mvc open pdf in new tab : Converting .pdf to text software application cloud windows html wpf class Miller%20-%20Combined%20Behavioral%20Intervention%20Thearpist%20Manual12-part1232

103 
4.5c.  Adherence Motivational Assessment 
When your client is not adhering to the medication plan, your first task is to understand the reasons 
why.  Don’t criticize, and don’t ask in frontal-assault fashion, “Why haven’t you been taking your 
medications?”  Instead, ask an open and supportive question (e.g., “In what ways has it been difficult for you 
to take your medications?”) and follow up with reflective listening to understand the obstacles.  The purpose of 
this assessment is to identify the sources of nonadherence, whether they involve individual, interactional 
and/or contextual issues.   The following areas are useful to explore: (from Meichenbaum & Turk, 1987; 
Pettinati, Volpicelli, Pierce & O’Brien, 2000; Carroll, & O'Malley, 1996; Volpicelli, Pettinati, McLellan & 
O’Brien, in press): 
Current beliefs and misperceptions about the alcohol problems. Does the client see his or her 
condition as serious enough to warrant use of medications? Does the client feel "cured"?  Does the 
client experience a sense of hopelessness about changing the drinking behavior?  
Current attitudes toward treatment. Has the client expressed dissatisfaction with some aspects of the 
treatment program, (e.g., length or content of treatment, therapist, research demands, or treatment 
plans)? 
Prior history with pharmacotherapy. Does the client have a history of repeated failure with 
medications?   
Client's expectations about the medications.  How appropriate or realistic are client's expectations 
and beliefs about the medications?  Is the client concerned that he/she is taking a placebo?  Does the 
client have negative associations with taking medications (e.g., as a “crutch,” not wanting to become 
addicted, etc.)? 
Comprehension.  Does the client have difficulty understanding and following medication procedures 
- e.g.,  has difficulty completing questionnaires, understanding the blister packs, reading the 
pamphlets, and in general understanding the instructions given to him/her.   
SSO involvement in supporting medication adherence. Can the SSO be more involved in supporting 
adherence?   Is there anything the SSO is doing that might be interfering with adherence? 
 Life circumstances.  Are there factors occurring in the client’s everyday life that interfere with 
medication adherence such as financial difficulties, work environment or schedule, domestic abuse, 
family problems, and/or health and legal problems?    
The overall purpose of the interview is to obtain information on reasons for the client’s nonadherence. To form 
an alliance, start by asking general or open-ended questions. "How are you getting along with the 
medications?”  Avoid confrontational remarks (e.g., “What do  you expect, a miracle?").  Ask  “How can I be 
of help?” which focuses on essentially the same issue but in a more collaborative fashion (Meichenbaum & 
Turk, 1987).  Stay close to the general counseling style of CBI (reflection, clarification, reframing, etc.) to 
maintain rapport and to obtain more information.   The following excerpt shows how an adherence interview 
might proceed: 
THERAPIST:  So you missed taking the morning dose of your medication for the last three days. Is 
that right?  
Converting .pdf to text - software application cloud:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Converting .pdf to text - software application cloud:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
104 
CLIENT: 
I keep forgetting. I was late for work. The kids were running wild. Besides, I have 
been feeling down and I’m not too sure about the drugs. 
THERAPIST:  There’s something about them that bothers you. 
CLIENT: 
I don’t know.  I guess I’m just not sure they’re going to do any good. 
THERAPIST:  You don’t think they’re going to help you, even if you take them faithfully. 
CLIENT: 
Well, maybe they would.  I just think I ought to do it on my own. 
THERAPIST:  When you succeed here, you want to know for sure that you’re the one who did it.  I 
can understand that.  What else bothers you? 
CLIENT: 
I guess I wonder if that’s why I’m feeling down.  Somebody told me that one of these 
drugs can make you depressed. 
THERAPIST:  So no wonder you’ve been careful!  You’re not sure you want to give credit to the 
drugs when you get better, and somebody also told you that they can make you feel 
worse!  I can see why you’ve been skipping some doses. 
CLIENT: 
Well is that true?  Can they make you depressed? 
Here, obviously, is an opportunity to set the record straight with clear information about what the medications 
can and can’t do.  It would be important for you to let the MM practitioner know these specific concerns as 
well, so you can both reinforce more accurate expectations.  The point above, though, is to recognize how a 
motivational interviewing style can be used to explore in a nonthreatening manner the client’s reasons for 
nonadherence.  Each of the therapist’s responses above contains reflective listening. 
4.5d.  Exploring Past Medication Adherence  
A reasonably straightforward problem-solving strategy is to ask your client about past experience in 
adhering to medications.  Specifically, ask about times when the client has had trouble taking medications as 
prescribed, and then ask about how the client has at other times succeeded in taking medications as prescribed.  
THERAPIST:  I’ll bet this isn’t the first time you’ve run into problems sticking with a medication 
plan.  Can you think of other times you had a prescription and didn’t quite take it as 
planned. 
CLIENT: 
I had a script for tranquilizers earlier this year. I was going through a separation at the 
time, and my son was skipping school. I didn’t take them for more than a month. I 
would either lose them or keep forgetting to take them.  
THERAPIST:  So there it was really a matter of keeping track of them, and remembering.  Many 
people have trouble like that, particularly when there is so much going on in their 
daily lives. Maybe that’s what’s happening here, too. 
CLIENT: 
I do have a lot of problems besides drinking, and I guess I wonder if this is the most 
important thing for me right now. 
software application cloud:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
HTML webpage will have original formatting and interrelation of text and graphical Besides, this PDF converting library also makes PDF document visible and
www.rasteredge.com
software application cloud:C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
Allow users to convert PDF to Text (TXT) file. This C#.NET PDF converting library is a professional and advanced PDF document manipulating control which can be
www.rasteredge.com
105 
THERAPIST:   A matter of priorities.  Let me ask you, too, about times when you have been able to 
stick with meds that were prescribed for you. 
CLIENT: 
Once a doctor prescribed Antabuse and I took it for three months. 
THERAPIST:  Really!  How did you do that? 
CLIENT: 
My mother came to live with me and helped me out at home.  I wanted to show her 
that I could be a good parent and not drink. I actually straightened up for a while.  
After my mother went back home, though, I fell into the same trouble - drinking, 
partying, and not handling responsibility. 
THERAPIST:  Again, it sounds like a matter of priorities.  When it was really important to you, you 
stuck with it.  Good for you! 
In the above excerpt the client offers important clues to assist her in complying with the medications.  Doubts 
about priorities and the breakdown in her support system may account partially for the lack of medication 
adherence.  At the same time, the client’s concern for her children might be a potential motivator to continue 
with the medications. 
4.5e.  Eliciting Self-Motivational Statements for Medication Adherence 
From a CBI perspective, medication adherence will be strengthened when the client perceives that it is 
important.  This means that you need to discover ways in which medication adherence might support the 
client’s own goals and interests.  As in other forms of behavior change, a motivational interviewing style draws 
on counseling methods like reflective listening, affirming, reframing, and normalizing, and it may be 
particularly useful to elicit client’s own self-motivational statements.  This is a unique kind of support that you 
can provide as an adjunct to the primarily educational approach of your Medical Management colleague. Your 
primary emphasis is on motivational issues rather than information about the medications.  Particularly address 
your attention to exploring the client’s ambivalence or reluctance about taking the medications.  Start by 
reflecting upon and normalizing any misgivings the client may have about the medication.   Then open up 
consideration of the other side: What might be some advantages of giving the medication a good try?  What 
might be the good and not-so-good consequences of not taking the medications?  Whatever you do, of course, 
avoid the kind of interaction in which you argue for why the client should take the medications, and the client 
takes the side of resisting. 
As before, it’s permissible for you to express your opinion and concerns, particularly after asking the 
client’s permission to do so (see CONC module 4.2).  Focus first, though, on eliciting the client’s own 
concerns and self-motivational statements. 
In the case example below, the client is unhappy about taking the medication after experiencing a 
"setback" in drinking. 
CLIENT: 
After last night's drinking and partying, I am feeling disgusted.  Now my wife is on 
my back and complaining again about the money, me hanging out with my friends, 
losing my job, all that. I don't think these drugs are working any more, and I’m sick of 
taking them.  
THERAPIST:  You’re really discouraged!   
software application cloud:VB.NET PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file
achieved with this VB.NET tutorial of PDF to text conversion Conversion of MS Office to PDF. give a series of demo code directly for converting MicroSoft Office
www.rasteredge.com
software application cloud:C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
Word converting toolkit is its industry-leading converting accuracy tables and chats) of original PDF file and maintains the original text style (including
www.rasteredge.com
106 
CLIENT: 
Well what’s the point?  It’s not working. 
THERAPIST:  You came here, I remember, really wanting and hoping to quit drinking and to 
improve your family relationships.  Now you see yourself as right back again where 
you started, with no progress at all.  
CLIENT: 
It sure seems that way. 
THERAPIST:  And I know you really want to change.  It must be so frustrating, when your hopes are 
so high.  You know, temporary setbacks really aren’t that unusual, even for people 
taking medications, especially when there have been years of heavy drinking to 
overcome. 
CLIENT: 
I just thought the drugs would make everything different.  
THERAPIST:  And wouldn’t that be great, if the medication could do it all for you! 
CLIENT: 
I saw this story on television and read in the newspaper about this drug, acamprosate.  
Sure sounded like it was the answer.  Maybe I’m getting the placebo. 
THERAPIST:  I see your dilemma.  You had hoped that the medication would just do it for you.   
Kind of like the person who goes to the drug store for something to cure the flu, and 
hopes it will work without resting, drinking a lot of water, taking it easy.  It’s pretty 
common - we expect magic from drugs, but they’re just part of the healing process.  
They can help, but may not be enough by themselves.  What else might you do to get 
back on track here, besides giving the meds a fair try? 
This example shows reflective listening, reframing, and normalizing as strategies to facilitate the client's 
adherence with the study medications.  
4.5f.  Delaying the Decision 
Despite your best efforts, some clients will remain adamant about not taking medications.  Don’t  
struggle further with a client over the issue.  Ask your client what his/her alternative plans are (other than 
medication)  for maintaining sobriety.  Review the pros and cons of these plans.  Ask about a "back up" plan 
(which might include medication adherence).  Then ask whether the client would be willing to delay the final 
decision about not taking medications until she or he has tried these other options.  Suggest that whatever 
happens, the client is in a "win-win" situation.  To illustrate: 
THERAPIST:  It sounds like you’ve firmly decided not to keep taking the meds.  What are the things 
you plan to do, then, to remain sober? 
CLIENT: 
I plan to stay home week-ends with my family and not go out with my friends. 
THERAPIST:  Okay.  That’s something you said that you had been doing before.  How did it work 
for you?   
software application cloud:Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
Professional PDF to text converting library from RasterEdge PDF document conversion SDK provides reliable and effective .NET solution for Visual C# developers
www.rasteredge.com
software application cloud:C# PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in C#.net, ASP
Support converting PDF document to SVG image within C#.NET it is quite necessary to convert PDF document into As SVG images are defined in XML text lines, they
www.rasteredge.com
107 
CLIENT: 
Okay for a while. Then I got the cravings again and went out with the guys a few 
times on the weekend and got hammered.  That was just before I came in here. 
THERAPIST:  What’s different now that would change the situation? 
CLIENT: 
I know now that I have to stop drinking. I don't want to lose my job and my family.  
THERAPIST:  They’re pretty important to you, your family.  And you like the job you have.   Can I 
ask you something personal? 
CLIENT: 
Okay 
THERAPIST:  What happens if it doesn't work out the way you want it to?  I worry some that you did 
try staying home before, and it didn’t work. 
CLIENT: 
What do you suggest? 
THERAPIST:  Well, I was just thinking: How about giving your plan a trial run for a month. And 
how about a back-up plan in case you find that your cravings come back again? 
CLIENT: 
I guess then I could try the meds again.  Maybe try A.A.  But I like the 30-day trial 
idea. 
THERAPIST:  All right.  So you think the meds or A.A. might help if your staying-home plan doesn’t 
work for you this time.  Now, I don’t know if I should say this or not, but can I 
suggest one more thing for you to consider? 
CLIENT: 
Why not.  I just think I should do it on my own. 
THERAPIST:  And you will.  You are!  You’re the one deciding what to do here - how and whether 
you’re going to stay sober, whether to take the medications or not.   It’s up to you.  
Anyhow, here’s my idea.  You were pretty discouraged this last time when you 
slipped back into drinking on weekends, right? 
CLIENT: 
And my wife was more than discouraged. 
THERAPIST:  It hit her pretty hard.  I know you feel bad about that.  And I know you hope it won’t 
happen again.  I don’t like to see you hit with that kind of discouragement either.  It 
happens - no one’s perfect, and I know it’s been tough.  This is a big change for you.  
Still it hurts.  Anyhow, what about this: A 30-day trial of your plan and the 
medications?  You don’t have to decide now - just think about it.  But that might be a 
win-win situation for you - give you the best chance of getting through that tough first 
month.  Why not pull out all the stops, and give yourself the best chance.  You can 
always decide later to stop the meds.  It’s up to you.  What do you think? 
The therapist accepts and reframes the client's decision not to take medications as a “temporary” one. This 
prevents the client from committing fully to a decision before having had a full opportunity to weigh the 
consequences of the action.  An individual facing an initially aversive task  (e.g., taking medication) may 
respond more favorably to the task over time (Kelman & Hovland, 1953).  Emphasizing freedom to delay the 
decision can sometimes buy the time needed to stabilize sobriety. 
software application cloud:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Best C#.NET PDF converter SDK for converting PDF to Tiff in Visual Studio .NET project. C# programming sample for PDF to Tiff image converting.
www.rasteredge.com
software application cloud:VB.NET PDF- HTML5 PDF Viewer for VB.NET Project
NET read PDF, VB.NET convert PDF to text, VB.NET VB.NET PDF- HTML5 PDF Viewer for VB.NET Online Guide for Viewing, Annotating And Converting PDF Document with
www.rasteredge.com
108 
4.5g.  Overcoming Practical Obstacles to Medication Nonadherence 
Individuals who present for treatment of alcohol dependence usually have multiple problems. They 
may be dealing with child care problems, housing needs, financial and legal concerns, family conflict, and  
medical and emotional disorders.  These other concerns can interfere with medication adherence.  Knowing an 
individual's status with regard to these factors can serve as an "early warning sign" to bolster a medication 
adherence plan even before major problems arise.  Meichenbaum and Turk (1987, p. 105) state the problem 
succinctly: Such individuals typically have "difficulty fitting the treatment into their daily lives".     
In these cases, explore with your client the kinds of obstacles that might interfere with taking their 
medications reliably, and problem-solve ways to remove them.  ("What would help you to keep taking your 
medication, even when the going gets tough?" ) For some clients, having the active involvement of the SSO in 
treatment  might be sufficient.  When the SSO is present, ask both the client and SSO how the latter could be 
helpful.  For example, some clients might desire the SSO to regularly remind them about the pills, while others 
might only want the SSO to provide encouragement in carrying out the medication plan.   Before deciding on 
specific action steps, make sure that both the client and SSO are committed to the plan.   
In the absence of a SSO, ask the client to draw upon other resources such as an AA sponsor who is 
supportive of pharmacotherapy to fulfill this treatment need. Other clients might need additional services to 
help structure or regain control of their social environment in order to adhere to the medication plan.  In the 
latter case, the Case Management module (4.3) can be introduced, but first make sure that you have obtained 
the client's agreement about the need for additional services.  The illustration below demonstrates how social 
resources can be utilized to sustain medication compliance. 
THERAPIST:  You have put a great deal of effort into the program, but I see that you are still 
struggling with whether or how to stick with your medication. 
CLIENT: 
Coming home from a tough job, getting the meals ready, and dealing with tantrums all 
at once is not easy.  By the time things have settled down, I have forgotten to take the 
evening dose.  Besides they don’t help me with these other problems.  Right now, I 
feel like quitting the program altogether.  
THERAPIST:  You’re really frustrated and discouraged because things aren’t working out as well as 
you hoped, or as quickly.  It’s so bad, in fact, that you are ready not only to quit the 
medications, but to quit your whole program.  I’m sure this feels very personal to you, 
but it happens all the time.  It’s not unusual to feel discouraged about now.  What this 
tells me is that I haven’t been as attentive to your needs as I should have been.  It 
means that more needs to be done, not less.  I'm wondering what kind of additional 
help you might need? 
CLIENT: 
I need someone to help me with the children, especially after work.  Frank leaves for 
work as soon as I get home. He works the evening shift in the same factory. 
THERAPIST:  And who else is there who cares about what happens to you? 
CLIENT: 
My Mom and sister.   I know they still care, but I kind of wiped them out of my life 
with the drinking.  I was embarrassed about the drinking and problems we were 
having in our marriage.  I didn’t want them interfering either.  Maybe it’s my pride 
that gets in the way. 
109 
THERAPIST:  You think they might still be willing to help you.  It’s tough asking for help, and you 
can do a lot on your own, but they might still be there for you. 
CLIENT: 
Yes.  I think so.  I didn’t realize how much I’ve neglected my family. Actually getting 
their help could be good in several ways.  
THERAPIST:  In what ways . . . .? 
The therapist helps the client identify her need for additional support without disconfirming her own individual 
coping resources.  Such practical support may help to broaden the client's social network, and also help sustain 
her commitment to treatment. 
110 
4.6.  MISS: Missed 
Appointments 
When a client misses a scheduled appointment, respond immediately.  It is your job as the therapist to 
actively re-engage your client, rather than waiting for the client to get back in contact.  First try to reach the 
client by telephone, and when you do, cover these basic points: 
1. Clarify the reasons for the missed appointment 
2. Affirm the client - reinforce for having come previously 
3. Express your eagerness to see the client again 
4. Briefly mention important concerns that emerged (self-motivational statements), and your 
appreciation (as appropriate) that the client is exploring these 
5. Express your optimism about the prospects for change 
6. Reschedule the appointment 
It can be useful to conduct a brief functional analysis of how the appointment was missed.  What led 
up to missing the appointment?  How did the client make the decision?  What happened as a result?  Be careful 
not to make this seem like an inquisition.  “I’m curious to know what happened, if you’re willing to walk me 
through it,” is a better tone. 
If no reasonable explanation is offered for the missed appointment (e.g., illness, transportation 
breakdown), explore with the client whether the missed appointment might reflect any of the following: 
* uncertainty about whether or not there is a need for treatment (e.g., "I don't really have that much of 
a problem)” 
* ambivalence about making a change 
* frustration or anger about having to participate in treatment (particularly with clients coerced by 
others into entering the program). 
Handle such concerns in a motivational interviewing style (e.g., with reflective listening, reframing).  Indicate 
that it is not surprising for a person to express their reluctance (frustration, anger, etc.) by not coming to 
appointments, being late, and so on.  Encouraging the client to voice his or her concerns directly may help to 
reduce their expression in future missed appointments.  Use Phase I strategies to handle any defensiveness that 
is encountered.  Affirm the client for being willing to discuss concerns.  Then summarize what you have 
discussed, add your own optimism about the prospects for positive change, and obtain a recommitment to 
treatment.  Elicit some self-motivational statements from the client in this regard.  Reschedule the 
appointment. 
In all cases, unless you regard it a duplication of the telephone contact that might offend the client, 
also send a personal, individualized handwritten note with these essential points.  This should be done within 
two days of the missed appointment.  Research indicates that a prompt note and telephone call of this kind 
significantly increases the likelihood that the client will return (Nirenberg, Sobell & Sobell, 1980; Panepinto & 
Higgins, 1969).  Place a copy of this note in the clinical file. This procedure should be used when any 
appointment is missed.  At least three attempts (new appointments) should be made to reschedule a missed 
session.  Finally, an additional handwritten note should be sent two weeks after the first.  This note should 1)  
111 
acknowledge the client’s decision to leave treatment and 2) encourage the client to return within the treatment 
window and 3) provide information about how this can be accomplished.  
When clients have missed three consecutive sessions, or a period of time has passed that would have 
normally encompassed those sessions and you have followed the pull-out procedure to contact the client as 
above, the client will be considered “inactive”.  At this time, you will fill out an Inactive Status Form 
(available from the Project Coordinator) and return it to the PC.  If the client returns within the treatment 
window and resumes CBI sessions with you, fill out the Active Status Form (available from the Project 
Coordinator). 
NOTE: There is no Therapist Checklist for this procedure. 
112 
4.7.  TELE: Telephone Consultation 
Some clients and their SSOs will contact you by telephone between sessions, for additional 
consultation.  This is acceptable, and all such contacts should be carefully documented in the client's file.  An 
attempt should be made to keep such contacts brief (5 minutes or less), rather than providing additional 
sessions by telephone.  
Early in a telephone contact, comment positively on the client's openness and willingness to contact 
you.  Reflect and explore any expressions of uncertainty and ambivalence that are expressed with regard to 
goals or strategies discussed in a previous session.  It can be helpful to normalize such ambivalence and 
concerns; for example:   
“What you're feeling is not at all unusual.  It's really quite common, especially this early in treatment.  
Of course you're feeling confused.  You're still quite attached to drinking, and you're thinking about 
changing a pattern that has developed over many years.  Give yourself some time.” 
Also reflect and reinforce any self-motivational statements and indications of willingness to change.  
Reassurance can also be in order during these brief contacts; e.g., that people really do make changes in their 
drinking problems, often with a few consultations. 
All telephone contacts must comply fully with and not depart from the basic procedures of CBI.  
Explore the concern that prompted the call, but do not deliver new treatment procedures (e.g., starting or 
continuing a CBI module) via telephone.  Indicate that you can discuss the client’s concerns in more detail at 
your next session. 
NOTE: There is no Therapist Checklist for this procedure. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested