113 
4.8.  CRIS: Crisis Intervention 
In certain circumstances, you may be contacted by the client or SSO in a condition of crisis.  It is 
permissible to schedule an emergency session with the client (and SSO) within the 16 week treatment period.  
In many cases it will be possible to handle the situation by telephone. 
If at any time, in your opinion, the immediate welfare and safety of the client or another person is in 
jeopardy (e.g., impeding drinking, client is acutely suicidal or violent), intervene immediately and 
appropriately for the protection of those involved, with consultation from your supervisor.  This may include 
immediate crisis intervention as well as appropriate referral.  If a client's urgent needs require more treatment 
than is provided, make a referral using procedures outlined in 4.3. 
There are some standard counseling procedures used in crisis intervention.  These can serve as 
guidelines during emergency sessions. 
1.  Listen.  Rely on reflective listening to gain an understanding of what has happened and how the 
parties are reacting. 
2.  Assess.  What is needed?  Are there immediate safety issues to address?  Is there danger of suicide 
or other violence?  What additional information is needed? 
3.  Help with Understanding.  Help the parties understand what is happening to them.  Make the 
situation comprehensible.  As appropriate, normalize events and reactions.   
4.  Focus on Problem Solving.  After listening, assessing, and helping with understanding, focus on 
practical problem solving.  What needs to be done first?  How can the immediate crisis be abated?  
Develop a specific plan to address short-term and longer-term problems. 
5.  Mobilize Social Support.  Who besides yourself can offer practical and emotional support for the 
client?  What family or community resources are available to provide additional support?  Link the 
client up with these sources of support. 
Cases where there appears to be a worsening of the drinking problems or evidence of other new and 
serious difficulties (e.g., suicidal thoughts, psychotic behavior, violence) should be referred to the senior 
clinician of your team for further evaluation and consultation.  Based on his/her own evaluation and the 
defined procedures of the study, the senior clinician will determine what action is warranted.  If alternative 
treatments or medications are warranted, the PI will be involved in making the determination of whether the 
client will be continued in CBI and in the study. 
Convert pdf table to text - SDK software service:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf table to text - SDK software service:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
114 
4.9 DISS: Disappointed to receive CBI-only condition 
This procedure is to be used when your client attends the first CBI session expressing disappointment 
at not being randomized to a medication condition.  Although all clients have agreed to this possibility in 
advance when signing the informed consent, some will have forgotten or minimized this possibility, with 
resulting dissatisfaction upon learning that CBI-only is their randomized condition.  Your response consists of 
four levels, and is designed to avoid the situation in which you argue for continuation while the client argues 
against it. 
1.  The first level, to be used with all clients in this situation, involves listening empathically and 
reflecting the client’s concerns.  Clients may have fantasized that the medication is a “miracle cure” or “the 
only thing” to help them.  Convey an understanding and acceptance of the client’s disappointment through 
your reflective responses.  
2.  Second, you can provide reassurance that there is good evidence that the CBI treatment is effective 
without added medication, as shown by previous research studies.  CBI was, in fact, constructed from the 
treatment methods with strongest evidence of efficacy.  Some clients will respond well to just this level of 
reflective listening and reassurance, and will indicate that they are ready to continue with the CBI intervention.   
3.  For clients who still seem ambivalent, consider a third level of response.  Ask the client if he or she 
would be willing to consider listing the “pros and cons” of continuing with CBI.  Make a written list of the 
benefits and costs that the two of you can generate about pursuing CBI, beginning with the negatives (such as 
missing out on a potentially helpful medication).  When listing the costs and benefits of continuing with CBI, 
prompt the client, as appropriate, to consider some that might have been overlooked.  These might include: 
- CBI is a free treatment with good evidence of effectiveness
- The client might have received the placebo if assigned to a medication condition 
- There are fewer visits and blood draws without the medication or placebo condition (the client saves 
11 clinic visits) 
- The client avoids any potential side effects of study medication 
- There is no need to remember to take medication according to the prescribed schedule 
- The client does not give up any options for later pharmacological treatment by participating in CBI.   Clients 
can always seek pharmacological treatment after the completion of the trial if CBI is not as helpful as 
they hoped. 
Offer a summary reflection when you have completed the list, describing both sides, and then ask what the 
client wants to do at this point.  Clients may resolve their ambivalence about participating in the CBI-only 
condition once this list has been generated, perhaps hearing some perspectives from you they had not 
considered.  If clients remain ambivalent or do not seem ready to proceed, move to the fourth level of 
intervention.
The fourth level involves emphasizing the client’s personal choice and control.  In a genuine and 
gentle fashion, emphasize that while you would like to proceed, it is not up to you, but it is his or her choice 
whether to continue in CBI.  Acknowledge that the client can withdraw from the trial and obtain one of the 
study medications from a private physician since it is already marketed in the U.S. (naltrexone).  This 
medication can be costly (about $2.00 per pill) but it is readily available.   Your approach should be one of 
SDK software service:C# Word - Table Processing in C#.NET
C# Word - Table Processing in C#.NET. Provide C# Users with Variety of Methods to Setup and Modify Table in Word Document. Overview. Create Table in Word.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software service:C# Word - Table Row Processing in C#.NET
C# Word - Table Row Processing in C#.NET. How to Set and Modify Table Rows in Word Document with C#.NET Solutions. Overview. Create and Add Rows in Table.
www.rasteredge.com
115 
accepting and honoring the client’s choice, while making it clear that you are hopeful he or she will remain in 
the study.  Above all, avoid the persuasion trap in which you attempt to convince the client he or she should 
remain in the study while the client responds with all the reasons they should not.   
SDK software service:C# Word - Table Cell Processing in C#.NET
you may need to create some text content or nest table in Word document, the following demo code will show you how to create a text paragraph in table cell.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software service:How to C#: Convert PDF, Excel, PPT to Word
Images. Convert Word to ODT. Convert PDF to Word. Convert ODT to Word. Footnote & Endnote Processing. Table Row Processing. Table Cell Processing. Annotate Word.
www.rasteredge.com
116
Phase 3    
Assisting With Change
SDK software service:C# Word - Convert Word to PDF in C#.NET
conversion library can help developers convert multi-page converted by RasterEdge Word to PDF converter toolkit and maintains the original text style (including
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software service:C# Word - Search and Find Text in Word
Images. Convert Word to ODT. Convert PDF to Word. Convert ODT to Word. Footnote & Endnote Processing. Table Row Processing. Table Cell Processing. Annotate Word.
www.rasteredge.com
117
5.0.  Phase 3:   Assisting With Change 
Phase 1 of CBI focuses on enhancing motivation for change, and Phase 2 has as its primary purpose 
the development of an appropriate individual plan for change and treatment.  Both Phase 1 and Phase 2 follow 
a standard format, with common modules that are delivered to all clients (as well as pull-out modules that are 
used on an as-needed basis).  
Phase 3, on the other hand, is completely individualized to your client’s situation and needs.  During 
this phase, treatment consists of procedures drawn from a menu of cognitive-behavioral skill-training modules.  
Through a process of discussion and negotiation with your client, select the modules that are most appropriate 
for his or her needs.  No single module is required here.  You also have discretion with regard to the number of 
modules that will constitute Phase 3.  As treatment proceeds you and your client may discover the need for an 
additional module that was not planned at the outset of Phase 3, and your treatment plan can be renegotiated.  
Finally, you have discretion within reasonable limits regarding the length of time and number of sessions 
needed for each module in Phase 3.   
The Phase 3 modules are designed to be practical, not just didactic.  It is important not only to tell your 
client about coping skills, but also to show and practice the skills within sessions.  Between-session practice 
assignments are appropriate in all modules, and will help your client to acquire the requisite skills for 
maintaining sobriety. 
Although a new part of treatment begins in Phase 3, it is important to remember not to abandon what 
has gone before.  Use the general counseling style of motivational interviewing throughout CBI.  It is common 
in Phase 2 and Phase 3 to encounter renewed ambivalence or other motivational issues for which Phase 1 
procedures can be particularly helpful.  It may be appropriate to revisit parts of Phase 2, because the functional 
importance of drinking can shift over time, suggesting the need for a new focus of treatment.  It is common to 
find that your treatment plan needs to be changed or amended.  Continue to use the pull-out modules as you 
encounter the clinical situations for which they were designed.  CBI is meant to be flexible, providing you with 
a variety of tools with which to respond to the needs of each unique client. 
Phase 3 modules involve the client in learning skills that will support a positive, rewarding 
alcohol-free lifestyle.  These are active modules.  Never simply talk or lecture to your client about new 
skills.  Involve your client!  Practice through role-plays.  Use the worksheets.  Assign home tasks to try 
between sessions.  Check on previously assigned tasks at the beginning of each session, and lavish positive 
reinforcement for any and all steps the client has taken to learn and apply new skills.  Remember the rhythm of 
TELL-SHOW-TRY.  First describe what to do, then model for your client how to do it, then ask your client to 
try it.   Give plenty of positive reinforcement in the practice process - point out what your client did well, and 
gently coach on points for improvement, then try it again.   
On the next page is a list of the modules from which you and your clients can choose in Phase 3, along 
with some of the more common indications for using each module.  Remember that it is fine to be working on 
two modules at the same time, although no more than two modules should be discussed in any single treatment 
session.   Use the Therapist Checklist provided for each module, to help you remember the procedures that are 
included.   
Modules of Phase 3 
SDK software service:How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.Word
and convert Word document to/from supported document (PDF and ODT). Empower to navigate word document content quickly via thumbnail. Able to support text search
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software service:C# Word - Header & Footer Processing in C#.NET
a run and text in paragraph IRun run = paragraph.CreateARun(); run.CreateText("Header"); //MORE TODO: // // doc.Save(@""). Create and Add Table to Footer &
www.rasteredge.com
118
TOPIC
COMMON REASONS TO USE THIS MODULE
5.1
ASSN
Assertive (Expressive) 
Communication Skills
To learn skills for expressing feelings, opinions, requests etc. 
in a constructive way
5.2
COMM
Communication  
(Listening) Skills
To learn skills for understanding others in a way that will 
build positive relationships
5.3
CRAV
Coping with Craving
To learn skills for dealing with urges and craving without 
drinking
5.4
DREF
Drink Refusal
To learn skills for refusing drinks and resisting social 
pressure to drink
5.5
JOBF
Job Finding
To learn skills for finding and keeping a rewarding job that 
will support stable sobriety 
5.6
MOOD
Mood Management
To learn skills for managing and reversing negative emotions 
without drinking
5.7
MUTU
Mutual Help Group 
Facilitation
To find and become actively involved in a mutual help group 
that will support stable sobriety
5.8
SARC
Social and Recreational 
Counseling
To find and become actively involved in pleasant social and 
recreational activities that do not involve drinking
5.9
SSSO
Social Support for 
Sobriety 
To increase positive social support for maintaining stable 
sobriety
SDK software service:Convert ODT to Word
Images. Convert Word to ODT. Convert PDF to Word. Convert ODT to Word. Footnote & Endnote Processing. Table Row Processing. Table Cell Processing. Annotate Word.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software service:C# Word - Footnote & Endnote Processing in C#.NET
paragraph.CreateARun(); //Create text for run run.CreateText("Paragrah for footnote and endnote"); //Just Show how to create a footnote and create table for it
www.rasteredge.com
119 
5.1.  ASSN: Assertion and Anger Management Training 
5.1a.  Overview 
Assertion training has come to be used in treating alcohol problems because of evidence that 
interpersonal conflicts and anger can be antecedents of a return to drinking.  Social skills training has been 
found to improve treatment outcomes for clients with a broad range of alcohol problems (Miller et al., 1998).  
In one study, mood management training was contrasted with active communication skills training (Monti et 
al., 1990). Clients who received active communication skills training, with or without a partner present, drank 
significantly less in the six months following treatment than did clients receiving the mood management 
program. A modification of this skills package was included in Project MATCH. Assertiveness training has 
been used to help reduce multiple problem behaviors including drinking, smoking, gambling, and overeating. 
This is a structured module designed to help clients whose inability to address others in an assertive 
manner may leave them vulnerable to heavy drinking. This training module helps clients use assertive 
communication skills to increase their personal power in conflicted interpersonal situations.  When clients 
become more assertive, they may be able to avoid the maladaptive pattern of using alcohol to cope with 
interpersonal conflict.  This module focuses on the expressive aspect of communication.  The receptive 
(listening) aspect of communication is covered in the COMM module (5.2).  These two modules work well 
together. 
First, teach clients to identify situations in which they may need to communicate their feelings, 
particularly in stressful situations. Next, define assertive behavior and differentiate assertive communication, 
passive communication, and aggressive communication.  Then teach appropriate assertive communication 
skills. Present clients with various hypothetical high-risk scenarios and have them practice assertive responses 
in role-play with you.   
It is important in this module, as in other Phase 3 modules, to make the material concrete and 
personally applicable to your client.  For example, in reviewing situations where assertive communication is 
needed (see 5.1c), don’t simply recite the list to your client, but make it personally relevant by asking, “When 
was the last time you . . . . (criticized someone, were criticized, etc.).”  Exploring each situation will give you 
further information about where skill development is particularly needed. 
It is also important to note that what constitutes assertive communication (as distinct from aggressive 
or passive communication) varies widely across cultures and subcultures.  What is regarded as normal 
assertive behavior in New York City may be extremely aggressive and inappropriate behavior in a 
Scandinavian or Native American social context.   The basic principle of finding a socially appropriate middle 
ground (between aggression and passivity) crosses cultures reasonably well, but cultural sensitivity is needed 
in determining what constitutes appropriate assertive behavior in the client’s social contexts. 
5.1b.  Rationale and Basic Principles 
People drink for a variety of reasons. One common reason that people drink, especially in situations 
where they feel negative emotions (e.g., angry, nervous, shy, or depressed),  is that they believe drinking will 
help them relax, speak their mind, express their feelings, or stand up for their rights.  Drinking can also be used 
to cover up the emotions that correspond with not asserting oneself in a difficult or intimidating situation. Even 
in situations that do not directly involve alcohol, nonassertive ways of relating to other people may eventually 
lead to drinking.  For example, one reinforcing consequence of drinking alcohol is quick relief from negative 
emotions.  Unexpressed emotions, however, tend to build up over time.  This can lead to "blowup" eruptions of 
aggressive communication style, and again to drinking.  The result can be a confusing alternating pattern of 
120 
suppressing emotions (passive communication) and erupting with strong emotions (aggressive 
communication).  Drinking alcohol does sometimes provide quick relief in these situations and may, for 
awhile, make the client forget or feel "on top of the world."  Yet alcohol doesn't get to the source of this 
problem, and so the same problem comes up again and again -- often growing worse over time.  
Assertiveness skills are directed at the source of the problem, making it less likely that clients will rely 
on passive or aggressive communication styles and want to drink for "relief."  This module, focuses on general 
skills for expressing feelings in a constructive manner. 
5.1.c.  Step 1 – Identifying Situations that Call for Assertive Communication 
The first step in teaching clients to become more assertive is to help them identify situations that call for 
assertive behavior.  Do this by asking your client to identify times or experiences that typically elicit strong 
emotional states such as anger, resentment, embarrassment or frustration. Frequently, clients are very adept at 
naming particular situations that produce strong emotions, but it helps sometimes to have a list of such 
situations available. A few examples are shown in Form W, which should be photocopied for use with each 
client.  Drinking situations frequently call for assertive behavior as well, but drink refusal and assertive 
communication about maintaining abstinence from alcohol are covered in a separate module (see Drink 
Refusal.)   
The following clinical dialogue illustrates how you might introduce this module and explore situations 
in which the client needs greater skill in assertive communication. 
THERAPIST: So as we discussed last time, today we’re going to work on assertive communication 
skills. Okay? 
CLIENT:  Yeah, I guess so. I’m not really sure what you mean.  
THERAPIST:  Well, that’s a great place to start.  Most people can benefit from some practice in 
assertiveness.  What that means is skill for good communication, expressing your feelings or getting 
your point across in a way that is respectful of both yourself and the other person.  I plan to explain 
this in more detail to you today, and I hope we can also spend some time practicing. How does that 
sound? 
CLIENT: Sounds all right to me. 
THERAPIST:  Good – well the first thing we need to do is to make a list of some situations where 
more assertive communication might be helpful to you.  One good indicator of this is situations in 
which you feel emotional red flags around other people - negative emotions, like when you feel 
nervous, or resentful, or irritated by someone, or when you feel put down.  Those are good times to 
have some assertive communication skills handy. 
CLIENT: Yeah – I can see that. 
THERAPIST: Here’s a list, for example, that shows a few situations where people might need good 
communication skills.  Do any of these sound like situations that you encounter sometimes?  
Reference: Form W 
121 
CLIENT: Well, sure – like just before I came into treatment, I had to deal with the cops. And I really 
am having a hard time dealing with my roommate. He does little things that drive me crazy. 
THERAPIST: Great – now that first example would fall under  this category – of  dealing with an 
authority  figure,  so  I’ll  circle  that  one.  The  second  would  focus  on  giving  negative  feedback  or 
constructive criticism, so I’ll circle number two. Can you think of any other real situations that might 
be coming up where it could be helpful for you to have good assertive communication skills?    
CLIENT:  I’m due to go to court in a couple of weeks.  
THERAPIST: All right - that’s a good example.  I’m going to write that down here on these extra 
lines. 
CLIENT:  Also, it may be silly, but I really hate asking people for directions. It’s like I have this idea 
that I should always know where I am and where I’m going.  It’s embarrassing. 
THERAPIST:  That’s a great example!  (Writes it on worksheet.)  What else might be coming up? 
CLIENT:  I have to ask my parents for some money to cover me for a few days, and I know they’ll 
think that I’m going to use it for partying. They’ll think I’m conning them, and that makes me nervous, 
and it makes me mad. 
THERAPIST:  Very good!  What else occurs to you? 
CLIENT: That’s about it, I guess.   
THERAPIST: Okay.  We may think of some more later, but that’s a great start.  Now that we’ve got 
these situations identified, I’d like to explain a little more about how assertive communication works, 
and then we’ll have some time to try some practice with these skills.  With these situations, we can use 
examples that will be really meaningful to you.  
CLIENT:  Okay. I guess it can’t hurt. 
After you  complete  the worksheet, move on to  describe assertive  communication  and how it differs  from 
passive and aggressive styles.  Throughout this process, engage your client actively in the discussion.  Avoid 
any long spans of time where you are talking and the client is just listening passively.  Ask for and encourage 
feedback, examples, questions, disagreement, concerns, etc. 
5.1d.  Step 2. Defining Assertive Communication 
Assertiveness means expressing oneself effectively in a way that does not violate the rights of others.  
In  short, assertive communication  occurs  when  a  person  expresses opinions, feelings,  or  requests without 
alienating or hurting others. As shown on the worksheet, sometimes assertive communication just involves the 
statement of opinion; other times it involves a request for a behavioral change in another person. Still other 
times, assertive communication can involve taking responsibility for one’s own actions and trying to make 
amends.  
Basic  Beliefs.  For assertive communication  to be effective, there are two general  beliefs that the 
person should believe or at least agree with: 
122 
1.  That I have a right to express my feelings, make requests for a change in behavior that affects me, 
and agree or disagree with what other people say. 
2.  That (all) other people have a right to express their feelings to me, make requests for a change in 
my behavior that affects them, and agree or disagree with what I say.  
It can be useful to discuss these basic beliefs with your client, and ask whether he or she agrees with each of 
them.  In the process, you may uncover some basic assumptions that need to be addressed for the client to 
accept  assertive  communication.    (For  basic  cognitive  therapy  procedures,  see  the  Mood  Management 
module.) 
Contrasting  Passive, Aggressive, and Assertive Communications.  The next step is to explain 
assertive communication as a middle road between two extremes.  Some people lean to one extreme, 
some to the other, and some vacillate back and forth between them.  It can be helpful to explain the 
two extremes and ask your client to tell you the disadvantages of each approach. 
Passive communication is when the speaker gives up his or her rights whenever it appears there might 
be a conflict between what they want and what someone else wants. Passive communication includes keeping 
silent, downplaying how one feels about something, or trying to get a message across though indirect means 
such as withdrawing, pouting, or isolating from others. Thoughts or feelings that might create conflict are not 
expressed directly, and so the other person may not know about them.  This can result in a bottling up of 
feelings  out  of  habit,  even  when  the  situation  doesn't  require  it,  and  a  consequence  can  be  anxiety  or 
resentment.  Alternatively, passive communication sometimes results in depressive symptoms, as the person 
may engage in a great deal of self-blame.  
Furthermore, passive communication is often misinterpreted.  A client might state, for example, “I 
wasn’t speaking to her – she knew what I wanted, because I was so quiet, and that’s just how I am.” The 
person believes that not communicating is correctly understood by others (mind reading), and may resent that 
his or her rights and feelings are not respected.  The person who relies on passive communication seldom gets 
what he or she wants.  In addition, other people may come to resent the passive style of communication, and by 
association, the person, for not communicating in a direct and assertive manner. 
 Aggressive  communication,  on  the  other  hand,  occurs  when  people  press  their  rights  while 
disregarding 
the rights and feelings of others.  An aggressive, coercive style often satisfies immediate short-term goals (get 
it “off my chest," get what I want) but the long-term consequences of this type of communication are often 
quite negative.  The aggressive communicator earns the ill will of other people, who in the long run may not 
want to be involved with the person anymore, or thwart his or her long-term goals.  Examples of aggressive 
communication extend, but are by no means limited, to violence and threatened violence.  Shouting, blaming, 
name-calling,  insulting,  shaming,  demanding,  derisive  humor,  and  ordering  are  direct  verbal  forms  of 
aggressive communication.     
Assertive communication occurs when people express themselves directly, and in a manner that also 
honors the rights and feelings of others.  There is a planful element in assertiveness: being clear about one’s 
own material (feelings, needs, goals), thinking through the most appropriate way to express these to the people 
involved, and then acting on the plan.  Usually, the most effective plan of action is to openly and directly state 
feelings and opinions, or make specific requests for the changes desired.  In different situations, however, 
people may decide that a more passive response is the safest approach (e.g., not responding verbally to a threat 
from a stranger), or that a more aggressive response is called for (e.g., when appropriately assertive requests 
have been ignored).  Assertive communication is flexible in that it takes into account the unique aspects of 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested