutely necessary.   
If the history of Project MATCH is any indication, thousands of therapists will read this 
manual after you.  We want it to be clear not only for you, but also for those who seek to follow 
this approach in the years ahead.  Thus these few months represent a critical period in which we 
can make improvements in the manual.  Please help us do so: from the smallest typographical 
errors to the most fundamental principles, your input is welcome.   
Address your suggestions to: 
William R. Miller, Ph.D. 
Department of Psychology 
University of New Mexico 
Albuquerque, NM 87131-1161 
Fax: (505) 277-6620 
Email: wrmiller@unm.edu 
Thanks for your help.  We will, of course, keep you posted when significant changes are made in 
CBI treatment procedures.  Send us your email address! 
1
1. 0 An Integrated Cognitive-Behavioral Psychotherapy for Alcohol Problems
1.1 Overview of the COMBINE Behavioral Intervention (CBI) 
The COMBINE Behavioral Intervention (CBI) integrates several elements of treatments tested in  
the multisite alcohol treatment study, Project MATCH: motivational enhancement therapy, cognitive-
behavioral skills training, and facilitation of involvement in mutual help groups.  CBI includes some 
standard elements that are delivered to all clients in Phase 1 and Phase 2, an individualized Phase 3 in 
which modules are selected from a menu of options in order to address clients’ personal needs and 
preferences, and Phase 4 for maintenance and termination procedures.  All of the elements included in 
CBI have been developed and tested in prior studies, with reasonable evidence of efficacy in the treatment 
of alcohol problems.  They are combined here to create a state-of-the-art treatment approach that is both 
empirically sound and sufficiently flexible to be applicable in ordinary clinical practice.   
Phase 1 begins with a period of open-ended motivational interviewing, to elicit and clarify the 
client’s intrinsic motivations for change.  This proceeds in the second session into more structured 
feedback of the client’s pretreatment assessment findings (motivational enhancement therapy, as tested in 
Project MATCH), again to further elicit and elucidate client motivations for change.  Phase 1 would 
normally be completed in two sessions, although the transition into Phase 2 is criterion-based rather than 
fixed (i.e., Phase 1 might continue over more than two sessions). 
As the client evidences readiness to initiate change, Phase 2 begins.  This starts with a summary 
of client motivations and feedback, and an invitation for the client to consider what changes are needed.  
A structured functional analysis is developed as an aid in this process, considering antecedents and 
consequences of drinking behavior, past perceived benefits of alcohol use, and possible alternative coping 
methods.  A second aid is a more general evaluation of psychosocial functioning, for the purpose of 
identifying possible areas for skill training.  These lead to the construction and discussion of an Options 
chart, identifying potential Phase 3 treatment foci.  From this, a specific treatment plan is negotiated with 
the client, using the Change Plan Worksheet.  This phase would normally begin in the third and continue 
through the fourth or fifth session, paralleling the development of a treatment plan in JCAHO-approved 
outpatient programs.  Two brief modules also included in Phase 2 for all clients are Abstinence Emphasis 
counseling and Systematic Encouragement for Mutual-Help Group Involvement.   
Phase 3 implements the treatment modules selected through the negotiations of Phase 2.  The 
length of each module is negotiated rather than fixed, determined by relative needs of the client for 
developing coping skills in each area.  Modules may also overlap in time (e.g., completing homework 
assignments from one module while initiating another module), but do not work on more than two 
modules simultaneously. 
The number of sessions to be provided is guided by the achievement of goals identified in the 
treatment plan, again paralleling normal clinical practice.  The expected duration of treatment is a 
minimum of 12 and maximum of 20 sessions, delivered over a period of 16 weeks from the date of the 
first treatment session.  A final check-up visit is planned for all clients at 16 weeks after the first session, 
even if treatment has been terminated earlier.  Sessions will normally be scheduled twice weekly at least 
until Phase 2 has been completed, fading to weekly or biweekly meetings as negotiated between you and 
your client.  Therapy must end within the 16 weeks of the date of your first treatment session, or with 
session 20, whichever comes first.  Treatment will often end earlier than this, however, by mutual 
agreement with your client.   
The involvement of a supportive significant other (SSO) such as a spouse or parent is not only 
encouraged, but expected in CBI whenever such a person is available and has a reasonably good 
2
relationship with the client.  Evidence clearly supports the value of family involvement in the treatment of 
alcohol problems.  Because clients are sometimes reluctant to have a SSO participate in treatment, special 
procedures are provided for engaging the SSO (2.6b).  Although a SSO is not required in order for the 
client to participate, every effort should be made to identify, include, and involve a SSO in treatment, 
unless such involvement appears to be detrimental to treatment.  The SSO may not be included in 
treatment, however, until after the client has completed Phase 1 (through assessment feedback). 
Termination occurs in any of four ways, whichever comes first: (1) when you and your client 
agree that the goals of treatment have been achieved and/or that further treatment is not warranted, (2) at 
Session 20, (3) when a client unilaterally stops attending sessions, or (4) on the 16-week anniversary of 
your first treatment session (whether or not the client is still attending sessions).  This anniversary is 
defined as the same numerical day of the month on which your first treatment session occurred.  Thus if 
your first session occurred on March 14, the last possible day for a final session would be July 14.  You 
may not deliver any further treatment sessions after this anniversary date.  If you believe that further 
treatment is still needed at the point of termination, you may make an appropriate referral (see section 
4.3f). 
1.2  Research Basis for the COMBINE Behavioral Intervention 
1.2a.  Combining Effective Treatments.  Project COMBINE is part of  a continuing search for 
more effective treatments for alcohol problems.  A large body of controlled trials is now available to help 
differentiate effective from less effective methods.  This literature has been reviewed extensively, with a 
variety of analytic approaches (Finney & Monahan, 1996; Holder, Longabaugh, Miller, & Rubonis, 1991; 
Institute of Medicine, 1990, Mattick & Jarvis, 1992; Miller, Andrews, Wilbourne, & Bennett, 1998).  
While differing in some respects, these reviews have come to generally similar conclusions, and converge 
on several points including: 
1.  Even relatively brief intervention is more effective than no treatment (cf. Bien, Miller, & 
Tonigan, 1993). 
2.  Teaching behavioral coping skills is strongly supported as a basis for treatment of alcohol 
problems. 
3.  Family involvement in treatment is associated with more favorable outcomes. 
Behavioral treatment programs increasingly combine a variety of elements with evidence of 
efficacy (e.g., Kadden et al., 1992; Monti et al., 1989), an approach also commonly used in the treatment 
of other addictive behaviors (Miller & Heather, 1998).  This approach has sometimes been called 
multimodal behavior therapy, and may draw upon components from a variety of theoretical or conceptual 
sources.  The pragmatic criterion for inclusion of components is empirical evidence that they are helpful 
in treatment of the disorder.  This results in a modular or menu approach, wherein specific methods 
(treatment modules) target aspects of the problem(s) to be addressed.  Some such programs have 
delivered a standard set of treatment modules to all clients, whereas others have sought to match 
components to the particular needs or desires of the individual (e.g., Kadden et al., 1992; Miller, Taylor, 
& West, 1980).   
The bases for matching modules to clients have varied widely.  Clinical judgment may be used by 
the therapist to select methods from the array of options, or clients may be given relatively free choice 
from the menu (Miller & Hester, 1986).   Hope was placed in the development of actuarial criteria for 
assigning clients to optimal treatments, based on evidence of differential efficacy of approaches (Project 
3
MATCH Research Group, 1993).  Project MATCH, the largest clinical trial of psychotherapies ever 
conducted, was focused on this task, and yielded surprisingly little evidence that treatment effectiveness 
can be enhanced by matching clients to treatments, based on the a priori notions of what client 
characteristics would predict better outcomes (Project MATCH Research Group, 1997a).   Instead, all 
three approaches that were compared (Cognitive-Behavioral Skill Training, Twelve-Step Facilitation, and 
Motivational Enhancement Therapy) yielded similar and quite favorable outcomes over follow-up as long 
as three years after treatment (Project MATCH Research Group, 1998a).   
Within a classic behavioral approach, treatment methods are selected on yet another basis, a 
functional analysis of the problem behavior.  The presenting concern is analyzed in the context of the 
person's social, cognitive, and emotional environment, with a view toward understanding what functions 
the problem behavior has served.  Functional analysis thus searches for systematic antecedents and 
consequences of the problem behavior - in this case, drinking.  Changes in the environment that precede 
drinking with some consistency known as stimuli can be understood in what behavioral psychologists’ 
call, within an operant framework, discriminative stimuli, but may also be conceptualized as classically 
conditioned.  In either event, they tend to elicit drinking.   Analysis of consequences, on the other hand, 
searches for factors that reinforce drinking, that make it more likely to occur.  Although the formal 
language of conditioning is not always used in practice, this analytic approach is implicit in language 
often used in treatment.  Eliciting stimulus situations, for example, are often referred to as triggers or 
slippery slopes, and behaviors of significant others that serve to reinforce drinking are termed enabling in 
common parlance. 
A comprehensive and systematic behavioral approach, then, would include a menu of empirically 
sound treatment components, and a process of functional analysis for determining which are most likely 
to be effective with each client.   Treatment is thus individualized rather than standardized.  The 
consistency is not in a particular content delivered in all cases, but rather in the underlying approach that 
views problem behavior as modifiable through changes in the relationship of the client to the 
environment.  Within this perspective, it is also sensible to include in treatment at least one significant 
other who represents an important part  of the client's social support system.   The consistency of evidence 
of the benefit of behavioral marital therapy in treating alcohol problems (Miller et al., 1998; O'Farrell, 
1993) lends further support to this perspective. 
Such a comprehensive and systematic approach was pioneered in the treatment of alcohol 
problems by Nathan Azrin and his colleagues (Azrin, 1976; Hunt & Azrin, 1973).  The community 
reinforcement approach (CRA) specifically views drinking as a behavior maintained and modifiable by 
positive reinforcement in the individual's real-life community context.  Emphasis is not placed on insights 
or transactions that occur within the therapy room, but on changing environmental contingencies to 
provide a lifestyle that is more rewarding than drinking (Meyers & Smith, 1995).   Through a series of 
controlled trials, the CRA has been supported as more effective than methods that were traditional at the 
time with inpatients (Azrin, 1976; Hunt & Azrin, 1973), outpatients (Azrin, Sisson, Meyers, & Godley, 
1982), and homeless individuals (Smith, Meyers & Delaney, 1998).  Other studies have supported the 
efficacy of the CRA in treating heroin (Abbott, Weller, Delaney, & Moore, 1998) and cocaine 
dependence (Higgins et al., 1991, 1993, 1994, 1995).  The volume and methodology of the CRA studies 
have placed it on the list of most strongly supported treatment methods for alcohol problems in virtually 
every review of empirical studies (Finney & Monahan, 1996; Holder et al., 1991; Mattick & Jarvis, 1992; 
Miller et al., 1998).  The CRA provides a systematic framework for integrating functional analysis, 
behavioral skill training, and family involvement in the treatment of alcohol problems. 
1.2b.  Motivational Interviewing.  Other research from the past two decades points to the 
importance of client motivation as a determinant of treatment outcome.  In Project MATCH (1997), for 
example, client motivation proved to be one of the strongest predictors of both short- and long-term 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested