Najavits, L.M. (in press). “Seeking safety”: Cognitive-behavioral therapy for PTSD and 
substance abuse. New York: Guilford Press. 
Nowinski, J., Baker, S., & Carroll, K. (1995).  The twelve-step facilitation manual: A clinical 
research guide for therapists treating individuals with alcohol abuse and dependence.  (Project Match 
Monograph Series, Volume 1). Rockville, MD: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. 
O'Farrell, T. J. (1993).   Treating alcohol problems: Marital and family interventions.  New York: 
Guilford Press. 
Orford, J. (1985).  Excessive appetites: A psychological view of addictions.  New York: John 
Wiley. 
Ouimette, P.C., Moos. R.H., & Finney, J.F. (1998).  Influence of outpatient treatment and 12-step 
group involvement on one-year substance abuse treatment outcomes.  Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 59, 
513-522. 
Patterson, G.R., & Forgatch, M.S. (1985).  Therapist behavior as a determinant for client 
noncompliance:  A paradox for the behavior modifier.  Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 
52, 846-851. 
Pettinati, H.M., Volpicelli, J.R., Pierce, J. D., & O'Brien, C. P. (2000).  Improving naltrexone 
response: An intervention for medical practitioners to enhance medication compliance with naltrexone in 
alcohol dependent patients.  Journal of Addictive Diseases, 19, 71-83. 
Prochaska, J. O., & DiClemente, C. C. (1982). Transtheoretical therapy: Toward a more 
integrative model of change.  Psychotherapy: Theory, research and practice, 19, 276-288. 
Prochaska, J. O., & DiClemente, C. C. (1984). The transtheoretical approach: Crossing 
traditional boundaries of therapy.  Homewook, IL: Dow Jones/Irwin. 
Prochaska, J. O., & DiClemente, C. C. (1985).  Processes and stages of change in smoking, 
weight control, and psychological distress.  In S. Schiffman & T. Wills (Eds.), Coping and substance 
abuse (pp. 319-345).  New York: Academic Press. 
Prochaska, J.O., & DiClemente, C.C. (1986).  Toward a comprehensive model of change.  In W. 
R. Miller & N. Heather (Eds.), Treating addictive behaviors: Process of Change (pp. 3-27). New York: 
Plenum Press. 
Prochaska, J. O., DiClemente, C. C., & Norcross, J. C. (1992).  In search of how people change: 
Applications to addictive behaviors.  American Psychologist, 47, 1102-1114. 
Project MATCH Research Group. (1993).  Project MATCH: Rationale and methods for a 
multisite clinical trial matching patients to alcoholism treatment.  Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental 
Research, 17, 1130-1145. 
Project MATCH Research Group. (1997a).  Matching alcoholism treatments to client 
heterogeneity: Project MATCH posttreatment drinking outcomes.  Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 58, 7-
29. 
Convert image pdf to text pdf - SDK control service:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Convert image pdf to text pdf - SDK control service:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
Project MATCH Research Group. (1997b).  Matching alcoholism treatments to client 
heterogeneity: Test of the secondary a priori hypotheses.  Addiction, 92, 1671-1698. 
Project MATCH Research Group. (1998a).  Matching alcoholism treatments to client 
heterogeneity: Project MATCH three-year drinking outcomes.  Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental 
Research, 22, 1300-1311. 
Project MATCH Research Group. (1998b). Matching patients with alcohol disorders to treatment: 
Clinical implications from Project MATCH.  Journal of Mental Health, 7, 589-602. 
Project MATCH Research Group. (1998c).  Therapist effects in three treatments for alcohol 
problems.  Psychotherapy Research, 8, 455-474.  
Rogers, C. R. (1957).  The necessary and sufficient conditions for therapeutic personality change.  
Journal of  Clinical Psychology, 21, 95-103. 
Rogers, C. R. (1959).  A theory of therapy, personality, and interpersonal relationships as 
developed in the client-centered framework.  In S. Koch (Ed.), Psychology:  The study of a science.  Vol. 
3.  Formulations of the person and the social context (pp. 184-256).  New York: McGraw-Hill. 
Rollnick, S. (1998).  Readiness, importance, and confidence: Critical conditions of change in 
treatment.  In W. R. Miller & N. Heather (Eds.), Treating addictive behaviors (2
nd
ed., pp. 49-60).  New 
York: Plenum Press. 
Rollnick, S., Mason, P., & Butler, C.  (in press).  Ready, willing and able: A practitioner's guide 
to behavior change.  Edinburgh: Churchill Livingston. 
Rollnick, S., & Miller, W. R. (1995).  What is motivational interviewing?  Behavioural and 
Cognitive Psychotherapy, 23, 325-334. 
Rose, S.J., Zweben, A., & Stoffel, V. (in press).  Interface between substance abuse treatment and 
other health and social systems. In B. McCrady & E. Epstein (Eds.),  Addiction: A comprehensive 
guidebook for practitioners. New York: Guilford Press.  
Sanchez-Craig, M. (1984). Therapist's manual for secondary prevention of  alcohol problems: 
Procedures for teaching moderate drinking and abstinence. Toronto, Canada: Addiction Research 
Foundation. 
Sanchez-Craig, M., & Lei, H. (1986).  Disadvantages of imposing the goal of abstinence on 
problem drinkers: An empirical study.  British Journal of Addiction, 81, 502-512. 
Saunders, B., Wilkinson, C., & Phillips, M. (1995).  The impact of a brief motivational 
intervention with opiate users attending a methadone program.  Addiction, 90, 415-424. 
Scales, R., Lueker, R., Atterbom, H., Handmaker, N., & Jackson, K.  (1997).  Impact of 
motivational interviewing and skills-based counseling on outcomes of cardiac rehabilitation.  Journal of 
Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation, 17, 328. 
Senft, R. A., Polen, M. R., Freeborn, D. K., & Hollis, J. F. (1997).  Brief intervention in a primary 
care setting for hazardous drinkers.  American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 13, 464-470. 
SDK control service:C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
If using x86, the platform target should be x86. C#.NET Example: Convert One Image to PDF in Visual C# .NET Class. Here, we take Gif image file as an example.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control service:C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. List<PDFImage> allImages = PDFImageHandler. ExtractImages(page); C#: Select An Image from PDF Page by Position.
www.rasteredge.com
Sheeren, M. (1988).  The relationship between relapse and involvement in Alcoholics 
Anonymous.  Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 49, 104-106. 
Sisson, R. W., & Mallams, J. H. (1981).  The use of systematic encouragement and community 
access procedures to increase attendance at Alcoholics Anonymous and Al-Anon meetings.  American 
Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, 8, 371-376. 
Smith, D. E., Heckemeyer, C. M., Kratt, P. P., & Mason, D. A. (1997).  Motivational 
interviewing to improve adherence to a behavioral weight-control program for older obese women with 
NIDDM: A pilot study.  Diabetes Care, 20, 53-54. 
Smith, J. E., Meyers, R. J., & Delaney, H. D. (1998).  The community reinforcement approach 
with homeless alcohol-dependent individuals.  Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 66, 541-
548. 
Snow, M.G., Prochaska, J.O., & Rossi, J.S. (1994).  Processes of change in Alcoholics 
Anonymous: Maintenance factors in long-term sobriety.  Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 55, 362-371. 
Sobell, L. C., & Sobell, M. B. (1992).  Recovery from alcohol problems without treatment.  New 
York: Maxwell MacMillan. 
Stephens, R. S., Roffman, R. A., Cleaveland, B. L., Curtin, L., & Wertz, J. (1994, November).  
Extended versus minimal intervention with marijuana dependent adults.  Paper presented at the annual 
meeting of the Association for Advancement of Behavior Therapy, San Diego, California.   
Tonigan, J. S., Ashcroft, F., & Miller, W. R. (1995).  A.A. group dynamics and 12-Step activity.  
Journal of  Studies on Alcohol, 56, 616-621. 
Trigwell, P., Grant, P. J., & House, A. (1997).  Motivation and glycemic control in diabetes 
mellitus.  Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 43, 307-315. 
Trimpey, J.  (1989).  Rational recovery from alcoholism: The small book.  Lotus, CA: Lotus 
Press. 
Truax, C. B., & Carkhuff, R. R. (1967).  Toward effective counseling and psychotherapy.  
Chicago: Aldine. 
Valle, S. K. (1981).  Interpersonal functioning of alcoholism counselors and treatment outcome.  
Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 42, 783-790. 
Volpicelli, J.R., Alterman, A.I., Hayashida, M., &, O'Brien, C.P. (1992). Naltrexone in the 
treatment of alcohol dependence. Archives of General Psychiatry, 49, 876-880. 
Volpicelli, J.R., Pettinati, H.M., McLellan, A.T., & O'Brien, C. P. (in press). BRENDA manual: 
A biopsychosocial intervention for treating alcohol and drug dependence. New York: Guilford Press. 
Volpicelli, J.R., Rhines, K.C., Rhines, J.S.,Volpicelli, L.A., Alterman, A.I., & O.Brien, C.P. 
(1997).  Naltrexone and alcohol dependence: Role of subject compliance. Archives of General Psychiatry, 
54, 737-742. 
SDK control service:C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Image to PDF Page in C#.NET. How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Add Image to PDF Page Using C#.NET.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control service:VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
C#: Convert PDF to HTML; C#: Convert PDF to Jpeg; C# C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into
www.rasteredge.com
Woollard, J., Beilin, L., Lord, T., Puddey, I., MacAdam, D., & Rouse, I. (1995).  A controlled 
trial of nurse counseling on lifestyle change for hypertensives treated in general practice: Preliminary 
results.  Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology, 22, 466-468. 
Zweben, A. (1991).  Motivational counseling with alcoholic couples. In W.R. Miller & S. 
Rollnick (Eds.),  Motivational interviewing: Preparing people to change addictive behavior (pp. 225-
235). New York: Guilford Press. 
Zweben, A., & Barrett, D. (1997).  Facilitating compliance in alcoholism treatment. In B. 
Blackwell (Ed.),  Compliance and treatment alliance in serious mental illness (pp. 277-293). Newark: 
Gordon & Breach Publishing Group.   
Zweben, A., Bonner, M., Chaim, G., & Santon, P. (1988). Facilitative strategies for retaining the 
alcohol dependent in outpatient treatment. Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly, 5, 3-24. 
SDK control service:VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET. Support PDF VB.NET : Select An Image from PDF Page by Position. Sample for
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control service:C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
NET. .NET library to batch convert PDF files to jpg image files. High quality jpeg file can be exported from PDF in .NET framework.
www.rasteredge.com
Appendix A 
Personal Feedback Report 
PERSONAL FEEDBACK REPORT 
1.  Alcohol Use 
YOUR DRINKING 
Number of standard “drinks” per week:   
______ drinks 
Your drinking relative to American adults (same sex):   
______ percentile 
LEVEL OF INTOXICATION 
Estimated blood alcohol concentration (BAC) level  
on the day you drank the largest amount of alcohol: 
_______ mg%  
ALCOHOL TOLERANCE LEVEL 
Low  
(0-60) 
Medium  
(61-120) 
High  
(121-180) 
Very High 
(181+) 
ALCOHOL DEPENDENCE LEVEL 
2.  Other Drug Use 
Percentiles 
(US Adults) 
Tobacco/         Marijuana/        Stimulants/      Cocaine 
Opiates 
Nicotine           Cannabis        Amphetamines 
SDK control service:VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
VB.NET code to add an image to the inputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control service:VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Extract highlighted text out of PDF document. Image text extraction control provides text extraction from PDF images and image files.
www.rasteredge.com
2
3.  Consequences 
Men   
Women 
17-24
23-30
23-24
17-36
16-21
86-135
10
17-24
22-30
23-24
15-36
14-21
81-135
15-16
20-22
21-22
14-16
14-15
75-85
9
14-16
18-21
22
12-14
12-13
68-80
13-14
18-19
19-20
12-13
12-13
68-74
8
13
15-17
20-21
11
10-11
61-67
12
15-17
18
10-11
10-11
60-67
7
High
11-12
13-14
18-19
9-10
9
53-60
10-11
13-14
16-17
9
9
53-59
6
10
11-12
15-17
8
8
48-52
9
11-12
14-15
8
8
46-52
5
Medium
9
9-10
14
6-7
6-7
41-47
7-8
9-10
12-13
7
6-7
39-45
4
7-8
8
12-13
5
5
36-40
6
7-8
10-11
6
5
32-38
3
Low
6
6-7
10-11
4
3-4
29-35
4-5
5-6
7-9
4-5
3-4
24-31
2
4-5
3-5
7-9
3
2
22-28
0-3
0-4
0-6
0-3
0-2
0-23
1
0-3
0-2
0-6
0-2
1
0-21
Ph            Re           Pe          Im           Sr          Tot 
Ph          Re          Pe           Im           Sr          Tot 
Ph     
Physical consequences 
Im    
Impulsive actions 
Re     
Relationship (interpersonal) consequences 
Sr     
Social responsibilities 
Pe     
Intrapersonal (emotional, self-esteem, etc.) consequences 
Tot   
Total negative consequences 
4.  Desired Effects of Drinking
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
Always
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
Frequently
Sometimes
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Never
Mental          Positive           Relief             Social         Drug            Assertion          Sexual          Negative          Self 
 Feelings          
Effects                                                                             Feelings      Concept
3
5.  Preparation for Change in Drinking
Very Ready  
Support for   
High 
Low 
for Change   
Abstinence   
Confidence 
Temptation 
10
1
10
1
9
2
8
3
7
4
6
5
5
6
4
7
3
8
2
9
10 
1
10
Not Ready   
Support for        
Low 
High 
For Change    
Drinking 
Confidence 
Temptation 
6.  Mood States
16-20
14-20
13-20
18-20
16-20
13-20
13-15
12-13
11-12
16-17
13-15
11-12
10-12
9-11
9-10
14-15
10-12
9-10
6-9
6-8
6-8
11-13
7-9
7-8
5
4-5
4-5
8-10
5-6
5-6
4
3
3
7
4
4
3
2
2
5-6
3
3
2
3-4
2
2
1
1
1
1-2
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
Tension 
Depression   
Anger                        Vigor 
Fatigue 
Confusion 
7.  Blood Tests
Your 
Score
Your 
Score
Your 
Score
M:  10-45 
F:   10-36
Normal
Range
M:  6-48 
F:   6-37 
Normal
Range
M:   7-74 
F:    5-49
Normal
Range
M: 79-97 
F:   79-98
AST (SGOT)                           ALT (SGPT) 
GGT (GGTP) 
MCV 
Appendix B 
Instructions for Preparing the Personal Feedback Report 
Prior to your second session with a CBI client, complete the Personal Feedback Report (PFR) by obtaining 
the pertinent data from the client's research file.  We recommend that this be done by the CBI therapist, although at 
some sites it may be preferable to have the PFR prepared by a research assistant.  Consult your Project Coordinator 
for proper procedures at your site, to ensure that the PFR is completed correctly and in time for your second CBI 
session. 
In order to complete the PFR you will need access to the following information from the client's file: 
Form 90-AIR (which incorporates Hours of Drinking) 
Number of alcohol dependence symptoms (of 7) met  
DrInC questionnaire (scored) 
Desired Effects of Drinking questionnaire (Form G, completed during the first CBI session) 
URICA scale (scored) 
Profile of Mood States (POMS, scored) 
Serum chemistry profile 
You will also need to be familiar with BACCuS, the IBM-PC software program for converting alcohol consumption 
data into standardized measures (Markham, Miller, & Arciniega, 1993). 
Procedures for Completing the PFR 
Section 1.  Alcohol Use 
The first piece of information to be presented to the client is the average number of standard drinks 
consumed during a week of drinking.  This figure is computed from Form 90-AIR, the interview protocol for 
quantifying alcohol consumption.  The calculation is based on the 90 days preceding the most recent drink (not on 
the entire period covered by the Form 90-AIR, which may include a period of abstinence prior to the interview.)  
Use figures computed by the Form 90-AIR software provided by the Coordinating Center.  (Until software is 
provided by the CC, these computations from Form 90 will need to be done by hand.)  Two figures are considered, 
of which the higher of the two is the number entered on the first line of Section 1 of the PFR.  The two numbers are: 
The number of standard drinks per week as reported on the Steady Pattern chart    and 
The average number of standard drinks per week during the 90-day period. 
In some cases the Steady Pattern chart will not have been completed, and in this case the 90-day average will be the 
figure to use.  Once you have determined the client's number of standard drinks per week, use the following chart to 
obtain the client's percentile among American adults.  Note that there are separate norms for men and women.  
Enter the percentile figure for the client’s gender on the percentile line of Section 1 of the PFR. 
The third figure for Section 1 is an estimate of the client’s peak blood alcohol concentration (BAC) during 
the 90-day baseline prior to last drink.  This is estimated from the Hours of Drinking section of Form 90-AIR.  
Using the BAC calculation program, enter the number of standard drinks consumed and the number of hours of 
drinking to estimate peak BAC.  For two or more calculations, use the highest BAC estimate.  If the estimate is 
higher than 700 mg%, however, doublecheck your figures, and if correct, enter 700 (never higher) as the estimated 
value in Section 1. 
ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION NORMS FOR U.S. ADULTS 
DRINKS PER  
Men  
Women 
WEEK 
0 (Abstainers)   
28%   
43% 
54%  
77% 
61%  
83% 
68%  
88% 
71%  
90% 
73%  
92% 
76%  
93% 
77%  
94% 
79%    
95% 
80%    
96% 
10 
82%    
97% 
11 
84%    
97% 
12 
85%    
98% 
13 
86%    
98% 
14 
87%    
98% 
15  
88%  
98% 
16-17   
89%    
98% 
18-19   
90%    
99% 
20-21   
91%    
99% 
22-23   
92%    
99% 
24-26   
93%  
99% 
27-30   
94%    
99% 
31-36   
95%   
99% 
37-42   
96%   
99% 
43-49   
97%    
99% 
50-59   
98%    
99% 
60+   
99%    
99% 
Source: 1995 National Alcohol Survey of 4,925 households.  Alcohol Research Group, Berkeley, California. 
Courtesy of Dr. Thomas K. Greenfield. 
One standard drink = 0.5 oz (15 ml) of absolute ethanol (Miller, Heather, & Hall, 1991) 
To complete Section 1, mark the Tolerance Level box according to the level of intoxication above.  For 
example, if BAC was 145 mg%, you would circle “High.”  Then enter the number of DSM-IV symptoms of alcohol 
dependence that the client met during intake assessment.  The maximum possible score is 7. 
Section 2.  Other Drug Use 
This information is also obtained from the Form 90-AIR.  The critical information is the number of days of 
use during the 90-day baseline window for each of the five drug classes shown.  Use the following table to 
determine the percentile for U.S. adults for each of the drug classes. 
Tobacco 
Men   
Women 
No use 
Any use 
69   
72 
Pack (20 cigarettes) or more/day 
85   
89 
Marijuana 
Use the total days of use in this 90-day period 
Days Use   
Men   
Women 
1-2   
93   
96 
3-11   
94   
97 
12-50  
96   
99 
51 or more   
99   
99.5 
Stimulants/Uppers 
Men   
Women 
No illicit use 
Any illicit use 
99.1   
99.5 
Cocaine 
Days Use   
Men   
Women 
No use 
Any use 
99.1   
99.7 
If Crack: 
Men   
Women 
No use 
Any use 
99.5   
99.8 
Opiates 
Men   
Women 
No illicit use 
Any illicit use 
99.5   
99.8 
Source: NIDA National Household Survey on Drug Abuse 1997. 
For adults 18 and over. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested