mvc display pdf in view : Convert pdf photo to text control application system web page azure winforms console Miller%20-%20Combined%20Behavioral%20Intervention%20Thearpist%20Manual4-part1291

23
Category
Intervention
Limited  social  resources 
(e.g.,  social  isolation, 
homelessness).
If your client has very limited social resources, inclusion of an SSO may not 
be feasible at this time.  Let your client know that while there doesn’t seem to 
be anybody around now, social networks can change and you would like to  
revisit the issue later on.
Logistic hurdles  to  SSO 
involvement 
(e.g., 
transportation 
or 
scheduling difficulties). 
Problems with a potential SSO physically getting to a session because of 
where they live, transportation, or scheduling difficulties often signify that the 
involvement of that SSO will need to be limited.  Their involvement may need 
to be as little as 1 session during the entire course of treatment.  Reinforce the 
idea  that  even  limited  involvement  by  an  SSO  can  be  very  helpful.  
Encourage your client to generate ideas about how to overcome the practical 
limitations and advise the client if you will be able to adjust your schedule to 
accommodate SSO participation (e.g., scheduling alternatives, having the SSO 
plan a special trip for a particular session). 
The client  does  not feel 
his/her social network is 
emotionally supportive.
Reflect the client’s view that the network is unsupportive.  Review the client’s 
Important People questionnaire to identify any people in the network that the 
client previously indicated were generally supportive.   If all evidence points 
to the unsupportiveness of the network, this suggests that an SSO need not be 
selected at this time.  Share with your client that you’ll revisit this issue later 
in treatment.  If it becomes evident that one or more members of the network 
have supported the client in the past, explore with your client specific ways in 
which these people were supportive.  Then talk with your client about having 
these people participate in treatment.    
The  client  believes  a 
potential  SSO  will  be 
reluctant to participate. 
In order to identify if the client’s negative feelings (see below) are really the 
concern, ask the client how he/she would feel about an SSO being there and 
what they think the role of an SSO is.  If the SSO’s reluctance (as perceived 
by the client) remains the problem, explore how the SSO has been supportive 
in the past.  Reframe the act of asking the SSO to participate as giving the 
SSO an opportunity to be supportive in yet another way. It may even be an 
opportunity for the SSO to learn how to be supportive with regard to the 
client’s drinking.  Negotiate with the client around having either the client or 
the therapist ask the SSO to participate.  If the client still is still reluctant, 
explore the risks and advantages of asking the SSO.
The  client  has  negative 
feelings  around  SSO 
participation (e.g., not to 
burden 
people, 
embarrassment, or wants 
to  “make  it”  on  his/her 
own). 
Normalize the client’s feelings and appropriately praise them (e.g., for their 
concern about burdening others; taking responsibility for their problem by 
entering treatment).  Discuss with your client the option of having an SSO 
participate as little or as much as the client wants. This can reduce burden on 
an SSO and increase the client’s sense of control. 
Convert pdf photo to text - software Library dll:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf photo to text - software Library dll:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
24
Do not proceed with the SSO selection process until you have the client’s agreement to have the SSO 
participate in the sessions.  If clients remain resistant to bringing an SSO after exploring in this manner, delay 
further discussion of SSO participation.  Clients who decline to have an SSO participate at this stage must be 
asked again in Phase II.  The clinician should remind themselves to query the patient again in Phase II about 
the possibility of SSO involvement.  The clinician must use the method outlined above to query again in Phase 
II.  If the patient declines again in Phase II, the clinician must query again in Phase III using the outline above. 
To summarize, the clinician should always query patients about SSO involvement in Phase I, optimally 
proceeding to the Important People (IP) questionnaire, which is completed at baseline to provide guidelines for 
the selection and clarification of the role of the SSO.  If the client exhibits resistance to reviewing  the IP form, 
the clinician will use the method outlined above (Involving the SSO in Treatment) for exploring and reflecting 
ambivalence.  At this point, the client may resolve his or her concerns and the clinician may proceed forward 
to using the IP form.  Alternatively, the clinician may decide to delay any further discussion of SSO 
participation to protect the therapeutic alliance and reduce resistance.  If so, the therapist is then obligated to 
query about SSO involvement in Phase II and again in Phase III. 
2.6.b2. Selecting a Supportive Significant Other  (SSO).  Use the Important People (IP) questionnaire, 
which is completed during the baseline assessment, to provide guidelines for the selection of a SSO.  The IP is 
used to identify people who are important to the client, not necessarily those who can fulfill the role of an SSO. 
Within the present context, the IP provides a reference for the therapist to initiate the discussion of selecting a 
SSO from an existing pool of potential candidates. To prevent miscommunication between you and the client, 
a glossary of terms is included (see below). Although they are common terms, for the purpose of SSO 
selection, they are defined as they relate specifically to the requirements of a SSO. 
Glossary of terms:
Sober: 
abstinent or drinks sparingly. 
Supports sobriety: 
will not drink in the company of the client and 
will not suggest or invite the client to drink and 
will not report on their own experiences related to drinking and 
will encourage the client's efforts to achieve stated drinking goals 
Maintains own sobriety: 
is recovering with no episodes of drinking in the last 6 months or 
has never experienced an alcohol use/abuse problem 
A decision tree (see Table 2.6) has been constructed to evaluate potential SSO candidates. The 
decision tree offers the opportunity for the therapist and client to define key requirements, potential barriers, 
and possible solutions for overcoming barriers, which may impact on the ability of a potential SSO to commit 
to this process. It also exposes the client to concrete and organized methods of decision making. It is a tool for 
the client to operationalize the level of support necessary for a SSO to meet the goals and objectives of the 
intervention. 
Prior to meeting with the client, have all necessary forms ready, the Important People form, several 
Supportive People forms (Form ll) in the event there are a number of potential candidates for this role, the 
glossary of terms, and the scoring guidelines. After greeting the client, remind him or her of the purpose of this 
software Library dll:C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
vector images to PDF file. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Ability to put image into
www.rasteredge.com
software Library dll:VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
Once the photo is inserted, its attributes, for As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
www.rasteredge.com
25
procedure, including the importance of selecting an appropriate SSO. Take some time with the client clarifying 
the terminology specific to the role of the SSO.   
Introduce the Supportive People form as a tool used to identify candidates for SSO, to identify 
potential barriers which could inhibit the ability of a selected individual to commit to this role, to identify 
potential solutions to those barriers, and to operationalize the level of support required by the candidate to 
fulfill the SSO role.  
Explore all potential candidates with the client in the event his or her first choice for SSO is unable or 
unavailable to participate. This will diminish the possibility that both the client and the therapist would need to 
dedicate part of another session to this task. Choosing an SSO should be experienced as a way for clients to 
include a person who is important to them and  who can support them in the treatment process, not as a way to 
exclude people whom the client values. 
Ideally, the SSO meets all of the recommended criteria. However, if the ranking falls below any of the 
recommended minimum percentages the therapist can request clarification from the client.  There may be an 
area in which the obstacle can be overcome with help from Project COMBINE staff or the therapist, or a 
combination of all involved. For instance, if transportation is a problem (i.e. available of sessions < 50%), 
perhaps arrangements can be made to alleviate that concern.  If you determine that there are a significant 
number of low ratings on the different criteria, encourage the client to identify another potential candidate for 
screening. Low ratings may represent obstacles for the SSO which may be insurmountable (or require more 
effort than is reasonable), and evaluation of another SSO candidate would be helpful.  If the client is unable to 
identify  another potential candidate it may be useful to postpone involving an SSO, or you may decide to 
invite this person in for no more than three sessions. This would be done with an understanding that the 
selected SSO may be able to fulfill the role within the three sessions or may be asked to continue to participate 
throughout the treatment program.  For more information on the problematic SSO refer to section 2.7.h.  
Decision Tree Criteria for Table 2.6: 
Supportive of Treatment: Questions 1-4 
1. Minimum score=75% 
2. Minimum score=75% 
3. Minimum score=75% 
4. Minimum score=75% 
Supportive of client: Questions 1-5 
1. Minimum score=75% 
2. Maximum score=25% 
3. Minimum score=50% 
4. Minimum score=75% 
5. Minimum score=75% 
Reference: Form ll 
software Library dll:VB.NET Image: Mark Photo, Image & Document with Polygon Annotation
SDK can easily generate polygon annotation on PDF file without using external PDF editing software. For example, if you want to add text annotation on your
www.rasteredge.com
software Library dll:VB.NET Image: Image Resizer Control SDK to Resize Picture & Photo
VB.NET Image & Photo Resizing Overview. The VB.NET image drawing application to draw text & graphics powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
26
Readily available to: Questions 1-3 
1. Minimum score=75% 
2. Minimum score=50% 
3. Minimum score=75% 
Table 2.6   Decision Tree: Selecting a Supportive Significant Other  (Shaded area denotes recommended 
criteria for SSO selection ). 
Supportive of Treatment:
Supports sobriety
Never 
0%
Rarely 
25%
Frequently 
50%
Usually 
75%
Always 
100%
Maintains 
sobriety
Never 
0%
Rarely 
25%
Frequently 
50%
Usually 
75%
Always 
100%
Available for 
sessions
Never 
0%
Rarely 
25%
Frequently 
50%
Usually 
75%
Always 
100%
Supports 
goals
Never 
0%
Rarely 
25%
Frequently 
50%
Usually 
75%
Always 
100%
Supportive of Me:
Listens
Never 
0%
Rarely 
25%
Frequently 
50%
Usually 
75%
Always 
100%
Blames
Always 
100%
Usually 
75%
Frequently 
50%
Rarely 
25%
Never 
0%
Helps
Never 
0% 
Rarely 
25%
Frequently 
50%
Usually 
75%
Always 
100%
Respects
Never 
0%
Rarely 
25%
Frequently 
50%
Usually 
75%
Always 
100%
Knows and 
understands 
Never 
0%
Rarely 
25%
Frequently 
50%
Usually 
75%
Always 
100%
Readily Available to:
Talk with me
Never 
0%
Rarely 
25%
Frequently 
50%
Usually 
75%
Always 
100%
See me
Never 
0%
Rarely 
25%
Frequently 
50%
Usually 
75%
Always 
100%
Be honest with 
me
Never 
0%
Rarely 
25%
Frequently 
50%
Usually 
75%
Always 
100%
The following vignette demonstrates how the IP can be employed in selecting a SSO for CBI 
treatment.  
THERAPIST:   Now that we have discussed what we mean by SSO would you like to review the 
Important People list that you completed last week to determine if anyone on that list 
fits the bill for you or perhaps you have thought about someone else who you would 
like to consider. Let's remember that these guidelines are just that, guidelines. They 
help us to consider what we are asking of this person and that sometimes the people 
who we think will be most helpful simply won't be able to fulfill the role for a variety 
of reasons. For instance, perhaps they live out of the area and would be unable to 
attend the 3-19 sessions or their work schedules would prohibit attending sessions. In 
other words, they are still supportive and will be able to help you in many ways, 
software Library dll:VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
function from following aspects. Key functions of VB.NET image cropper control SDK; VB.NET image cropping method to crop picture / photo;
www.rasteredge.com
software Library dll:VB.NET Image: Image Scaling SDK to Scale Picture / Photo
A 1: Using this VB.NET image scaling control SDK API, developer can only scale one image / picture / photo at a time in .NET class application.
www.rasteredge.com
27
however, this particular role requires some things that may be difficult for them to 
complete. So this helps to make this important decision while recognizing there may 
be many helpful and supportive people but only one or two who can help in this role. 
CLIENT:  
But I really want my spouse to do this. I know this won't be a problem. 
THERAPIST:   You may be right, let's take a look. As I said earlier, there are three qualities we look 
at in the support system. They include someone who is supportive of the treatment you 
are seeking, supportive of you as a person, and someone who is available to you. 
CLIENT:  
I guess I don't understand what you mean. Why can't I just do this on my own or ask 
my spouse to bring me here? 
THERAPIST:   Well let's take a look at the guidelines. Often it really helps us to see the obstacles so 
we can work with them or around them. For instance, being able to get here can be a 
problem for the person you choose. We have identified a potential problem, 
transportation. Solving that problem may, in fact,  help your supportive other feel 
better about helping. Perhaps they will feel more welcome and needed because we 
were able to identify a problem we knew could interfere. Of course, some problems 
with filling this role may be personal and something we couldn't possibly know. 
CLIENT:  
Okay, I think that makes more sense to me. 
THERAPIST:   Good. So according to your Important People list there are five important people you 
have identified. Now, I see that you rated three of them as extremely important. Shall 
we start with those three? 
CLIENT:  
Sure, my wife is on that list. Just like I said. 
THERAPIST:   I see that. So let's see how this guideline works. Your sister is also on the list, 
however, she lives in another state. Obviously, living in a different state makes it 
impossible for her to attend anywhere from 3-19 sessions. However, I think you would 
still want to ask her for support in this important decision to change your drinking. 
CLIENT:  
Absolutely. I was thinking that I could really only have one person be there for me. 
This actually looks like I can ask for other people to help, but maybe one person who 
can do all this stuff with me. 
THERAPIST:   Great! So another person on this list is your brother. 
CLIENT:  
Yeah, I think that he'd be really helpful. He's been trying to get me to stop drinking for 
at least three years. He finally quit but really had a hard time with it. Not that I drink 
like he did, but he really worries about me. 
THERAPIST:   Well, it looks like we are jumping ahead a little bit here, in a good way. As you can 
see on the guide sheet the supportive person should support your sobriety, maintain 
their own sobriety and your goals for treatment. How do you rate your brother on 
these categories? 
software Library dll:VB.NET Image: How to Save Image & Print Image Using VB.NET
is developed to help VB.NET programmers save & print image / photo / picture from ASP Capable of saving and printing multi-page document files, like PDF and Word
www.rasteredge.com
software Library dll:C# Image: How to Add Antique & Vintage Effect to Image, Photo
creating control add-on is widely used in modern photo editors, which We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
www.rasteredge.com
28
CLIENT:  
I'd have to say 110%. Actually, in some ways I think he might be better at this than 
my spouse. Not that I haven't hurt or worried him, but my spouse has really suffered 
with this. Maybe I should think about asking him. 
THERAPIST:   Well, before you make your decision let's complete the list. Remember, you still have 
important people in your life, this particular person should be able to attend 3-19 
sessions  and you should be able to rate them pretty highly on these categories. So do 
you want to continue now or  do you have any questions first? 
CLIENT:  
Let's finish this now. Maybe when we are done I'll have some questions. 
THERAPIST:   Good enough.    
If your client is reluctant to have a SSO attend, follow a motivational interviewing style to encourage 
SSO involvement.  Particularly helpful are open-ended questions followed by reflective listening.  Ask the 
client about specific concerns she or he has about having someone attend the sessions with him/her.   Ask 
about what the benefits and costs are of having a SSO attend the sessions  - e.g., what is the worst and best 
thing that could happen if your (SSO) attends?  Reflect back the unfavorable and favorable responses about 
SSO attendance. For example:  
On the one hand  you are concerned that your (SSO) may end up policing your drinking.  On the other 
hand, having your (SSO) involved might enable you to stay away from alcohol. Would you be willing 
to give it a try at least for a session or two?  
Using the aforementioned motivational techniques can help resolve the client's ambivalence with 
regard to SSO attendance. If the client still refuses, don't push.  Acknowledge the client's autonomy ("Okay, 
that's how you feel for now. It's really your choice"), and indicate that you may come back to the issue (i.e., 
SSO involvement) later on in treatment.  Then do keep trying periodically to encourage the client to involve a 
SSO in treatment. 
If the client agrees to involve a SSO, the simplest way to initiate this is to have the client ask the SSO 
to come.  It might be useful to rehearse how the client would approach and ask the SSO. It is also permissible 
for the client to telephone the SSO from the office during the session. If the client prefers, however, or if the 
client's own invitation does not get the SSO to come on the first try, offer to make the contact.  This requires 
written permission from your client.    
Before the client leaves the session ask him or her to give a letter to the SSO.  Mention that the letter 
defines a role for the SSO, and provides important information on how the SSO can contribute to the 
therapeutic process.  Show the letter to the client and ask if he or she has any specific concerns about it's 
contents.  If the client has serious reservations, postpone handing out the letter until you have had a chance to 
resolve their concerns.  Here is suggested language for the letter: 
Dear [SSO]: 
This letter is to introduce and invite you to participate in a treatment program, in support of [client], 
who believes you could be particularly helpful. I am currently working with [client] in our program, 
which is one of a number of treatment centers in the United States participating in the development of 
state-of-the-art treatment for alcohol problems. This treatment works best when a supportive person 
participates in the treatment sessions.  
[Client] values your help and has named you as a trusted person who could fulfill this important role. 
He (or she) views you as someone who is available and supportive, as well as positive about [his/her] 
software Library dll:C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET convert PDF to SVG. vector image, graphic picture, digital photo, scanned signature remove multiple or all images from PDF document.
www.rasteredge.com
software Library dll:VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images image, graphic picture, digital photo, scanned signature Except PDF text processing function, RasterEdge XDoc.PDF for
www.rasteredge.com
29
seeking treatment for alcohol problems. [His/her] treatment will involve up to 18 further sessions over 
a maximum period of 16 weeks, based on progress towards goals agreed upon at the beginning of 
treatment.  
This letter is to ask whether you would be willing to participate in a supportive role in some of 
[client’s] treatment. We can discuss the amount of your participation, and reach a decision that is 
acceptable to all involved. The treatment sessions last about an hour and are scheduled at everyone¹s 
convenience. They are held at [location]. 
What would be involved?  As we work together, [client] will be developing specific plans for 
change.  If you agree to participate, you could be helpful to [client] by giving encouragement, offering 
helpful ideas, and supporting [his/her] own efforts toward treatment goals.  You would not be on your 
own; We will discuss in session how best you can support [client] toward positive change. 
I hope that you will agree to come to at least one session, to explore how you might support 
[client’s] efforts toward change. If you have any questions, please feel free to call me at the number 
listed above.  Otherwise, [client] can just tell you the date and time of [his/her] next appointment so 
that you may attend. 
Thank you for considering to help in this way. Your support could make a big difference.  
2.6b.3.  Summary of SSO Recruitment Process 
Step One: Clinician initiates involvement of a Supportive Significant Other.  If client agrees, clinician proceeds 
to review of Important People questionnaire (Form LL) and selection of SSO. 
Step Two: If client disagrees, clinician elicits concerns and responds with motivational interviewing style as 
outlined in Involving the SSO in treatment, page 2:22 and in box on 2:23 
Step Three: If client continues to be reluctant to discuss SSO involvement, therapist may delay further 
discussion of this issue, but must query again in Phase II and Phase III. 
2.6c.  Completing Assessment Needed for Phases 1 and 2.  There are three questionnaires that all 
clients need to complete in preparation for the second session and for Phase 2 of treatment.  Allow enough 
time to administer these at the end of the first session, so that you can obtain a few additional scores you will 
need for feedback (PFR) in session 2.  Do not proceed with session 2 until these assessments have been 
completed (about 15-20 minutes needed).  Do not send these questionnaires home with your client.  They must 
be completed in the office, under more standard and controlled conditions.  The three questionnaires are: 
Desired Effects of Drinking Questionnaire 
(used in 3.2b)   
What I Want From Treatment   
(used in 3.5b) 
Client Services Request Form   
(used in 4.3c) 
Begin with a transitional statement such as: 
As I mentioned earlier, there are some you’ll need to 
complete in  preparation for our next session together.  I 
have three questionnaires here that I need you to complete, 
30
and then I’ll tell you briefly about what we’ll be doing next 
time.  You can fill these out right here.  If you have any questions, I’ll 
be [right outside, in the next office, etc.], and let me know when you’re 
done. 
Before moving on, scan the questionnaires to make sure that all items have been completed.   
Client Services Request Form 
Desired Effects of Drinking 
What I Want From Treatment 
2.6d.  Ending the First Session.  Allow at least ten minutes to close the session.  Conclude the first 
session with a summary statement, drawing together all that has happened in it, including self-motivational 
statements offered during the session.  
Then explain what happens in treatment from there on.  Here is an example of what you might say: 
Next time I will be giving you some feedback from the interviews and questionnaires you completed, 
answering any questions you may have about it.  Then we’ll be taking a closer look together at how 
you have used alcohol, and how it has fit into your life thus far.  That will take us a session or two.  
From there we’ll start to think together about where you want to go from here.  We have between 12 
and 20 sessions to work together during the next sixteen weeks.., and you will have a lot to say about 
what we do here during that time.  We’ll work out together an individualized treatment plan that 
makes sense for you, that deals with things that seem important to you.  Again, you are the expert on 
you, and no one else can decide what you are going to do. How does that sound to you?  
2.6e.  Scheduling the Next Session.  Schedule the next session, usually within a few days of the first 
session.  During the first four weeks of treatment it is recommended that sessions be held at least twice weekly 
(permissible range: 1-3 times weekly during the first four weeks in which treatment is delivered).  Thereafter 
sessions will normally be reduced to once weekly (permissible range: 1-2 times weekly during Weeks 5-12).  
The maximum number of CBI sessions with a single client is 20, including any emergency sessions that may 
be used to deal with crises.  
Reference: Form F 
Reference: Form G 
Reference: Form H 
31
2.6f.  Sending a hand-written note.  After the first session, prepare a handwritten note to be mailed to 
the client.  This is not
to be a form letter, but rather a personalized message in your own handwriting.  [If your 
handwriting is illegible, make other arrangements, but the note should be handwritten, not typed.]   
There are several elements that can be included in this note, which are personalized to the individual: 
1.  A "joining message." ["I was glad to see you,” etc.] 
2.  Affirmations of the client. 
3.  A reflection of the seriousness of the problem. 
4.  A brief summary of highlights of the first session, especially self-motivational statements that 
emerged. 
5.  A statement of optimism and hope. 
6.  A reminder of the next session. 
Here is an example of what such a note might say: 
Dear Mr. Robertson: 
This is just a note to say that I'm glad you came in today.  I agree with you that you have some serious 
concerns to work on, and I appreciate how openly you are exploring them.  You are already seeing 
some ways in which you could make a healthy change.  I think that together we will be able to find a 
way through these problems.  I look forward to seeing you again on Tuesday the 24th at 2:00. 
Place a photocopy of this note in the client's clinical file. 
2.6g.  Completing the Session Record Form.  The Session Record Form must be completed for every 
client contact including regular sessions, emergency sessions, telephone contacts, canceled sessions, and no-
show sessions.  Begin the form by entering the client’s case number and printing your own name and therapist 
number. [If for any reason a different therapist assumes responsibility for a case or delivers a session, a new 
Session Record Form must be started.] Also record the 16 week date which is the last possible session date.  
Staple the Session Record Form inside the front cover of the client’s chart.  If one form is filled and a 
continuation page (same form) is required, staple the new form on top of the previous form. 
Log each session on this form at the time of the session.  Do not wait until later to fill in the 
information needed.  Enter one of the following codes in the correct column for each and every client contact 
(including missed sessions and telephone contacts with client or SSO): 
S-___  To indicate that an actual face-to-face treatment session was completed, regardless of its 
length.  Give each completed session a sequential number (S-1, S-2, etc.) 
BA 
Client had positive BAC (>.05), and session was rescheduled. 
32
CA 
To indicate a session that was scheduled but missed because the client canceled  it (whether or 
not it was rescheduled) more than four hours before the time.    (A time stamped answering 
machine message constitutes prior notice.) 
NS 
To indicate a session that was scheduled but missed (no show) because the client failed to 
appear and either gave no notice or gave notice within less than 4 hours of the scheduled time. 
OS 
Face-to-face counseling session with SSO only; client not present. 
TC 
To indicate a telephone contact with the client, regardless of length, and regardless of whether 
initiated by therapist or client.  This code is also used if a telephone contact included both the 
client and the significant other in the same call. 
TH 
Session was canceled by the therapist (e.g., due to illness). 
TS 
To indicate a telephone contact with the significant other but not the client, regardless of 
length, and regardless of whether initiated by therapist or significant other. 
UC 
Unscheduled contact, face to face (e.g., walk-in). 
Record the date of the session (month/day/year) and the time that the session actually began.  The latter is the 
time when you began talking with your client in session, not the time at which you were scheduled to begin.  
When the session is over, enter “time ended” as the actual time when the client left the session, not the time 
when the session had been scheduled to end.  Then use the “time began” and “time ended” values to determine 
the number of minutes that the session lasted (do not round).  For CA and NS codes, enter the date on which 
the session had been scheduled, but do not enter any values for “time began” and “time ended.”  Also indicate 
whether a significant other participated in any portion of the session by checking either “Yes” or “No”.  
(Accompanying the client to a session does not count unless the SSO was present in the treatment room for at 
least part of the time.)  For the TS code, this box will always be marked “Yes.”  Do not check Yes or No for 
missed sessions (CA or NS codes). 
Finally, indicate the correct Phase for the session (I-IV) and which modules you delivered, at least 
partially, during the session by designating the two letter module codes.  These codes are contained on the 
Therapist Checklists. 
2.6h.  Completing the Therapist Session 1 Checklist.  In addition to the Session Record Form which 
you keep throughout the course of treatment, also use the appropriate Therapist Checklist during each and 
every session.  There is a special Therapist Session 1 Checklist to be completed during each client’s first 
session.  The checklist helps you to remember important elements of treatment, and also allows you to 
document whether you have delivered each of them.  (Supervisors and tape raters will use similar forms to 
parallel your own entries.)  Use a check mark [Υ] to indicate each element of treatment that you deliver, 
marking them during the session as you complete them.  When the session has ended, make sure you have 
checked all of the boxes corresponding to procedures that you delivered.  Also note that there is a procedure 
(hand-written note) to be completed after Session 1. 
Reference: Form A 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested