Section 3.  Consequences 
Score the DrInC-2R and record the client’s raw scores in the boxes at the bottom of the chart on page 2 of 
the PFR.  Use the norms shown on the PFR to determine the client’s decile for each of the five subscales and the 
total score.  Within each scale, circle the range in which the client’s score falls.  Be sure to use the correct side (men 
or women) of the profile. 
Section 4.  Desired Effects of Drinking 
Score the Desired Effects of Drinking questionnaire using the key below.  Each item can contribute up to 
three points to the subscale score, and each subscale contains four items, for a maximum possible score of 12 on 
each subscale.  Then on the PFR circle the total score for each of the nine subscales.   
Desired Effects of Drinking Key 
Scale 
Items 
Totals 
Assertion 
16 
25 
34 
Drug Effects 
15 
24 
33 
Mental 
11 
20 
29 
Negative Feelings 
18 
27 
36 
Positive Feelings 
12 
21  
30 
Relief 
13 
22 
31 
Self Esteem 
10 
19 
28 
37 
SE 
Sexual Enhancement 
17 
26 
35 
SF 
Social Facilitation 
14 
23 
32  
Total Score 
Tracy L. Simpson, Ph.D., Judith A. Arroyo, Ph.D., William R. Miller, Ph.D., and Laura M. Little, Ph.D. 
Convert pdf image to text - software Library dll:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf image to text - software Library dll:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
Section 5.  Preparation for Change in Drinking 
The Readiness score is obtained from the URICA scale.  Use the norms below to determine the client’s 
decile, and circle it. 
The Support score reflects the degree of Support for Drinking, and is obtained from the Important People 
interview.  Use the norms below to determine the client’s decile, and circle it.  
The Confidence score is obtained from the Alcohol Abstinence Self-Efficacy (Confidence) scale.  Use the 
norms below to determine the client’s decile, and circle it. 
The Temptation score is obtained from the Alcohol Abstinence Self-Efficacy (Temptation) scale.  Use the 
norms below to determine the client’s decile, and circle it. 
Decile
URICA  
Readiness
IP 
Support for Drinking
AASE  
Confidence
AASE  
Temptation
Decile
10
12.9 or higher
66.8 - 100%
4.4 or higher
4.0 or higher
10
9
12.3 - 12.8
58.4 - 66.7 %
3.9 - 4.3
3.7 - 3.9
9
8
11.7 - 12.2
50.1 - 58.3%
3.5 - 3.8
3.5 - 3.6
8
7
11.3 - 11.6
41.8 - 50.0%
3.3 - 3.4
3.2 - 3.4
7
6
10.7 - 11.2
37.6% - 41.7%
3.0 - 3.2
3.0 - 3.1
6
5
10.3 - 10.6
33.4 - 37.5%
2.8 - 2.9
2.8 - 2.9
5
4
9.9 - 10.2
25.1 - 33.3%
2.6 - 2.7
2.4 - 2.7
4
3
9.4 - 9.8
16.8% - 25.0%
2.3 - 2.5
2.0 - 2.3
3
2
8.9 - 9.3
8.4% - 16.7%
1.9 - 2.2
1.6 - 1.9
2
1
8.8 or lower
0 - 8.3%
1.8 or lower
1.5 or lower
1
Section 6.  Mood States 
Score the Profile of Mood States (Short Form - 30 items) using the publisher’s profile form.  Enter the 
client’s raw score for each of the six subscales, entering the score in the appropriate box. 
Section 7.  Blood Tests 
Obtain the client's serum chemistry scores on AST (SGOT), ALT (SGPT), GGTP, and MCV from the lab 
report.  Record these lab scores in the corresponding boxes of the PFR.  Interpretive ranges shown in the lower 
boxes should be the lab normal values for the laboratory performing the assays (to be filled in at local site). 
software Library dll:C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
www.rasteredge.com
software Library dll:C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document.
www.rasteredge.com
Appendix C 
CBI Therapist Guidelines for Presenting the Personal Feedback Report 
This information is to help you in interpreting the Personal Feedback Report to your clients.  Following the 
general motivational counseling style described in this manual, your task is to provide a clear explanation of the 
client's feedback in understandable language.  
Give the original copy of the PFR to your client (and significant other), and retain a copy for your file.  The 
PFR consists of three pages of data from interviews and questionnaires.  When you have finished presenting the 
feedback, the client may take home the PFR plus a copy of "Understanding Your Personal Feedback Report."  If 
you end a session partway through the feedback process, however, you should retain the original PFR, sending it 
home with the client only after you have completed your review of feedback at the next session.  
Be thoroughly familiar with each of the scales included on the PFR.  "Understanding Your Personal 
Feedback Report" provides basic information for your client.  Here are some additional points that may be helpful 
to you in reviewing the PFR with clients. 
1. Alcohol Consumption 
Standard Drinks per Week.  The idea of a "standard drink" is an important concept here.  Explain that all 
alcohol beverages - beer, wine, spirits - contain the same kind of alcohol, ethyl alcohol.  They just contain different 
amounts of this drug.   We are using, as a "standard drink," any beverage which contains half an ounce of ethyl 
alcohol.  Thus, the following beverages are each equal to one standard drink: 
Beverage 
Usual % 
Ounces   =  Alcohol Content 
Beer   
.05   
10 oz    =  0.5 oz  
Table Wine 
.12   
4 oz    
=      0.5 oz 
Fortified Wine     
.20   
2.5 oz    =  0.5 oz 
Spirits 
80 proof 
.40   
1.25 oz   =  0.5 oz 
100 proof  
.50    X  1 oz   
0.5 oz 
Explain that the average number of standard drinks per week was calculated from the client's own report of drinking 
in the pretreatment interviews, and was converted into standard units.  The normative table (in Appendix A) 
provides an estimate of the client's standing among American adults of the same sex, with regard to alcohol 
consumption.  The conversion table provides percentile levels for various numbers of standard drinks per week, 
based on U.S. household survey data.  A good explanation of this percentile figure is that, "This means you drink 
more than _____% percent of American [men/women] do, or that (100-X )% of American [men/women] drink as 
much or more than you do."   
Estimated BAC Peak.  Explain that the number of drinks consumed is only part of the picture.  A certain 
number of drinks will have different effects on people, depending on factors like their weight and gender.  The 
pattern of drinking also makes a difference: Having 21 drinks within 4 hours on a Saturday is different from having 
21 drinks over the course of a week (3 a day).  Another way to look at a person's drinking, then, is to estimate how 
intoxicated he or she becomes during periods of drinking.  Be clear here that you are discussing "intoxicated" in 
terms of the level of alcohol (a toxin) in the body, and not the person's subjective sense of being drunk.  It is 
common for alcohol dependent people to be quite intoxicated (high BAC) but not look or feel impaired.  The peak 
intoxication level is one reflection of the person’s tolerance for alcohol. 
software Library dll:VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Image. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document in VB.NET Project.
www.rasteredge.com
software Library dll:C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Free PDF image processing SDK library for Visual Studio .NET program. Powerful .NET PDF image edit control, enable users to insert vector images to PDF file.
www.rasteredge.com
The unit used here is milligrams of alcohol per 100 ml of blood, abbreviated "mg%."  This is the unit 
commonly used by pharmacologists, and has the additional convenience of being a whole number rather than a 
decimal (less confusing for some clients).  If you or your client wish to compare this with the usual decimal 
expressions of BAC, simply move the decimal point three places to the left.  Thus: 
80 mg%   =  .08 
100 mg%  =  .10 
256 mg%  =  .256 
and so on 
Note that the "normal social drinking" range is defined as from 20-60 mg% in peak intoxication.  In fact, 
the vast majority of American drinkers do not exceed 60 mg% when drinking.  Although 500 mg% is a lethal dose 
of alcohol for most adults, some alcohol dependent clients have been known to survive much higher levels, with 
some even continuing to drink and drive at 700 mg%.  We have used 700 mg% as a cut-off for estimates, even 
though somewhat higher levels can be survived. 
The behavioral effects as shown in "Understanding Your Personal Feedback Form" can be understood as 
the ordinary effects of various BAC levels.  Because of tolerance, people may reach these BAC levels without 
feeling or showing the specific effects listed.  The presence of a high BAC level, especially if accompanied by a 
reported absence of apparent or subjective intoxication signs, is an indication of alcohol tolerance.   
Tolerance.  Discuss tolerance with your client as a risk factor.  This is counterintuitive for many clients, 
who believe that an apparent absence of subjective impairment means that the person is in less rather than more 
danger.  In fact, people with a high tolerance for alcohol have a greater risk of being harmed and developing serious 
problems from drinking.  Tolerance level here is estimated from the maximum BAC level reached by the client 
during the pre-treatment assessment period.  A few points to cover (in language appropriate for your client) are: 
1. Tolerance is partly inherited, partly learned.   
2. For the most part, tolerance does not mean being able to get rid of alcohol at a faster rate (although this occurs 
to a small extent).  Rather it means reaching high levels of alcohol in the body without feeling or showing the 
normal effects. 
3. Normal drinkers are sensitive to low  doses of alcohol.  They feel the effects of 1-2 drinks, and this tells them 
they have had enough.  Other people seem to lack this warning system. 
4. One result of tolerance is that the person tends to take in large quantities of alcohol - enough to damage the 
brain and other organs of the body over time - without realizing it.  Thus the drinker is harmed but does not 
“feel” it, creating a false sense of safety or impunity.  An analogy would be a person who loses all pain 
sensation.  While at first this might seem a blessing, in fact it is a curse, because such a person can be severely 
injured without feeling it.  The first sign that your hand is on a hot stove is the smell of the smoke.  Similarly, for 
tolerant drinkers, the first signs of intoxication are not felt until rather high BAC levels are reached. 
Alcohol Dependence Level.  Explain the concept of alcohol dependence to your client.  Many will be 
familiar with physical withdrawal signs, and may equate these with dependence.  In fact, dependence is much 
broader than physical withdrawal, and involves alcohol progressively dominating more and more of the person’s 
life.  A few points to cover (in language appropriate for your client) are: 
1.  Dependence is not limited to physical withdrawal, but is a behavioral pattern in which drinking becomes 
increasingly central and important in one’s life. 
2.  Dependence occurs gradually, and many people do not realize it is happening. 
software Library dll:VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Extract highlighted text out of PDF document. Image text extraction control provides text extraction from PDF images and image files.
www.rasteredge.com
software Library dll:C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Image text extraction control provides text extraction from PDF images and image files. Enable extracting PDF text to another PDF file, TXT and SVG formats.
www.rasteredge.com
3.  It is not an all-or-none thing; dependence varies in severity. 
4.  There are seven signs of dependence on any drug.  The current standard, to make a diagnosis of alcohol 
dependence, is meeting at least three of these.  You had _____ out of 7 signs. [If appropriate, it is okay to review 
the symptoms, which briefly stated are: 
1.  Tolerance 
2.  Withdrawal (physiological dependence) 
3.  Using (drinking) more or longer than intended 
4.  Persistent desire or failed efforts to cut down or quit 
5.  Much time spent in obtaining, using, and recovering from the drug 
6.  Giving up important social, occupational, or recreational activities 
7.  Continued use despite persistent problems 
5. Your assessment report will contain the specific symptoms of dependence which are positive for your 
client, although the format varies across sites.  You should not give this information to your client;  it 
is provided for your information only. 
2.  Other Drug Use 
Here the client’s personal use of drugs in several categories is being compared with national norms, as 
established by the household survey of the National Institute on Drug Abuse.  The survey is conducted quite 
carefully, with full confidentiality, and proper measures are taken to sample households representatively (e.g., not 
only those with telephones).   
Explain what the percentile (%) scores mean that have been written on this first sheet.  A 95 in this column, 
for example, means that the client’s use of this drug is greater than 95 out of 100 American adults (over the age of 
12).  Said another way, fewer than 5% of adults use this drug as much as the client does. 
These numbers will often seem quite high to a client.  The reason is that the vast majority of U.S. adults do 
not use these drugs at all, a fact that is often surprising to clients whose social circle is comprised primarily of users. 
3.  Consequences 
The client’s recent negative consequences of drinking (as scored from the DrInC-2R) are shown on page 2 
of the PFR.  The client’s raw scores for the total scale and for five specific subscales are printed in the boxes at the 
bottom of the profile form (note that there are separate norms for men and women).  These same raw scores are 
circled in the column corresponding to each scale, to show the client’s elevation relative to individuals currently 
seeking treatment for alcohol dependence.  Be sure to point out that the normative reference group has changed 
from page 1, where drinking and drug use were being compared with the general population.  Here a “low” score is 
low relative to people entering treatment for alcohol dependence, which may still be a rather high score in the 
general population.  (This is the only normative base currently available, and comes from Project MATCH.)  
Explain that this shows the extent to which the client has experienced negative consequences (problems) 
related to his or her drug use, in comparison with people who are being treated for such problems.   
Here is some basic information to help you interpret the subscales.  This information is also on the client’s 
form, Understanding Your Personal Feedback Report. 
Physical 
This score reflects unpleasant physical effects of alcohol use such as hangovers, sleeping problems, 
and sickness; harm to health, appearance, eating habits, and sexuality; and injury while drinking 
software Library dll:VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
VB.NET code to add an image to the inputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
www.rasteredge.com
software Library dll:C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
NET. .NET library to batch convert PDF files to jpg image files. High quality jpeg file can be exported from PDF in .NET framework.
www.rasteredge.com
Interpersonal  These are personal, private negative effects such as feeling bad, unhappy or guilty because of 
drinking; experiencing a personality change for the worse; interfering with personal growth, 
spiritual/moral life, interests and activities, or having the kind of life that you want. 
Social 
These are negative consequences more easily seen by others.  They include 
Responsibility work/school problems (missing days, poor quality of work, being fired or suspended), spending 
too much money, getting into trouble, and failing to meet others’ expectations. 
Interpersonal  These are negative effects of drinking on important relationships.  Examples are damage to or 
the loss of a friendship or love relationship; harm to family or parenting abilities; concern about 
drinking expressed by family or friends; damage to reputation; and cruel or embarrassing actions 
while drinking. 
Impulse 
This is a group of other negative consequences of drinking that have to do with  
Control 
self-control.  These include: overeating, increased use of other drugs, impulsive actions and risk-
taking, physical fights, driving and accidents after drinking, arrests and trouble with the law, and 
causing injury to others or damage to property. 
4.  Reasons for Drinking 
A fourth general domain of interest is your client’s stated reasons (motivations) for drinking.  These are 
derived from the Desired Effects of Drinking questionnaire, which you administered in Session 1.   Simply circle 
the client’s total score for each of the subscales.  Feedback here is not normed, but reflects the absolute level of 
each reported reason for drinking.  The nine scales are: 
Mental  
to feel more creative or mentally alert; to think, work or concentrate better 
Positive Feelings  to change mood or feel good, to relax or celebrate 
Relief   
to relieve tension, forget problems, avoid painful memories 
Social Facilitation to be sociable and comfortable in social situations, to meet and enjoy people 
Drug Effects 
to get drunk, get over a hangover, to sleep, or stop shakes or tremors 
Assertion 
to feel more powerful or courageous, to express anger 
Sexual Enhancement  to feel more romantic and sexually excited, enjoy sex more, be a better lover 
Negative Feelings to feel less depressed, angry, ashamed, or fearful 
Self-Esteem    to feel better about oneself, less guilty, disappointed, or angry with oneself 
5.  Preparation for Change in Drinking 
This section contains four different variables that may be important indicators of how prepared your client 
is for change in drinking.  Low scores on these four scales reflect potential obstacles to change. 
Readiness.  The first of these is the client’s self-reported level of readiness for change, a summary index scored 
from the URICA by adding together the contemplation, preparation, and action items and subtracting the 
precontemplation items.  The decile norms here are from Project MATCH, and compare your client’s readiness 
score with those from clients entering treatment for alcohol dependence.  High scores indicate high self-reported 
readiness for change. 
Support.  What is being measured here (from the IP interview) is the degree to which your client’s social 
network supports continued drinking.  Note that the deciles are inverted here, with 10 at the bottom.  Vertically 
low scores (higher deciles) suggest a potential obstacle to change: namely, that the client’s social network favors 
continued drinking.  Vertically high scores (lower deciles) reflect low social support for continued drinking. 
Confidence.  High scores here reflect a high degree of confidence (self-efficacy) to abstain from drinking.  
Clients with low scores are not reporting much confidence in their ability to abstain. 
Temptation.  This scale, like Support, is also inverted, with high deciles at the bottom.  Clients with vertically 
low scores (higher deciles) are reporting a lot of temptation to drink in their social environment.  Clients with 
vertically high scores (lower deciles) report low levels of temptation to drink. 
Remember that vertically low scores on all these scales represent potential obstacles to change.  Vertically high 
scores on all these scales represent preparation for change. 
6.  Mood States 
This section reflects your client’s mood state during the week before pretreatment evaluation.  These mood 
states fluctuate widely, and thus the scores may or may not represent the client’s mood at the time of your feedback 
session.  The scale names are fairly good descriptors of the adjectives contained in each factor.  Norms here are 
based on U.S. adults. 
7.  Blood Tests 
These four serum assays can be elevated by excessive drinking, and thereby reflect in part the physical 
impact of alcohol on the body.  It is noteworthy that many heavy and problematic drinkers have normal scores on 
these assays.  The physical damage reflected by elevations on these scales may emerge much later than other types 
of problems.  Also, normal scores on these tests cannot be interpreted as the absence of physical damage from 
drinking.  The destruction of liver cells near the portal vein where blood enters, for example, can occur well before 
liver enzymes reflect a warning.  When these scales are elevated, then, it is information to be taken seriously.   
Be sure to clarify that, as a nonmedical professional, you are not qualified to interpret these findings in 
detail.  The medical staff will review elevations with your client, if they have not already done so.  Clients who are 
concerned and want more information should be advised to discuss their results with medical staff (such as the MM 
practitioner).  
The following information will help you explain to clients the basic processes underlying these assays, and 
what they may mean: 
AST and ALT.  AST (aspartate animotransferase, previously called SGOT) and ALT (alanine transferase; 
previously called SGPT) are enzymes that reflect the overall health of the liver.  The liver is important in 
metabolism of food and energy, and also filters and neutralizes poisons and impurities from the blood.  (The 
analogy to an oil filer is helpful for some.)  When the liver is damaged, as happens from heavy drinking, it becomes 
less efficient in these tasks, and begins to leak enzymes into the bloodstream.  Elevated levels of these enzymes are 
general indicators of compromised liver function. 
GGT.  Serum gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT or GGTP) is an enzyme found in liver, blood, and 
brain, which is more specifically sensitive to alcohol's effects.  If drinking continues, elevations of this enzyme 
predict later serious medical problems related to drinking, including injuries, illnesses, hospitalizations, and deaths.  
This enzyme is often elevated first, with AST and ALT rising into the abnormal range as heavy drinking continues.  
GGT is also sensitive to recent drinking, and an elevation may reflect a recent heavy drinking episode. 
MCV.   This is not a liver function measure, but rather is mean corpuscular volume, the average size of red 
blood cells.  Heavy drinking causes blood cells not to have enough hemoglobin which is necessary to carry oxygen 
around the body and brain.  Trying to make up for less hemoglobin, the blood cells grow larger.  While there are no 
serious immediate consequences of this enlargement, it reflects harmful effects of drinking that in the long run can 
damage circulation and brain cells. 
Elevations on serum test scores can occur for reasons other than heavy drinking.  GGT, for example, can be 
elevated by cancer or hormonal changes.  In this population, however, the most likely cause of an elevation is heavy 
drinking.  These test values tend to return toward normal if the person stops drinking.  Reductions in GGT (by 
changed drinking) have been shown to be associated with substantially reduced risk of serious health problems. 
Appendix D 
Understanding Your Personal Feedback Report 
The Personal Feedback Report summarizes results from your pretreatment evaluation.  Your counselor has 
explained these to you.  This information is to help you understand the written report you have received, and to 
remember what your counselor told you about it.   
Your report consists of three sheets.  They summarize information from interviews, questionnaires, and 
blood tests completed as part of your pretreatment evaluation.  
Section 1: Alcohol Use 
The first line in this section shows the average number of drinks per week that you reported having 
during the months before entering this program.  Because different alcohol beverages vary in their strength, we 
have converted your regular drinking pattern into standard "one drink" units.  In this system, "one drink" is equal to: 
10 ounces of beer  
(5% alcohol)  or 
4 ounces of table wine    
(12% alcohol) 
or 
2.5 ounces of fortified wine (sherry, port, etc.)    (20% alcohol) 
or 
1.25 ounces of 80 proof liquor    
(40% alcohol)   or 
1 ounce of 100 proof liquor  
(50% alcohol) 
All of these drinks contain the same amount of the same kind of alcohol: one-half ounce of pure ethyl alcohol.   
This first piece of information, then, tells you how many of these standard "drinks" you were consuming 
per week of drinking, according to what you reported in your interview.  (If you have not been drinking for a period 
of time recently, this refers to your pattern of drinking before you stopped.) 
To give you an idea of how this compares with the drinking of American adults in general, the second 
number in Section 1 is a percentile figure.  This tells you what percentage of U.S. men (if you are a man) or women 
(if you are a woman) drink less than you reported drinking on average.  If this number were 60, for example, it 
would mean that your drinking is higher than 60% of Americans of your sex (or that 40% drink as much as you 
reported, or more).   
Your total number of drinks per week tells only part of the story.  It is not healthy, for example, to have ten 
drinks per week by saving them all up for Saturday.  Neither is it safe to have even a few drinks and then drive.  
This raises the important question of level of intoxication. 
A second way of looking at your past drinking is to ask what level of intoxication you were reaching.  It is 
possible to estimate the amount of alcohol that would be circulating in your bloodstream, based on the pattern of 
drinking your reported.  Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC) is an important indication of the extent to which 
alcohol would be affecting your body and behavior.  It is used by police and the courts, for example, to determine 
whether a driver is too impaired to operate a motor vehicle. 
To understand better what BAC means, consider this list of common effects of different levels of 
intoxication: 
COMMON EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT 
LEVELS OF INTOXICATION 
20-60 mg% 
This is the "normal" social drinking range.   
NOTE: Driving, even at these levels, is unsafe. 
80 mg% 
Memory, judgment, and perception are impaired.   
Legally intoxicated in some states. 
100 mg% 
Reaction time and coordination of movement are affected.   
Legally intoxicated in all states. 
150 mg% 
Vomiting may occur in normal drinkers; balance is often impaired. 
200 mg% 
A "blackout" may occur, loss of memory for events occurring while intoxicated. 
300 mg%  Unconsciousness in a normal person, though some remain conscious at levels in excess of 600-700mg% 
if tolerance is very high. 
450 mg%  Fatal dose for a normal adult, though some survive much higher levels if alcohol tolerance is substantial. 
The number shown as level of intoxication is a computer-calculated estimate of your highest (peak) BAC 
level during the months preceding your entry to this program.   
It is important to realize that there is no known "safe" level of intoxication when driving or engaging in 
other potentially hazardous activities (such as swimming, boating, hunting, and operating tools or machinery).  
Blood alcohol levels as low as 40-60 mg% can decrease crucial abilities.  More dangerously, the drinker typically 
does not realize that he or she is impaired.  The only safe BAC when driving is zero.  If you must drive after 
drinking, plan to allow enough time for all of the alcohol to be eliminated from your body before driving.  
Section 1 also shows a level of alcohol tolerance based on your BAC peak.  Tolerance refers to the  ability 
to “hold your liquor,” to have alcohol in your bloodstream without showing or feeling the normal signs of 
impairment for that level of intoxication. Some have the impression that a high level of tolerance means that a 
person can drink more safely than others, but in fact the opposite is true.  A person with a high tolerance for alcohol 
simply does not feel or show the level of intoxication, and as a result may expose his or her body to high and 
damaging doses of alcohol without realizing it. 
Finally, in Section 1, is your score for level of alcohol dependence.  Although many people think of 
dependence as having physical withdrawal from alcohol, alcohol dependence is actually much broader.  In fact, one 
can be alcohol dependent without experiencing withdrawal symptoms when drinking is stopped.  Alcohol 
dependence is a pattern of one’s life becoming more centered on drinking.  In essence, drinking (and recovering 
from its effects) gradually dominates more and more of one’s time and life.  There are seven signs of alcohol 
dependence, and the score that is circled here shows how many of these signs you reported.  Three signs are 
required for a diagnosis of alcohol dependence. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested