ARMS EXPORTS AND TRANSFERS: 
FROM Sub-Saharan AFRICA 
TO Sub-Saharan AFRICA
Study realized by Africa Europe Faith and Justice Network - AEFJN
December 2010
AEFJN Arms export and transfers from Sub-Saharan Africa to Sub-Saharan Africa                                                      1/11
Convert pdf to txt batch - Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
convert pdf image to text online; convert pdf file to text online
Convert pdf to txt batch - VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
changing pdf to text; convert pdf to word searchable text
ARMS EXPORTS AND TRANSFERS: Sub-Saharan AFRICA TO Sub-Saharan AFRICA 
ARMS EXPORTS AND TRANSFERS WITHIN AFRICA
Although intra-continental weapons transfers are not well-documented there are 
some general trends that have developed over the years. 
First of all, small arms and light weapons (SALW) are the most commonly used 
weapons in violent conflicts in all African regions East and Southern Africa, as well as 
in the West and Central regions. According to Wezeman, groups such as the Lord’s 
Resistance Army (LRA) in Uganda, various Somali factions across the Horn of Africa, 
and the post-election violence in Kenya are further incited by the omnipresence of 
illegally-trafficked Small Arms and Light Weapons (SALW). 
Secondly, most of these weapons are second-hand and/or refurbished equipment. 
Thirdly, these intra-continental transactions involving SALW are the primary way that 
internationally embargoed areas such as Somalia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, 
and Darfur are able to obtain weapons. 
And lastly, some regions within the continent are developing their own weapons and 
ammunition manufacturing capacities. 
A new characteristic is that some African governments are making payments for 
weapons or military services in kind, such as in mining concessions (in Angola, DR 
Congo, Sierra Leone, etc) or to obtain access to significant natural resources, (in 
Sudan, China gets access to oil in exchange for weapons) or other deals , such as the 
one that took place between South Africa and Uganda in 1997 where arms were 
exchanged for gold bars. 
There have been numerous instances of some countries supplying weapons to both 
sides in the same war. For instance, South African APCs, mine-detection and mine-
protected vehicles are to be seen with both the Khartoum government forces and 
the southern SPLA in the Sudan. The same occurred in Burundi with Pretoria 
supplying both the government and the rebels.
A number of brokers and companies in Africa play a decisive role in the illegal 
transfer of arms, transporting weapons between different countries. 
A number of West African states make a “triangulation”, they buy arms for their own 
use, but they forward it to a third state under embargo. Currently there is very little 
information on the arms transfers from African states to other African states. Though 
the transfers to and from these states is not very important in economic terms, these 
transfers can play an important role in the disruption of regional security and socio-
economic development. 
AEFJN Arms export and transfers from Sub-Saharan Africa to Sub-Saharan Africa                                                      2/11
VB.NET Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in vb.net
Visual Studio .NET project. Batch convert editable & searchable PDF document from TXT formats in VB.NET class. Able to copy and paste
convert scanned pdf to editable text; convert scanned pdf to text online
C# Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in C#.net, ASP
Free .NET library for creating PDF from TXT in both C# C#.NET class source code for creating PDF document from Convert plain text to PDF text with multiple fonts
pdf image to text; convert pdf to openoffice text document
African countries with producing capacity
There is very little information on the main producers and exporters of small arms in 
Africa. Only a few African countries have the capacity to manufacture arms and 
ammunition with South Africa topping the list, followed by Nigeria. but other states, 
like Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania and Zimbabwe are also producers. In Western Africa 
the production capacity is smaller and based on imported technology. Some 
factories of ammunition exist in Burkina Faso, Cameroun, Guinea and RD Congo. A 
small handcraft production takes place in some other states, like Ghana. Even the 
production capabilities of these countries are limited and are based on imported 
technology, machinery and basic components. There is little information on the final 
use of the small arms imported by these states.  The difficulty to get this information 
is due to the fact that most of these states never reported their transfers and 
production to the UN Register, marking always NONE. In 2009 only Burundi and 
Seychelles send their report to the UN register. 
Even though South Africa has an arms industry that produces a range of modern 
military products it remains dependent on imports for most of its military 
equipment. South Africa is the only country in the region that exports substantial 
volumes of arms—it was the 17th largest arms exporter globally in the period 2004–
2008. 
2 Transactions during this period include the supply of a great number of armoured 
vehicles for use in peace operations in Africa, and a variety of weapons to African 
armed forces.
SOUTH AFRICA ARMS EXPORTS 
While South Africa is dependent upon imports for most of its military equipment, it 
also boasts a domestic arms industry that produces a range of modern military 
products. The small arms component of the South African industry comprises less 
than ten manufacturers and their output is insignificant in terms of the global small 
arms trade. South Africa is the only country in Sub-Saharan Africa that exports 
substantial volumes of arms, and it is the biggest exporter of conventional arms 
within the African continent. South Africa was the 17
th
largest arms exporter globally 
in the period from 2004 to 2008, particularly due to its sales contracts with African 
armed forces. For example, in 2006 South Africa exported 4 armored cars to Burkina 
Faso, 8 mine-protected and 47 armored vehicles to Senegal, and 4 mine-protected 
vehicles to Ghana. In 2007, South Africa sold anti-tank missiles to Algeria. 
Table 1.1 shows the value of South African conventional weapons to other countries 
on the continent over the course of 2008 and 2009. Some key transactions to notice 
are the isolated yet relatively massive sales of arms to Sudan in 2008 and to Uganda, 
Kenya, and Senegal in 2009. South Africa is also a key supplier to the North African 
arms race, as exemplified by the large contracts given to Algeria (520.5 million Rand 
AEFJN Arms export and transfers from Sub-Saharan Africa to Sub-Saharan Africa                                                      3/11
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Free PDF creator SDK for Visual Studio .NET. Batch create adobe PDF from multiple forms. Create writable PDF from text (.txt) file.
converting pdf to editable text; best pdf to text
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Best VB.NET component to convert Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint to searchable PDF document. Create writable PDF file from text (.txt) file in
change pdf to text file; convert pdf photo to text
over two years), Egypt (110.8 million Rand), and Tunisia (300 million Rand in 2008 
alone). 
Table 1.1: South African Exports of Conventional Arms 
1 Rand ~ 0.15 USD (October 2010)
Recipient Country
2008 
in millions 
of  Rand
2008
in  millions 
USD
2009
in millions 
of Rand
2009
in  millions 
USD
Algeria
138.3
20.12
382.2
55.59
Angola
4.9
0.71
0.5
0.07
Benin
-
-
0.75
0.11
Botswana
12.5
1.82
30
4.36
Burkina Faso
34.6
5.03
Burundi
15.1
2.20
22.4
3.26
Chad
15.2
2.21
2
0.29
D.R. Congo
-
3.4
0.49
Egypt
58.5
8.51
52.3
7.61
Gabon
5.2
0.76
0.7
0.10
Ghana
45
6.55
25
3.64
Kenya
55.7
8.10
Lesotho
4.2
0.61
4.5
0.65
Madagascar
2.3
0.33
Malawi
14.5
2.11
-
Mauritania
0.6
0.09
Mozambique
0.2
0.03
Namibia
-
5.3
0.77
Niger
7.6
1.11
-
Nigeria
51
7.42
12.9
1.88
Rwanda
4.6
0.67
2.4
0.35
Sudan
64
9.31
Senegal
-
-
85
12.36
Somalia
4.7
0.68
Swaziland
12.5
1.82
AEFJN Arms export and transfers from Sub-Saharan Africa to Sub-Saharan Africa                                                      4/11
VB.NET Image: Robust OCR Recognition SDK for VB.NET, .NET Image
of images and documents. More and more companies are trying to convert printed business Texts will be outputted as searchable PDF, PDF/A,TXT, HTML, XML, E-Book
convert pdf scanned image to text; convert pdf to editable text online
C# Image: How to Add Antique & Vintage Effect to Image, Photo
Place the evaluation license key txt file at your C# I apply the vintage effect to a batch of image powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
convert pdf document to text; c# convert pdf to text file
Recipient Country
2008 
in millions 
of  Rand
2008
in  millions 
USD
2009
in millions 
of Rand
2009
in  millions 
USD
Tanzania
11.2
1.63
9.4
1.37
Tunisia
300
43.64
Uganda
2.1
0.31
169
24.58
Zambia
18.9
2.75
32.1
4.67
The main recipient of South African military equipment in 2009 is Uganda, at a 
moment when the Lord Resistance Army renewed its attacks. 
In 2006 a South African subsidiary of the British company BAE Systems sold Mamba 
armoured personnel carriers to the Ugandan government ahead of the elections.  At 
least 32 such vehicles were sold by the subsidiary, called Land Systems OMC, since 
2002. 
The lack of international controls means that an overseas subsidiary can secure sales 
in military equipment which a UK-based company would not be allowed to do. 
There are allegations that some of the vehicles sold by South Africa to Uganda were 
used to quash demonstrations in Kampala in support of the opposition candidate 
and later on in view of the elections. 
Other African countries with weapons manufacturing capacity
A new development is the emergence of African arms producers. 
Table 1.5: Weapons Manufacturing Capacity in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA)
Countries with Known Weapons Manufacturing Capacity
Central Africa
Unknown Manufacturer on 7.62mm NATO cartridge.
Ethiopia
Ethiopia currently has small military industries. 
Kenya
With assistance from FN Herstal of Belgium (1996), Kenya has 
domestic capacity to produce small arms and ammunition.  The 
bullet factory’s capacity is 20,000-60,000 bullets per day, while 
local consumption is about two million bullets per year. Kenya 
refuses to open up its factories for independent verification of their 
facilities despite ratifying the UN Arms Trade Treaty. The factory 
produces three types of bullets, namely, 9mm ammunition for the 
FN35 Browning pistol and the Sterling, Uzi or H&K MP5 sub-
machine guns used by the armed forces; 7.62x51mm for the FN-
FAL and the G3, the main rifles used by the armed forces; and 
5.56mm ammunition, used by the Kenya police. The factory does 
not have the capacity to manufacture ammunition for the AK-47, 
AEFJN Arms export and transfers from Sub-Saharan Africa to Sub-Saharan Africa                                                      5/11
the most popular assault rifle in the region. 
Nigeria
Nigeria has the domestic capacity to manufacture small arms which 
are similar to the AK-47 and the requisite ammunition. 
Sudan
Built with assistance from the Chinese, Sudan has at least three 
weapons factories outside of Khartoum. There are news that the 
Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC), designated as a terrorist 
organizations, is operating a secret weapons factory in Sudan to 
funnel weapons to terrorist organizations in Africa and the Middle 
East.  
Tanzania
Tanzania has small arms ammunition factories.
Uganda
Uganda also has small arms ammunition factories. It justifies it by 
the long-running war with rebels in the north and hostility with 
Sudan. Uganda refuses to open up its factories for independent 
verification of their facilities despite ratifying the UN Arms Trade 
Treaty. There are three weapons manufacturers in Uganda; the 
largest, Nakasongola Arms Factory, is owned by Chinese 
(government and private sector) interests.
Zimbabwe
Zimbabwe has small arms ammunition factories since the days of 
the Munitions Production Board of the Second World War. 
In 1985 ZANU (PF) government established the Zimbabwe Defence 
Industry (ZDI) which erected two arms production factories with a 
dual status of being both a private company and a state enterprise. 
In 1986 NORINCO of China was awarded the contract to build a 
small arms ammunition factory in Zimbabwe for the ZDI. By 1990, 
only the Explosives Filling Plant, the Small Arms Ammunition 
project were built. In  1987 the French Government offered a 
financial package to the ZDI. 
The illegal transfer of arms from Africa to Africa
In Africa as elsewhere, the illicit trade in small arms and light weapons is opaque, 
amorphous and dynamic. It is also a global enterprise with illicit weapons across 
Africa coming from virtually every major arms producing country in the world.
There are quite a number of examples of “irresponsible” transfers from and to West 
African states. The Revolutionary United Front of Charles Taylor got it s arms via 
Burkina Faso, Niger and Liberia. Though Ivory Coast has been under UN embargo 
since 2004, yet the conflict was fuelled by arms delivered from Liberia to rebel 
groups. RD Congo was under embargo since 2003, but Rwanda has often violated 
this embargo providing arms to rebel groups. Added to that a number of arms traffic 
networks operating from Tanzania, Burundi and DR Congo have been sending arms 
to the different rebel groups. La Somali has been under UN embargo since 2000, yet 
AEFJN Arms export and transfers from Sub-Saharan Africa to Sub-Saharan Africa                                                      6/11
the government of Djibouti has furnished arms and medicines to the Islamic Court 
Union, an opposition group. 
Darfur has been for years under UN embargo but arms have been provided by the 
Chadian government. 
Many countries buy arms mentioning they are for their own use, but later on they 
are directed to a third country under embargo. Chad, Burkina Faso and Guinea have 
done that in different occasions. 
As of 1 October 2010, three francophone States of sub-Saharan Africa are under 
partial or total arms transfers sanctions imposed by regional or international 
organizations: Ivory Coast, DR Congo (UN) and Guinea (Economic Community African 
and Western European Union).
Arms traffickers on other continents fly or ship weapons illicitly into Africa. Most of 
the illicit small arms used in Africa originate from China, Israel, and more than 20 
OSCE (Organisation for Security and Co-operation in Europe) members.  The 
clandestine nature of this trade makes it impossible to know its real value, but it is 
obvious that in Africa the illicit trade in small arms is counter-developmental on 
many levels. 
Governments and armed groups in neighbouring or further states are also significant 
sources of illicit small arms. These governments, e.g. the case of Morocoo, Algeria 
and Libya that 
bought arms that are likely aimed at 
providing material support to one or 
more of the parties to the conflict, in neighbouring countries by transferring illicitly 
large numbers of small arms. Since 2000, UN investigators have documented 
weapons transfers by neighboring governments to armed groups in Somalia, 
Democratic Republic of Congo, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Sudan, all of which were 
under UN arms embargoes at the time of the transfers.
Rebels and other armed groups are another major source of illicit small arms.  Cross-
border arms trafficking by members of armed groups is also common. Rebels often 
cross the poorly secured borders to smuggled weapons and trade them for food, 
vehicles and other consumer goods. According to UN investigators, Somali militias 
regularly buy arms from and sell arms to each other on the local black market. 
There are other ways in which illegal arms enter the market. Small arms are seized or 
stolen from government forces, looted from state armouries, purchased from 
corrupt soldiers and stolen from private owners. Similarly, peacekeepers are 
occasionally relieved of (or voluntarily part with) their small arms, which often end 
up in rebel arsenals. 
As national governments tightly monitor and regulate their African manufacturers, 
very limited numbers of African-manufactured arms and ammunition enter the 
illegal market.
The unauthorized craft production of firearms by local gunsmiths is a significant 
source of illicit small arms in some areas. Their profusion constitute a major problem 
in some countries. A recent study of craft production in Ghana by Emmanuel Kwesi 
Aning found that the country’s unlicensed gunsmiths (more than 400, each capable 
AEFJN Arms export and transfers from Sub-Saharan Africa to Sub-Saharan Africa                                                      7/11
of making up to 80 guns per year) have the collective capacity to produce up to 
200,000 firearms a year, some of which are reportedly “of a quality comparable with 
industrially produced guns”. 
On a small scale, weapons are brought in to different countries by soldiers who have 
served in peacekeeping missions, for example in Liberia or Sierra Leone, and who 
often return home with their weapons to sell them on to combatants and gun 
dealers.
Transfers from African countries to other African countries
Table 1.2: Arms Exports and Transfers: Africa to Africa 
Intra-Continental Arms Exports and Transfers
Libya 
Libya is known to send arms to Sudan, to both the government 
through official sales and to various rebel groups in embargoed areas. 
In 2008, Libya sold one transport aircraft, ammunition for tanks, and 
an unspecified amount of rockets for combat helicopter use to Chad. 
Although these sales are legitimate, Chad and Libya both are known to 
divert officially imported arms to embargoed and conflict zones such 
as Darfur and Eastern Chad, respectively. (see Table 1.3 below)
Sudan
Although there is not much information, there are reports that Sudan 
has exported weapons to Algeria.
Tanzania
Reportedly, Burundi receives shipments of light weapons from 
Tanzania.
South 
Africa 
In 2008 the well-known case of the ship docked in Durban, South 
Africa ready to offload arms shipped from China to Zimbabwe at a time 
when political violence in the country had reached unprecedented 
levels. Human rights activists fearing the arms would be used against 
civilians seen as enemies of the State, worked tirelessly to ensure the 
arms would not find their way into Zimbabwe. A South African judge 
ruled that the cargo of rocket-propelled grenades, mortar rounds and 
ammunition could not be transported overland. 
Zimbabwe
Since 1995, the ZDI has begun to play the role of an arms broker for 
regional purchasers and international arms dealers. The ZDI has sold 
surplus G3 guns and ammunition from the Zimbabwean Defence 
Forces to some United States collectors. Botswana has bought large 
quantities of ammunition and has ordered some military vehicles 
through the ZDI. There have been reports of various Chinese, Israeli 
and French weapons being sold to Angola, Uganda and the Democratic 
Republic of the Congo, the deals being brokered by the ZDI. The ZDI 
hopes that the role of arms broker could well be the answer to their 
AEFJN Arms export and transfers from Sub-Saharan Africa to Sub-Saharan Africa                                                      8/11
hopes of breaking into the international arms market. A recent report 
suggests that the ZDI supplied arms, ammunition, uniforms and other 
military suppliers to Kabila's forces during and after their war to 
overthrow Mobutu.
It is also alleged that the ZDI has acted as a broker 
for arms supplied by countries such as the United States of America 
and South Africa.
Somalia
A report  by Amnesty International (AI) 2010 suggest that unregulated arms supplies 
to the Transitional Federal Government (TFG) in Somalia have found their way into 
the hands of the militant Islamist fighters Al Shabaab. The report accuses Uganda, 
Ethiopia and Yemen of supplying the TFG-outside of the UN regulatory regime which 
imposed an arms embargo on Somalia. The UN Monitoring Group on Somalia has 
reported that since 2006 TFG forces have received arms and ammunition from the 
three neighbouring states having applied for exemptions to the UN arms embargo. 
The problem is that arms supplied are not properly accounted for by the TFG which 
facilitates major diversions of arms or money for arms. TFG lacks the capacity to 
prevent the diversion of substantial quantities of its own weaponry and military 
equipment to other armed groups and to Somalia’s domestic arms markets. 
AI is calling for all countries to suspend arms transfers and financial assistance until 
adequate safeguards are in place to ensure the weapons will not be used by TFG 
forces to commit human right violations, or diverted to other armed groups and 
potentially used against civilians, African Union peacekeepers or TFG forces 
themselves. 
Arms Transfers to Non-State Actors 
Table 1.3: Arms Transfers to Non-State Actors
Arms transfers to rebel groups and other non-state actors
Ogaden  National 
Liberation
Front 
(Ethiopia) 
ONLF rebels: get training and arms from Eritrea, Somalia, 
and Sudan(get weapons flows from arms left over from 
Sudanese civil war)
Sudanese  People’s 
Liberation Army
(Sudan)
With the rise of ethnic violence in the South and the specter 
of renewed civil war with the North, the SPLA is able to 
funnel weapons in from Ethiopia, Eritrea, Uganda, and 
Kenya.
Justice and Equality 
Movement; Sudanese 
Liberation 
Movement/Army 
(Sudan)
These Darfuri rebel receive SALW from Chad, Eritrea, and 
the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya group, all of whom are in breach 
of the UN arms embargo against the Darfur region of 
Sudan.
AEFJN Arms export and transfers from Sub-Saharan Africa to Sub-Saharan Africa                                                      9/11
Lord’s  Resistance 
Army 
(Uganda)
The LRA only uses SALW in its protracted campaign against 
the Ugandan government. These weapons are obtained 
from Kenya and Sudan.
Kenyan
non-
government 
opposition
Illegal arms are brought into Kenya through its porous 
borders with its various Horn and Great Lakes neighbors: 
Uganda, (Southern) Sudan, (South) Ethiopia, and Somalia.
Somali rival factions
Somalia had a weapons embargo put in place by the 
international community in 1992, and although this 
embargo is still in effect, Somali rival factions consistently 
obtain weapons from Ethiopia, Libya, Sudan, Egypt, 
Djibouti, Uganda, and Eritrea.
Nigeria,  the  Niger 
Delta Region
Nigeria has porous borders on both its land and sea edges,
allowing gun smuggling from a variety of countries.  Many 
of these weapons come from war-torn countries in Africa. 
Many of the arms smuggling rings operate out of 
Cameroon, Equatorial Guinea and Nigeria. The smugglers 
use speed-boats to connect to the high seas, and then ferry 
the arms back to shore.
Most of the weapons—such as the Russian AK-47, the 
German G-3, the Belgian FN-FAL, Czech machine guns and 
Serbian rocket-propelled grenades (RPGs)—are supplied
by illegal dealers and sellers, who are paid through the 
proceeds of bunkered (stolen) oil. In October 2006 Chris 
Ndudi Njoku, a Nigerian businessman, specialized in 
importing prohibited firearms into Nigeria, was arrested in 
possession of G-3s, AK-47s and Beretta automatic rifles. 
European dealers are also involved in the trade with their 
Nigerian counterparts. 
Arms to Embargoed Territories
Table 1.4: Arms to Embargoed Territories
Countries that send arms to embargoed territories
Nigeria 
In 2007, Nigeria sent 50 pistols and revolvers to Liberia. There is also 
evidence that arms have been illegally smuggled over the years from 
Nigeria into Benin, Ghana, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Chad, and Niger.
Rwanda
Rwanda has been funnelling weapons in to the Democratic Republic of 
Congo, in flagrant violation to the existing embargo. 
Liberia
Liberia has been known to transfer arms to Sierra Leone during its 
embargo period. 
AEFJN Arms export and transfers from Sub-Saharan Africa to Sub-Saharan Africa 
10/11
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested