mvc display pdf in view : Converting image pdf to text SDK software API .net wpf windows sharepoint Miller%20-%20Combined%20Behavioral%20Intervention%20Thearpist%20Manual5-part1292

33
2.6i.  Beginning the Second Session.  Normally the second session begins with a brief status check, 
then proceeds with the process of assessment feedback.  The transition from Phase 1 to Phase 2 may or may 
not occur during this session.  If your client does not show readiness to discuss a change plan (Phase 2), don't 
insist on pressing forward during this session.   
Use these two procedures at the beginning of the second and every subsequent session: 
Status Check.  Begin this and each subsequent session with a brief check-in on how the client has been 
since the last session.  Ask an open question (e.g., "How have you been doing since I saw you last?") 
and then follow with reflective listening.  Except in the event of crisis, keep this check-in relatively 
short (< 10 minutes).  Particularly if you are a good listener, it is easy to fall into a pattern of spending 
a significant portion of each session with recent details.  While a certain amount of checking and 
listening is useful to develop and maintain rapport, this has the potential to impede progress in a 
structured treatment like CBI.   
Structuring Statement.  After the status check, begin this and each subsequent session with a brief 
structuring statement to review what has been done thus far and explain what will be happening today.  
Make a gentle transition and then proceed.  A common form of the opening structuring statement is:  
"Last time we . . . ." or "So far we . . . . " (including checking on any homework assignments 
that were given to do between sessions)"       and then 
"Today, we . . . .." 
If it seems warranted, you may spend additional time in motivational interviewing during Session 2, before 
proceeding to assessment feedback. 
2.6j.  Providing Assessment Feedback.  The style of motivational interviewing has been combined 
with personal feedback in a motivational “check-up” format.  Personal feedback with normative comparisons 
can itself alter behavior, and when combined with a motivational interviewing style can substantially decrease 
problem behavior.  The principle is that of developing discrepancy by comparing personal status with 
normative ranges.   
After an initial period of motivational interviewing, Phase 1 proceeds in Session 2 with feedback to the 
client from the pretreatment assessment.  This is done in a structured way, providing clients with a written 
report of their results (Personal Feedback Report, Appendix A).  To initiate this phase, give the client the 
Personal Feedback Report (PFR), retaining a copy for your own reference and the client's file.  Go through the 
PFR step by step, explaining each item of information, pointing out the client's score, and comparing it with 
the normative data provided.  The details of this feedback process are provided in Appendix C. 
A very important part of this process is your own monitoring of and responding to the client during the 
feedback.  Observe the client as you provide the feedback.  Allow time spaces for the client to respond 
verbally.  Ask for reactions to the feedback.  Use reflective listening to reinforce self-motivating statements 
that emerge during this period.  Also respond reflectively to defensive statements, perhaps reframing them or 
embedding them in a double-sided reflection.  Examples: 
CLIENT: Wow!  I'm drinking a lot more than I realized. 
THERAPIST:  It looks awfully high to you. 
CLIENT: I can't believe it.  I don't see how my drinking can be affecting me that much. 
Converting image pdf to text - SDK software API:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Converting image pdf to text - SDK software API:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
34
THERAPIST:  This isn't what you expected to hear. 
CLIENT: No, I don't really drink that much more than other people. 
THERAPIST: So this is confusing to you.  It seems like you drink about the same amount as your 
friends, yet this says you drink a lot more than most people.  You wonder how both can be true. 
CLIENT: More bad news! 
THERAPIST: This is pretty difficult for you to hear. 
CLIENT: This gives me a lot to think about. 
THERAPIST: A lot of reasons to think about making a change. 
Often a client will respond nonverbally, and it is possible also to reflect these reactions.  A sigh, a 
frown, a slow shaking of the head, a whistle, a snort, or tears can communicate a reaction to feedback.  You 
can respond to these with a reflection of the apparent feeling. 
If the client is not volunteering reactions, it is wise to pause periodically during the feedback process 
to ask: 
What do you make of this? 
Does this make sense to you? 
Does this surprise you? 
What do you think about this? 
Do you understand?  Am I being clear here? 
Clients will have questions about their feedback and the instruments on which their results are based.  
For this reason, you need to be quite familiar with the assessment battery and its interpretation.  Some 
additional interpretive information is provided on the PFR and in “Understanding Your Personal Feedback 
Report” (Appendix D), which the client takes home. 
If not completed during the second session, return the client’s PFR to the clinical file so that you are 
sure to have it when you resume feedback in Session 3.  Then at the beginning of Session 3, retrieve the client's 
PFR from the file, give it to the client and resume your review by first giving a summary of feedback that has 
been covered thus far.  Then ask, “Are you ready to go on?" and proceed.   
When you have completed your review of the client's feedback, give the client a copy of the PFR as 
well as a copy of "Understanding Your Personal Feedback Report" (Appendix D).  Explain that the latter 
contains information helpful in remembering what the various scores mean on the PFR, and that he or she is 
welcome to ask more questions about the feedback now or in future sessions. 
2.6k.  Completing Therapist Checklists.  Therapist Checklists are to be used in all sessions throughout 
CBI.  After Session 1 (covered in 2.6h above) there is not a separate checklist for each session.  Instead, 
checklists document procedures that may be delivered across sessions.  Start using the Therapist Checklist for 
Phase 1 Completion during Session 2, and continue to follow it until all Phase 1 procedures have been 
completed.  Then proceed to the Phase 2 checklist and continue to use it until all Phase 2 procedures have been 
completed.  In Phase 3, there is a separate checklist for each module that you and your client select allowing 
you to document the completion of procedures within modules.  It is permissible to be working on two (but 
never more than two) modules at the same time during Phase 3.   
SDK software API:VB.NET PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file
This guide give a series of demo code directly for converting MicroSoft Office which users may quickly render and convert TIFF image file to PDF document.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software API:C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
NET SDK library and components for converting PDF file in convert PDF to various document and image file formats Allow users to convert PDF to Text (TXT) file.
www.rasteredge.com
35
2.6l.  Ending Sessions.  In addition to a standard opening for sessions (see 2.6i), there is also a normal 
procedure for bringing sessions to a close.  About five to ten minutes before your scheduled time is over, signal 
that the session is coming to a close and offer a summary reflection, give an indication of what will happen 
next, and then give the client an opportunity to ask for clarification or add something.  Here is an example: 
Let me go over what we’ve done today, and where we will go from here.  We talked a lot today about 
the reasons why you want to quit drinking, and also some of your concerns about quitting.  I really 
appreciate how honest you have been with me and with yourself in exploring this.  You have really 
enjoyed drinking, particularly up until a few years ago, and it has become a major part of your social 
life.  You can see, though, that in another way it has taken over your life, to the point that it is 
compromising your health and your relationship.  You started drinking in the morning, even though 
you had promised yourself you wouldn’t ever do that, and some of the feedback we discussed worries 
you.  We’re getting to the end of the time we scheduled today, but I’d like to see you again soon 
because you seem really eager to take a next step.  What we’ll do next time, then, is to start sorting out 
what you want to do about your drinking.  There are some things we can do together to figure out what 
might work best for you, and I will certainly want to hear your own ideas on what you want to do.  
How does that sound?  Did I miss anything important? . . . . . .  Is there anything else you’d like to ask 
or tell me before next time?   
The content of the closing summary will vary, of course, depending on what happened in the session.  The 
point is to draw together in your summary: 
what has been discussed during the session 
self-motivational themes that have emerged during the session (and before) 
honest affirmation of the client’s efforts, strengths, intentions, etc. 
any tasks that the client is to do between now and the next session 
anticipation of what you will be doing in the next session 
scheduling of the next session 
2.7 When the Supportive Significant Other (SSO) Attends the first CBI Treatment Session 
2.7a. Overview.  Typically, the first SSO-involved session occurs at the third session of  CBI 
treatment, but only after the feedback on the baseline measures has been provided to the client.  The overall 
purposes of the initial SSO-involved session are (1) to orient the SSO to his or her role/function in CBI 
treatment (2) to obtain the SSO’s commitment in supporting the client’s efforts to change and (3) to enhance 
the SSO’s skill in providing clear and meaningful support to the client. Efforts are made to find opportunities 
for the SSO to increase his or her supportive behaviors. Other activities include helping the SSO determine 
when to, and when not to, offer support. For example, there are certain circumstances where it may be 
desirable for the SSO to "back off" rather than continuing to offer support.  Such situations may involve a 
client's failure to adhere to treatment goals such as not taking medications, not attending job training sessions, 
and not willing to "sample" abstinence.  Under these circumstances it may be valuable for the SSO to withdraw 
her/his support to allow the client the opportunity to experience the costs/consequences of his choices/actions. 
This process can help mobilize a client’s inner resources to deal with the drinking problems. 
2.7 b. Orienting the SSO to CBI.  SSO selection should occur by the second CBI session. If the client 
agrees, the SSO is invited to the third CBI session, but only if assessment feedback has been completed.  At 
this initial SSO-involved session, welcome and thank the SSO for coming in support of the client’s treatment.  
Ask the SSO whether he or she received the letter inviting him or her to participate in the client’s treatment (A 
letter inviting the SSO to participate will be given to the client to bring to the SSO prior to the initial SSO-
involved session).  Briefly review the contents of the letter for those who did not receive it. Ask the SSO 
SDK software API:VB.NET Image: Tutorial for Converting Image and Document in VB.NET
VB.NET Project for Converting Image to Byte Array, Convert Word to Image in VB.NET Application. Use VB.NET Code to Convert Image to Stream, PDF to Image
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software API:C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
watermark and save PDF text, image, table, hyperlink and bookmark to Word without losing format. Powerful components for batch converting PDF documents in C#
www.rasteredge.com
36
whether he or she has questions and concerns about the strategies and procedures covered in the letter.  
Respond in a straightforward manner to any questions or concerns that the SSO may have about the 
information.  
To prevent misunderstandings between you, your client, and the SSO, which could result in 
compliance problems later on, review the goals and objectives of the client's treatment.  Clarify what roles the 
SSO might play in the sessions.  Remind the SSO that she or he knows much more about the client than the 
therapist and consequently could be helpful in a number of ways such as providing constructive feedback on 
the plans which have been devised by the client and therapist to maintain abstinence.  Explain that the SSO is 
not expected in any way to be a co-therapist, and assure the SSO that you will not ask him or her to do 
anything that he or she is not comfortable doing.  If the SSO is a family member, explain that you will not be 
doing marital or family therapy (in which the relationship is the focus of treatment). You may discuss issues 
that have to do with communication in relationships, but the primary purpose of treatment is to help the client 
get and stay sober. Explain also that the SSO’s role does not include any policing or enforcing, but rather the 
main focus is to be supportive of change. Explain clearly that the SSO’s role is to provide support for sobriety 
during treatment, both inside and outside of sessions.  This will include: 
offering helpful ideas and input 
giving encouragement  
supporting and reinforcing the client’s efforts to stay sober, and  
helping - in ways the client wishes- to carry out plans for staying sober. 
In general, by becoming an ally for change the SSO can help to improve the effectiveness of treatment. 
However, you may want to remind the client that no one else can make the ultimate decision about change, or 
take responsibility for it. 
Mention that the intention of CBI treatment is to have the SSO participate in all CBI sessions so that 
the client will obtain maximum benefit of treatment.  Explain that the number of CBI sessions (i.e., up to 20 
sessions) is usually decided collaboratively among the parties involved (i.e., client, SSO, and therapist).  
Typically, a client’s treatment is terminated when she or he (client) has achieved treatment goals or a 
determination is made that she or he (client) has derived optimum benefit from such involvement.  Here is an 
example of how this opening statement might sound in ordinary language: 
THERAPIST:   
I appreciate your willingness to attend these sessions and to help David 
(client) as he makes some major changes.  Your support and encouragement 
can be valuable in helping David overcome the drinking problem.  Let me 
start by asking - in what way have you tried to be helpful in the past?   
SSO:  I found that David didn’t drink at all when I kept him busy around the house, especially when 
I asked him to care for the children. He loves his children and would never do 
anything to hurt them.  He never drank when he would take them out for food, 
ball games, and swimming.  
THERAPIST:  So one thing you have tried is to keep him busy, especially with the children, to help 
him not drink. (Turning to the client) Is that something that you found 
helpful? 
CLIENT: 
I didn’t realize what was behind it, but I know I don’t drink when I’m taking care of 
the kids. 
SDK software API:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
source code for quick integration and converting PDF to HTML is a 100% clean .NET document image solution, which that are included in target PDF document file.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software API:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
If using x86, the platform target should be x86. C# programming sample for PDF to Tiff image converting. // Load a PDF file. String
www.rasteredge.com
37
PIST: 
Good.  (To SSO).  How else have you tried to support David in not drinking?  Give me another example. 
It didn’t work very well, but I would kind of snoop around to see if he had a bottle - things like that. 
PIST: 
You meant well in doing that, but it didn’t really work so well.  I can see, though, that you have really been 
looking for what you can do to support him in not drinking - whether or not it 
was always the right thing to do.  (Turning to client) Let me ask you this: Do 
you have any concerns or anticipate any problems in having Martha (SSO) 
come to the sessions with you?   
CLIENT: 
I’m concerned that if Martha comes to these sessions, she will get obsessed with my 
drinking. This was a problem in the past. Martha was furious with me when I 
was drunk, and like she said, she acted like a detective.  Sometimes when I 
arrived home with a package I would get this suspicious look as if I was 
hiding booze in the bag.  This stopped once I entered this program, though. 
THERAPIST:  (To SSO).  So you have been making an effort not to be too involved with his drinking 
since he came here.  I imagine it was something of a relief for you. 
SSO:  It certainly is.  I feel like finally I don’t have to be the only one standing between him and his 
alcohol. 
PIST: 
You know, that’s really not so unusual.  When somebody you love is in trouble, you’re concerned and just 
want to do something, anything.  It happens particularly when the level of 
stress and conflict is high.  Sometimes people do things that don’t make sense, 
just trying to do something, anything to bring about a change.  Now it feels 
like the weight isn’t so much on your shoulders.   I think you both understand 
that even with Martha participating in these sessions, the real responsibility 
for change lies with you, David.  Nobody can do it for you, even if they really 
want to.   (Turning to the Martha) What I want you to do in these sessions is 
to provide emotional support while David  is making changes related to his 
drinking.  You could also provide constructive input and ideas along the way.  
But there’s really nothing else right now that I need for you to do.  Just your 
being here is helpful. What do you both think about that?   Are you willing to 
help in that way, Martha? 
Here are a few points to remember after you have given your introduction and described the SSO’s role.  
1.  Ask whether the SSO is willing to help in this way. 
2.  Ask whether the client is willing to have the SSO help in this way. 
3.  Ask whether the SSO has any questions that you could answer. 
4.  Ask whether the client has any questions about how the SSO will be involved. 
Ask the SSO what steps has she/he found helpful to the client in achieving sobriety. If SSO is unable 
to respond give her/him a few examples of what might be helpful to a client such as maintaining a sense of 
optimism, praising the client for his or her efforts, spending time with the client in activities incompatible with 
alcohol use, and  celebrating the achievement of an important step - e.g., refusing to drink with a special friend.  
In the case illustration below, the therapist discusses with Janet (client's wife - SSO) and Bob (client)  how to 
employ support effectively with the client: 
SDK software API:C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
RasterEdge PDF to JPEG converting control SDK (XDoc.PDF for .NET) supports converting PDF document to JPEG image file in .NET developing platforms using simple
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software API:VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
VB.NET PDF Converting DLLs for PDF-to-Word. This is an example for converting PDF to Word (.docx) file in VB.NET program. ' Load a PDF document.
www.rasteredge.com
38
THERAPIST:   
Based on my previous discussions with Bob you appear to be his strongest 
supporter.  You seem really committed to helping him overcome the drinking 
problem and I really applaud your coming to the sessions with him. Maybe 
you can start by saying something about the steps you have taken that have 
been helpful to him. 
JANET: 
Well, I am just so proud that he has been sober for the past three weeks and I 
told him so.  I have encouraged him to open up to me about how hard it is to 
stop drinking.  
THERAPIST:   
How did you do this? 
JANET: 
I don't know.  I just thought it was important for Bob to know how badly I felt 
about the drinking. Telling him this seemed to help him open up more to me. 
THERAPIST:   
(To Bob) How has this helped? 
BOB:   
Janet’s  support and encouragement has meant a lot to me.  I find it easier to 
handle my urges when I know Janet is behind me.   
JANET: 
He (Bob) appreciates my efforts.  In the past, when I tried to help he would 
often tell me to leave him alone.  This no longer happens.  
THERAPIST:    
These are important ways to help Bob avoid drinking.  I am impressed that 
you both recognize the importance of Janet’s support in addressing the 
problem.   
Comment:  Here the therapist discusses the importance of the reinforcing behavior with Janet.   At the 
same time, he (therapist) helps to build confidence of the SSO by linking Janet's change efforts to client 
outcomes.  
Continue the discussion on the importance of these reinforcing activities.  Explore other ways that the 
SSO could be helpful to sustain sobriety. Examine how the presence of the SSO could lead to an improvement 
in the drinking.  Below is another case illustration demonstrating how reinforcing behavior impacts positively 
on the treatment process.    
THERAPIST:   
(To Bob) What are other ways Janet can be helpful to you? 
BOB:   
I am not sure Janet realizes this but last week when she went to the ball game 
with me I was tempted to order a beer from the vendor but I didn't.  I knew 
she (Janet) would be upset if I started to drink.     
THERAPIST:   
Janet, how did you feel? 
JANET: 
I was glad Bob asked me along. Going to ball games and bowling can be bad 
for him. I was pleased that Bob had me in mind when he decided not to drink.  
The fact that I do not drink at these events probably helps a little bit.  
THERAPIST:   
(To Bob) What did you learn from the situation?   
BOB:   
Having her (Janet) there really helped.  I was able to control my desire to 
drink because I did not want to disappoint her. Also, it helped to talk to her 
39
beforehand about the difficulties of attending a ball game on a hot summer 
afternoon without having a beer.  
THERAPIST:   
Having Janet there was really good for you.  What do you suppose would 
have happened if she wasn't there? 
BOB:   
I'm sure that I would have come home drunk.  
THERAPIST:   
(To Bob) There will be times when you are in problem situations (high risk) 
like bowling when Janet will not be there.  What do you need to do to help 
yourself to stay sober? 
BOB:    
I could telephone her but this is not always possible.  I probably should 
always keep Janet in mind if I am to get through the situation (high risk) 
without drinking.  
Comment: The therapist helps Bob understand how Janet’s presence enabled him to refrain from 
alcohol use.  He helps Bob identify the coping mechanism used in this situation to forestall alcohol use.  Bob 
learns that just "keeping Janet in mind" may be an effective coping mechanism in dealing with future alcohol 
use. 
2.7c.  When Differences Occur Between the SSO and Client.  It is not uncommon to find that the 
SSO is more committed to changing the drinking practices than the client him/herself.  As a result, 
discrepancies often occur between SSO and client concerning what needs to be done to overcome the drinking.  
Such differences need to be normalized and resolved.  In the excerpt below, Janet’s proposed action steps are 
in conflict with Bob’s. 
JANET: 
I want to raise a concern about an event occurring at our house next week.  We are 
planning a surprise birthday party for Bob's  father. I do not think we should serve 
alcohol at the party.  Bob disagrees. He sees no problem in having alcohol available 
for relatives and friends.  I tell him he is just looking for trouble if he serves alcohol.    
THERAPIST:   I am impressed that you both recognize this as a potential problem and are willing to 
talk about it.  These issues are not uncommon in families where one of the partners is 
struggling to stay sober.  What may be helpful here is to discuss what might happen if 
alcohol is served or not.  Let's start with not serving alcohol at the party. What do you 
suppose would happen? 
BOB:    
I'm afraid that it will cause trouble with my friends. I do not want to be made the fool.  
JANET: 
Bob' friends may find out he has a drinking problem if no booze is served.  I say, "so 
what".  It might help if his friends know.  
THERAPIST:  You (Janet) feel that letting his friends know about the drinking problem would be a 
clear indication of Bob's commitment to change and perhaps not serving drinks would 
give a clear message to the friends about Bob's desire to remain sober.  
JANET: 
Absolutely!  
40
THERAPIST:  What about the alternative, that is, serving drinks to your friends and family? What do 
you think would happen?   
JANET: 
This is the situation we have faced before and it has never worked.  Bob tries to have 
one or two drinks just to be social but after a while just loses it.  
BOB:   
This time it will be different because you (to Janet) will be there.  
JANET: 
I am not so sure.  You still drank last time I went to the bar with you and your friends.  
BOB:   
I get very nervous about saying 'no' to my friends and usually end up drinking too 
much. 
JANET: 
You can handle your friends.  You're not afraid to tell them off about other things like 
when they owe you money. When you feel right about something you can be really 
strong. 
BOB:   
That's true. 
JANET: 
I just want to say one thing: If you want to serve liquor I can't stop you.  But I won't be 
there watching you 'boozing'. 
BOB:   
You're not coming to the party? 
JANET: 
Not if you serve drinks.  I can't stand watching what you do to yourself.  The 
arguments about trying to get you to stop. The blaming of yourself the next day 
followed by the apologies. This is just too much. It really upsets me (Janet begins to 
cry).  
THERAPIST:  (To Janet)  You really do not want to continue hovering over Bob about the drinking, 
do you? 
JANET: 
I need to let go for my own sanity.  I can't stand by and watch Bob destroy himself. 
Maybe my not being at the party would help.  Bob would finally learn that he really 
can't drink. 
THERAPIST:  Let me summarize the situation. If you serve drinks, there is a high probability that 
you (Bob) will resume drinking and upset your family.    If you don't, then you might 
be pressured to drink again by your friends.   Any other alternatives?   
JANET: 
A third possibility is that the friends might actually understand and be sympathetic 
toward Bob about the drinking. They might even become supportive of his desire to 
change.  This is what he should expect if they were real friends.   
Comment:  In the  excerpt above the SSO demonstrates her support for and confidence in Bob's ability 
to handle the pressure of his friends to drink.  Janet recognizes that not attending the party may not only be 
important for herself but for Bob as well.  It might lead to Bob’s understanding that he cannot drink 
moderately, at least when socializing with friends. 
2.7d.  What Does the SSO Do If the Client Resumes Drinking? There may be times during the course 
of treatment that the client will resume drinking which in turn could pose problems for the SSO. Some SSOs 
41
might become angry, frustrated, or disappointed with the client and leave treatment abruptly, an act which 
conceivably could impact negatively on the therapeutic process (e.g., undermine the self-efficacy of  the client 
in dealing with the drinking).  Alternatively, some SSOs might intervene to protect the client from the costs or 
consequences of the drinking.  Examples of such behavior include making excuses for the client to his or her 
employer, friends, or family for the alcohol use, cleaning up after him/her after a drinking episode, and in 
general, continuing to play a supportive role despite the client’s using. These  activities on the part of the SSO 
have been termed “enabling behavior”(Meyers, Smith and Miller, 1998).  Such behavior allows the client to 
shift  responsibility for the drinking away from himself and on to the SSO.  Not allowing the client the 
opportunity to experience the negative consequences of the drinking (i.e., enabling behavior) can undermine 
his or her commitment to change  (Meyer, Smith, and Miller, 1998).  Thus, it may be useful to have a 
discussion about alcohol use while the client is still sober or before heavy drinking occurs.   At the same time, 
efforts should be made to have the SSO and client devise a constructive plan to deal with the drinking when or 
if it occurs (See #’s 1-4 below).  Otherwise, there is a risk that the SSO may inadvertently diminish the 
effectiveness of the treatment.  In short, taking a proactive stance with the SSO and client can better prepare 
them for dealing with the drinking episodes. Therefore, you might consider doing the following: 
1. 
Explain that a return to alcohol use is not uncommon in alcoholism treatment especially in the 
early months of treatment. However, the longer the client is able to abstain, the better the 
chances are for continued sobriety. 
2. 
Indicate that the client him/herself is responsible for addressing the problem. 
3. 
Mention that procedures have been developed (see section 4.4. on Resumed Drinking) for 
helping the client deal with these episodes. Discuss the methods used for helping clients who 
have resumed drinking. 
4. 
Examine the pros and cons of the various options the SSO might have in dealing with the 
drinking.   One option is to withdraw support from the client while she or he is drinking. This 
might mean not participating in drinking-related events such as bowling, attending ball games, 
and parties. If the SSO is a spouse, this might mean having separate sleeping arrangements, 
not sharing the evening meal, and in general spending more time apart from each other while 
the client is still drinking.  Mention that such an approach has been shown to be effective in 
facilitating positive change. Another option  might be for the SSO to stop attending the 
sessions and seek help elsewhere (e.g., attendance at Al-Anon) while the client is still 
drinking.  This may be useful for SSOs who are having a great deal of difficulty in coping with 
the negative feelings resulting from the client’s alcohol use. 
At the end of the session give the SSO a list of available phone numbers and hours in the event that he 
or she needs to contact the therapist.  Also, give the SSO an appointment card so that he or she may feel like an 
integral part of the treatment process.   
2.7e.  Audiotaping.  When a SSO arrives for the first time, before turning on the tape recorder, explain 
that in this program, treatment sessions are routinely audiotaped for purposes of research and supervision.  
Explain that what is said during sessions remains confidential, and that tapes are carefully protected and are 
heard only by a supervisor and project research staff.  Also explain that the tape recorder can be turned off 
during a session, when either the client or SSO wishes, if particularly sensitive material is being discussed.  
42
If the SSO is willing to be audiotaped, have the SSO sign the consent form for this purpose, and 
proceed.  If the SSO prefers not to be taped during the first session attended, proceed, but explain that future 
sessions would have to be audiotaped if the SSO chooses to attend.  If the SSO is unwilling to be audiotaped, 
which would prevent the taping of all future sessions, identify another SSO. 
2.7f.  SSO Consent.  Because the SSO will be participating in treatment sessions and will be tape 
recorded, the SSO should review and sign a consent to be treated, acknowledging that session recordings will 
be reviewed by supervisors and will be used to obtain data about treatment processes.  This consent form must 
be approved by the local IRB, and should be signed before the second session in which the SSO is involved. 
2.7g.  The Basic CBI Approach.  While having a SSO involved in treatment can be very helpful, it 
does not fundamentally alter the nature of CBI.  Maintain the same motivational and problem-focused style, 
staying within the procedures prescribed in each module.  Some modules contain specific guidelines for how 
to involve a SSO.  Keep your focus on the client.  Do not shift into a marital/family therapy strategy, where 
you focus on changing the relationship.  The primary focus is on the client.   
Examples of appropriate therapeutic responses involving the SSO 
Discussing how the SSO responds to client drinking 
Reflecting SSO statements 
Encouraging the SSO to provide positive reinforcement for sobriety 
Material contained in the Communication Skills module 
Examples of inappropriate therapeutic responses involving the SSO 
Discussing family of origin issues 
Constructing a genogram 
Giving advice on parenting strategies   
Sex therapy 
2.7h.  The Problematic SSO.   If the presence of the SSO poses a temporary problem, it is permissible 
to gently excuse the SSO from part or all of a session.  There are circumstances, however, where the SSO’s 
involvement poses more persistent problems. 
Identifying the problematic SSO.   With proper screening, SSOs who interact negatively with the client 
will be screened out prior to their involvement in treatment.  Nevertheless, there may be cases where the 
presence of a SSO can pose serious problems in the sessions.  Therefore, it is important to detect problematic 
SSOs before they undermine the treatment process.  The following circumstances are examples of SSO-related 
problems in sessions:  
The SSO undermines the client's efforts to change the drinking behavior. The client's 
optimistic comments about change are met with skepticism or derision by the SSO. The client 
is repeatedly reminded of previous failures in implementing a change plan.  Overall, the SSO  
displays a negative attitude toward the change process.    
The SSO evidences an unwillingness or inability to participate in activities that might lead to a 
change in the drinking pattern such as attending alcohol-free events with the client.  In 
developing a change plan the SSO provides few constructive remarks unless prompted by the 
therapist.       
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested