mvc open pdf in new tab : Convert pdf to plain text online application SDK tool html wpf .net online Miller%20-%20Combined%20Behavioral%20Intervention%20Thearpist%20Manual1-part1228

4
drinking outcomes.  As reviewed below, studies have also documented the efficacy of certain 
interventions designed to enhance client motivation for change. 
Motivation may be one key in understanding the puzzle of effective brief counseling.  For three 
decades, studies have documented the efficacy of relatively brief interventions for problem drinking (Bien 
et al., 1993; Heather, 1998).  In research spanning more than a dozen nations, brief counseling (1-3 
sessions) has consistently been shown to be significantly more effective than no treatment (Bien et al., 
1993).   This has led, in the addictions field as elsewhere, to a search for critical conditions that may be 
necessary and/or sufficient to induce change (e.g., Orford, 1985; Rollnick, 1998).  Miller and Sanchez 
(1994) described six elements that they found to be common components in the relatively brief 
interventions shown by research to induce change in problem drinkers.  These are summarized by the 
acronym FRAMES: 
FEEDBACK of personal risk or impairment 
Emphasis on personal RESPONSIBILITY for change 
Clear ADVICE to change 
A MENU of alternative change options 
Therapist EMPATHY  
Facilitation of client SELF-EFFICACY or optimism 
These therapeutic elements are consistent with a larger review of research on what motivates problem 
drinkers for change (Miller, 1985; Miller & Rollnick, 1991). 
Evidence also points to the importance of the therapeutic skill of accurate empathy, as defined by 
Carl Rogers and his students (e.g., Rogers, 1957, 1959; Truax & Carkhuff, 1967).   Empathic skill has 
been shown to be a strong predictor of therapeutic success with problem drinkers, even when treatment is 
guided by another (e.g., behavioral) theoretical rationale (Miller, Taylor & West, 1980; Valle, 1981).  
Therapist empathy has been shown to predict more favorable outcomes as long as two years after 
treatment (Miller & Baca, 1983).  In contrast, the opposite style of direct confrontation has been 
associated with poorer treatment outcomes (Miller, Benefield, and Tonigan, 1993; Miller et al., 1998).   
Building on the work of Rogers, Miller (1983) described the clinical style of motivational interviewing 
for treating addictive behaviors.  It combines the reflective, empathic style of Rogers with directive, 
strategic methods to enhance motivation for change (Rollnick & Miller, 1995). 
The drinker's check-up was developed as a first application of motivational interviewing.  It was 
initially tested with adults recruited through newspaper announcements offering a free check-up for 
people who would like to find out whether alcohol is harming them in any way (Miller & Sovereign, 
1989).  Those who responded were heavy drinkers with significant alcohol-related problems, and were 
randomized to receive an immediate check-up or to wait for 10 weeks before receiving the check-up 
(Miller, Sovereign & Krege, 1988).  The intervention consisted of a 2-hour structured evaluation, 
followed by a 1-hour session of feedback in a motivational interviewing style.  Problem drinkers given an 
immediate intervention showed a significant reduction in drinking at 10 weeks that was maintained a year 
later.  Those on the waiting list were then offered the check-up, and showed a similar reduction in alcohol 
use.  A second evaluation, again with media-recruited adults, randomized problem drinkers to receive 
their check-up feedback in a motivational interviewing style, or in a more directly confrontive style, with 
both approaches delivered by the same counselors (Miller, Benefield, & Tonigan, 1993).  Relative to the 
waiting list group, reductions in drinking were seen in both conditions within 6 weeks of counseling, with 
a 69% reduction in the motivational interviewing group and a 41% reduction in the more confrontive 
group.  Because the same counselors provided both conditions and styles thus overlapped, the actual 
behavior of counselors within sessions (regardless of the assigned style) was coded from tape recordings 
Convert pdf to plain text online - application SDK tool:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to plain text online - application SDK tool:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
5
and used to predict client outcomes.  A single counselor behavior predicted client drinking as long a year 
later: the more the counselor confronted, the more the client drank.   
Next the drinker's check-up was tested as a prelude to outpatient treatment at a U.S. Veterans 
Administration medical center.  Clients entering treatment for alcohol abuse and dependence were 
randomly assigned to receive or not receive a single session of assessment feedback and motivational 
interviewing before beginning outpatient therapy.  Those in the control condition received brief advice to 
make good use of their treatment.  Clients receiving motivational interviewing showed substantially 
greater reductions in drinking at 3-month follow-up, with twice the rate of total abstinence (Bien, Miller, 
& Boroughs, 1993).  Similar findings have been reported by Aubrey (1998) from a randomized trial with 
adolescents entering outpatient treatment for substance abuse.  Substance-dependent adolescents given 
assessment feedback and motivational interviewing at intake remained significantly longer in treatment 
(20 vs. 8 sessions), reported greater suppression of alcohol and illicit drug use at 3-month follow-up, and 
showed a 63% higher rate of total abstinence from all drugs including alcohol. 
This design was repeated in the substance abuse program of a private psychiatric hospital. 
Inpatients who received a drinker's check-up at intake were judged by their therapists (who were unaware 
of group assignment) to be more motivated and compliant during treatment. Three months after discharge, 
the motivational interviewing group again showed markedly greater suppression of drinking when 
compared with clients receiving the same inpatient program without a motivational session at intake.  The 
rate of total abstinence was twice as high as in the control group who went through the same inpatient 
program (Brown & Miller, 1993).   
Project MATCH (1993) tested a four-session motivational enhancement therapy (MET) as a 
stand-alone aftercare and outpatient treatment.  A total of 1,726 clients (outpatients as well as clients in 
aftercare following intensive treatment) were randomized to MET or to one of two 12-session treatments: 
twelve-step facilitation therapy, or cognitive-behavioral skills training.  MET clients reported somewhat 
more drinking during the 3 months of treatment, but the difference was no longer significant at 6, 9, 12, 
15, or 39-month follow-ups (Project MATCH Research, Group, 1997, 1998). 
Others have tested the efficacy of motivational interviewing and closely-related approaches with 
diverse populations.  Significantly improved outcomes have been reported in clinical trials in the 
treatment of opiate (Saunders, Wilkinson, & Phillips, 1995), cocaine (Daley, Salloum, Zuckoff, Kirisci,  
& Thase, 1998; Daley & Zuckoff, 1998), and marijuana use disorders (Stephens, Roffman, Cleaveland, 
Curtin, & Wertz, 1994), with severely dependent drinkers (Allsop, Saunders, Phillips, & Carr, 1997), 
pregnant heavy drinkers (Handmaker, 1993), and heavy drinkers in college (Baer, Marlatt, Kivlahan, 
Fromme, Larimer, & Williams, 1992) or identified through health care settings (Heather, Rollnick, Bell, 
& Richmond, 1996; Senft, Polen, Freeborn, & Hollis, 1997; Woollard, Beilin, Lord, Puddey, MacAdam, 
& Rouse, 1995).  Adaptations of the check-up have also been reported in positive trials with 
cardiovascular rehabilitation (Scales, Lueker, Atterbom, Handmaker, & Jackson, 1997) and diabetes 
management (Smith, Heckemeyer, Kratt, & Mason, 1997; Trigwell, Grant & House, 1997).  One negative 
trial has been reported by Kuchipudi et al. (1990) in treating alcohol dependent patients with 
gastrointestinal disease who had not responded to prior counseling. 
In sum, motivational enhancement methods have been found in at least 16 controlled trials to 
improve compliance and/or outcomes in treatment for a range of chronic problems.  The two primary 
components of MET - structured assessment feedback and a motivational interviewing style - have been 
tested separately as well as in combination.  Personal feedback alone, without therapist contact, was also 
found to suppress heavy drinking, although the effect was smaller than that commonly observed with the 
in-person drinker’s check-up (Agostinelli, Brown, & Miller, 1995).  Therapeutic empathy (Miller et al., 
1980, Valle, 1981) and motivational interviewing (e.g., Handmaker, 1993; Heather et al., 1996; Saunders 
application SDK tool:C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
a single text character and text string to PDF files using online source codes in C#.NET class program. Insert formatted text and plain text to PDF page using
www.rasteredge.com
application SDK tool:VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
doc.Save(outputFilePath). VB: Add Password to Plain PDF File. Following are examples for adding password to a plain PDF file in Visual Basic programming.
www.rasteredge.com
6
et al., 1995) appear to exert beneficial effects apart from the context of assessment feedback.  In 
combination, they enhance the outcomes of diverse treatment programs.  For this reason, motivational 
interviewing and assessment feedback comprise the first phase of the COMBINE Behavioral Intervention 
(CBI).   This is consistent with earlier, albeit less systematic attempts to address motivational issues at the 
outset of CRA treatment (e.g., Azrin et al., 1982; cf. Meyers & Smith, 1995). 
1.2c.  Mutual Help Group Involvement.  A third element encompassed in CBI is involvement of 
the client in a mutual help group.  Research, for example, consistently supports a modestly positive 
association between client involvement in Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and more favorable treatment 
outcomes (Emrick, Tonigan, Montgomery, & Little, 1993), a finding upheld in Project MATCH (1997).  
The consistency of this finding, in the context of matching research, led Glaser (1993, p. 392) to opine 
that "everyone should be encouraged to try AA" but that "no one should be required to attend."  Clients in 
Project MATCH (1997) who were assigned to the twelve-step facilitation therapy also showed a modest 
but enduring advantage when continuous abstinence was used as the outcome criterion.   
For these reasons, encouragement to participate in a mutual help group was incorporated as a 
standard module in CBI.  Because a range of other mutual help organizations has become available 
(though little is yet known of their effectiveness), the module emphasizes sampling from AA or other 
options available in the client's vicinity.  It incorporates systematic encouragement procedures developed 
within the community reinforcement approach, and shown to be effective in increasing group attendance 
(Sisson & Mallams, 1981). 
1.3 Coordination with Medical Management 
This section applies specifically to COMBINE.  CBI is one of two psychosocial interventions 
offered in COMBINE.  All participants in COMBINE who are taking medication also receive Medical 
Management (MM).  Thus your client will usually be seeing both you and an MM practitioner who will 
monitor trial medications and attend to medical care issues.  (For clients receiving no medication, 
however, you will be your client’s only therapist.)  Here is some important information about the 
coordination of care between MM and CBI. 
1.3a.  Scheduling.  Before you see a client, he or she will have been through a number of steps in 
the COMBINE trial including (1) screening and informed consent to participate, (2) about 3 hours of 
medical evaluation and initial assessment, and (3) randomization to a treatment condition that includes 
CBI.  If the client is also receiving medication, he or she will have seen an MM practitioner first for a 
one-hour initial session.  After this first MM session has been completed, the client is ready to start CBI 
with you.  You may see the client for your first CBI session at any time after the first MM session, and at 
the latest one week later, coinciding with the client’s second MM visit.  MM visits for each client are 
scheduled at Weeks 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, and 16.  It will usually be most convenient to schedule your 
weekly sessions to coincide with these visits.  The normal procedure will be for the client to see the MM 
practitioner immediately before your CBI session.  You may, however, schedule CBI sessions at other 
times as well, and there will be weeks (such as 5, 7, and 9) when there is no MM visit scheduled. 
1.3b.  Client Flow.  You will be notified by your Project Coordinator when a new client has been 
assigned to you.  Clients are randomly assigned to therapists in Project COMBINE, although the Project 
Coordinator may constrain the randomization algorithm so that therapists receive different case loads, 
depending on availability.  As indicated in 1.3a, the client (if medication is being given) will first see the 
MM practitioner, and then can begin CBI.  From that point onward, MM and CBI proceed independently, 
although it is usually best to coordinate scheduling of appointments.  Both MM and CBI end by the 16 
week anniversary. 
application SDK tool:VB.NET Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in vb.net
Able to convert plain text to various fonts, colors and sizes of text content in PDF. Free SDK component built in .NET framework. Online evaluation source code
www.rasteredge.com
application SDK tool:VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb
Insert formatted text and plain text to PDF page. features, like delete and remove PDF text, add PDF text box and Access to online VB.NET class source codes.
www.rasteredge.com
7
1.3c.  Continuation.  It is a required part of CBI to encourage clients to continue on their trial 
medications.  Follow procedures described in section 4.5 (Support of Medication Adherence pull out), 
and refer your client to the MM practitioner if concerns arise regarding medications and side-effects.  
Supporting medication compliance is part of your task in CBI (except for those clients not receiving 
medication).  Nevertheless, clients are permitted to continue in the study, in follow-up interviews, and in 
CBI even if it is necessary for their medication to be discontinued (by the MM practitioner), or if for some 
other reason they stop taking their medication.  It is also the case that clients may continue with their 
medication, MM, and follow-up visits even if they stop attending CBI sessions.  The stopping of either 
CBI or medications (and MM) does not affect the client’s eligibility to participate in other aspects of the 
study.  In fact, we encourage all clients to continue in the study, whether or not they wish to continue one 
or both of their treatments. 
1.3d.  Communicating with the MM Practitioner.  With the important exceptions noted below, 
you should not need to discuss with your client’s MM practitioner what transpires in CBI.  As a general 
rule, what clients tell you in CBI sessions is not conveyed to the MM practitioner.  However, there are a 
number of occasions when you and the MM practitioner need to exchange information for the 
coordination of care.  No special consent is needed for this purpose, because you are both clinical staff of 
the treatment program.  It is acceptable to exchange information with the MM practitioner for these 
purposes: 
1.  Scheduling the First Visit.  The first CBI session may occur any time after the client’s first 
MM visit, and should occur no later than one week after MM and medication have been initiated.  
The first MM visit lasts approximately 50 minutes; others last only 10-20 minutes.  It is 
acceptable to schedule the first CBI visit to occur immediately after the first MM visit, if the 
client is willing to remain for two hours. [In cases where no medication is part of the client’s 
COMBINE treatment, CBI may begin any time after completion of baseline assessment and 
randomization.] 
2.  Scheduling Subsequent Visits.  Coordinate with the MM practitioner so that MM and CBI 
sessions are scheduled for client convenience.  The normal procedure will be for the client to see 
the MM practitioner first, and then see you for CBI.  Note that from Month 1 onward MM 
sessions become biweekly and then monthly, whereas CBI continues on a weekly basis, so there 
will be CBI weeks when there is no corresponding MM session.  Work closely with your client’s 
MM practitioner to coordinate scheduling for your client’s convenience. 
3.  Need for Medical Information.  Contact the MM practitioner when you need information or 
have a question regarding trial medications (although neither you nor the MM practitioner will 
know which medication a client is taking) or the client’s medical condition. 
4.  Drinking Data.  During MM visits, the MM practitioner will be asking the client about 
drinking since the client’s last MM visit.  The MM practitioner’s report (see Form B) will be 
passed along to you routinely by your Project Coordinator, with the client’s knowledge.  When 
you receive these reports, review them promptly, make any appropriate notations, sign them, and 
return them to the Project Coordinator.  Alcohol use is an important consideration in medical 
management.  If it should happen that your client, in the course of CBI sessions, divulges to you 
information about drinking that is discrepant with what the MM practitioner knows (e.g., the 
client told the MM practitioner that he or she was not drinking, but reported to you that he or she 
actually was; the client has been drinking much more than was admitted to the MM practitioner), 
you must discuss this discrepancy with the MM practitioner for safety reasons. 
application SDK tool:C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
Support to add password to PDF document online or in C#.NET WinForms for PDF file protection. C# Sample Code: Add Password to Plain PDF File in C#.NET.
www.rasteredge.com
application SDK tool:C# Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in C#.net, ASP
Viewer & Editors, C# ASP.NET Document Viewer, C# Online Dicom Viewer, C# Online Jpeg images Viewer, C# HTML Convert plain text to PDF text with multiple fonts
www.rasteredge.com
8
5.  Medication Adherence.  It may happen that a client expresses to you, during a CBI session, 
an intention to discontinue medication or the fact that he or she has already stopped taking 
medication.  The MM practitioner may also indicate to you that there are problems with 
medication adherence via the regular report (see Form B).  Here you should follow the procedures 
outlined in the Support of Medication Adherence (SOMA) pull out (section 4.5).  Encourage your 
client to discuss concerns with the MM practitioner.  If you have adherence information that is 
apparently unknown to the MM practitioner, convey this information directly and promptly to the 
MM practitioner yourself, either by direct conversation or in writing (on Form B).  If your client 
discloses to you that he or she has been less than honest with the MM practitioner regarding the 
taking of medication, express concern, following procedures described in section 4.5, and 
encourage your client to discuss concerns with the MM practitioner.  Also convey the information 
directly and promptly to the MM practitioner yourself, either by direct conversation or in writing.  
6.  Side Effects and Other Medication Concerns.  During some CBI sessions, some clients may 
express distress about side effects, or raise other concerns related to their medication.  The proper 
procedure for you here is: (1) encourage your client to discuss the concern with the MM 
practitioner; and also (2) notify the MM practitioner of your client’s stated concern. 
7.  Client Safety.  Finally, it is important for you to pass along to the MM practitioner any 
information that you believe could be important in medical management, or for the protection of 
your client’s safety.  Examples would include suicidal ideation, a marked increase in anxiety or 
depression, or significant physical complaints. When in doubt, convey such information to the 
client’s MM practitioner promptly.  A client’s safety always has top priority.  Encourage your 
client to talk to the MM practitioner about the concerns, and also convey the information directly 
and promptly to the MM practitioner yourself, either by direct conversation or in writing. 
Whenever you convey information to the MM practitioner, document this in the client’s chart. 
1.4 How Does CBI Differ from Prior Cognitive-Behavioral Therapies? 
The COMBINE Behavioral Intervention shares many common features with previously described 
comprehensive cognitive-behavioral treatment approaches (e.g., Marlatt & Gordon, 1985; Monti, Abrams, 
Kadden, & Cooney, 1989).  In particular, we used as a starting point the cognitive-behavioral coping 
skills therapy that was tested in Project MATCH (Kadden et al., 1992).  The CBI retains, in Phase 3, a 
strong emphasis on teaching clients personal coping skills to help them in their recovery.  A modular 
approach is used to individualize treatment to clients’ needs. 
In other respects, CBI differs from prior cognitive-behavioral treatments that centered on the 
acquisition of individual coping skills.  In light of more recent findings and developments in the alcohol 
treatment field, CBI was designed to extend and build upon basic cognitive-behavioral approaches in 
several respects.  These include: 
Reference: Form B 
application SDK tool:C#: XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET Online Help Manual
Enter the URL to view the online document. Click to OCR edited file (one for each) to plain text which can be copied Click to convert PDF document to Word (.docx
www.rasteredge.com
application SDK tool:C# Word: How to Extract Text from C# Word in .NET Project
Simple to convert a Visual C# MS Word doc Word text extractor preserves both the plain text as well powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
9
 
use of integrated therapeutic strategies designed to move clients through the stages of change, 
rather than assuming initial readiness for change 
 
an initial focus on client motivation for change, drawing on motivational enhancement therapy as 
developed and tested in Project MATCH (Miller, Zweben, DiClemente, & Rychtarik, 1992) 
 
adoption of motivational interviewing (Miller & Rollnick, 1991) as a therapeutic style throughout 
treatment 
 
a more thorough functional analysis of drinking behavior, and a more general review of the 
client’s psychosocial functioning, linked directly to the development of an individualized 
treatment plan 
 
explicit exploration of client strengths, resources, and prior successes 
 
more central emphasis on modifying the client’s social environment and social support systems, 
consistent with a community reinforcement approach to treatment 
 
intentional involvement of a supportive family member or significant other throughout treatment 
 
specific procedures to encourage sampling of and involvement in twelve-step and other mutual-
help programs 
 
integration of behavioral treatment with the use of therapeutic medications 
 
incorporation of specific counseling procedures developed from the community reinforcement 
approach (e.g. sobriety sampling, social and recreational counseling) 
 
greater flexibility in content and duration of treatment, to more closely approximate standard 
practice 
 
a Phase 4 in which treatment sessions are faded and responsibility for maintenance is shifted to 
the client, with an emphasis on internal attribution of change. 
In general philosophy, CBI does not assume that the acquisition of individual coping skills during 
treatment is the primary mechanism by which recovery occurs.  Rather, CBI is an integrated approach, 
combining several major elements, each of which has been supported as effective in alleviating alcohol 
problems: (1) enhancement of client motivation for change, (2) family involvement in treatment, (3) 
emphasis on the client’s social/community context of reinforcement for drinking and abstinence, (4) an 
individualized treatment approach, (5) cognitive-behavioral skill training, (6) support for use of 
therapeutic medications, and (7) involvement in mutual-help groups.  In sum, although it has similarities, 
CBI is quite different from and broader than cognitive-behavioral therapies that place primary emphasis 
on the acquisition of individual coping skills. 
10
A Comparison of Cognitive-Behavioral Coping Skills Therapy (Project MATCH) 
and the COMBINE Behavioral Intervention  
Cognitive-Behavioral Coping Skills 
Therapy (Project MATCH)
COMBINE Behavioral 
Intervention 
Number of 
Sessions
Fixed at 12 sessions (8 core and 4 elective)
Flexible, up to 20 sessions according to client 
needs
Frequency of 
Sessions
Weekly
Flexible; semi-weekly at first, biweekly or 
less during maintenance phase
Duration
3 months
up to 16 weeks
Primary 
Emphasis
Acquisition of individual coping skills to 
maintain abstinence
Enhancement of reinforcement and social 
support for abstinence
Client 
Motivation
Minimal emphasis on client motivation for 
change (5 minutes)
Incorporates motivational enhancement 
therapy at the outset
Family/SO 
Involvement
Limited to 2 sessions
Encouraged and expected throughout 
treatment
Functional 
Analysis
Informal (10 minutes)
Structured and detailed
Clinical Style
45 minutes of rapport building by asking 
questions and structuring
Motivational interviewing
Support for 
Medications
None
Incorporated with behavioral interventions
Mutual-help 
Involvement
None explicitly encouraged
Specifically encouraged and facilitated
Treatment Plan
Content fixed for 8 sessions; then 4 module 
sessions chosen
Fixed format for 2-3 sessions until individual 
treatment plan is negotiated
Content 
Modules
*Coping with Craving and Urges 
*Managing Thoughts About Alcohol 
*Problem-Solving 
*Drink Refusal 
*Emergencies / Coping with a Lapse 
*Seemingly Irrelevant Decisions 
Starting Conversations 
Nonverbal Communication 
Introduction to Assertiveness 
Receiving Criticism 
Awareness of Anger 
Anger Management 
Awareness of Negative Thinking 
Managing Negative Thinking 
Increasing Pleasant Events 
Managing Negative Moods 
Enhancing Social Support Networks 
Job-Seeking Skills 
Couples/Family Involvement 1+2 
*core (required) sessions
Coping with Craving and Urges 
Drink Refusal and Social Pressure 
Communication Skills 
Assertive (Expressive) Skills 
Mood Management Training 
Social and Recreational Counseling 
Social Support for Sobriety 
Job-Finding Training 
[SSO involved throughout]
Module Format
One session each; one module at a time
Flexible duration; may be working on 
different modules simultaneously
11
Pull-Out 
Procedures 
(for dealing 
with specific 
problems that 
arise)
Two “emergency sessions” permitted, content 
unspecified
Procedures used as needed: 
Sobriety Sampling 
Raising Concerns 
Referral 
Resumed Drinking 
Support for Medication Adherence 
Missed Appointment 
Telephone Consultation 
Crisis Intervention 
Disappointed to receive CBI-only     
condition 
Maintenance 
Phase
None; limited to termination session
Specific maintenance phase with fade-out of 
sessions, plus termination session
1
Phase 1  
Building Motivation for Change
2
2.  Phase 1: Building Motivation for Change 
2.1. What is Motivation? 
The central purpose of Phase 1 is to enhance your client’s motivation for change.  Some clients 
will come to treatment well along with readiness to change, and Phase 1 will go quickly.  Others will 
come less ready to change, and more time will be needed to build motivation in preparation for Phases 2 
and 3.   
Some people have the impression that motivation is some kind of inner life force such as “will 
power,” that clients have in varying amounts.  This concept of motivation is rather vague, and can lead 
the clinician to give up on clients who “aren’t really motivated,” or to use confrontation or pep talks in an 
attempt to pump up the client’s motivational level - strategies that are relatively ineffective in triggering 
behavior change.   
A more helpful way of thinking about motivation is as the probability of taking steps toward 
change.  This is, in fact, how most psychological research has defined motivation.  When you ask, “What 
is a client motivated to do?” you are in this sense asking, “What is the client likely to do?”  Once you 
understand motivation in this way, your task becomes increasing the probability that your client will take 
action toward change. 
As it turns out, a client’s doing something is one of the better predictors of treatment outcome.  
Sometimes described as “compliance” or “adherence,” the common-sense general finding is that when 
clients take active steps toward change, they are more likely to succeed.  Clients do better when they 
attend more treatment sessions, or take their medication faithfully (even if the medication is a placebo; 
see Fuller et al., 1986), or attend more AA meetings, or try out a number of different processes for 
change.  During Phase 1, then, your job is to increase the likelihood that your client will take active steps 
toward change. 
Motivational interviewing is a client-centered yet directive style of counseling designed to do just 
that - to help resolve ambivalence about a problem behavior and initiate change (Rollnick & Miller, 
1995).  It is the clinical style to be used throughout CBI.  Based on principles of motivational psychology, 
it is designed to initiate rapid, internally-motivated change.  Motivational Enhancement Therapy (MET; 
Miller, Zweben, DiClemente, & Rychtarik, 1992) was developed as one specific application of 
motivational interviewing for use in Project MATCH (1993, 1997).  Derived from earlier research on "the 
drinker's checkup" (reviewed above), MET provides systematic feedback of the client's assessment data, 
offered within the supportive and empathic style of motivational interviewing.  Motivational interviewing 
and MET constitute Phase 1 of CBI, which focuses on increasing client motivation for change.  This 
flows naturally into Phase 2, which centers on  negotiating a change plan and sets the stage for the 
cognitive-behavioral skill-training components of CBI in Phase 3. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested