51 
wells had been fractured in shale gas plays in the United States, with NRC identifying only a few 
cases of possible felt seismicity. 
Wastewater Disposal Via Injection  
Water produced from a reservoir is often a large quantity.  Produced water usually has high 
concentrations of salt and contains residues of oil and gas.  Frequently, it is gathered and re-
injected.  In some cases the water is piped or trucked to wells that inject the water into other 
strata.  Wastewater disposal wells are installed into porous and permeable strata thought to have 
suitable characteristics for accepting the wastewater.  This technique of wastewater disposal has 
been used for many decades by the oil and gas industry and also has been used for disposal of 
both industrial wastewater and municipal sewage treatment plant effluent.    
There have been a number of cases of induced seismicity associated with wastewater injection 
into formations used only for disposal.  Figure 15 (above) shows the locations of some of these 
cases.  The incidence of felt earthquakes is higher for wastewater disposal via injection wells 
because a large volume of water is injected without any withdrawal of fluids, with the result that 
fluid pressures can be increased within a large area surrounding the injection well.  Such large-
scale injection increases the chance of elevating fluid pressures in a natural fault that is already 
under stress.  The GWPC report (2013, p. 18, citing Holland) briefly describes an episode of 
approximately 1,800 earthquakes ranging in magnitude up to 4.0 M at a location in Oklahoma, 
about 8 to 12 miles from disposal wells thought to have possibly triggered the events.  In a more 
thoroughly studied case located in the Paradox Basin of Colorado, the injection of natural brines 
(not from oil and gas industry activities) triggered earthquakes up to 9.9 miles away from the 
injection well (see NRC, 2013, p. 90, citing Block, 2011).  The largest earthquake possibly 
induced by disposal of wastewater in the United States was a 4.7 M event in central Arkansas.  It 
was one of 1,300 earthquakes, all located within the vicinity of several active disposal wells and 
showing temporal and spatial correlation with the wells (GWPC, 2013. p. 19-20, citing: 
Ausbrooks).  In a recent case, small earthquakes ranging up to 4.0 M were correlated with a 
nearby deep disposal well near Youngstown, Ohio (GWPC, 2013, p. 21-22, citing Tomastik).  
The GWPC report mentions other cases in Texas and West Virginia, apparently related to 
disposal of produced water from shale plays. 
Industry Practices and Regulations 
The following are a few facts relevant to understanding and considering the potential for induced 
seismicity associated with expansion of industry activity in the shale and tight sand gas (and oil) 
plays onshore in the United States: 
1) Typical quantities of water injected during shale and tight sand hydraulic fracture jobs are 
1 to 6 million gallons per well; typical quantities of flowback water are 1 to 3 million 
gallons.  
2) Typical quantity of production-related water to be disposed from a well or reservoir is 
approximately 10 barrels of water per 1 barrel of oil produced; comparatively, little water 
is produced per million cubic feet of natural gas produced (see NRC 2013, Table 3.2). 
3) The geographic distribution of conventional resources (Figure 16) and the distribution of 
unconventional resources (Figures 1, 3, and 4) cover a large portion of the co-terminus 
Convert pdf table to text - Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
convert pdf to text online; convert pdf to txt online
Convert pdf table to text - VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
c# convert pdf to text file; convert pdf to word searchable text
52 
United States (and Alaska), including large metropolitan areas and areas of 
manufacturing. 
4) Industry practices and resource attributes vary among the unconventional resource plays 
such that the potential for impacts and preventative operational measures may differ for 
each play (see Table 13 for comparison of attributes of the major plays). 
5) Underground injection wells along with gas and oil wells are allowed in almost all states.  
Neither Federal nor State regulations directly address induced seismicity (GWPC, 2013, 
p. 14, citing: McGuire).  The one exception is that Ohio issued regulations in October 
2012 to directly address the risks of induced seismicity associated with disposal wells 
(GWPC, 2013, p. 33-34, citing: Tomastik).  Lesser controls and permit application 
procedures are in place in Colorado and Arkansas (Ibid, p. 34-35, citing Ellsworth, 
Ausbrooks).  These regulations provide the authority to stop injection when necessary to 
protect public welfare.   
Figure 16: Lower 48 States’ Conventional Gas Plays  
(EIA, 2009) 
Table 13: Attributes of Major Shale Gas Plays in the United States 
Gas Shale Basin 
Barnett 
Fayetteville
Haynesville 
Marcellus 
Woodford 
Antrim 
New 
Albany 
Estimated Basin 
Area (mi
2
5,000 
9,000 
9,000 
95,000 
11,000 
12,000 
43,500 
Depth (ft) 
6,500 – 
8,500
1,000 – 
7,000
10,500 – 
13,500 
4,000 – 
8,500 
6,000 – 
11,000 
600 – 
2,200 
500 – 
2,000 
Net Thickness (ft) 
100 – 
600 
20 – 200 
200 – 300 
50 – 200 
120 – 220 70 – 120 50 – 100 
C# Word - Table Processing in C#.NET
C# Word - Table Processing in C#.NET. Provide C# Users with Variety of Methods to Setup and Modify Table in Word Document. Overview. Create Table in Word.
convert pdf to txt format online; convert pdf to editable text
C# Word - Table Row Processing in C#.NET
C# Word - Table Row Processing in C#.NET. How to Set and Modify Table Rows in Word Document with C#.NET Solutions. Overview. Create and Add Rows in Table.
convert pdf to text for; convert image pdf to text
53 
Gas Shale Basin 
Barnett 
Fayetteville
Haynesville 
Marcellus 
Woodford 
Antrim 
New 
Albany 
Depth to Base of 
Treatable Water 
(ft) 
~1,200 
~500 
~400 
~850 
~400 
~300 
~400 
Rock Column 
Thickness 
Between Top of 
Pay and Bottom 
of Treatable 
Water (ft) 
5,300 – 
7,300 
500 – 6,500 
10,100 – 
13,100 
2,125 – 
7,650 
5,600 – 
10,600 
300 – 
1,900 
100 – 
1,600 
Total Organic 
Carbon (%) 
4.5 
4.0 – 9.8 
0.5 – 4.0 
3 – 12 
1 – 14 
1 – 20 
1 – 25 
Total Porosity 
(%) 
4 – 5 
2 – 8 
8 – 9 
10 
3 – 9 
10 – 14 
Gas Content 
(scf/ton) 
300 – 
350 
60 – 220 
100 – 330 
60 – 100 
200 – 300 40 – 100 40 – 80 
Water 
Production 
(barrels 
water/day) 
N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
5 – 500
5 – 500 
Well Spacing 
(acres) 
60 – 160 
80 – 160 
40 – 560 
40 – 160 
640 
40 – 160 
80
Original Gas-In-
Place (tcf)
327 
52 
717 
1,500 
23 
76 
160 
Technically 
Recoverable 
Resources (tcf)
44 
41.6 
251 
262 
11.4 
20 
19.2 
(GWPC and ALL Consulting, 2009, Exhibit 11) 
 
Opportunity for Harm 
Overlying the current shale plays and tight sand plays are areas of various levels of development, 
including urban areas (such as Dallas, Fort Worth, and Pittsburgh), industrial areas, rural areas, 
forests, and arid land.  Prior events of induced earthquakes have garnered more attention in areas 
that historically have been aseismic in recent history.  Earthquakes in shale play areas have been 
below the magnitudes that would cause structural damage.  The potential exists for stronger 
earthquakes, most likely in association with deep well disposal of wastewater from 
unconventional plays.  As more injection wells are used, more instances of induced earthquakes 
are possible.   
Assessment of Environmental Impacts  
 
NRC examined the scale, scope, and consequences of seismicity induced during fluid injection 
and withdrawal related to energy technologies, including shale gas recovery, and concluded that 
“the process of hydraulic fracturing a well as presently implemented for shale gas recovery does 
not pose a high risk for inducing felt seismic events” (NRC, 2013). 
C# Word - Table Cell Processing in C#.NET
you may need to create some text content or nest table in Word document, the following demo code will show you how to create a text paragraph in table cell.
convert pdf to word to edit text online; convert pdf to txt
How to C#: Convert PDF, Excel, PPT to Word
Images. Convert Word to ODT. Convert PDF to Word. Convert ODT to Word. Footnote & Endnote Processing. Table Row Processing. Table Cell Processing. Annotate Word.
convert pdf to text file using; convert pdf to text vb
54 
The relative risks associated with further expansion of the unconventional natural gas industry 
activities may be summarized as follows: 
1) Wastewater disposal via injection wells presents the highest risk of induced seismicity.  
In contrast, oil/gas production is expected to be low-risk.  Hydraulic fracturing seems to 
cause few felt earthquakes, based on current industry practices and the frequency of 
reported events. 
2) Industry practices generate wastewater in proportion to the number of wells developed 
and in proportion to the amount of natural gas produced.  Wastewater may be dealt with 
in a number of ways, but underground injection through disposal wells is a low-cost 
approach that is likely to continue for some period of time.  In some states, facilities are 
now being specially designed and constructed to treat this waste water for reuse or safe 
release.   
3) Faults in proximity to points of fluid injection relate to higher risks.  For wastewater 
disposal wells, earthquakes may be triggered up to 10 miles away (see GWPC, 2013, p. 
12; NRC, 2013, p. 90, citing Block, 2011).  Avoidance of known faults can reduce risks 
when siting injection wells. 
4) Injection of large volumes of fluid tends to elevate pore pressures longer distances from 
wells.  This results in a higher probability of triggering a susceptible fault.  Disposal 
practices could be considered such that injection of wastewater occurs in strata where 
fluids of equal volume are currently being removed or where fluids of equal volume have 
been removed in the past (such as depleted oil fields). 
5) As the number of wells increases, so will the chance of wells being in close proximity to 
susceptible faults.  Risks also increase from the cumulative effect on fluid pressures of 
having multiple wells injecting large volumes of fluid into a single stratum or a small 
region. 
6) Most of the economic risk relates to the potential for damage to buildings and 
infrastructure if a larger earthquake is triggered.  Structural damage can occur but very 
rarely does.  Generally, the potential for harm to people is very low.   
Concerning the assessment of impacts from induced seismicity, NRC (2013) noted the following 
in its summary: 
“Recently, several induced seismic events related to energy technology 
development projects in the United States have drawn heightened public attention. 
Although none of these events resulted in loss of life or significant structural 
damage, their effects were felt by local residents, some of whom also experienced 
minor property damage.  Particularly in areas where tectonic (natural) seismic 
activity is uncommon and energy development is ongoing, these induced seismic 
events, though small in scale, can be disturbing to the public and raise concern 
about increased seismic activity and its potential consequences.” (p. 5) 
 
 
C# Word - Convert Word to PDF in C#.NET
conversion library can help developers convert multi-page converted by RasterEdge Word to PDF converter toolkit and maintains the original text style (including
convert pdf to word to edit text; convert pdf table to text
C# Word - Search and Find Text in Word
Images. Convert Word to ODT. Convert PDF to Word. Convert ODT to Word. Footnote & Endnote Processing. Table Row Processing. Table Cell Processing. Annotate Word.
convert pdf to searchable text online; c# pdf to txt
55 
Land Use Impacts 
All energy sources create some impact on land use, and most have substantial land requirements 
when the whole supply chain is included (Sathaye et al 2011).  The development of 
unconventional natural gas resources clearly includes direct and indirect changes to the land, as 
discussed below.  Some impacts are short-term in nature, while others may be more permanent.  
While no single authority appears to have compiled comprehensive information on the intensity 
of land use impacts on a comparative basis, there have been various efforts to estimate land use 
associated with energy sectors, with more emphasis on electricity generation.  For instance, 
biomass energy can utilize 460,000 m
2
/GWh/yr (Nicholson 2013), while a typical hydroelectric 
reservoir utilizes 250,000 m
2
/GWh/yr (Fthenakis and Kim 2009).  Geothermal plants may impact 
up to 900 m
2
/GWh/yr (MIT 2006); and wind energy may impact approximately 1,100 
m
2
/GWh/yr (Ong et al 2009).  Larger solar plants, which vary in size and technology employed, 
can impact up to 15,000 m
2
/GWh/yr (Ong et al 2013).  Photovoltaic arrays deployed on existing 
structures would be substantially less.  Unfortunately, it is difficult to compare these land use 
impacts with those associated with unconventional gas, which may be used for more than 
electricity generation.  The following discussion highlights the land use impacts that may result 
from the development of unconventional natural gas resources. 
Natural gas development generally occurs on undeveloped land that may be privately or publicly 
owned.  These lands may be currently used for residential, agricultural, light industrial, timber 
management, wildlife management, or recreational uses.  Land use impacts would occur as a 
result of surface disturbances mainly associated with the construction and development of new 
access roads, well pads, and pipeline Rights-of-Way (ROWs), as well as the other ancillary 
infrastructure that may be needed during gas exploration and production activities (e.g., lay-
down areas, compressor stations).  Additional development as a result of natural gas exploration 
and production activities may also include the construction of new housing, office buildings, 
equipment yards, raw material supply storage, and other related infrastructure to support the 
workforce and material needed for the myriad of activities associated with natural gas 
development (e.g., land clearing, well drilling, well completion and stimulation [hydraulic 
fracturing], gas production, and pipeline construction). 
Description of Disturbances 
The following section discusses land requirements and activities for the two main components 
associated with natural gas production:  well drilling/production and pipeline 
construction/operation. 
How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.Word
and convert Word document to/from supported document (PDF and ODT). Empower to navigate word document content quickly via thumbnail. Able to support text search
conversion of pdf image to text; convert pdf to rich text format
C# Word - Header & Footer Processing in C#.NET
a run and text in paragraph IRun run = paragraph.CreateARun(); run.CreateText("Header"); //MORE TODO: // // doc.Save(@""). Create and Add Table to Footer &
convert scanned pdf to editable text; convert scanned pdf to text word
56 
Figure 17: Typical Well Pad Development in a Wooded Location 
(Photo courtesy of Robert M. Donnan, http://www.marcellus-shale.us/
 
Well Drilling (Exploration/Fracking/Production) 
Access Roads:  These are typically needed to provide entry to leased properties for the purposes 
of exploration activities, development of well pads, drilling and completion of wells, and well 
stimulation prior to production.  The length of access roads varies depending on topography, 
proximity to existing roads, and other location-specific requirements.  Access roads need to be 
wide enough to accommodate large trucks carrying heavy equipment and large quantities of 
materials to and from the well pads.  As development and production operations proceed, local 
residents can be confronted with increased truck traffic, and additional noise and light as 
construction, development, drilling, and production typically proceed 24 hours per day.  Utilities 
may also follow the same corridor. 
Well Pad Size/Components:  A well pad is a prepared area that provides a stable base for drilling 
rigs, retention ponds, water storage tanks, piping and pumps, and other related equipment.  After 
well completion, the pad also serves as the location of the wellhead.  Pad preparation includes 
clearing and leveling several acres of land which is usually leased from the landowner.  Typical 
well pads are 3-5 acres, but may be as large as 7-10 acres for locating multiple horizontally 
drilled wells.  Horizontal directional drilling, combined with high-volume hydraulic fracturing, 
allows multiple wells (up to 8-12) to be drilled from one well pad (Clark et al. 2012). 
Well Pad Spacing:  Typical well spacing starts at one well pad per square mile.  A single square 
mile of surface area would require 16 pads for 16 conventional wells, while the same area using 
horizontal wells would require a single pad for 6 to 8 wells (NETL, 2009).  The need for 
additional well pads is determined by characteristics of the local geology and production status. 
Convert ODT to Word
Images. Convert Word to ODT. Convert PDF to Word. Convert ODT to Word. Footnote & Endnote Processing. Table Row Processing. Table Cell Processing. Annotate Word.
convert pdf file to text; convert pdf to txt file format
C# Word - Footnote & Endnote Processing in C#.NET
paragraph.CreateARun(); //Create text for run run.CreateText("Paragrah for footnote and endnote"); //Just Show how to create a footnote and create table for it
convert pdf to text document; converting pdf to searchable text format
57 
Figure 18: A Typical Well Pad in Pennsylvania 
(Photo courtesy of Robert M. Donnan, http://www.marcellus-shale.us/
Pipelines 
New gathering and transmission pipelines will be constructed as a result of increased 
unconventional gas development.  Widths of ROWs for construction vary from 75 to 100 feet.  
Gathering pipelines run between individual well sites, compressor units, and metering stations.  
Transmission pipelines (interstate pipelines) move gas between two or more states.  Pipelines 
usually require the pipeline company to acquire ROW to private or public lands.  A pipeline 
ROW is a strip of land over and around natural gas pipelines where some of the property owner’s 
legal rights have been granted to a pipeline operator.  An ROW agreement between a pipeline 
company and a property owner is also called an easement and is usually filed in the appropriate 
county office with property deeds.  ROWs provide a permanent, limited interest in the land, 
allowing the pipeline company to install, operate, test, inspect, repair, maintain, replace, and 
protect one or more pipelines within the designated easement (Penn State Extension, 2014).  
Pipeline easements may also be obtained by eminent domain.  For gathering lines, the laws 
governing exercise of eminent domain vary by state.  As an example, in New York, 
Pennsylvania, and West Virginia, eminent domain generally only applies to transmission 
pipelines.  Therefore, for individual gathering lines, the pipeline operator must negotiate 
easements with each individual landowner along the anticipated pipeline route. 
Access/Maintenance Roads:  Like well pads, the construction and operation of pipelines require 
access roads to facilitate the movement of workers, equipment, and materials to the job site as 
construction activities progress along the pipeline route and to allow for inspection and 
maintenance activities after completion. 
Construction ROW:  Construction of pipelines requires a wider ROW to allow access to heavy 
equipment and the staging of removed soils and other materials (pipe, gravel) needed to 
complete the pipeline installation.  The width varies depending on the size of the pipeline and the 
terrain to be crossed, but would typically be between 75 to 100 feet for larger pipelines.  Larger 
widths may be necessary to accommodate site-specific challenges, like the use of horizontal 
directional drilling to avoid impacts to sensitive or unique resources.  Considering localized 
topography of the pipeline project, this area in general represents between 9.1 and 12.1 acres of 
disturbance per mile of pipe (Oil & Gas Journal). 
58 
Figure 19: Typical Eastern U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Construction
(Photos courtesy of Robert M. Donnan, http://www.marcellus-shale.us/) 
Lay-Down Areas:  During pipeline construction, open areas are needed along the pipeline route 
to stage equipment and materials to facilitate efficient management of construction activities. 
Final ROW:  Individual ROW agreements may vary, but generally, the pipeline company’s final 
ROW extends 50 feet total width (established at 25 feet from each side of the installed pipeline).  
Special conditions may cause deviations from this typical case.  An ROW is usually mowed 
periodically, and cleared of trees, high shrubs, and other obstructions on an annual basis.  
Easements also restrict land owners from certain activities within the ROW that could impact the 
integrity of the pipeline. 
Figure 20: Typical Pipeline Right-of-Way Cross-Section 
(https://www.aogc.com/beawarepipelinesinyourcommunity_en.aspx
Compressor Stations:  Similar to well pads, compressor stations require stabile flat areas. 
Figure 21: Examples of  Natural Gas Compressor Stations
(Photo courtesy of Robert M. Donnan, http://www.marcellus-shale.us/
59 
Other Ancillary Infrastructure 
The development of gas exploration and production infrastructure (wells and pipelines) requires 
a substantial workforce and a variety of raw materials.  This leads to the development of 
ancillary infrastructure with additional but similar potential impacts to land use (sewer lines, 
water lines, utility lines, etc.).  However, much of this development may occur in areas that are 
less rural or remote, where access to highways or other transportation modes can be provided. 
Housing:  New hotels/motels, especially extended-stay motels; temporary worker bunkhouses or 
worker villages; RV campgrounds; or other housing developments constructed for the purpose of 
housing shale gas field workers. 
Commercial Space:  Office buildings to provide space for the management support and technical 
teams associated with gas development spring up around the area of well development and 
pipeline activities.  These are needed for the myriad of companies providing well drilling 
services, well operation support, pipeline construction, well-field services, and their 
subcontractors.  Warehouses and equipment storage yards provide space for staging equipment 
and materials, or maintaining equipment (example below). 
Figure 22: Typical Construction Staging and Equipment Areas
(Photo courtesy of Robert M. Donnan, http://www.marcellus-shale.us/
Supporting Businesses:  The rapid development associated with unconventional gas exploration 
and production often leads to an increase in the businesses indirectly supporting the work force.  
Office and field workers need food, fuel, raw materials, and other supplies to complete their 
work.  Convenience stores and gas stations provide easy access to such necessities for the field 
workers.  Vendors provide the raw materials, like pipe, sand, cement, and chemicals.  Often, 
larger facilities develop near rail or barge lines where bulk goods transportation can be accessed 
(examples from Texas and Pennsylvania below). 
60 
Figure 23: Pipe Storage Facility in Pennsylvania  
(Photo courtesy of Robert M. Donnan, http://www.marcellus-shale.us/
Typical land use impacts include the following: 
 Conversion of agricultural (crops and grazing) and forested lands to open disturbed, 
semi-industrial uses. 
 Conversion of lands to maintained ROWs for access roads and pipelines.  Some lands in 
ROW may revert back to agricultural uses, but soil compaction may be an issue. 
 Loss of lands for public recreational use/access. 
 Increased ease of access to lands via new access roads.  Many may be gated, but walk-in 
accessibility would be increased. 
 Cumulative impact of development on public and private lands, such as increased 
deterioration of local and secondary roadways due to repetitive high axle load truck 
traffic. 
The real issue with land use impacts is not the minor impacts related to each well pad, access 
road, or pipeline.  When the impacts from these individual components of shale gas development 
are considered in aggregate, or cumulatively, the impacts become magnified on an ecosystem of 
regional scale.  Aerial photographs taken from areas with major shale gas development illustrate 
this, showing the extensive numbers of well pads and networks of access roads and pipelines that 
have resulted.  In the rural areas where much of this development occurs, it is easy to see that 
such widespread development can carve up the land once used for agricultural, grazing, timber 
management, wildlife management, and recreational purposes.  While these land uses can still 
occur, the patchwork that results from shale gas development undoubtedly leaves a mark on the 
quantity of land consumed, quality of recreational use, and the quality of habitat available to 
many important wildlife and plant species.  It must be noted, however, that some of these 
changes may be a benefit to certain wildlife species. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested