mvc open pdf in new tab : Convert pdf file to txt application control utility azure web page wpf visual studio Miller%20-%20Combined%20Behavioral%20Intervention%20Thearpist%20Manual21-part1251

CLIENT:   I could have had a drink or twenty. 
THERAPIST: Right - and you chose not to.  What if that’s what you had done?  What would 
have happened?   
CLIENT: Like I said, I would have felt a lot worse on Saturday.  I would probably have stayed 
home on Saturday and drank all day, instead of going out and getting things done. 
THERAPIST: All right.  There’s one thing you could have done differently, that would have led 
to much worse feelings and consequences.   It would have magnified your negative mood.  Now 
the opposite is true, too.  What else could you have done differently on Friday night, besides 
staying home alone, that might have had better results? 
CLIENT: What else am I supposed to do?  I’m not supposed to go to bars, and there’s not much 
else to do out there on a Friday night.  
THERAPIST:  It’s a real challenge sometimes to figure out what to do instead of a mood 
magnifying behavior. First identify the behavior that’s magnifying your mood, and then try some 
healthier options.      
CLIENT: I don’t know – maybe it’s best just to be alone. 
THERAPIST:   I hear some mood magnifying thoughts right there!      
CLIENT: Well, the being alone thing really bugs me. I know I don’t want to be alone, which is a 
more balanced thought, I guess, but at the same time, I’m nervous about meeting people. I guess 
that’s what AA meetings are for. 
THERAPIST:   You can meet people at meetings. You can also meet them at a ton of other 
places. The Thursday night newspaper every week has pages of things that are happening in the 
community, most of which don’t involve drinking.  And going out and doing something around 
other people is just one set of possibilities.  What else could you do? 
CLIENT: You mean like call somebody on the phone? 
THERAPIST: There’s a good idea!  What if you had done that instead on Friday night? . . . . 
Thought substitution and response substitution lend themselves well to task assignments between 
sessions.  The spirit here is one of experimentation - of trying out different thoughts and different 
behaviors, to see what happens.  It’s the same idea expressed in the module on Social and Recreational 
Counseling (SARC, 5.8) - sampling different possibilities to find what is more rewarding.  Negotiate 
specific assignments, drawing heavily on your client’s own ideas whenever possible.  It can be useful to 
continue keeping the mood monitoring sheets during this period when new thoughts and responses are 
being tried.   
5.6n.  Applying STORC  with Urges to Drink 
If your client experiences urges to drink, the procedures of this module may be particularly 
helpful.  Urges can be analyzed with the same STORC model, and positive changes may occur at any link 
in the chain.  Urges often involve a good deal of self-talk, which can have a magnifying effect.  Similarly, 
thought and response substitution can counteract and weaken urges to drink. 
Convert pdf file to txt - application control utility:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf file to txt - application control utility:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
Hidden automatic self-statements about urges can make them harder to handle ("Now I want a 
drink.  I won't be able to stand this.  The urge is going to keep getting stronger and stronger until I blow 
up or drink.")  Other types of self-statements can make the urge easier to handle ("Even though my mind 
is made up to stay sober, my body will take a while to figure this out.  This feeling is uncomfortable, but 
in a few minutes it will pass.  I'll surf over it.") 
The two basic steps are the same: 
1.  Identify the STORC components that make up an urge to drink.  What is the situation?  What 
self-talk is involved?  What are the automatic thoughts that make it harder to cope with an urge? 
How does the client respond when experiencing (and labeling) an “urge”?  
2.  Find ways to challenge the toxic self-talk (stinking thinking) with replacement thoughts and 
responses. Here are some examples of replacement thoughts that people have used successfully in 
sobriety: 
Where is the evidence?  What is the evidence that if you don't have a drink in the next 10 
minutes, I will die?  Has anyone who has been detoxed ever died from not drinking?  
Who says that successfully sober people don’t have these feelings from time to time?  
What is the evidence that there is something uniquely wrong with me, that means I can’t  
stay sober?  Who do I think I am? 
What is so awful about that?  What's so awful about feeling bad?  Of course I can survive 
it.    Who  said  that  sobriety  would  be  easy?    What's  so  terrible  or  unusual  about 
experiencing an urge to drink?  If I hang in there, I will feel fine.  These urges are not like 
being hungry or thirsty or needing to relieve yourself – they are more like craving a 
particular food when you see it, or an urge to talk to a particular person – they pass in 
short order. 
I don’t have to be perfect.  I’m not God.  So I make mistakes.  I can be irritable, 
preoccupied, or hard to get along with sometimes.  Other times I’m more centered, 
loving, and lovable.  Human beings make mistakes.  It’s part of being alive and human. 
Similarly, there are many possible responses to try instead of drinking.  Call someone.  Go to a 
movie.  Take a hot bath.  Go to a meeting.   As always in CBI, it is best to elicit the client’s own ideas.  It 
can sound terribly trite to list things a person can do instead of drinking, and clients generally have better 
ideas anyhow. 
application control utility:Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
from other C# .NET PDF to text conversion controls, RasterEdge C# PDF to text converter control toolkit can convert PDF document to text file with good
www.rasteredge.com
application control utility:VB.NET Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in vb.net
Batch convert editable & searchable PDF document from TXT formats in VB.NET class. Able to copy and paste all text content from .txt file to PDF file by keeping
www.rasteredge.com
5.7.  MUTU:  Mutual-Support Group Facilitation 
5.7a.  Rationale 
Support for sobriety makes a big difference.  Studies rather consistently find that involvement in 
mutual-support groups is associated with less drinking and more abstinence after treatment.  Particularly 
for clients whose current social systems support drinking rather than abstinence, involvement in a mutual-
support group can provide a new support system for sobriety, and may significantly improve treatment 
outcome (Project MATCH Research Group, 1998a). 
For this reason, all clients in CBI are encouraged to at least sample mutual-support groups.  This 
module is a much shortened version of Twelve-Step Facilitation therapy (Nowinski, Baker & Carroll, 
1995), an important change: encouragement is broadened to mutual-support groups more generally, and is 
not restricted to twelve-step groups; consequently, no emphasis is given to helping clients work the early 
steps of the twelve-step program.  Instead, the module focuses on facilitating the client’s sampling of 
available mutual support groups as an aid for sobriety.  Specific objectives of this module are: 
To give clients a rationale for using social supports as a primary mechanism for stabilizing and 
maintaining treatment gains. 
To identify clients who have a particular need for mutual-support group participation because of 
inadequate social support for sobriety. 
To educate clients about the anticipated benefits of different mutual-support programs, and what 
to expect (procedurally) from different support groups. 
To minimize faulty beliefs about different mutual-support programs by providing pertinent 
support group information including (when available)  “approved" literature, or source materials. 
To offer temporary support and a resource for clients to address questions about, or discuss 
negative experiences with mutual-support group involvement. 
To assist the client in finding an appropriate and acceptable mutual-support group. 
5.7b.  Definition and Background of Mutual Support 
People with problems in their lives seek many routes to alleviate their distress.  One common 
response is to seek the help of others with similar problems.  The process of turning to a group of  peers 
with similar problems has been described as self-help or mutual aid (McCrady & Delaney, 1995), terms 
synonymous with the one that is used in this manual: mutual support.   Self-help or mutual-support 
groups have proliferated for persons with substance abuse problems.   Many of the mutual-support groups 
had their beginnings in the fertile climate for alcohol treatment services in the United States after the post-
war era.  However, mutual-support groups are not simply an artifact of the U.S. treatment system, but are 
becoming more common in other countries as well, where they are seen increasingly as an important 
adjunct to alcoholism treatment (Mäkelä, 1993; McCrady & Delaney, 1995).  
application control utility:C# Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in C#.net, ASP
message can be copied and pasted to PDF file by keeping NET class source code for creating PDF document from Convert plain text to PDF text with multiple fonts
www.rasteredge.com
application control utility:C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
2. To TIFF. Export PDF to TIFF file format. 3. To TXT. Export and convert PDF to TXT file. 4. To Image. Convert PDF to image formats, such as PNG, JPG, BMP and
www.rasteredge.com
5.7c.  Overview of Mutual-Support Programs 
The earliest of the contemporary mutual-support groups is Alcoholics Anonymous (AA).  
Founded in Akron, Ohio in 1935, AA claims to have 2 million members, and more than 90,000 registered 
groups in over 140 countries (Alcoholics Anonymous World Services, 1994).  AA is a fellowship of men 
and women who help each other to stay sober by living without alcohol through following the 12 steps of 
recovery (see Appendix E).  The core beliefs reflected in the 12 steps include the “powerlessness” of the 
alcoholic to control his/her drinking; and the existence of a “higher power” (i.e. “God as we understand 
him”) who can restore a life,  if  allowed (paraphrased from steps 1, 2, and 3).  A number of other groups 
established on the steps and traditions of AA have developed to help individuals addicted to other 
psychoactive substances such as narcotics (Narcotics Anonymous - NA) and cocaine (Cocaine 
Anonymous - CA).  AA groups are peer led, and the organization of AA is non-professional, relying on 
the volunteer activities of its members to chair meetings, coordinate activities, and represent the interests 
of its members at the state and national levels.  
Other groups exist that either complement AA or provide an alternative.  Overcomers Outreach 
(OO), is a program for evangelical Christians that applies biblical teachings to the 12 steps.  OO 
emphasizes abstinence and the disease concept, and is open to persons with any kind of addiction, as well 
as others who consider themselves “co-dependent.”  The Calix Society, a program for Catholics who are 
recovering from alcoholism, was founded in 1947 and is present at least in the United States, Canada, 
Scotland and England.  Both of these programs focus on spirituality and religious study in the context of 
recovery from alcoholism through AA.   
Several other mutual-support groups have developed from a different view of alcoholism, one 
that emphasizes rationality and personal responsibility rather than spirituality.  They are intended to be 
alternatives to AA and the other more spiritual or faith-based recovery programs.   
Women for Sobriety (WFS) was founded in 1967 by Jean Kirkpatrick (1978) as a mutual-support 
program designed specifically to meet the needs of women in recovery.  The program is based on the 
belief that many of the underlying principles of AA such as powerlessness and surrender are counter-
therapeutic to the needs of women.  WFS believes that many woman develop drinking problems as a way 
of coping with negative emotional states.  While emphasizing abstinence as a necessary goal, WFS 
emphasizes personal control, and a positive self-identity as the appropriate mechanisms of recovery.  
WFS asserts that once a woman can cope without drinking, she is no longer in need of support services.  
WFS meetings are led by a moderator (often a mental health professional and/or a former WFS member), 
and in that regard are not strictly mutual-support groups. 
Secular Organizations for Sobriety - Save Our Selves (SOS) began in 1985 as a self-help program 
promoting a scientific (as opposed to the spiritual or religious) method of achieving sobriety.  SOS 
promotes the importance of supportive others in achieving and maintaining sobriety, and promotes 
abstinence as the only rational approach to living.  SOS meetings are peer-led, and are structured around a 
set of suggested guidelines for sobriety. 
Rational Recovery (RR) was founded by Jack Trimpey in 1986 and is based on the principles of 
rational-emotive-therapy (Ellis & Velten, 1992).  RR proposes 13 rational ideas as an alternative to the 12 
steps of AA (Trimpey, 1989).  RR emphasizes abstinence as the safest route to overcoming an alcohol or 
drug problem, but also stresses personal decision-making.   RR groups are peer-led, but all groups have a 
professional therapist who functions as an advisor.   
The newest American addition to mutual-support programs is Moderation Management (MM), 
founded by Audrey Kishline (1994).  It was designed for people who are “problem drinkers” rather than 
application control utility:VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
2. To TIFF. Export PDF to TIFF file format. 3. To TXT. Export and convert PDF to TXT file. 4. To Image. Convert PDF to image formats, such as PNG, JPG, BMP and
www.rasteredge.com
application control utility:C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
Allow users to convert PDF to Text (TXT) file. It's easy to be integrated into your C# program and convert PDF to .txt file with original PDF layout.
www.rasteredge.com
chronically alcohol-dependent people, and MM specifically departs from a disease model of alcoholism.  
Its purpose is “to provide a supportive environment in which people who have made the healthy decision 
to reduce their drinking can come together to help each other change.”  Meetings are free of charge, and 
are peer-led by volunteers.  Specific guidelines and limits are prescribed, drawn from research on 
behavioral self-control training.  It is the only U.S. mutual-support group that focuses specifically on a 
goal of moderate and problem-free drinking.  (MM’s goal conflicts with the abstinence emphasis within 
COMBINE, which is restricted to alcohol-dependent clients. Nevertheless, it is important to be 
knowledgeable about MM as a mutual-help program.) 
Other groups that fit the general definition of a mutual-support group may exist in certain 
communities.  Many urban churches have special outreach ministries established to help in recovery from 
substance use disorders.  These are generally peer-led, often by a church member who is in recovery.  In 
addition, communities with large ethnic populations often establish organizations to promote cultural 
identification and affiliation within the community.  These organizations may sponsor groups organized 
to offer positive role-models and  social or recreational outlets for constituents.  These natural support 
systems represent indigenous resources that can be used to support clients who are in need of enhanced 
social resources and supports.  Delgado (1996) suggests that these groups can provide a culturally 
acceptable alternative to the more conventional mutual-support groups described in this section.  These 
resources “can be used to address expressive, informational, and instrumental needs within individuals, 
families and communities... and present opportunities for members of a community to take on help-giving 
roles” (page 5).  In other words, faith groups and community-based organizations may provide effective 
alternatives as mutual-support experiences and should be incorporated into the menu of mutual-support 
options suggested to augment CBI treatment. 
Basic Aspects of Mutual-Help Groups 
GROUP
LEADERS
INTENDED 
FOR
APPROACH
ABSTINENCE 
EMPHASIS
Alcoholics 
Anonymous
Peers
Anyone with a sincere 
desire to stop drinking
Spiritual, 12-step 
Disease model
High
Calix Society
Professional 
Affiliate
Catholics in recovery
Catholic faith 
and 12 steps
Low
Moderation 
Management
Professional 
Moderator
People who want to reduce 
their drinking
Behavioral self-
control
Low
Overcomers 
Outreach
Peers
Christians seeking to 
overcome an addiction
Christian faith 
and 12 steps
Moderate
Rational 
Recovery
Internet
Anyone with an alcohol or 
other drug problem
Rational-emotive 
therapy
High
Secular 
Organization 
for Sobriety
Peers
Anyone sincerely seeking 
sobriety
Secular and 
scientific 
approach to 
recovery
Moderate
SMART 
Recovery
Trained 
Coordinator
Anyone wanting to change 
addictive behavior
Rational-emotive 
behavior therapy
High
Women for 
Sobriety
Professional 
Moderator
Women who desire to stop 
drinking
Empowerment, 
cognitive therapy
Low
adapted from McCrady & Delaney (1995) 
application control utility:VB.NET PDF - WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET Program
are allowed to view PDF on VB.NET project, annotate PDF document with various notes and shapes, convert PDF to Word document, Tiff image, TXT file and other
www.rasteredge.com
application control utility:C# TIFF: Use C#.NET Code to Extract Text from TIFF File
oPage.SaveTo(MIMEType.TXT, outputTxt demonstrates how to extract the first page text from a multi-page TIFF file, and then save the result as a pdf file.
www.rasteredge.com
5.7d.  Matching Considerations in Mutual-Support Referrals 
The recommended method for utilizing mutual-support groups is to integrate them into your 
treatment approach (Ouimette, Moos, & Finney, 1998).  A number of researchers have indicated that a 
referral to AA or another support program should be routinely offered to clients with an abstinence goal 
(Edwards, 1980; McCrady & Delaney, 1995).   Glaser (1993) specifically recommended that all clients 
should be encouraged to try mutual-support groups, and also that no one should be required to do so.  
This is the approach taken in CBI: to encourage (but not require) all clients to sample mutual-support 
options as potential aids to recovery. 
There are many possible considerations in matching clients with optimal mutual-help programs. 
Here are several: 
Availability.  One obvious limitation is the range of mutual-support programs available in the 
community.  AA is most likely to be accessible.  In some areas it will be the only mutual-support 
resource.  A broader range of alternatives is often available in more populous areas. 
Program Philosophy.  There are substantial differences in the philosophy, structure, orientation 
and leadership of the various mutual-support groups.  Even within large organizations like AA, 
there can be wide variety in the group environment of meetings (Tonigan, Ashcroft, & Miller, 
1995).  If you know both your client and the available programs and groups, you may be able to 
provide helpful guidance in the selection of initial meetings to try.   
Spirituality.  A major distinction between 12-step and the more secular organizations (RR, SOS, 
WFS) is the emphasis placed on spirituality - a central and consistent component of AA.  It is not 
the case that clients need to be “religious” in order to be comfortable in or respond to AA. 
Nevertheless, the God language, open prayer, and spiritual steps of AA meetings may be alien or 
offensive to some clients. 
Similarity.  An important determinant of social affiliation is perceived similarity.  Consider who 
the client is likely to encounter at various programs and groups.  If the client might be the only 
woman, Hispanic, or person under 30, it is not likely to be a comfortable social network.   
5.7e.  Social Support for Sobriety  
A recent clinical trial investigating client-treatment matching showed that AA (and by extension,  
other mutual-support group) involvement may be less important for individuals who already have a high 
level of social support for abstinence (Project MATCH Research Group, 1998a).  This does not mean that 
AA or other group attendance will be unhelpful.  Indeed, mutual-support group members will reinforce 
the client’s decision to abstain, and may provide useful role-models for long-term drug-free coping. For 
individuals with good social support for abstinence, encourage mutual-support group attendance as you  
would other possible strategies for maintaining behavior changes (Snow, Prochaska, & Rossi,1994).   
Clients with networks  supportive of  continued  drinking,  however, do substantially  better  in 
treatment that specifically and concretely attempts to facilitate their affiliation with AA (Longabaugh, 
Wirtz, Zweben, & Stout, 1998).  The MATCH study cited above revealed that attending AA groups 
during the first year following treatment served to immunize the individual, increasing the resiliency of 
abstinence (Project MATCH Research Group, 1998a).  This finding is very consistent with the folk 
advice in AA suggesting that sobriety is promoted by “going to meetings, reading the ‘Big Book’ and 
talking to your sponsor.”  
5.7f.  Initiating Mutual-Support Group Involvement 
Provide a Rationale.  Begin by providing a clear rationale for mutual-support group involvement.  
As always, start by asking your client for reasons why having additional support could be helpful (self-
motivational statements).  It  may be  useful  to provide  information from research or  from personal 
experience about mutual-support group participation, emphasizing its value in maintaining long-term, 
stable abstinence.  The purpose here is to provide a rationale for participation that is both factual and 
congruent with the client’s beliefs or circumstances.   
Explore Attitudes about Mutual-Support.  Next ask about your client’s prior experience with 
mutual-support groups.  Most clients will have had some exposure, which may have been positive or 
negative.  What did the client like or appreciate about the groups he or she attended?  What did he or she 
dislike, or what were the barriers to participating?  For clients with no prior mutual-support experience, 
ask what they could imagine would be helpful about participating in such groups.  Consistent with the 
motivational style of CBI, be careful not to get into a disagreement with your client in which you argue 
for mutual-support participation and the client argues against it. 
Give Information about Available Groups.  Offer information that is pertinent to this particular 
client,  in language  she  or  he  will  appreciate.    Draw  on  your  knowledge  of  the  available groups.  
Regarding AA, for example, you might say to a male client who is unfamiliar with 12-step programs: 
AA was started in 1935 by an New  York stockbroker and an Ohio surgeon  who had been 
“hopeless” alcoholics.   They had both tried and failed at many attempts to quit on their own, 
and  finally  discovered that  what helped  them was  to  help  other  alcoholics  who  were  still 
drinking.  For these men, forming a group with other alcoholics, for mutual encouragement and 
support was the  key to their staying free from alcohol.   Millions  of  others  have  tried  this 
approach. 
Besides general information, also give practical information about exactly what a client is likely to 
experience in attending a meeting.   
AA meetings tend to follow a routine.  When you go to this particular meeting, you will probably 
find that it starts with a time of silence followed by the serenity prayer.  Then the secretary (that’s 
the voluntary leader of the group) will have someone read a description of AA from ‘How it 
Works
’ in the Big Book of AA.   Then they’ll ask if there are any newcomers or visitors to the 
group.  If you are willing, you introduce yourself by your first name only, so that the rest of the 
group can welcome you.   It’s okay to pass, though.  You don’t have to say anything at all if you 
don’t want to.  You will probably feel more a part of the meeting, though, if you say something 
about why you are there, and what has been happening.  This meeting then discusses one of the 
twelve steps.  It’s over in an hour, and at the end everyone holds hands and recites the Lord’s 
prayer.  How does that sound to you?” 
A good way to know these specifics is to sample meetings yourself.  If you are not a person in recovery, 
most programs nevertheless allow visitors to attend, or may have specific “open” meetings (as in AA).  
Give a fair and accurate description of the various groups available in your area.   
Encourage Sampling.  Particularly for newcomers, it is useful to encourage your client to “try it 
out” or “shop around” without making an initial commitment.  Emphasize that groups vary widely, and 
each person should find the group(s) most comfortable and appropriate for his or her own situation.  Give 
your specific endorsement to participating,  
I would really like you to give serious thought to trying out AA or another kind of group, in 
addition to the work we are doing together here.  Treatment and mutual support together seem to 
lead to the best outcomes.   Which of these groups that I’ve described do you think might be the 
best place for you to start - the one you might check out first? 
Provide Referral Information.  Once you have arrived at a specific plan for sampling groups, give 
your client the needed contact information.  This will usually include some introductory literature and a 
list of local meeting times and places.  Written material is available for most groups.  Use  officially 
approved  literature when you are referring clients to 12-step meetings.  Give local or toll-free numbers 
through which your client can contact the group of interest. 
Make a Specific Plan.  Finally, arrive at a specific plan.  Which meeting will the client attend?  
When and where?  How will the client get there?  Trouble-shoot any obstacles to attendance that may be 
encountered.  For many clients, it is not enough just to give the information.  Consider specific steps to 
help your client get to meetings.  For example, pre-arrange with a group member to receive a call from 
you (from the session, with your client’s permission), and give the phone to your client so that the 
member can offer to meet the client at the group, perhaps provide transportation, etc.  Practical steps like 
these can make a big difference in whether clients actually get to meetings (Sisson & Mallams, 1981). 
5.7g.  Emphasizing Action 
Contrary to some aphorisms, it is not simply attending mutual-support groups that results in 
positive change.  A number of studies investigating the level of participation have found that it is active 
involvement and personal investment that predict abstinence.  For instance, Sheeren (1988) reported that 
“reaching out to other members of AA for help and the use of a sponsor” were the most important 
activities predicting whether an AA member would relapse or not.  Similarly, Montgomery, Miller, and 
Tonigan (1995) reported that the extent of involvement or active participation in AA processes (i.e. 
working the steps, using a sponsor, etc.), rather than mere attendance at meetings, was associated with 
more favorable outcomes on both consumption and meaning-in-life measures. 
The implication of these findings is straightforward.  Clients benefit more if they become more 
actively involved in the program.  Thus, as your client finds a group that is acceptable, continue to ask 
about and encourage active involvement.  
So you heard some people at meetings who have several years on a program.  What is it, do you 
think, that keeps them coming back? . . .  
In general, the research on mutual-support groups shows that people who invest more, get more 
out the group.  It’s not just going to more meetings, but also things like showing up early, sticking 
around afterward to talk to people, exchanging phone numbers, reading the materials.  
Some people volunteer to make the coffee, clean up after the group, or offer some other kind of 
help.  Different things appeal to different people.  What have you thought about, as ways you 
might get a little more involved? 
As with other home task assignments, always ask about your client’s ongoing experience with 
AA  or  other  support  groups,  once  you  have  negotiated  participation.   Explore potential  obstacles, 
particularly clients’ beliefs and attitudes that impact whether or not they are likely to follow through 
(Meichenbaum & Turk, 1987).  Remember to provide information and advice within the larger clinical 
style of  motivational interviewing.   
5.7h.  Handling Negativity about Mutual-Support Group Attendance 
Clients may express directly (e.g., complaints), or indirectly (e.g., non-attendance) their 
dissatisfaction  with or disinterest in mutual-support groups.     Explore  the roots of  negativity in a 
supportive, nonjudgmental manner.  Value the client’s own perceptions and experience, offering accurate 
reflection.  Add your own encouragement, but never insist that a client attends.  If the client is not ready 
to consider attending now, put the topic on hold and come back to it later in treatment when he or she may 
be more receptive. 
I understand you felt self-conscious at the meeting, and also you’re wondering whether you really 
need this kind of support.  It really is up to you, of course.  I just encourage you not to close the 
door.  There are many different meetings, and getting involved really does help many people to 
establish and maintain their sobriety.  Let’s just leave it at that for now, but would it be okay if 
we talked about it again in a few weeks?   
5.8.  SARC:  Social and Recreational Counseling 
Often when clients present for treatment, they have few outside interests and activities.  As 
alcohol dependence develops, drinking occupies more and more of the person’s time, and drinking 
companions displace prior associates.  Conversely, an important part of the process of recovery is 
rebuilding a life without drinking.  This may include finding a nondrinking peer group, sampling and 
pursuing positive social-recreational activities that do not involve drinking, and establishing or re-
establishing stable employment (see 5.5).   
The central goal in this module is to help your client connect with reliable sources of positive 
reinforcement that do not involve or depend on drinking.  The SARC module is one that is easily done in 
combination with another module.  You may not need to devote the entire session to SARC procedures, 
but rather can work on two modules during the same sessions. 
5.8a.  Explaining the Rationale 
Start by discussing with your client the importance of healthy, supportive relationships and 
rewarding recreational activities.  As much as possible, elicit from the client reasons why it is important 
to have rewarding activities and companions not associated with drinking.  Avoid lecturing clients about 
matters of which they are likely at least somewhat aware.  You might say, “Drinking has occupied a lot of 
your time and energy in the past, and it sounds like many of your regular contacts were drinking 
companions.  One of the important challenges is to develop new interests, friends, and rewarding ways to 
spend your time that don’t involve alcohol.  What might be the advantages, do you think, of having fun, 
finding some new interests, or being with friendly people without drinking?”  As self-motivational 
statements emerge, reinforce them with reflection. 
Here are a few of the points that often arise in discussions of this kind.  If your client does not 
come up with advantages, offer a series of these and ask which of them seem like the best reasons.  
Present the basic ideas in language appropriate for your client, not necessarily as phrased below. 
Drinking friends, even if they don’t pressure you, can be powerful triggers for drinking, 
especially early in sobriety. 
Empty time (including time spent in relatively mindless activities) is not rewarding, tends to 
promote low moods, and does not support self-esteem. 
If you’re sober but not enjoying it, you’re not likely to stay that way. 
Positive reinforcement is like vitamins.  It helps to be sure you have some every day. 
Finish up with a summary reflection that draws together the important reasons for developing alcohol-free 
sources of positive reinforcement.  
5.8b.  Assessing Sources of Reinforcement 
Have your client describe people, places and activities that were often associated with drinking. 
This will give you a sense of how drinking was linked to particular peers,  places, or events.  Similarly, 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested